Posts tagged with "modern art"

Photo of COLOMA CHAIR in LALANA via Gnazzo Group for use by 360 Magazine

LALANA EXHIBITION

The LALANA Exhibition is an entirely original and provocative art concept that is currently on display in the Miami Design District, which presents art as people have never seen- or used- before. LALANA is a design initiative that works with modern and contemporary Argentine artists to reimagine their original artworks as functional pieces bred in local techniques and noble materials. The exhibition features three textile pieces based on artworks by Roberto Aizenberg alongside a floor piece and sculptural chair by Luis Fernando Benedit

These resulting pieces have been hand-woven artisanally in silk and wool or built as prototypes from sketches, enabling new ways of engagement with the artworks which can now be used, touched, and inhabited. Designed for those curious at heart, this exhibition sets your inner child free.

Architect, designer, and visual artist, Benedit began his career in the arts in the early sixties. He explored Informalism and Neo-figurative art, and later approached the aesthetics of Pop with bright solid colors and a hint of humor. In the seventies, he explored the connection between art, science, and nature. A recurring subject in Benedit’s work is the historical and cultural identity of Argentina. Parallel to his artistic and architectural career, he designed a vast variety of interiors and every-day items, such as lamps, tables, chairs, and other furniture. Conceived as unique pieces, they frequently feature materials and elements that evoke this local imagery, from a modern and often satirical point of view.

Aizenberg studied architecture for a year before devoting himself to painting. He joined the workshops of Antonio Berni and Juan Batlle Planas, both Surrealist pioneers in the Argentine art scene at the time. Architectural structures and geometrical shapes would soon become a key element in the development of a very personal iconography, rooted in surrealism and metaphysical painting. Throughout a five-decade-long career, he worked in multiple techniques, including oil painting, drawing, collage, etching, sculpture and jewelry design. The objects represented, with sharp edges and muted colors often resemble buildings or towers, with endless rows of tiny empty windows, much like ancient monuments or abandoned cities. They are set in unlikely landscapes, where the earth is a dark and reddish hue, against huge bright skies in gradients of blue, green or yellow, which might evoke those of Aizenberg’s birthplace in Entre Ríos. Often, the central feature of these enigmatic compositions are multi-faceted shapes -resembling fans or umbrellas- suspended in space. In others, it is curvilinear figures recognizable as human. Treading a fine line between figuration and abstraction, these striking images arouse feelings of uncertainty and existential uneasiness. The impossible combination of these elements create dreamlike atmospheres, sometimes peaceful, other times nostalgic, but in all cases unsettling, like an unapproachable symbolic language.

annika wells from epic records inside 360 MAGAZINE

Annika Wells – Modern Art

Rising pop artist Annika Wells shares the video for her new single “Modern Art.” The video was directed by Logan Fields (Syd, Slayyyter, Rod Wave) and captures the songs essence as Annika walks the halls of an art gallery. The exhibit? Remnants of a relationship.

The minimalist pop song is a poignant piece of commentary on heartbreak in the digital age. Her voice is soft yet fragile as she tries to absorb the truth of her own words. “There’s no pretty way to break a heart,” she intones in a half whisper over an ominous drone. A delicate beat then kicks up underneath, urging her to share more. “Breaking up is modern art,” she declares, before orchestral strings sweep in as if soundtracking the credits to another sad ending.

The track not only captures the pain of a breakup, but the struggle with having to process it inside—and online. Annika explains that the song “explores the aftermath in the modern age where our relationships are no longer just interpersonal experiences, but digital galleries in which we can curate, arrange, and erase carefully constructed identities. It walks you through the world that’s left after the real break up—the physical evidence, but also the online remnants that are increasingly inescapable in this day and age.”

