Posts tagged with "painter"

Michael J.Browne's Art for Auction painting by Michael J.Browne use by 360 Magazine

Michael J.Browne’s Art for Auction

Kicking off Dreweatts’ Modern & Contemporary Art auction is Michael J. Browne’s homage to Manchester United painted in 2013. The work shows iconic players such as Ryan Giggs, Eric CantonaDavid Beckham, Paul Scholes, and Wayne Rooney alongside managers Matt Busby and Alex Ferguson in procession. The central figure, Nemanja Vidić, holds a golden ball as the players walk against a backdrop of triumphant iconography drawing on symbols of strength from the Roman Empire including the Colosseum, a triumphant arch, and the Latin word ‘Legio’meaning ‘chosen body or legion’ reigning high above the players, together with ‘X 20 X’ referring to the number of leagues won by United. To the right of the scene is Manchester United’s stadium and across the painting held high on crosses are large silver trophies with gold crowns signifying their success and achievements.

Michael J. Browne was born in Moss Side, Manchester. Growing up in a difficult household Browne found escapism in art from a very young age. He was inspired by anything that he saw around him and turned his creativity into something positive focusing on drawing. At a young age, Browne went to live with his art teacher and went on to study at Chelsea School of Art followed by an MA at Manchester Metropolitan University.

Browne has always been particularly fascinated with the Renaissance masters and has become renowned for depicting well-known figures encompassing topics of cultural importance, history, or religion. Browne shot to fame in 2001 with his work The Art of the Game depicting Eric Catona as Jesus. The work was displayed at the National Portrait Museum. Before this his copy of the Sistine Chapel painted in the Cocotoo restaurant in Manchester caused great publicity between 1992-1994. Other important figures he has illustrated include Wayne Rooney, Donald Trump, and Jeremy Corbyn.

The work is estimated to fetch £10,000-15,000 in Dreweatts’ Modern & Contemporary auction on 12th October 2021.

Kristin Poole image via Krista Detwiler at The Sun Valley Museum of Art

Sun Valley Museum of Art Q×A

By: Emily Bunn

 A keystone of Ketchum’s community, the iconic Sun Valley Museum of Art (SVMoA) is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. The museum is inviting the public to experience the joy of music and the arts to celebrate the momentous occasion. In past years, SVMoA has hosted 52 Grammy-Award winning artists, featured notable lecturers and visual artists, and awarded over $1 million in arts scholarships to local students and teachers. SVMoA’s Artistic Director, Kris Poole, sat down with 360 Magazine to talk about upcoming summer classes at the museum, the current BIG IDEA exhibition, and future plans for expansion. 

SVMoA is celebrating its 50th anniversary this summer! Are any special performances lined up to commemorate this momentous occasion? 

Clay, Silver, Ink: Sun Valley Center at 50, was on exhibit at The Museum from May through July.

The exhibition is guest-curated by artists Jim Romberg, Sun Valley Center for the Arts’ Director of Ceramics from 1973 to 1986, and Peter de Lory, who began teaching in 1974 and was Director of Photography from 1976 to 1979 and during the summers of 1982 and 1983.

Clay, Silver, Ink features artwork by 60 photographers, ceramic artists and printmakers, as well as several painters, who led classes and workshops at the Sun Valley Center for the Arts during the organization’s first 15 years. Many of the labels will include quotes from the artists that reflect on their experience at The Museum. A slide show of student work and snapshots from the era was also included in the exhibition.

SVMoA’s 50th Celebration & Birthday Concert will take place on August 26 and feature Pink Martini with China Forbes.

Pink Martini is led by the dynamic and hyperenergetic Thomas Lauderdale. The group’s repertoire is inspired by music from around the world and crosses genres of classical, jazz and old-fashioned pop. With 12 musicians onstage and songs performed in 25 languages, Pink Martini has crisscrossed the globe and has played with more than 70 orchestras.

Lauderdale’s co-conspirator in the band is his Harvard classmate, China Forbes. A year after starting the band, Lauderdale invited Forbes to join Pink Martini, and they began penning songs together. Since then, Forbes and Lauderdale have co-written many of Pink Martini’s most beloved songs, including “Sympathique,” “Lilly,” “Clementine,” and “Let’s Never Stop Falling in Love.” Forbes’ original song “Hey Eugene” is the title track of Pink Martini’s third album, and many of her songs can also be heard on television and film.

The concert will be a special one, starting with a look back at the Sun Valley Center for the Arts’ 50 years and a look ahead to SVMoA’s next 50. SVMoA will share memories and birthday cupcakes and asks everyone to come dressed for a party.

Is SVMoA offering any summer workshops or adult classes?

Yes! We offered 22 adult classes last year, and we plan to expand that programming throughout 2021 and into 2022. Classes range from one-night craft series workshops to creative jump-ins and week-long master class intensives. This summer, we offered the following courses:

Craft Series Workshop:

THREE COLOR REDUCTION PRINTS

Craft Series Workshop

CERAMIC TRANSFORMATION VESSELS

Writing Class

A THOUSAND WORDS: Guided Writing about the Art You See

Creative Jump-In

POCKET SKETCHING

Craft Series Workshop

CAPTURING THE BEST PHOTOS ON YOUR IPHONE

Creative Jump-In

NO-WASTE LEATHER BAG

Creative Jump-In

BEGINNING DRAWING

Creative Jump-In

SUN VALLEY STONES: Oil painting

Creative Jump-In

BUILDING LAYERS WITH OIL AND COLD WAX 

How many students are currently in SVMoA’s art education program and k-12 education program this year?

SVMoA serves nearly 4,000 students through four unique arts education programs over the course of a year, reaching every child in Blaine County. Some programs happen in school classrooms, others in the museum space or performance halls. SVMoA’s student participants come from every public and private school in the Wood River Valley.

SVMoA features “BIG IDEA” projects. What does the BIG IDEA represent?

The BIG IDEA was designed to allow our community to enter into the conversation through a variety of avenues. If you are interested in going to see a film, or listening to a lecture, we hope the program content piques your curiosity enough to get you to visit the exhibition in The Museum or take a class that will allow you to go deeper into the subject. BIG IDEAs run the gamut from serious subjects like Refugees and/or Gender in the 21st century, to lighter fare that explores subjects, like the important role that bees or bicycles play in our world. Artists make art about the world they live in, and more often than not, what is on their minds is a topic we should be paying attention to as well.  We have the opportunity to use the BIG IDEA model to engage people in ideas that matter. The art on exhibition, the music, films, lectures, discussions are all fodder for some pretty interesting conversations.

Why did SVMoA choose to display “Untrammeled: At Wilderness’ Edge” as the museum’s current big idea project?

