Posts tagged with "abstract art"

UKRAINIAN artist, painter, professor via 360 MAGAZINE

Yana Bystrova

Yana Bystrova is a third-generation Ukrainian artist, born to create undeniably conceptual, enticing pieces of art. Having her body of work showcased in galleries around the world, Yana has continuously stunned audiences with her meticulous creations full of color, concept and mixed media.

Listen to Yana’s full conversation with the 360 team on the 360 MAG Podcast HERE.

No stranger to pouring her countries rich history into her designs, we now see Yana’s paintings amongst the traveling exhibition Painting in Excess: Kyiv’s Art Revival, 1985 – 1993,” originally set to be showcased in her homeland of Ukraine.

Engulfed in the world of artistry since before she can remember, Yana often questions whether she had a choice on becoming an artist. Her professional ability has been evident from a young age; with Yana’s mother often telling a story about a painting she created in her adolescence. The piece, showcased at a children’s museum, was suddenly stolen from their home. Yana created the painting at the mere age of three years old.

Having doubted her position as an artist, Yana, too, experimented with differing professions before returning to her craft. She dabbled in design and programming, in which she gained mass success with. Nonetheless, she knew that the corporate environment did not suit her appropriately and went back to her original passion for creating art.

Amidst the ongoing war in Ukraine, Yana has been deeply affected by the destruction to her country. A daunting task, Yana spoke about the devastation she felt from hearing about the Russian invasion when stating, “It is horrible, I was in shock and very disoriented in the beginning [of the war].”

Yana’s thoughts pour into her work, evoking a new era of her works. She finds that her most recent paintings are a version of the distilled reality of the situation at hand. Each hue used in her art represents something deeper than the color wheel could ever encompass, it exemplifies the weight of Ukraine on Yana’s heart.

She often considers the conflict endured by everyone affected by the war; those who have fled and those who are still in the country. The situation at hand in Ukraine has had an everlasting affect on her personal and professional wellbeing.

“[It is] one thing is to be a tourist; another thing is to be a refugee.”

Her latest participation in the new exhibition “Painting in Excess: Kyiv’s Art Revival, 1985 – 1993” was organized a few years back, postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Held at the Coral Gables Museum through October of 2022, the showing was originally conceived by the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers. The project embraces a life of its own, taking a new shape and meaning modernly with the tragedy occuring in Ukraine.

Yana utilizes delicate use of color to personify her artistry, creating new narratives. In the way that verbal communication only accounts for a small portion of human interaction, Yana attributes color to bridging these gaps and expressing what cannot be stated in words. Often investigating new mediums for her artistry, Yana carefully crafts art that is theoretical and impactful.

Amongst her upcoming exhibitions, Yana has a New York residency opening on June 3. Entitled “Yana Bystrova: Approaching a Chaotic Reality,” the showing will be held at Gallery Arte Azulejo. A gallery walk will be sported on June 16 as well.

Additional resource on Yana.

Article by: McKinley Franklin x Vaughn Lowery

Yana Bystrova Ukranian artist image via Yana Bystrova for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Reebok via Jason Silva for Reebok for use by 360 Magazine

Reebok × Tyrrell Winston

Reebok and contemporary artist Tyrrell Winston have confirmed the release of their highly anticipated footwear collaboration, the Tyrrell Winston x Reebok Club C (GZ1567, $120) and Question Mid (GZ1565, $120). The collection is available beginning May 6 exclusively HERE before its wider global release on May 13 from Reebok and select retailers.

Known for his found-object artworks featuring deflated basketballs, broken nets, and cigarette butt compositions, Tyrrell Winston’s art is both endearing and thought-provoking. Through Winston’s collaboration with Reebok, he expresses his love for heritage and basketball on the iconic Question Mid and his favorite model, the Club C.

“First and foremost, both shoes needed to be something my friends and I could wear every day—nothing over the top, subtle details,” commented Winston. “When it comes to footwear, I prefer it simple and straightforward. But on a more abstract level, these shoes were about ongoing conversations with friends and the idea of envisioning oneself as a racehorse with blinders on.”