About Annika Wells

Most people keep personal, embarrassing, and crazy thoughts to themselves. Annika Wells isn’t one of those people. She doesn’t just express these thoughts out loud either. She peppers them through her songs with the kind of honesty you expect from your childhood best friend. In her music, she’ll rattle off bucket list ambitions, refer to herself phallically, or write about a doomed romance (with that same ex as her cowriter). After watching her older brother play piano, she started taking classical lessons at the age of four. She eventually ended up at Berklee College of Music in Boston. 

Before dropping out, she linked up with producer Giulio Cercato and wrote and recorded what would become her first single “Break” in 2016. It caught fire around the world, catapulted onto the Spotify Global Viral Chart, and eventually eclipsed 15 million Spotify streams. She wrote and featured on “Crawl Outta Love” for Illenium, amassing 58 million Spotify streams, reaching the Top 30 on the Billboard Hot/Dance Electronic Songs Chart, and notching the International Songwriting Competition (ISC) Grand Prize. Between performing in sold-out arenas across the country with Illenium throughout 2019, she landed a string of major placements as a writer for Jonas Brothers, PRETTYMUCH, BTS, and Steve Aoki. After racking up over half a billion streams, she welcomes everyone into her mind and heart on a series of singles and her forthcoming debut for Vol. 1/Epic Records.

illustration by Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

Elevate Your Space

Tired of staring at the same four walls? Or has something about your home bothered you persistently? Even if you’re not ready to commit to time and money, there are many little tricks and changes you can DIY that can have a significant impact on the look and feel of your home interior design. Beyond feeling better, many of the easy switches homeowners can make are also far more environmentally friendly, creating a greener, cleaner home.

Here’s a list of inexpensive ideas from experts to elevate your indoor space and tips on how you can change your home’s atmosphere.

  • Plants

Live plants, faux plants, emotional support plants! There are so many options to choose from.
If you have the space and light for live plants, they are able to change the overall appearance of a space, and they have also been shown to boost moods, increase productivity and concentration, reduce stress, and eliminate air pollutants. This makes for a healthier, happier interior space that looks good and makes us feel good, too. In fact, there are many studies on how having plants encourages self care.

However, artificial plants are also great for those who want them just for decorative purposes. They never outgrow their pots, the leaves will never droop, and there’s no need to worry about watering them. Pet-safe and child-safe, perfect for those who travel a lot.

  • Pets

Nothing compares to the unconditional love from a pet that keeps you company. Pets, especially dogs and cats, have been proven that they can reduce stress, anxiety, and depression, ease loneliness, encourage exercise and playfulness, and improve your overall health. While caring for an animal can help children grow emotional and social skills, pets also provide valuable companionship for adults. Other benefits include comfort and support, as dogs are very present and they know how to sit there and be loving.

  • Sponge an Old Door

A few decades ago, sponging an entire room or hallway was a major trend. With today’s color technology, one can paint doors in tight or small hallways to add texture and drama to a once drab space.

While traditional sponging only used 2 to 3 colors, with 4 to 6 colors, this same technique can inherit or take on characteristics of rusted copper, stone or marble – depending on your color choice and technique used. Sponge painting is a technique that can create a beautiful array of ombre color effects, one color blending into another. While this might sound complicated, it involves nothing more than applying a base coat of color, then using sponges to dab on another color so that the underlying color shows through.

  • Epoxy Countertop

An epoxy coating will last longer than pretty much any other type of coating and epoxy coating by itself is scratch resistant due to the composition of its ingredients. When done right, epoxy countertops provide a long-lasting and durable surface. Their non-porous nature also means that they’re resistant to moisture and have other characteristics such as compactness and good leak resistance. While epoxy countertops provide a glossy look that can make cheap materials look more luxurious, you will still need to use common sense and not place hot pots and pans on it as they are not the most heat resistant.

  • Refresh Old Fixtures with Edison Bulbs and LIFX Lights

A really simple way to add character to your interior design is by changing the light bulbs that you use.
Edison Bulbs exceeds the warmth of an incandescent bulb, making your environment warm and cozy while adding detail. However, keep in mind that they are not the best at lighting the entire room.