As part of our 50th Anniversary celebration, we wanted to explore a BIG IDEA that had specific resonance with our local community. Because Sun Valley is a mountain resort town whose very existence owes its debt to the wilderness, we felt reexamining the premise of the 1964 Wilderness Act was an important effort.

At the time that we began talking with artists we had no idea that at this moment the topic would hold particular urgency. Our community, like many others in the mountain west, is experiencing an explosion of tourism and new residents. The exhibition and BIG IDEA grapple with what it means to live on the edge of and with wild places—how do we respect people’s need to be in the wilderness with our need to preserve and protect that very space? How should our idea of “managing” wilderness change/evolve?

We are so pleased to be engaged in the discussion through the work of 4 powerful artists, all of whom have international reputations, and two of whom we commissioned to do new work for this project. Adding talks by journalist Kevin Fedarko and curator Jock Reynolds only enriches the conversation. 

Who is the next speaker in the museum’s lecture series? Why was this speaker chosen? 

As part of the next BIG IDEA project Untrammeled: At Wilderness’ Edge, SVMoA will welcome ​​journalist Kevin Fedarko, award-winning author of “The Emerald Mile” as our first speaker of the 2021/2022 fall/winter season. Fedarko’s book on the The Emerald Mile, with the subtitle The Epic Story of the Fastest Ride in History Through the Heart of the Grand Canyon, chronicles both the complex story of the Canyon’s environmental history, as well as the compelling story of how a couple river and wilderness junkies took the fastest boat ride ever down the Colorado River during the legendary flood of 1983. At this moment in 2021 when we are grappling how best to live on the edge of wilderness, this book and Fedarko’s tale beautifully illustrates the complicated nature of our relationship with wild places.

Jock Reynolds is a nationally respected curator and artist who served as the Director of the Yale University Art Gallery from 1998 to 2018.  He has worked closely with Mark Klett, one of the artists in the Untrammeled exhibition, and is keenly interested in the role that art plays in shaping our national discussions. Jock will be in conversation with Mark Klett and Laura McPhee about their commissioned artworks.

Sandra Cisneros is one of the United States most important poets and writers.  She is best known for her evocation of Mexican American life in Chicago. “The House on Mango Street,” written in 1983, continues to be taught in classrooms throughout the country. Cisneros has been invited to participate in SVMoA’s lecture series to speak to the value and richness of cross-cultural experiences.  As a woman and a writer Cisneros beautifully explores the experience of being connected to both the US and to Mexico.  There are so many members of our community and so many people in our country who share this relationship. We look forward to welcoming Cisneros to this community at this moment of growth and transition.

How do the three SVMoA spaces– The Museum, The Liberty Theatre, and the Hailey House and Classroom – each operate? What is each space’s function?

The Museum

Sun Valley Museum of Art is non-collecting museum that is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums (one of only five institutions in Idaho). SVMoA offers free admission and is open to the public throughout the year. Its downtown Ketchum location allows stop-by visitors as well as event and exhibition attendees to explore and experience art firsthand—both through visual art exhibitions and hands-on immersive education opportunities.

The Liberty Theatre

The former home of the Company of Fools, the historic The Liberty Theatre is centrally located on Main Street in Hailey, Idaho.  The theatre is currently closed, awaiting some needed renovations.

The Hailey House and Classroom

The historic Hailey House, birthplace of American poet Ezra Pound, is open to visitors by appointment and during scheduled events. The house is frequently used to house visiting artists, teachers and musicians. The Hailey Classroom is open for adult, teen and youth classes and workshops during scheduled programs.

The museum is in the process of constructing a new building as well. How does SVMoA plan to use their new space?

Sun Valley Museum of Art needs expanded facilities. Currently we are not able to meet the community need for everything from classes to lectures to exhibition tours so we are actively seeking the right opportunity to build or renovate a new space. The community deserves to have a museum that can be a point of pride and meets the needs of today’s families and students as well as our growing and diverse community. As the cornerstone of Wood River Valley’s rich and diverse arts and culture scene, SVMoA is eager to develop a state-of-the-art facility that will engage more people on a deeper level, create more immersive experiences, and ensure accessibility for everyone in our community.

SVMoA operates as an arts education nonprofit. How can interested patrons support the arts? 

SVMoA’s annual programs are supported in large part by its more than 1,200 members. When you join as a SVMoA member, you don’t just support your own arts experience; you support arts access for all. Your membership fee pays it forward so your fellow community members can experience the arts—the joy, the wonder, the inspiration, and the healing.

SVMoA’s annual Wine Auction welcomes friends, families, arts supporters, vintners and chefs to celebrate and support the arts each summer. The 2021 Wine Auction wrapped in mid-July and raised more than $1 million for arts education with the help of more than 350 attendees.

BIG IDEAS and major program support comes from memberships, individual donations, private foundations and public and private grants. 

Regarding COVID-19, does the museum require guests to purchase tickets in advance online, or can visitors purchase tickets upon arrival? 

SVMoA’s museum space is free and open to the public. SVMoA classes and events typically require advance registration and/or ticket purchase (as events can sell-out), but SVMoA will in general welcome walk-up attendees and participants if space allows. 

At The Museum walk-in visitors are always welcome! If you’d like to learn more about the artwork in the exhibition, we invite families and small groups for private tours with The Museum’s curators. To schedule a tour please contact us at 208.726.9491 or at information@svmoa.org. 

*Featured artwork by Laura McPhee

Companion Species - WSU via Krista Detwiler at the Sun Valley Museum of Art for use by 360 Magazine
Companion Species by Jordan Schnitzer
Mark Klett - Inside ice cavern via Krista Detwiler at the Sun Valley Museum of Art for use by 360 Magazine
Inside Ice Cavern by Mark Klett
Laura McPhee artwork via Krista Detwiler at the Sun Valley Museum of Art for use by 360 Magazine
Laura McPhee
Image courtesy of Flying Horse for 360 Magazine

Mirah Lehr’s Residency at Flying Horse

Flying Horse Editions Selects Mira Lehr For 2021 Visiting Artist Residency Program

Lehr’s New Editions of Original Works Created in Residency will Debut During Art Basel Miami Beach 2021 at INK Miami