The result: two clean yet evoking iterations of iconic Reebok heritage sneakers, each featuring pony hair elements, Winston’s autograph on the outsole, and subtle nods to the artist’s New York doodles or “Noodles.”

“Club C has been a part of my life for a very long time and are my go-to studio shoe—I’ve documented the wear of various pairs of Club C in the studio over the last few years, so this shoe is truly an extension of my work,” continued Winston. “The Question Mid, well it’s a pinch-myself moment. Iverson’s cultural impact on and off the court is remarkable, almost godly, defying stamina and style. Both silhouettes are about references to my work, but they themselves are not art—on a certain level I look at them as mediums.”

Highlighting the collaboration, Winston, alongside creative director Drew Villani, took care in building a narrative through content. “The Journey”—inclusive of a short film and in-environment photography—observes the concept of ‘vision vs. sight’ via two interconnecting stories that explore different methods of travel—traditional and modern.

Within the story, Question Mid is captured on a horse ranch positioning the equines as key to the infrastructure of many societies. Club C is captured on the Staten Island Ferry or “iron horse,” a daily form of modern transport that Winston used in the early days, while pursuing his dream.

“Racehorses have blinders to keep them focused on what’s ahead, not the horses to their right or left. We as people often need our own hypothetical blinders when we’re pursuing something. We should not look left or right—look straight ahead and go.”

In closing, Winston shared thoughts of gratitude: “My 16- or 17-year-old self is doing backflips, and so in my 36-year old self. It’s exciting to be a part of Reebok’s history.”

The Tyrrell Winston x Reebok Club C (GZ1567, $120) and Question Mid (GZ1565, $120) are available beginning May 6 exclusively from their website before their wider global release on May 13 from Reebok’s website and select retailers.

About Tyrrell Winston

Tyrrell Winston is known for his assemblages of old basketballs that he frequently arranges into grids, so they become studies of material, culture and history. Self-taught, Winston began his art practice creating collages using paper scraps he found while roaming the streets of New York City, where he had moved to study arts administration at Staten Island’s Wagner College. He also collected debris like basketballs and cigarette butts, both of which now serve as foundational material for his mixed-media works. Winston, who has built a large following on social media, also creates freestanding sculptures, wall hangings from recycled basketball nets, and paintings of famous athletes’ signatures. His artworks all explore what the artist calls “embedded history”: the narratives perpetually lodged in other people’s discarded objects.

art illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for use by 360 magazine

Mother and Child

Dreweatts is thrilled to present the discovery of a new work by one of the most important British artists of the 20th century, the esteemed British sculptor Henry Moore (1898-1986). After two years of working with the Henry Moore Foundation and the family of the owner, former Publisher and Editor of The Architectural Review magazine Hubert de Cronin Hastings (1902-1986), the sculpture, titled Mother and Child has now been authenticated. Commenting on the discovery, Dreweatts’ specialist Francesca Whitham, said: “It has been such a fascinating journey working with this rare Henry Moore sculpture. I was elated, after many months of delays due to Covid restrictions, to finally receive the letter from the foundation authenticating the piece as a genuine Moore. Dreweatts are honored to bring this sculpture to the market for the very first time, presenting an opportunity to purchase a unique and rare sculpture by one of the most important British artists of the 20th century.” 

The foundation was able to link the work to a sketch of the sculpture by Moore already held in its’ records, titled Eighteen Ideas for Sculpture, which he produced in 1939.

The sculptural group is believed to have been gifted to Hubert de Cronin Hastings directly by Henry Moore, as they met through The Architectural Review magazine, via Moore’s friend Jim Richards, Assistant Editor of the magazine at the time, who had befriended Moore after writing an article on his work for the magazine in 1934. The sculpture was passed down by Hubert to his son, John Hastings in the 1970s, remaining on his mantlepiece amongst an eclectic mixture of objects until he passed away in 2019.