If you’ve been anywhere on the Internet in the past few years, you’ve probably seen those color-changing bulbs and wanted them. Not only do they change colors, LIFX lights can also be accessed away from home and are energy-efficient, though their main selling point is their colors.

  • Hang a Skateboard

When it comes to interior design, hanging a skateboard deck on the wall probably isn’t the first thing you would think of doing.

However, this has become one of the latest trends in recent years and has grown so much that it now holds a spot in the modern art world. Skateboard deck wall art gives personal touch and could also potentially become a hobby (though it might be expensive) – and a complete freedom of expression.

  • Build or Fabricate an Installation

An easy fix to an empty space is building or adding an installation, such as a wall mural or wall art to dress your space up. A popular one is faux ivy leaves dangling from your shelves or walls. Be sure to save and reuse any paper scraps as well as recycle any waste possible!

As cryptocurrency has started to take a huge presence in the media world, it’s not surprising that people also want to show off their digital art, and digital art display systems such as Token Frames has made it possible for you to display your NFT art in your home, office, or anywhere else you wish.

  • Install Floating Shelves

Floating shelves offer minimalistic support – barely visible to the eye but giving extra storage and glamor. It seems futuristic in nature and has a “suspended in mid-air” vibe.

Additionally, the floating shelf can be used for an array of things: jars, plants, books, lamps, and more. You can choose the design or color you’d like them to come in and be creative with it.

  • Buy and Use Multi-functional Furniture

Multi-functional furniture reduces clutter and helps to save space – sometimes even providing extra storage. This helps to keep your interior tidy and make the area feel inviting. Such examples include storage tools or ottomans that can also be used as seating or a side table, folding chairs that can easily be compacted and kept away, or sofa beds that can easily be unfolded for a spot for guests to sleep on. There are many other options and furniture that provide multi-functions.

  • Hang a Light Box Painting or Design One with Rechargeable LED Lights

Light has always been used in a plethora of artistic works. Neon lights, backlight, sculptural light, and in most recent years, LED lights. These lights have been used for store signage and in malls for the longest time, and it has been a trend to also use them as a decorative piece in your homes today. Not to mention, they can be easily DIY-ed with purchasing a few strips of LED lights. They’re great because there are no visible wires and they won’t put holes in your walls as they are magnetic.

  • Create a Gallery Wall

You’ve probably seen amazing images of gallery walls online and wished that you could get the look in your home. Good news: creating a beautiful look with wall art is simpler than you think! You don’t need to be a pro interior designer to create a breathtaking gallery wall. Follow Desenio’s step-by-step guide full of gallery wall ideas to get an insta-worthy look in your home.

  • Resurface Old Platforms

While a full-fledged renovation is not always on the table, resurfacing old platforms or surfaces can always be a fun full day project to do (depending on the scale of the project and what is used). Countertops, walkways, doors, and so on. Benjamin Moore sells a glitter paint that brings a touch of shimmer and adds character to any room. This is ideal for an accent wall of even a piece of furniture.

Resurfacing is a cost-effective alternative and a low-cost investment that could potentially last for years to come.

  • Create Vintage, One-of-a Kind, Minimalist Interiors

A modern and artistic piece of furniture is unique, but the price tag isn’t always the most inviting. However, there are many thrift store options available for you to pick up an old piece of (broken) furniture and refurbish it to look like a one-of-a-kind item.

Many people throw out perfectly usable table tops when some of the legs are worn out, and you can always cut off the legs and replace them with something else – a traditional table could look really special with hairpin legs.

Another hot item that has made a comeback is the modern style glass standing desks, a simple and elegant design that you could purchase for $2000, or simply pick up materials from a hardware store and DIY it for less than a tenth of that price.

By opting for a more natural and modern minimalistic style, cut down on the need for extraneous décor items. Choose to bring in one of our earlier tips, plant life, as a way to make a home feel alive instead of bogged down.