Nationally Acclaimed Studio Invites World’s Leading Artists to Push Boundaries with Cutting-Edge Technology
Flying Horse Editions, the nationally acclaimed printmaking studio that invites some of the world’s leading artists for its Visiting Artist Residency Program, has chosen Mira Lehr for their select roster of artists for 2021. The studio is celebrated for cutting-edge technology and inspiring artists to push the boundaries of printmaking, in a kinetic setting among its team of master printmakers. In her new series, Lehr, now at the bold age of 86, is experimenting with explosives, fuses, plexiglass, watercolor, and inks ‒ exploring new ways to use nontraditional materials in the art of printmaking. Mira Lehr is a force of nature to be reckoned with, said Theo Lotz, the Director of Flying Horse Editions. She is a fearless explorer. Lehr’s body of work spans all media, not bound by one process. Her artistic energy and spirit are boundless. We knew that her bold approach to artmaking would lead to a great collaboration. Lehr thrives in our studio, which relishes the unexpected. Lehr’s new work created at this residency will debut during Miami Art Week/Art Basel Miami Beach 2021, at the INK Satellite Fair (December 1-5 at the Dorchester Hotel).
This fair is produced by the International Fine Print Dealers Association, and is recognized worldwide as one of the leading presentations of works on paper by internationally renowned artists. Lehr’s new limited editions will then tour nationwide with Flying Horse throughout 2022 at several art fairs across the U.S. and internationally. Her new work will also be presented at an opening reception at the studio, featuring live demonstrations of her process of igniting gunpowder and fuses to create her artworks. Flying Horse Editions was established in 1990 at the University of Central Florida. The artists invited to participate in the residency has included: Diana Al-Hadid, Elia Alba, Chakaia Booker, Will Cotton, Ke Francis, Luis Gispert, Eddie Martinez, Odili Donald Odita, and Toyin Ojih Odutola.
Lehr completed the first part of her studio residency in the spring, and will return to Flying Horse later this year to complete her new editions there. Every artwork in Lehr’s new editions will each be an original work of art that was created exclusively during the residency. They were each imagined with these trailblazing printmaking techniques in mind, and are each one of a kind. So far, Lehr has created a series of monotypes with watercolor prints created on plexiglass. She has also created a new lithograph with collage pieces that will be burned and ignited using the artist’s signature technique with fuses and gunpowder, for a new varied edition.
My experience at Flying Horse Editions has been a powerful new adventure in artmaking for me. I am honored to have been invited to their artist residency this year, said Mira Lehr. Their passionate commitment to the craft of printmaking is evident, they really put their hearts into the visiting artist’s experience . I was able to experiment with great freedom ‒ they encourage the artists to take risks, while remaining true to your voice.
This research space houses professional visiting artists for short term residencies with assistance from master printmakers and students. The artists’ drawings are scanned, manipulated digitally, and then put on a copper plate similar to what would have been used during Rembrandt’s time. Lehr’s nature-based imagery includes painting, design, sculpture and video installation. Her processes include innovative usage of resin, gunpowder, fire, Japanese paper, dyes and welded steel. Her paradoxically destructive yet creative fire techniques burn holes and leave imprints in her prints resulting in an even more layered and complicated final artwork. The resident artists invited to Flying Horse Editions have the benefit of working with a massive 300-ton hydraulic press that is dramatically colored red. This behemoth machine produces complex relief prints that expand the creative possibilities of what artists may have previously envisioned. Unlike traditional presses, this hydraulic press applies an immense amount of pressure, downward onto the printed area, yielding much more precise images, with several blocks in multiple colors. Because the printer requires such fine tuning, Siemens donated a sophisticated electronic system that tricks out the controls enabling unparalleled precision. Watch the high-tech colossus in action here.
The Visiting Artist Residency Program at Flying Horse Editions is made possible by the members of the institution, a grant from the Winifred Johnson Clive Foundation, and with funding by the Judith and David Albertson Endowment in the Arts. The goal of the program is to create a world-class initiative that promotes creative interaction between professional artists and students, while also creating sustainability within the printmaking field ‒ training the next generation of artists and printmakers.
Flying Horse Editions is a collaborative research center in the College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Central Florida, and a non-profit publisher of limited-edition prints, artist books, and art objects by internationally renowned artists.

About the Artist
Mira Lehr’s solo and group exhibitions number more than 300. She is a graduate of Vassar College (1956) with a degree in Art History, under the mentorship of Linda Nochlin, the renowned feminist art historian. Lehr will be the subject of a new, 420-page international monograph by the leading art book publisher Skira Editore, to be published in the spring of 2022. She has been invited to present a solo exhibition at the Deering Estate in the fall of 2021.
Lehr has been collected by major institutions across the U.S., including the Smithsonian Museum of American Art (Washington), the Getty Museum Research Center (Los Angeles), the Boca Raton Museum of Art, the Perez Art Museum Miami, the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center (NY), the Margulies Collection, the Mennello Museum of American Art, MOCA North Miami, the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU, and the Orlando Museum of Art. Her work is in the private collections of Elie and Marion Wiesel, Jane and Morley Safer, and Judy Pfaff, among others. She is included in the Leonard Lauder Corporate Collection in New York. Thirty of her paintings were commissioned for the collection of Mount Sinai Hospital. Her work can be seen in American Embassies around the world and is permanently on view in the Sloan Kettering Memorial Center.
Lehr’s 2020 solo museum show at the Mennello Museum of American Art was selected by The New York Times as one of the leading museum exhibitions nationwide in the U.S. in the 2020 special Museums Section. Her solo museum exhibition headlined Art Basel Miami Beach 2019 at the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU, and also received national and international critical acclaim. Her museum-wide exhibition at the MOCA North Miami spanned across 10,000 square feet of installations. She has currently been chosen by Flying Horse Editions as an invited artist for the Visiting Artist residency.
Mira Lehr’s nature-based work encompasses painting, sculpture, and video. She uses nontraditional media such as gunpowder, fire, fuses, Japanese paper, dyes, and welded steel. Lehr is known for igniting and exploding fuses to create lines of fire across her paintings. Critics are calling Lehr the Godmother of Miami’s art scene because in 1960 she created one of the nation’s first co-ops for women artists. At the age of 86 and with a career that spans more than six decades of artmaking, Lehr is creating more new work now than at any other point in her life ─ with a heightened sense of urgency about the planet and climate change. In the 1950s, Lehr studied and worked in New York as an artist, where she met some of America’s most prominent masters including: Joan Mitchell, Lee Krasner, and Helen Frankenthaler. She studied with James Brooks, Ludwig Sander, Robert Motherwell, and within the Hans Hofmann circle.
When Lehr moved back to Florida in 1960, she was shocked at the lack of an art scene, especially for women. She convinced many of the masters from New York to visit and lead workshops for her league of women artists. This helped the evolution of art in Florida. She was selected in 1969 by Buckminster Fuller, as one of only two artists, to participate in his World Game Project about sustainability and his groundbreaking Spaceship Earth concept which preceded the world’s very first Earth Day in 1970. Lehr’s video installation, V1 V3, was on view at the New Museum, NY. Her work has been included in numerous art fairs during Art Basel Miami Beach. She was the recipient of the Vizcaya Museum Lost Spaces Commission, where she was commissioned to create a site-specific installation for Vizcaya Museum and Gardens as part of the Museum’s centennial celebrations.