The work is also considered an extremely rare piece as it is cast in lead, which was a material the sculptor only used for a short period in the 1930s, during a time in his career when he was experimenting with other materials such as string and wire for his series of stringed sculptures. Mother and Child is believed to be a preliminary design for one of these stringed sculptures, which explains the unusual markings on the front, adding to its’ joyful and playful nature.

Jean Debufet art via The Guggenheim Museum for use by 360 Magazine

Jean Debufet: Ardent Celebration

The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao presents Jean Dubuffet: Ardent Celebration, sponsored by BBK, an exhibition surveying the defining decades of the career of Jean Dubuffet, spanning his first years of committed artistic production in the 1940s through his final fully developed series, completed in 1984. The exhibition is drawn primarily from the rich holdings of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and supplemented by important selections from the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice. At the end of World War II, Jean Dubuffet (b. 1901, Le Havre, France; d. 1985, Paris) began exhibiting paintings that defied entrenched artistic values. He rejected principles of decorum and classical beauty, along with pretensions of expertise. Instead, he looked to the commonplace and the unheralded, employing crude materials, mundane subjects, and a style that spurned any outward sign of academic training. In this approach, Dubuffet was challenging norms that he believed obstructed authentic expression and devalued everyday experience. However, his goal was not only to reveal how threadbare cultural conventions were; he also wanted to illustrate the vitality of life freed from them. As he once claimed, “I would like people to see my work as a rehabilitation of scorned values and… make no mistake about it, a work of ardent celebration.” 

Dubuffet was committed to this aim throughout his career, though he continually transformed the means he used to pursue it. He tested different mediums, including painting, drawing, collage, lithography, sculpture, and performance. Meanwhile, he moved fluidly between figuration and abstraction, explored multiple compositional strategies, and periodically reinvented his palette. Throughout these changes, Dubuffet’s work stayed grounded in its dedication to sharing new and revitalizing perspectives with viewers, as well as its refusal of convention. Jean Dubuffet: Ardent Celebration will focus on this celebratory impulse, as it offers an overview of the breadth of Dubuffet’s production. The ability to present a full survey of the artist’s career largely from the collection of New York’s Guggenheim Museum is thanks to the close relationship the museum established with Dubuffet. The museum hosted three major exhibitions on the artist during his lifetime, including Jean Dubuffet 1962– 66 (1966), Jean Dubuffet: A Retrospective (1973), and Jean Dubuffet: A Retrospective Glance at Eighty (1981). The institution also collected his work in depth, beginning with the acquisition of the Door with Couch Grass (Porte au chiendent) (1957) in 1959. 