  • Install Dimmable Switches or Choose Natural Lighting

There are many good reasons to install dimmer switches around your house. Instead of just turning lights on or off, you get a wide range of variety by installing a dimmer switch. Additionally, when the lights aren’t functioning at full capacity, they use less energy and save bulb life. Dimming lights can also make a room more comfortable and create a lovely ambiance for a party or event. Most dimmers are designed to fit a standard wall box opening, which makes it easy to replace the switch for any incandescent or halogen light with a dimmer.

Setting up your workspace near a window or skylight can also help make an area feel warmer and more welcoming. Natural light is also very flattering on Zoom! Additionally, opting to bring as much natural light as possible into a space can avoid the unnecessary use of electricity better for both home and wallet. By taking advantage of all lighting options, a home can feel bigger and brighter.

  • Paint Dingy Walls

Walls that have collected dust and dirt over the years? You can always paint over a dirty, chipping and flaking surface, but the trick for new paint to stick is to clean the surface and sand them down to be free of dust that could interfere with your paint ability to adhere to walls.

illustration for Alex Bogdan for use by 360 magazine
  • Collectibles

Collectibles like wine, music albums, records, posters and concert tickets are for enjoyment and fun, while some other figurine collections like KAWS or Tenacious Toys might be a little more expensive. Whether it’s a family tradition or an investment, collectibles often add character to someone’s home with personal touch.

  • iHome Technologies

Today’s advancement in technology enables you to have an automated home, one that is intelligent enough to understand your needs and lifestyle. With the touch of a button, what you want is executed immediately. iHome now offers full lines of alarm clocks, portable speakers, Bluetooth vanity mirrors, sleep therapy wellness products, and a licensed line of smartphone, tablet, and smart home products.

By: Armon Hayes, Kai Yeo, Justin Lowery × Vaughn Lowery

Thanks, it's Cashmere via Elysian Brewing for use by 360 Magazine

Story Behind the Can

January 24th is National Beer Can Appreciation Day, which celebrates the historic and thirst-quenching day beer was first sold in cans! In celebration, here are a few of Elysian Brewing’s most iconic beer cans through the years including Salt & Seed, the hit summer seasonal rose released last year which features a photograph of an actual watermelon, and Dayglow, which showcases a tiger with laser beams shooting out of its eyes (yes, you read that right).

The in-house design team at Seattle-based craft brewery Elysian Brewing is known for its art-forward approach to beer can creation. The small design team is constantly pushing the boundaries and exploring how they can drive excitement and inspiration through label design, often through a mixed-medium and DIY creative take on label design.  

The creativity and imagination that goes into their labels are endless, leading to everything from sculptures, photography, and even shampoo being featured on product labels. In celebration of the upcoming holiday, the Elysian design team talked about their favorite labels throughout the years.

Dayglow IPA

Elysian Design Team: “What company proudly puts a tiger shooting laser beams out of its eyes on a bottle and pushes print? As ridiculous as the concept seems, the visual was a hit. Dayglow was the winner of the 2014 Beverage World Global Packaging Design Awards, paving the way and setting a standard for all future Elysian label designs to come.”

Mother Pig Fresh Hop IPA

Elysian Design TeamL “The art for Mother Pig was inspired by the hop picker at the farm that provided the hops for this IPA. The picker is a specialized machine the growers refer to as ‘Mother Pig’ as it herds up all the little piglets (Hop bines).”

Salt and Seed Watermelon Gose

Elysian Design Team: “This tongue-in-cheek ‘still life’ reveals itself as an impossible object; similar to a ship-in-bottle, it begs out consumers to question—’how the heck did they do that?’ The creation of this label was done in-house and all by hand for an elaborate, albeit lo-fi photoshoot.”