Image via Big Hassle Media

Shintaro Sakamoto – Obscure Nightclub

JAPANESE SONGWRITING LEGEND SHINTARO SAKAMOTO SHARES VIDEO FOR OBSCURE NIGHTCLUB, THE FEELING OF LOVE EP OUT JULY 17, 2021 VIA ZELONE RECORDS, 12″ VINYL RELEASE TO BE RELEASED AS OFFICIAL RECORD STORE DAY DROP

Praise for Shintaro Sakamoto

Sakamoto’s mission is an expressive palette he has carefully made for himself with a ship-in-a-bottle-like focus. – Pitchfork 

[How To Live With A Phantom’s] glimmering alloy of post-hippie global pop, soft-rock, lite-funk, Tropicalia, feels both meticulous and sly, vaguely evoking similar efforts by Beck. – The New York TImes

By deliberately amplifying the foreign strangeness that composers built into easy-listening exotica and that dilettantish listeners imposed on bossa nova and Latin jazz, the Japanese musician Shintaro Sakamoto seems to ask, ‘What if this alien music were made by actual aliens?’ – SPIN Magazine

Japanese psychedelic rock legend Shintaro Sakamoto is proud to share the official video for Obscure Nightclub from the new The Feeling Of Love EP, due July 17, 2021 via his own Zelone Records. Watch the video HERE, listen to the title track HERE, and look out for the EP’s vinyl release as a Record Store Day 2021 Drop this weekend. View the list of participating Record Store Day stores HERE.

The video was directed by Kensuke Ide, also a musician himself. Both this video and the next one (to be released soon) were shot on Super 8mm film by the director. Obscure Nightclub is a song depicting an image of Sakamoto gazing at the lost visions of the nightlife. The textures of Ideߣs 8mm film perfectly illustrate the character of the songs made during the pandemic.

The four-track EP features the laid-back style for which Sakamoto’s solo material has become known, but as always, the songs bear the marks of restless experimentation. The title track features characteristic elements like steel guitar and heavily-effected vocals, while Obscure Nightclub is a ballad enveloped in a catchy flute melody. By Swallow Season opens the B-side with its mid-tempo jazzy boogie, accompanied by wah-wah guitar and saxophone. The EP ends with Don’t Tinker With History, a funky number complete with a James Brown-worthy guitar riff.

WATCH THE OBSCURE NIGHTCLUB VIDEO

HEAR THE FEELING OF LOVE

Shintaro Sakamoto is a Japanese music composer, producer, writer and singer based in Tokyo. He began his career in 1989 as a member of the psych/rock band Yura Yura Teikoku, where he played guitar and sang.

Yura Yura Teikoku released 10 albums over the course of 21 years, disbanding in 2010. The following year, Sakamoto launched a solo career and started his own record label, Zelone Records. He released his debut solo album How To Live With A Phantom, where Other Music Recording & Co. licensed the album for the US/EU/UK release in 2012. In 2014, Sakamoto released a split 7-inch single with Mayer Hawthorne for Record Store Day, and then released his 2nd solo album Let’s Dance Raw.

Once again, Other Music Recording & Co. licensed the album for the US/EU/UK release (and it reached #2 on Billboard’s World Chart in October, 2014). Sakamoto’s 3rd solo album Love If Possible was released in Japan, and digitally worldwide in 2017, and a split 7-inch single with Devendra Banhart was also released in Germany. Shintaro Sakamoto gave his first solo live performance at the WEEK-END Festival in Cologne Germany. In 2018, Sakamoto went to tour in China, Netherlands (Le Guess Who?), London, and Mexico (Tropico Fes.).

In 2019, Sakamoto participated in a song on a new album ATRAS / ALEM by O Terno, a band based in Sao Paulo. In the same year, new single Boat was released with a successful US headline tour (SF, SR, Chicago and NY). In 2021, he participated on a 50th-anniversary musical tribute to beat poet Allen Ginsberg’s The Fall of America: Poems of These States 1965-1971.

EP cover illustration by Shintaro Sakamoto

SHINTARO SAKAMOTO

THE FEELING OF LOVE EP

(ZELONE RECORDS)

Side A:

  1. The Feeling Of Love
  2. Obscure Nightclub

Side B:

  1. By Swallow Season
  2. Don’t Tinker With History

Connect with Shintaro Sakamoto via the official site, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and YouTube.

Painting by Meg Lionel Murphy via The Untitled Space for use by 360 MAGAZINE

MEG LIONEL MURPHY × TRAUMATICA DRAMATICA

LAST DAYS TO VIEW MEG LIONEL MURPHY’s “TRAUMATICA DRAMATICA”

The exhibition is on display from June 5th to July 3rd, 2021 at The Untitled Space in New York City.

Curated by Indira Cesarine, “Traumatica Dramatica” debuts the latest series of Murphy’s vibrant and emotionally charged paintings. Lionel Murphy’s paintings are directly influenced by her own personal experiences, as she copes with debilitating PTSD from severe domestic violence. She works out of a little blue shack in a junkyard on her family’s property in Wisconsin, where she paints detailed, vivid works on paper and panel depicting heartbroken giants that magically grow larger, stronger, and scarier than the world around them. Forbes has also recently featured Meg Lionel Murphy’s “Traumatica Dramatica”. Read their full article HERE.

Her solo exhibition “Traumatica Dramatica” addresses violence against women from her own perspective as well as the historical precedent of emotional and physical violence against women throughout the canon of art history. “The idea of violence haunts me, and I try to etch that subject into even the pinkest of paint,“ she has stated of her visceral portraits. Lionel Murphy depicts through her vivid brush strokes and intricate imagery a reverie through which the viewer can get lost with each poetic detail. Her paintings of the female form as giantess unconquerable figures address their experiences of pain, trauma, and healing as well as their interactions with the environments they consume as they assert their power. Her work depicts a reverence for fragility and humanity while examining questions about whiteness, gender, sexuality, class, sacrifice, pain, sickness, loneliness, and most of all—violence and its haunting memories.

Head over to Artsy to check out the viewing room for “Traumatica Dramatica” by artist Meg Lionel Murphy.

Enter the viewing room HERE and view the available artwork HERE.

Brooklyn Art Studio illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Blank Slate Exhibition

Blank Slate’s Inaugural Summer Exhibition Series

Location and Timing

The Series will run from June 10 through July 18, 2021. Gallery hours are Monday – Friday from 6pm – 10pm and Saturday – Sunday from 1pm – 10pm. Artists will be present during the opening reception of each exhibition. Blank Slate is located at 283 47th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11220.