About Jean Debufet 

Dubuffet was born in Le Havre, France, in 1901. At seventeen, he began studies at Académie Julian, a respected art school. However, he soon became disenchanted with the curriculum’s distance from real-world concerns and dropped out. In the following years, he remained engaged with the creative community in Paris, circulating with artists like Raoul Dufy, Juan Gris, Fernand Legér, André Masson, and Suzanne Valadon. In 1923, he came across the work of the visionary artist Clémentine Ripoche, and the next year, he discovered Dr. Hanz Prinzhorn’s book Artistry of the Mentally Ill. These two encounters began Dubuffet’s life-long, integral engagement with art made by psychics, children, and people experiencing mental illness— a kind of artistic production he would later term “Art Brut.” For much of the 1920s and 1930s, Dubuffet worked in his family’s wine distribution business. It was not until 1942, at the age of forty-one, while living in Nazi-occupied Paris, that he decided to devote himself to being an artist. The works he made in the ensuing years were a direct challenge to commonly held ideals about beauty, skill, and the elevated status of art, as revealed in Miss Cholera (Miss Choléra) and Will to Power (Volonté de Puissance), both made in January of 1946. Dubuffet complemented this production with publications and talks in which he explicated his belief that the mechanisms of mainstream culture were moribund, stifling, and should be cast aside. Alongside his clear criticality, Dubuffet was experimenting with alternate paths forward, paths that he believed would lead to more fruitful, genuine modes of expression. During the 1940s and 1950s, he invited audiences to fundamentally reconsider the concept of beauty and demonstrated how worthy of admiration ordinary things could be. His work of this era delights in the qualities of quotidian and base materials. To emphasize the physicality of his paint, he used additives like lime, cement, or sand to thicken his oil paint into a paste he called “haute pâte.” With this medium, he could create deeply textured, complex surfaces, and he could shape his compositions in more immediately physical ways. Dubuffet sometimes went a step further in his explorations of materials, using found objects like rocks, rope, and, later, aluminum foil in his paintings. In parallel, he sought to overthrow socially enforced notions of beauty with nontraditional choices of subjects and the inventive ways in which he depicted them. This goal is particularly apparent in his early portraits, like Portrait of Soldier Lucien Geominne (Portrait du soldat Lucien Geominne) (1950) and his series of nudes, Ladies’ Bodies (Corps de Dames) (1950–51), but it extends to his depictions of frequently ignored objects, including dilapidated walls, rustic doors, soil, and rocks. From 1962 into the 1970s, Dubuffet pursued his most extended body of work, the Hourloupe cycle. These paintings and sculptures are distinguished by networks of interlocked cells, many filled with parallel stripes, most often in red, blue, and white. Though this cycle marks a significant stylistic shift, it continues Dubuffet’s commitment to constructively realigning his and his audiences’ engagement with art and the world more broadly. With the Hourloupe, cycle, which is represented in this exhibition with the works Nunc Stans (1965) and Bidon l’Esbroufe (1967), Dubuffet established a vocabulary that enabled him to create and explore an ever-expanding, fantastical universe, unified by its shared visual expression. It also allowed him to more pointedly take on phenomenological and epistemological issues. The intricacy of the patterning can lead to visual ambiguity, especially when multiple pieces are seen together. This enigmatic quality suggests the transience of what seems permanent and the contingency of an object’s supposedly defining form. Together these effects occasion a rethinking of the relationship between perception and reality, an aim that was of deep importance to the artist. For the last decade of his life, Dubuffet continued to focus on the workings of the mind, especially as they relate to the external world. By drawing attention to these mental functions, he hoped to inspire new, liberated ways of thinking. In the Theaters of Memory (Théâtres de mémoire) series (1975–79), Dubuffet established a vocabulary for expressing how the mind mixes perception, memories, and concepts as it tries to make sense of events and surroundings. His last two series, Sights (Mires) (1983–84) and Non-Places (Non-lieuxs) (1984), represented in this exhibition by Sight G 132 (Kowloon) (Mire G 132 [Kowloon]) (1983), and Given (Donnée) (1984), respectively, are characterized by tangles of lines and are largely absent of recognizable imagery. With these paintings, Dubuffet considered what experience would be like if the mind did not sort the outside world into preconceived, socially defined categories—extending even to the distinction between the real and imagined. Free of such constraints, the artist believed people would be able to access new, limitless possibilities of experience and creativity.

Nightclub Gif by Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

MERGING VERSES NFT

The future of fashion is the merging of two verses, the virtual world (metaverse) and the physical world. We explore this through the unity of traditional photography and animation—where humans and AI co-exist.

The NFT world is something that is growing and still confusing for many people not directly involved in the producing and purchasing of these new age art pieces. 360 MAGAZINE was able to interview several people directly involved in the production side of NFTs, including producer and model Bee Davies and photographer Jacques Burga.

Interview with Bee Davies

  • What made you become interested in NFTs?

I became interested in NFTs when I started doing virtual production and realized that there was no marketplace for digital art. More than that, there was no fan base. We know famous photographers and people who collect their photographsbut there’s not the same kind of hype surrounding animators. An NFT marketplace not only legitimizes their work, but provides a platform that opens up the door for a whole new kind of collector.

  • How do you respond to people suggesting NFTs are overly expensive and pointless?

Couldn’t you say that about all collectibles? Digital art, like any art, is meant to be enjoyed; the NFT marketplaces and wallets allow you to do that much more easily.

  • What is your favorite NFT?