Thanks, It’s Cashmere Hazy IPA

Elysian Design Team: “This label was a first in our history in that it cleverly highlighted the hop used within its name, leaned into it, and turned it into a full-on story. It set a high bar for beers following its footsteps and reimagined what it means to write a beer description.”

Maria BLANCHARD for use by 360 Magazine

Masterpieces from the Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris

Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris (MAM) and the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao now present the new exhibition From Fauvism to Surrealism: Masterpieces from the Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris. The exhibition is sponsored by the BBVA Foundation, which has been able to showcase an array of around 70 art pieces by revolutionary artists.

The pieces exemplify the history of the MAM paired with a display of the artistic efforts that encompassed Paris during the leading decades in the 20th century. The bravery and freedom of fauvist and cubist artists in the two movements during this time period was deemed scandalous. The movements were able to transform conventional interpretation of portraiture, landscape and still-life.

MAM was developed on the Exposition Internationale (1937) as a homestead to modern art collections of the city of Paris. Exposition Internationale grew promptly in years after as more and more art was acquired by significant artists of the Parisian art scene, becoming a formal museum in 1961. Sponsors like Dr. Maurice Girardin provided vital support for the project, as his museum endowment of 1953 became the core for the collection of modern masters.

The pieces of the museum are arranged chronologically over three sections. The sections begin at the top of 20th century and lead to the time after World War II. The variety of artwork in this exhibition illustrates a historical viewpoint of the key protagonists that were so convoluted in crucial artistic movements.

Nightclub Gif by Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

MERGING VERSES NFT

The future of fashion is the merging of two verses, the virtual world (metaverse) and the physical world. We explore this through the unity of traditional photography and animation—where humans and AI co-exist.

The NFT world is something that is growing and still confusing for many people not directly involved in the producing and purchasing of these new age art pieces. 360 MAGAZINE was able to interview several people directly involved in the production side of NFTs, including producer and model Bee Davies and photographer Jacques Burga.

Interview with Bee Davies

  • What made you become interested in NFTs?

I became interested in NFTs when I started doing virtual production and realized that there was no marketplace for digital art. More than that, there was no fan base. We know famous photographers and people who collect their photographsbut there’s not the same kind of hype surrounding animators. An NFT marketplace not only legitimizes their work, but provides a platform that opens up the door for a whole new kind of collector.

  • How do you respond to people suggesting NFTs are overly expensive and pointless?

Couldn’t you say that about all collectibles? Digital art, like any art, is meant to be enjoyed; the NFT marketplaces and wallets allow you to do that much more easily.

  • What is your favorite NFT?

The one I produced with Jacques for 360, because it exemplifies the merging of the real world and the metaverse.

  • Was it odd to see yourself become an NFT?

Not at all. Since the dawn of social media we have all had virtual versions of ourselves, this is just an overt way of expressing it.

  • What are your biggest artistic inspirations?

I would like to create and produce a completely virtual fashion show for the industry’s top fashion houses (this means AI talent, virtual runways, and digital clothing/accessories…as well as an audience attending in VR). And of course, mint every bit of the digital experience so it can be enjoyed in the metaverse for eternity.

  • What are some upcoming projects you’re looking forward to?

I have a bunch of NFTs that will be dropping soon that I’ve collaborated on with different animatorssome of which feature the actors from the SciFi TV Pilot I created.

Interview w/ Jacques Burga

  • What made you become interested in NFTs?

It’s a whole new way of making business. I enjoy pushing boundaries when it comes to projects related to my field. It also makes me feel there’s always a next step to follow and to explore disciplines that I wasn’t precisely an expert in.

  • How do you respond to people suggesting NFTs are overly expensive and pointless?

To keep the mind open to new ways of mixing technology and creativity may be good advice.

  • What are your inspirations as a photographer?

I am inspired by People and Beauty

  • Why did you decide to blend photographic elements with virtual ones?

Our world has become very virtual. Photography gets elevated when it’s blend with other disciplines such as Art or Technology (virtuality.)