How to Attend

Please contact Jennifer Spencer to make an appointment. To secure tickets, visit Blank Slate Exhibitions.

SCHEDULE

MASKS by Spencer Flores and Maxwell Sykes

June 10 – June 18

MASKS examines the shared experiences and the psychology of hiding behind a mask. The compositions and subject matter of the work speak to communal experiences of feeling disconnected as we emerge from the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.
 

Maxwell Sykes is a Los Angeles-based painter who focuses on oil painting and draws inspiration from color and figure. Maxwell learned basic skills from working with his father’s construction company in South Central LA at the age of 13. His work can be found on Instagram.

Spencer Flores, a Mexican American artist, is influenced by his obsession with music and music videos and an endless fascination with comics, cartoons, and film. Ren & Stimpy is one of his biggest influences when it comes to storytelling and exaggerated art styles. As an artist, he is constantly in search of the nostalgia of his youth. His work can be found on Instagram.

Everyday Goddess by Liliana Rasmussen

June 24 – June 27

Liliana Rasmussen is a Brooklyn-based artist from the West Coast whose work emphasizes feminine energy and agency and seeks to capture the beauty of women of color. A multi-disciplinary artist, she also creates tufted rugs, mirrors, and wall pieces. Her work can be found at Lily & Papaya and on Instagram

Rise of a Movement: BLM by Divine Williams

July 1 – July 10

Divine Williams, a Trinidadian photographer based in Brooklyn, has been documenting the evolving Black Lives Matter movement for more than seven years. This exhibit features her collection “We March for our Brother” (Trayvon Martin, 2013); “Uprising in Ferguson” (Michael Brown, 2014); “Memorial of Sterling” (Alton Sterling, 2016); and “The Last Straw” (George Floyd, 2020). Her work can be found on Instagram.

Faces and Memories by Frida Vargas

July 15 – July 18

Frida’s artwork evokes emotions drawn from experiences in the journey of her life, reflected in colors and abstract shapes. About “Faces and Memories,” Frida has [said / written]:

Sometimes the journey is tough. So much so that as a result of the pandemic, I learned the hard way that people aren´t forever, but art is. Unfortunately, I’ve lost loved ones, I’ve even lost myself. Life, despite everything, is astounding and unexpected, and we must accept it as such. In these difficult events, painting was the only way I could cope with these tragic circumstances, and it has been quite an experience. So, in this collection, I´m taking the human form by a different approach. What does it mean? The rest is up to you.

Born and raised in Chihuahua, Mexico, Frida is an artist and architect. In her works, she experiments with a wide range of different techniques, especially oil on canvas. Her paintings can be described as abstract and colorful compositions. Frida’s work can be found on Instagram.

For more information about the inaugural Summer Exhibition Series, visit Blank Slate.

The Gnarled Branch illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Q×A with The Gnarled Branch

Q&A with David Irvine from The Gnarled Branch

David Irvine is the multi-talented artist behind the Gnarled Branch. He is known for his imaginative ‘Re-Directed Paintings’, whimsical furniture, original paintings, painted burnt out light bulb ornaments, salvaged record paintings, and so much more. You can visit his Etsy shop here! You can see throughout his work that there is an interest with popular characters which brings life to the rural paintings he often re-directs. Irvine will match the original artist’s style within the painting or counter it intentionally, but he always leaves the original signature clear to see. There’s a story behind each of his works, including the painting “The Last Trick or Treater” which is one of Irvine’s favorites. Read on to learn more about David’s work, inspiration, and so much more.

What is your background – in addition, did your upbringing prompt a specific reference point within your work? Is your work informed by certain concepts or themes from your childhood, background, socioeconomic status, where you lived or were raised?

DI: I was fortunate to be raised by parents who appreciated all the arts. Going to see theatre shows, music performances, and gallery exhibits were always exciting. I was encouraged to develop with the visual arts and musically as well with regular music lessons and art lessons. They were at first concerned when I decided to pursue a career in the visual arts, as they knew it can be a real struggle – but were fully supportive and excited that I was accepted into art college to study illustration.

How does this impact how you see the world and create art?

DI: It’s no secret the art world can be very snooty, takes itself far too seriously and that is a real shame. In a lot of the genres that I do- I am always considering humor and fun as elements in a piece. Especially during these difficult pandemic times, art needs to uplift and provide smiles and not be staunch, same old -same old themes that have been done over and over.

Do you have an educational background or experiences that have contributed to your evolution as an artist?

DI: I studied illustration at Sheridan College, and throughout my childhood would occasionally take art lessons. The rest was experimenting and being self-taught with various mediums and medium combinations. I taught visual art to a wide range of ages through community night school and was an art tutor to a terrific student with special needs. Those were very memorable years.

What does your work aim to say?

DI: I do so many different genres of art, I think there’s a spectrum of what I want to communicate…. from making people laugh and feel good — to the darker, macabre work to scare and bring the viewer into a world that they may not feel comfortable being in… I guess I make art to get a reaction… not just creating something for its sole purpose is to look pretty and match the sofa.

Is there a particular artist that inspired you to pursue art?

DI: My grandfather was an accomplished amateur painter and I’d watch him work and see the pieces he did… maybe that was the first seed…Other than that I would always sign out art books from the library and soak in everything from master painters to illustrators and cartoonists who worked presently.

Whose techniques do you study or admire?

DI: There are so many — but in high school, I always enjoyed Ralph Steadman ink illustrations, Van Gogh for his boldness, Rene Magritte for the unique and surreal visuals … Currently I’ll search through websites like Tumblr or magazines like Juxtapoz and discover artists both old and new who mix unusual mediums or have their own unique style.

How do you cultivate a collector base?

DI: When I first started as a fine artist, I didn’t have a computer- the internet wasn’t a thing yet, so I was reliant on physically going to galleries and public places to show my work. From little gift or record shops to restaurants and cafes. Now with technology, it’s just a matter of updating and refreshing social media, submitting articles to websites, or being lucky and being featured by a blog, website, or podcast…it all helps and a lot more convenient to be able to post an instructional video from home, or post new work in progress photos to a website, than to lug workaround or mail promo packages out to land a show. Once a collector is on board, having top-notch customer service skills and excellent communication is key…

What inspires you to paint?

DI: I’ll have a lot of eureka moments as I’m sketching or planning out new works or series….and I have to then see that eureka image come to fruition. It would drive me bananas having a good idea sitting there on a page and going nowhere. As well it is my chosen job- so those bills must get paid.

How do you look for new ways to challenge yourself?