The one I produced with Jacques for 360, because it exemplifies the merging of the real world and the metaverse.

  • Was it odd to see yourself become an NFT?

Not at all. Since the dawn of social media we have all had virtual versions of ourselves, this is just an overt way of expressing it.

  • What are your biggest artistic inspirations?

I would like to create and produce a completely virtual fashion show for the industry’s top fashion houses (this means AI talent, virtual runways, and digital clothing/accessories…as well as an audience attending in VR). And of course, mint every bit of the digital experience so it can be enjoyed in the metaverse for eternity.

  • What are some upcoming projects you’re looking forward to?

I have a bunch of NFTs that will be dropping soon that I’ve collaborated on with different animatorssome of which feature the actors from the SciFi TV Pilot I created.

Interview w/ Jacques Burga

  • What made you become interested in NFTs?

It’s a whole new way of making business. I enjoy pushing boundaries when it comes to projects related to my field. It also makes me feel there’s always a next step to follow and to explore disciplines that I wasn’t precisely an expert in.

  • How do you respond to people suggesting NFTs are overly expensive and pointless?

To keep the mind open to new ways of mixing technology and creativity may be good advice.

  • What are your inspirations as a photographer?

I am inspired by People and Beauty

  • Why did you decide to blend photographic elements with virtual ones?

Our world has become very virtual. Photography gets elevated when it’s blend with other disciplines such as Art or Technology (virtuality.)

  • What is your relationship with digital artwork?

I’m working on digital projects related to Fashion and NFT. My relationship is continuously growing.

  • When did you become interested in photography?

When I left an internship at a high profile magazine in Paris and decided to become independent and nurture my desire to create fashion.

  • What, in your opinion, is your best piece of artwork/photography?

I cherish every project since it is composed of pieces that create a nice puzzle for me.

  • What projects can we expect to see from you in the future?

I will always want to explore and collaborate with new technologies and artists that share my vision of fashion and people.

NFTs available on OpenSea.

MEET THE TEAM

Media Partner: 360 MAGAZINE

Studio: Daylight Studio

Producer: Bee Davies / Hive Global Media

Photographer: Jacques Burga

Make-up Artist: Sarah Tweedy

Hair Stylist: Christine McManemi

Wardrobe Stylist: Yash Joshi

NFT Marketplace: Opensea

Digital Designer: Edward Harber

Model: Bee Davies 

Animator: Vizzee

Virtual Model Creator: Vizzee

Metaverse Creators: Vizzee / Mercedes Luna Larrahona / Zoë Jane Bernet

PA: Stefanie Murza / Aleko Syntelis

nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
Insporum via Desenio for use by 360 Magazine

Famous Art Prints from Desenio

Museum-style prints featuring the work of famous painters are trending right now! Choosing an iconic art print for your hallway, reading corner or living room is sure to brighten up the home and score you some cultural points. Desenio has some great options. If you want to tap into this new interior trend but you’re not sure which famous artist’s work to choose, here are some great options Desenio offers!

Pioneering Abstract Art by Hilma Af Klint

Hilma Af Klint was a true pioneer of abstract art and succeeded in developing symbolic imagery before any other known artist. Bring femininity, bold colors, and intrigue to your walls with her abstract works.

Impressionist Paintings by Monet

Claude Monet was a founder of French impressionist painting. Impressionism is an art movement considered to be very romantic due to the artists’ focus on using soft brush strokes to express the softness of the light. Prints featuring Monet are the perfect choice if you want to bring a sense of calm to your space.

Woodblock Prints by Hokusai

Katsushika Hokusai, known as Hokusai, is best-known for his woodblock print entitled The Great Wave off Kanagawa, or simply, The Wave. This work is iconic because Hokusai effectively communicates the size of the cresting wave by placing Mount Fuji as a relatively small landmark in the background.