  • What is your relationship with digital artwork?

I’m working on digital projects related to Fashion and NFT. My relationship is continuously growing.

  • When did you become interested in photography?

When I left an internship at a high profile magazine in Paris and decided to become independent and nurture my desire to create fashion.

  • What, in your opinion, is your best piece of artwork/photography?

I cherish every project since it is composed of pieces that create a nice puzzle for me.

  • What projects can we expect to see from you in the future?

I will always want to explore and collaborate with new technologies and artists that share my vision of fashion and people.

NFTs available on OpenSea.

MEET THE TEAM

Media Partner: 360 MAGAZINE

Studio: Daylight Studio

Producer: Bee Davies / Hive Global Media

Photographer: Jacques Burga

Make-up Artist: Sarah Tweedy

Hair Stylist: Christine McManemi

Wardrobe Stylist: Yash Joshi

NFT Marketplace: Opensea

Digital Designer: Edward Harber

Model: Bee Davies 

Animator: Vizzee

Virtual Model Creator: Vizzee

Metaverse Creators: Vizzee / Mercedes Luna Larrahona / Zoë Jane Bernet

PA: Stefanie Murza / Aleko Syntelis

nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
Optimistic Vivacity via Tim Tadder for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Tim Tadder

If you have ever seen photos of an Olympic athlete, you have no doubt seen Tim Tadder‘s work. As a photographer, he has captured the likes of Michael Phelps and Simone Biles. Recently, Tadder hosted an exhibition at Avant Gallery in New York City. 360 was given the opportunity to ask him about his artistic inspirations and his style.

How did you get into art? Was there a moment you realized you wanted to do art professionally?

I’ve always been involved in some capacity with art as a major thematic in my life. It was always what I most enjoyed in school, as a hobby, & just overall being creative. I left a career as a teacher and pursued photography as a craft and a creative expression form when I was 27, after realizing I needed to enjoy my occupation and creating was a massive part of that. 

When did you realize art was the career choice for you? Was there a moment when you realized you were gaining recognition and success in the art world?

People see me as a highly creative photographer and artist. The way that I see the world has a particular point of view that is sought after. I think embracing that as who you are and what you do and how you perceive and see has value and therefore is a viable career once you can monetize that vision. Everything else falls into place from there. 

People will collect and want to own a piece of your vision and hang it on a wall, which ultimately empowers you as an artist to continue to create and explore your vision knowing that you have the financial support in order to do so. 

When ‘Nothing to See’ first was shared as large format prints, the response was overwhelming. It was at that point that I knew there was serious traction in a new marketplace, one that I had always dreamed of being a part of and was fortunate that this particular series of images was embraced by collectors and galleries. 

How does knowing a multitude of art mediums help you with your artwork?

I come from a background of 20 years of creating advertising campaigns for the world’s biggest brands and our job is to create on demand art that sells a product. And in doing so, you learn to use all the tools at your disposal to make the most powerful image for that purpose. I have been able to use all of that skill and knowledge and channel it into my personal fine art work to create images that convey messages that are important to me and that should be heard around the world. 

What do you look at to get inspiration to create?

Pre-COVID I attended a lot of art fairs and contemporary museums to look at trends, masters, & to find inspiration on how people explore visual presentation. I found that going to those events and seeing the art in person really helped me refine my message and refine my voice. In a COVID world, I try to follow artists on IG and Twitter who I’m inspired by and keep abreast of their new work and from there I try to find my own lane to blend out, be distinct, and be noticeable. Right now there’s so many rabbit holes that one can go down to find inspiration, whether it’s instagram or twitter or the NFT space.

You use bright and vibrant color schemes in your artwork, when and how did that start? What’s your process when deciding about the colors you will use?  