DI: I get bored very easily… so challenges are always put in place to not get bored. Every artist has a spectrum of color they usually gravitate to when creating a piece…I like to switch things up and use the colors I don’t normally use or come up with different color combinations/ mixing. I’ll even wear tinted sunglasses so the colors I think I’m using wind up making happy accidents when I look at the piece without the sunglasses. Using oil pastels with acrylic paint… various types of inks and papers …are many variables that can be used to break away from regular tendencies when approaching a piece.

Do you have a favorite painting that you have completed? If so, can you tell us the story behind it?

DI: I did a solo show a few years ago with Halloween as the main theme. A few favorite paintings came out of that show including one called the Last Trick or Treater. It showed a bird’s eye view looking down onto an old tyme small hamlet, and one child in a ghost costume running down a street with a lantern. I think I captured the quiet of the night, and the bit of panic the boy was having as he was quickly trying to get home.

What inspired Re-Directed painting for you?

DI: When I first started as a fine artist, I had very little money and art supplies and framing was expensive. I would frequent yard sales and thrift shops to purchase old frames, lithographs on board, and existing canvas prints to paint over and frame. Around 2009 I started to paint weird imagery in an existing piece and then later one piece my Mom was getting rid of was a seascape -where I had the immediate vision of two reapers playing with a beachball. I painted them in, shared them on social media and things snowballed rather quickly from there. I came up with the term re-directed as I used that as a tag and hoped people would begin to associate it with me…and it worked! Other people now use that term – which is fine… I prefer that to ‘Improved Painting’…as I never meant to demean the original artist. All these redirected pieces were salvaged and unwanted and quite likely wind up as landfill. I hate waste and seeing potential thrown away. This was just another method to upcycle. I’ll spend considerable time touching up the piece from scratches, buffs or sun/ water damage then I’ll add in my own visions. ..never covering the signature of the original artist. Research is always done prior to any painting to insure it’s not of significant value. I rarely work on originals, always lithographs, canvas prints, or anonymous paint by numbers.

Is there anything that you would like to add?

DI: Even though most know my work through my ongoing Re-Directed thrift art series, I look forward to continuing my upcycling work (hand-painted ornaments using salvaged burnt-out light bulbs, pop art paintings on discarded, damaged vinyl records, beer cap pins, and redoing/painting discarded wooden furniture…) and preventing landfill.

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Photo Credit: David Irvine
Photo Credit: David Irvine
Photo Credit: David Irvine
Photo Credit: David Irvine
NOLA Has Wiiings illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

NOLA Has Wiiings

Red Bull has teamed up with the New Orleans Pelicans and renowned visual artist Brandan “Bmike” Odums for NOLA Has Wiiings, a project dedicated to replacing backboards at basketball courts throughout New Orleans.

Bmike selected eight local creatives to transform old local backboards into works of art, which will be on display starting this month at the New Orleans Pelicans’ Smoothie King Center and online at RedBull.com.

New Orleans locals can vote for their favorite backboard starting today via the Pelicans Mobile App or website. The artist with the most votes will have the opportunity to conceptualize and design a full art court that serves the New Orleans community. 

Bmike’s custom backboard, for exhibit only, will be on display at Studio BE for the duration of the project.

NOLA Has Wiiings brings artists from around the city together to celebrate, brighten and educate communities through colorful displays of art that showcase NOLA’s unrivaled ability to rebound. 

NOLA Has Wiiings Artists

  • Ceaux, a New Orleans-born multidisciplinary artist, has created a backboard inspired by Harrell Park – located on the “Pigeon Town” side of Carrollton – and the color and playfulness that’s felt at playgrounds. 
  • Ayo Scott, painter and son of nationally recognized artist John T. Scott, has created “Big Ol’ Lil Big Chief” in collaboration with Big Chief Terrence “T” Williams of the Black Hawk Hunters, which is inspired by the resilient spirit of the people of New Orleans. 
  • Kara Crowley – Visual Artist, an artist who embraces black culture and positive representation in her own artistic interpretations, has created a backboard which showcases multiple hands expressing the message of unity. 
  • Jessica Strahan, a self-taught painter and muralist native to and based in New Orleans, has created a backboard inspired by dance and its ability to take people through vibrant moments in time. 
  • Marc Verrett / MarcFreshArt, a Baton Rouge based muralist, has created a backboard that illustrates a positive rise to overcome obstacles through imagery of a skull paired with colorful butterfly wings to represent the eternal drive to fly above. 
  • Jade Meyers/THEARTISTJADE, Art director and founder of the art-based company, “J A D E 1 9 9 1,” has created a piece inspired by liberation, growing up in New Orleans, power, nature, Black culture and sports culture. 
  • Bryan Brown, an artist whose work focuses on New Orleans culture, random but beautiful moments, and philosophy, has created “The Big Brain,” a representation of getting mentally healthy to unlock one’s true full potential. 
  • 1985 Poet; Artist: Monique Lorden, an artist and author and co-illustrator of “I Wish for Freedom,” a poetic picture book, was inspired by her memories of hooping at the park to create “Hoops Dreams and Poetry,” a visual story of childhood hope and community.
Art Exhibition illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Loribelle Spirovski Exhibition

In what is set to be the highlight of their Summer 2021 calendar, HOFA Gallery, London, will host ‘Coronation‘, a solo exhibition by prolific contemporary figurative painter Loribelle Spirovski, between the 2– 16 June this year. The upcoming exhibition, comprised entirely of new artworks created during the 2020 lockdown, delves into the effects of recent international epoch-making events on private life as distilled through the lens of the artist’s mind.         

‘Coronation’ builds on many of the themes and motifs audiences have seen in her past critically acclaimed collections like ‘Hommes’ and ‘Memento Mori’. It is also a potent play on words whose double meaning points to the Covid-19 pandemic as well as the political power shifts and significant moments occurring simultaneously which continue to exert mammoth influences on the external and internal lives of people everywhere. 

In her new collection, Loribelle explores familiar and poignant themes with an urgency that speaks to the moment, employing her signature line technique to delineate eyes, faces and human forms entangled and abstracted into the minimalist geometric background which represents the room of the mind. She notes that “With the pandemic reducing the worlds of many to the confines of their phone screen, [the] ‘room’ motif seems more pertinent than ever…as a metaphor for the mind and the characters and scenes inhabiting it, signifying the external world filtered into the subconscious.”

The tenuousness of a reality mediated by technology and social media distortions is yet another strong theme of ‘Coronation’. However, the overarching theme is undoubtedly the inescapable reckoning all must face with history. As power shifts in the US reverberate around the world, ‘Coronation’ compels viewers to interrogate the things that hold sovereign power in their lives, prefaced on the recognition that there is need for a re-orientation, repudiation, or re-affirmation of individual commitments.