 

Hilma Klint's The Ten Largest Childhood No. 2 via Amanda Eklof for Desenio for use by 360 MagazineCalude Monet's The Four Trees via Amanda Eklof for Desenio for use by 360 Magazine

Hokusai's The Wave via Amanda Eklof for Desenio for use by 360 Magazine

Sergio “Valenz” Valenzuelo

SPECTRUM MIAMI AND RED DOT MIAMI PRESENTS SERGIO “VALENZ” VALENZUELO

Attendees invited to meet the world-renowned abstract artist from Guatemala, as part of a full day of interactive programming, starting at 1:00 p.m.

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Photo Credit: Redwood Media Group

Miami, FL – Saturday, December 9th, 2017: Thousands of art enthusiasts attended the second full day of Spectrum Miami and Red Dot Miami to discover more than 75 modern and contemporary galleries from the Florida region and around the globe, representing over 500 leading contemporary artists from primary and secondary markets, within the walls of the only three shows under one roof.

On Friday evening, local Miami producer and fashion curator, Celia Evans of Planet Fashion TV, put on a stunning presentation at Red Dot Miami entitled ‘Art After Dark’ that showcased art-inspired fashion through the ages. The invitation-only VIP event featured models on top of especially created boxes, transformed with designs from various labels from the seventies, eighties, nineties and today. DJ entertainment and live music were enjoyed by a crowd of hundreds who gathered around the main entertainment area to catch a glimpse of models wearing retro designs and t-shirts with bold fashion statements.

Today’s third complete day of programming invites attendees to meet the acclaimed abstract artist from Guatemala, Sergio “Valenz” Valenzuela – a contemporary artist who tells stories with everyday objects, primarily expressing them with graphite and acrylic on canvas. His medium to large abstract artworks prominently feature elements such as chairs, ladders, and beds. These recognizable structures serve as a way for the artist to signify the opportunities, growth and dreams we all carry as individuals. Valenz’ wall art has been featured in over eighty group shows and thirty solo exhibitions in South America and around the world. Among numerous recognitions and awards he was selected as the winner of the “Young Artist” award in 2005, and granted a scholarship to study at the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux Arts, Valen.

Programming highlights for Saturday, December 9th at Spectrum Miami and Red Dot Miami, include the following.

SPECTRUM MIAMI2:00 p.m. ART TALK / LIVE DEMONSTRATION: ARTIST TRISTINA DIETZ ELMESArt Talk Stage, Booth 918, sponsored by Artblend Growing up in Asia, Tristina Dietz Elmes soaked up the oriental culture, developed an appreciation for the arts, and formed an innate sense of balance and color. Learn how she incorporates the ancient influences into her modern experiments in color, and watch her unique painting technique as she uses her hands, large brushes, and other media techniques with the floor as her easel.

3:00 p.m. MEET THE ARTISTS: i+CONNECTi+CONNECT, Booth 704 Witness a live demonstration of the i+CONNECT Interactive Art Gallery. Experience a deeper connection with artists and the story behind their work with this high-tech fine arts platform. See virtual introductions to artists, their studios, methods, and portfolios, complemented with live online consultations.

6:00 p.m. ART TALK / LIVE DEMONSTRATION: ARTIST ASBEL GOMEZ DUMPIERREArt Talk Stage, Booth 918, sponsored by Artblend  Cuban artist Asbel Gomez Dumpierre has a philosophy: “I believe art is the aesthetic testimony of our existence.” In this Art Talk interview, we’ll explore that philosophy and see how art has influenced his life, his teaching, and his career. We’ll also be his muse while he shows us his talent and paints for us.

RED DOT MIAMI 3:00 p.m. MEET THE ARTIST: VALENZArte Collective, Booth R205, R305 By using elements such as chairs, ladders, beds, monocycles, trapeze artists, swings, and machines, Valenz tells stories about life. The chairs signify, according to the context, opportunities and the patience required for them to step into our lives. The ladders represent our desire to climb, to continue our personal growth. Beds represent periods when we sleep and dream, things we cannot share with anyone else. Playful characters are representative of the uniqueness and singularity of each of the moments that we experience throughout our lifetimes and the game that life is. Come meet Valenz, and share some of the game with him.