I’ve always been attracted to bold use of color. It’s been a monochord in my commercial work since my career began. For me that’s an instinctual choice. To use bold colors to help story tell. In choosing, a lot of it comes from instinct and a lot comes from what those colors represent. For ‘Nothing to See,’ I chose the bed, black, & white hues because they were historically represented of fascist banners and that collection was born out of a desire to create iconic, anti-fascist imagery. 

You photograph both still-lives (mostly mannequins) and people. Is there one you prefer to photograph? What led to you choosing a humanoid inanimate object as your main subject in many photos/series? 

I choose to use real people and not mannequins. I select models that have very androgynous, mannequin-esque features because I want my images to represent humankind and not just a type of individual, which sometimes comes from casting talent with defining characteristics. It’s not a picture of someone, it’s a picture of something

You edit with high contrast, high-saturation as your signature style. What drew you to this editing style?

Instinctive choices. It’s how I see, it’s how I visualize, it’s what I as an artist feel is beautiful. It wasn’t a choice to follow a trend, it was my own visual aesthetic.

Image via Gruin Gallery for 360 Magazine

Keelin Montzingo – Cosmic Latte Nostalgia

Keelin Montzingo’s Cosmic Latte Nostalgia

Opening Thursday, September 9th, 2021 from 6-8pm with artist in attendance

Exhibition through October 10th, 2021

Make an appointment here

Location: 1515 N Gardner St, Los Angeles, CA, 90046

We are homesick most for the places we have never known. – Carson McCullers

Gruin and Show Gallery are pleased to present Keelin Montzingo’s first solo exhibition in Los Angeles entitled Cosmic Latte Nostalgia. 

Longing for a time that never was and a place that is accessible only within the imagination, Keelin Montzingo presents a collection of exciting new work that navigates the space between notions of home and the projected world we occupy online. Here, home refers not to where we live, but how we exist within our bodies and how this has changed over time as technology has developed and our sense of self has become increasingly warped and abstracted.

Cosmic Latte is known to be the average color of the universe, the compression of all we know to exist, a milky beige which is found in all of Montzingo’s new paintings. Referencing the mirroring of the cosmos within the Internet, these works explore the dichotomy between self-expression and entrapment within simulation. The search for authenticity in the contemporary world is inextricably linked to public displays of fictionalized behavior. As we seek to find ourselves we develop increasingly more sophisticated ways to invent who we are for others.

The mirror and the real meet and connect at a threshold where we can either try to untangle the facade or find ways of working with where we have arrived, understanding that we cannot revert back to the myths we have cultivated. This journey of controlling representation is nothing new, the Internet is simply a contemporary vehicle for a process we have been undergoing for centuries. The difference is that now we are accelerating at a pace we cannot keep up with or control.

Montzingo does not seek to judge those who cultivate personas, she does not perceive this behavior as duplicitous but rather as an act of creativity. Our ability to imagine is what has led us to turn the camera on ourselves and use the body as a platform for storytelling. Ironically the most extraordinary aspect of humanity, our ability to envision, is also what leads us to invent ever more creative ways to attack the psyche and enact destructive behaviors. Whenever something verges towards a deeper truth, a deeper facade comes with it. Reflected in the cosmos we cannot escape the laws of attraction and opposition.

Montzingo longs to escape the complexity of the now, to dwell in the pastel landscapes of a 1970s Palm Springs utopia where all is simplified and we are distilled to archetypes, the female body a symbol of the mother, the creator, the lover, the seer. But this is impossible, so instead she affords her subjects the freedom of time travellers, moving back and forth through data, creating a link between an imagined past, the contemporary world and projections of the future. For this reason, instead of painting women she knows, Montzingo paints models who are anonymous to her, employing the silhouette of the conventionally celebrated body to free this stereotype and speak of all female identity.

Keelin Montzingo (b.1992) is New York based painter. She studied Communications at the University of Massachusetts and Modern and Contemporary Art at Christies. Montzingo’s paintings are housed in collections in the USA, UK, Singapore, Switzerland, Lebanon, Italy and Thailand. She has exhibited in Paris, New York, and Los Angeles.