By her own account, Loribelle was no stranger to the emotional turmoil many experienced during lockdown. The pressures of living with restricted access to family, friends, and the outdoors while news of Covid-19 casualties trickled in forced the artist to take a stand against looming mortality by rediscovering and reaffirming the purpose of her art as a medium for self-expression and for exhuming the hidden contentions of the mind. ‘Coronation’ is an outcome of this defiance and the show will run at HOFA’s flagship gallery in Mayfair for 2 weeks from 2 to 16 as both an in-gallery show and a virtual exhibition, for all to enjoy.

Coronation‘ opens at HOFA Gallery, London on 2 June and runs for two weeks until 16 June 2021. 

A parallel virtual show will also be accessible to all online via a secure weblink.

In compliance with Covid-19 safety protocols, all visits to the gallery will be strictly on RSVP basis.

HOFA Gallery Website

Instagram

Photo courtesy of artist
Photo courtesy of artist

Immersive Van Gogh To Continue Through Sept. 6 in Chicago

Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago, a new venue within Chicago’s recently renovated landmark Germania Club Building, today announced that due to popular demand the U.S. premiere of the blockbuster art experience Immersive Van Gogh Exhibit will extend its dates through Labor Day after having sold out the initial block of tickets. The Exhibit will open one hour earlier at 9 a.m. and will offer Saturday afternoon VIP and Premium tickets in February and March. Tickets go on sale Saturday, Jan. 30 at 9 a.m. at vangoghchicago.com and by phone at 844-307-4644.

Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago, a three-story facility located at 108 W. Germania Place, is dedicated to immersive art presentations, merging the boundaries between entertainment and culture to give visitors the sense that they are encountering art as never before. Utilizing the building’s Victorian Era architectural details, 35-foot-tall walls and multiple levels (including balconies), the venue will present vibrant immersive art exhibitions that surround the viewer on all sides.

The venue’s first presentation, Immersive Van Gogh, is a visually spectacular digital art exhibition that recently received widespread critical acclaim during its debut in Toronto. Immersive Van Gogh invites audiences to “step inside” the iconic works of post-Impressionist artist Vincent van Gogh, evoking his highly emotional and chaotic inner consciousness through art, light, music, movement and imagination. The Italian creative team who pioneered digital experiences in Paris will create a custom design to fit the gracious Neo-Classical architecture of the exhibition’s Chicago home.

The hour-long, walk-through experience has been designed with health and safety as a priority. Capacity will be limited in accordance with the City of Chicago’s safety protocols.  Additional safety precautions include touchless ticket-taking, temperature checks upon arrival, hand sanitizer stations, social distancing markers throughout the venue, and digitally projected social distancing circles on the gallery floors to ensure appropriate spacing. All guests must wear a face covering at all times during their visit to Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago.

Immersive Van Gogh was designed by creative director and Italian film producer Massimiliano Siccardi, with original, mood-setting music by Italian multimedia composer Luca Longobardi, who provided a score that combines experimental electronic music with pure, ethereal and simple-seeming piano. Vittorio Guidotti is the Art Director. Siccardi and Longobardi are both pioneers of immersive digital art experiences in Paris, where they were part of the team that created the world-renownedVan Gogh, Starry Night exhibition, among others. With more than 70 projectors illuminating over 15,000 square-feet, visitors to Immersive Van Gogh will be encircled from head-to-toe in Van Gogh’s brushstrokes and colors, including animated details from works such as Self Portrait with Felt Hat (1888), The Bedroom in Arles (1889), Irises (1889) and The Starry Night (1889).

Immersive Van Gogh is a new way of encountering art, as it quite literally surrounds viewers on all sides with the brilliant work of one of the greatest painters of all time,” said Immersive Art Space Co-Producer Corey Ross. “Both connoisseurs and new admirers of Van Gogh’s work are guaranteed a breathtaking perspective on the influential artist’s oeuvre. Merging state-of-the-art technology, theatrical storytelling, animation and some of the finest works of art ever created, Immersive Van Gogh is a uniquely mesmerizing experience that seemingly transports the viewer into the artist’s mind to see these timeless works as never before.”

“Despite being unknown throughout his life, Van Gogh’s artwork has created a lasting impact through its emotional richness and simple beauty,” said Massimiliano Siccardi, Immersive Van Gogh designer. “Both myself and Luca Longobardi are very excited to visit Chicago and once again bring Van Gogh’s legacy to life in a way that is unique to the beautiful architecture of the Germania Club Building.”

The premiere of Immersive Van Gogh, which opened in Toronto this past July, has already received rave reviews from critics around the world. The Toronto Sun pronounced it, “intense and emotional, cathartic and liberating” and Debra Yeo of the Toronto Star reflected, “I wondered: could projections of paintings on walls and floors be thrilling? The answer is yes.” Called “dazzling” by Lonely Planet and a “blockbuster digital experience that has taken the art world by storm” by artnet news, the exhibition can be summed up by CTV’s description, “a completely new way of encountering art.” Immersive Van Gogh has already been enjoyed by more than 180,000 guests since its debut in Toronto during the pandemic in July 2020. During July and August 2020, according to Ticketmaster, it has surpassed worldwide ticket sales for any of the ticketing platform’s live cultural events.

Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago is operated by Immersive Art Space LP, a partnership between co-producers Corey Ross, Svetlana Dvoretsky, Maria Shclover and Irina Shabshis. The venue also will feature a merchandise/gift shop and café. Future plans include additional immersive art shows as well as live performances.

Ticket prices start at $39.99 for adults ($24.99 for children 16 or younger) with untimed and flexible ticket options available. Beginning Saturday, Jan. 30, tickets will be on sale Feb. 11 through Sept. 6, 2021. The venue is easily accessible by public transportation and has ample parking in the nearby James House parking garage. For more information aboutImmersive Van Gogh, visit vangoghchicago.com or call 844-307-4644.  Follow the exhibition on social media at @vangoghchicago onFacebook, Instagram and Twitter.

ABOUT THE PRODUCERS AND CREATIVE TEAM

MASSIMILIANO SICCARDI, Artistic Creator

Massimiliano studied at the London School of Contemporary Dance of London. But in 1990, he left the world of dance to begin a new journey in the world of video art. Massimiliano quickly became the artistic force behind several visual mise-en-scène for choreographers around the world. He also created video scenographies for numerous prestigious festivals and galas around the world. He also re-constructed the video mapping of the Basilica di Giotto and for the Teatro Petruzzelli of Bari, where one of his permanent installation’s virtually reconstruct the frescoes of the Cupola. Massimiliano is also a celebrated photographer and has had photo exhibitions in Spoleto and Rome, to name a few. He is professor of digital image elaboration at the Accademia di Comunicazione e Immagine of Rome. In 2012 Massimiliano received the prestigious International Award “Romaindanza” for his talent in the visual work of dance theatre. Since 2012, he has been artist in residence at the Carrières de Lumières – Atelier des Lumières where he authored the mise-en-scène of numerous immersive shows. He is currently creating projects within Italy as well as New York, Berlin, Leipzig and Rome.