6:00 p.m. MEET THE ARTISTS: ARIEL ORTEGA & NASRIN SHEYKHIABRA Gallery, Booth R203 Influenced by his native Colombia, Ariel Ortega is unable to detach from the history of his native land and uses it as a driving force to work harder and bring his inspiration to others. In this way, he feels his art accomplishes its mission. For Nasrin Sheykhi, her works do not fall into just one category. Painting, caricature, illustration—each work beckons the viewer to come closer to catch the references to architecture, music, cinema, literature, calligraphy, physics, psychology. The pieces are alive with movement and hidden meanings. Come meet these innovative artists and see what influence their art makes upon you.

7:00 p.m. MEET THE ARTIST: MARIELLE PLAISIRContemporary Art Projects USA, Booth R215Upon first glance, you see the depth of the narrative in each of Marielle Plaisir’s exquisite tapestries and unique paintings. Meet Plaisir and hear her story, her influences, and inspirations. The essence of her artworks is theatrical—and we are drawn into the story and drama of each one. As a French-Caribbean artist, she blends life and fiction into her use of textiles, fibers, and fabrics and brings social commentary to each piece. Her surrealist approach allows her to move from the reality of life to the capacity of imagination.

Spectrum Miami includes this year’s Art Labs, featuring “Our Path” curated by Sculptor James West; “A Walk In the Clouds” curated by Noor Blazekovic; “Rainbow Ribbon Magic” curated by Sarah Stieber and Theresa Fulton, and “Art Fusion With Life Is Art” curated by James Echols. This year’s Art Talks are sponsored by Artblend and selected by gallery owner and curator Michael Joseph, that include discussions and live demonstrations throughout the week by artists Jason Sauer, Gustavo Fernandez, Rafael Vera, Gaston Locklear, Nino Liguori, Tristina Dietz Elmes, Asbel Gomez Dumpierre, Grant Cleveland, as well as by members from the New York Film Academy faculty and alumni.

This year’s Spotlight Artists Program provides collectors with a focused look at several prominent artists who will each be creating a site-specific exhibition. Spotlight Artists for 2017 are Paul ChangShannon DeFreitasRobert Peterson and Thomas Wargin. The LaunchPad Artist Program showcases an emerging and unrepresented artist who is selected to create an exhibition at the show, resulting from collaboration among local art institutions, galleries, and Spectrum Miami. This year’s LaunchPad Artist is Alicia Rodriguez, an emerging glass sculpture artist.

ArtSpot Miami will be celebrating its fifth anniversary within Spectrum Miami, December 6—10, 2017. ArtSpot Miami is a specially curated show by Aldo Castillo, an international art dealer and curator. A forward-thinking art show exhibition specializing in modern and contemporary art with an emphasis on international and Latin American artists.

At Red Dot Miami, this year’s Spotlight Gallery Program takes a focused look at several cutting-edge galleries chosen by the Redwood Media Group selection committee. Featured Spotlight Galleries for 2017 are JG Fine Art Lemon Frame GallerySteidel Fine ArtContemporary Art Projects USA, and Vehement Art.is year’s Art Lab is curated by Celia Evans, founder of Planet Fashion TV, who continues with the highly popular “Art Loves Fashion” installment, featuring fashion shows, cocktails, and a live performance by a special celebrity recording artist. The exciting evening of entertainment and style will take place during a new annual event being introduced at Red Dot Miami – “Art After Dark” taking place on Friday, December 8th. Sponsored by Louis Jadot WineFortune International Realty and Canvas Condos, this debut cultural affair will be attended by the who’s who of Miami’s art scene, as well as by Miami’s movers and shakers from the luxury lifestyle industry.

General Admission tickets for Spectrum Miami and Red Dot Miami are $25 for one day and $75 for the Opening Night Preview Party with a five-day pass. Tickets grant access to Spectrum Miami, Red Dot Miami and ArtSpot Miami. For further information on the shows or to purchase tickets, please visit spectrum-miami.comreddotmiami.com, or artspotmiami.com.