VISITOR INFORMATION

Show Gallery is located between Hollywood and Sunset at 1515 N. Gardner Street off of Sunset Boulevard. There is limited parking in the lot directly behind the gallery. Show Gallery is open by appointment only.

Visit Keelin’s artwork on Gruin and learn more via their website and Instagram.

Artwork for 360 Magazine

GRAPHIC ART TRENDS FOR 2021

Artwork is often the center of a home and brings life and character to a space. As time progresses, artwork trends change and as the new season approaches new art trends are arising. 

With the start of a new year, Desino is excited to present the graphic art trending this spring! Abstract art is at the forefront for the coming season, with organic shapes, arches and geometric lines adding an artsy element to our walls. Check out the latest graphic prints created by our very own Design Studio.

ARCHED DESIGNS

The rounded arch can be spotted through architectural history, and this year the classic curved shape is leading the way in the interior world. Arched furniture, doorways and home accessories are being spotted everywhere! This spring we’ll be decorating our walls with arched designs that bring a classic and stylish feel to our homes. Many people have used the arched design as a makeshift headboard, a DIY that blends in with the trends. 

ORGANIC SHAPES

For abstract art lovers, the organic shapes coming this spring are the perfect addition to your walls! Featuring warm, earthy tones, this graphic art featuring soft shapes and curves will bring a fresh feel to your gallery wall. These pair perfectly with less abstract pieces of art and tie together any gallery wall. 

FIGURATIVE FUTURE

In contrast to the abstract art trending right now, figurative art is coming on strong this season. With a more simplistic approach to this art style, we’re loving these simple portrait drawings honoring our human shapes. These pieces of art encapsulate the beauty of human features. 

GEOMETRIC STRIPES

Monochrome art complements all kinds of interior styles and this season we’re embracing these geometric patterns in black and white. A great choice if you want a modern accent piece for your wall, these graphic prints will look great in minimalist and colorful homes alike. Pairing these with silhouettes, as seen in the gallery wall below, instantly creates a beautiful contemporary wall. 

Visit desenio.com for more graphic gallery walls and inspiration.

Artwork for 360 Magazine
Artwork for 360 Magazine
Artwork for 360 Magazine

John McAllister Hand-Embellished Series

Who can resist a portal into another world? Light and color beckon. The transport is swift: John McAllister‘s large-scale paintings and panoramas hold your hand while keeping you on a need-to-know basis as perspectives shift, borders interrupt, and the landscape saturates. Balance was achieved before you arrived. The world is dimensional but flat, sculptural with the serenity of a still life. In nature’s fertile decoration, we become immersed in the ordered chaos of pattern and colorful echoes of Pierre Bonnard, Henri Matisse, and Édouard Vuillard.

In ember blazons lazing daze, we are treated to a series of fifteen unique works by McAllister. The base print features a glowing scene of trees and brush surrounded by a massive border in which McAllister has taken pastel delight, electrifying each piece with hand-embellishments. The result is an intimate series, like a postcard from a dream.

John McAllister has a forthcoming solo exhibition at Wentrup Gallery (Berlin) this fall. Previous solo exhibitions have been held at James Fuentes (New York), Richard Telles Fine Art (Los Angeles), Shane Campbell Gallery (Chicago), and Carl Freedman Gallery (London) among others. His work has been included in group exhibitions at Le Consortium art center (Dijon, France), Marciano Art Foundation (Los Angeles), Almine Rech Gallery (Paris), and more. His work is included in both the Rubell Family Collection and the collection of the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. McAllister lives and works in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Shop Limited Edition Prints:

John McAllister Unless Airy Dreams, Strike the Piercing Cord

Brad Phillips To Do List

Jesse Mockrin Garden of Love

Matthew Palladino Drapery

Brandi Twilley La Vie

Josh Reames Cowpoke