LUCA LONGOBARDI, Composer

Italian composer and pianist Luca Longobardi is a classically trained musician who incorporates the contemporary electronic music into his pieces. Born in 1976, Longobardi studied classical music in Italy and New York and went on to earn his doctorate in digital audio restoration in Rome in 2011. His works reveal a strong interaction between classical and contemporary music. The experience he has gained as a theatre musician has increased his interest in the relationship between sounds and spectacle; he has composed music for ballets and films and accompanied installations and experimental art productions (Atelier de Lumières – Paris,Carrière des Lumières – Baux-de-Provence, Kunstkraftwerk – Leipzig). At his multimedia performances and in his recordings, strong experimental electronic music meets pure, ethereal and simple-seeming piano playing that nevertheless relays deep emotions.

COREY ROSS, Co-Producer

Founded in Toronto in 2003 by Corey Ross, Starvox Entertainment has ranked in Profit Magazine’s Fastest growing Canadian companies for 5 years in a row. Starvox produces, manages, represents and promotes cross-over performing arts shows and exhibitions that tour Canada, the United States and internationally. Ross has produced multiple theatrical shows in Chicago including the Harry Potter parody Potted Potter, Evil Dead The Musical, Champions of Magic and Sherlock Holmes. In Las Vegas, Ross produces three shows for Caesars Entertainment—Wow, Extravaganza and Potted Potter.  In the world of art exhibitions, Ross produces the Art of Banksy in London, Canada, the USA and Taiwan, as well as Immersive Van Gogh and Illusionarium in Toronto.

SVETLANA DVORETSKY, Co-Producer

Toronto’s Show One Productions was founded in 2004 by the enterprising Russian born impresario Svetlana Dvoretsky. Initially focused on classical music, the company has since expanded greatly and is now a leading presenter of high-profile International artists, symphony orchestras, theatre and dance companies and special projects. The company is especially proud of its presentations of Mikhail Baryshnikov, John Malkovich, Michel Legrand, Slava’s Snow Show, Valery Gergiev and the Mariinsky Orchestra, Vladimir Spivakov and the Moscow Virtuosi, Eifman Ballet, the Vakhtangov Theatre, opera stars sopranos Sondra Radvanovsky and Hibla Gerzmava, and the late baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky. Trio Magnifico Opera Gala – the historic union and once-in-a-lifetime event at The Four Seasons Opera House of soprano Anna Netrebko and tenor Yusif Eyvazov in their Toronto debuts, with Hvorostovsky in his last Toronto appearance – remains an exceptional musical memory in the history of the performing arts in Canada. Dvoretsky is a proud recipient of the Order of York by the Government of Canada for “an outstanding contribution in art and culture.”

MARIA SHCLOVER and IRINA SHABSHIS, Co-Producers

New York-based Maestro Immersive Arts is the latest creative venture by Maria Shclover and Irina Shabshis, in partnership with Lighthouse Immersive (Canada) to introduce the immersive art genre in major markets across the United States.

Shclover is a classically trained pianist who later became a finance and international business professional, after graduating from NYU Stern School of Business. With extensive finance experience under her belt, Shclover founded Maestro Artist Management in 2004 that initially concentrated on presenting classical music and special events.

Shabshis joined Maestro Artist Management in 2005, with a classical music background and vast computer science experience. Maestro Artist Management focused on providing a bespoke experience to international artists and over the years became one of the leading boutique artist management companies that presented international tours of such legendary classical musicians as Yuri Bashmet, Olga Kern, Denis Matsuev, Mischa Maysky, Vadim Repin, Vladimir Spivakov and Dmitri Hvorostovsky. Together, the company presented more than 1,000 events and sold more than 700,000 tickets, working with international stars such as Michel Legrand, John Malkovich, Mikhail Baryshnikov and many others. As a presenter of some of the world’s best talent in the international performing arts, the company closely collaborated and partnered with some of the most prestigious art organizations, such as Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, Kennedy Center, The Metropolitan Opera and various Broadway productions.

In 2012, Shclover and Shabshis formed a non-profit organization, Cherry Orchard Festival Foundation, to introduce international theatrical projects and acclaimed performers to American audiences. Festival has been a summer staple in New York and beyond, and received rave reviews from critics and audiences, welcoming such prominent international companies and projects as Gesher Theatre (Israel), John Malkovich and the international cast of Giacomo Variations (Austria), The Theatre of Nations (Russia), Vakhtangov State Theatre (Russia), Jaunais Rīgas Teātris (Latvia), Tango Fire Dance Company (Argentina), Rafael Amargo Flamenco Company (Spain), The Moscow Virtuosi Chamber Orchestra (Russia), Max Raabe & Palast Orchester (Germany), Theatre-Atelier Piotr Fomenko (Russia) and many more. In 2018, Shclover and Shabshis founded yet another venture, the Russian Film Week USA, an annual showcase of both independent and artistic films that represent the dynamic landscape of Russian filmmaking today. The festival received a resounding welcome from critics and audiences, and is continuing through January 29, 2021.

ABOUT VINCENT VAN GOGH

Legendary Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh (1853 – 1890) is recognized as one of the world’s greatest and best loved artists. He was born in the Netherlands to his father, Theodorus van Gogh, and his mother, Anna Cornelia Carbentus, a moody artist whose love of nature, drawing and watercolors was passed on to her son. He worked at his uncle Cornelis’ art dealership when he had already been fluent in French, German and English, as well as his native Dutch. He fell in love with English culture when he was transferred to the Groupil Gallery in London in 1873.

During his short life he painted more than 2,000 artworks ranging from ordinary household items and self-portraits to surreal landscapes that inspire awe. Van Gogh was a post-Impressionist painter whose work — notable for its beauty, emotion and color — highly influenced expressionism in 20th-century art. He struggled with mental illness and remained poor and virtually unknown throughout his life.

He was tragically admitted to a psychiatric hospital after offering his severed ear to a woman at a local brothel. For hope, he turned to painting and nature, until one day when he went out to paint in the morning with a loaded pistol in his hand and reportedly shot himself in the chest. In his 37 years alive, Van Gogh only sold one painting, The Red Vineyards, to his brother Theo.

Couple at Immersive Vincent Van Gogh exhibit.

Immersive Van Gogh Exhibit