Posts tagged with "Interview"

Japanese Breakfast Jubilee album art via Peter Ash Lee for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Japanese Breakfast

Tuesday, January 18, indie pop act Japanese Breakfast performed “Slide Tackle,” a track from their GRAMMY-nominated album, Jubilee, on The Late Show with James Corden. Michelle Zauner, applauded founder, did a ‘Bar Chat interview where she talked about these recent nominations and more. Watch Japanese Breakfast’s performance on The Late Show with James Corden HERE.

Jubilee released last June as one of the years leading, critically acclaimed albums. The album stole spots on Best Of lists for 2021 from Rolling Stone, People Magazine, Pitchfork, Entertainment Weekly, Billboard, NPR, Wall Street Journal, The Ringer, SPIN, Esquire, Vulture, The AV Club, Paste, Cosmopolitan, UPROXX, Consequence of Sound, Slant and Hypebeast. The album gained so much attention that it was even voted the #1 album of the year on NPR’s Listener’s Poll and #1 on UPROXX’s Critics Poll.

If that wasn’t enough success for one year, Zauner, too, published her New York Times Best Seller, Crying in H Mart, which is now being reworked for MGM’s Orion Pictures. The book is a moving memoir that captures Zauner’s experiences growing up Korean American, the struggles she went through with the death of her mother and how she navigated discovering her own identity.

About Michelle Zauner

The Korean American musician and author Michelle Zauner is renowned for her sonic demeanor. Born in Seoul, South Korea, Zauner grew up in Eugene, Oregon for most of her adolescence. Zauner took to music instantly, beginning to learn to play the piano at 5, later moving to the guitar at age 15. Her mother’s passing in 2014 lead to her starting Japanese Breakfast. She tells Teen Vogue, “I moved back to Oregon to care for her, and I kind of put the band on indefinite hiatus. Unfortunately, she passed away, and while I was in Oregon, helping take care of the house and being a support system for my dad, the only way that I could have something for myself was if I made my own record. So I kind of carved out some time to do that.” Japanese Breakfast’s debut came in 2016 with the hit album Psychopomp. Through the album, Zauner revealed the intense period that followed her mother’s death. Zauner’s unique perspective amongst mainstream pop music sets her apart from other artists, and she’s one you’ll want to take a listen to.

Jonny Marlow for use by 360 MAGAZINE

SPOTLIGHT: CARSON MACCORMAC

While chasing his dreams of becoming an actor, Canadian actor Carson MacCormac has established himself in the industry, and has plans to only expand his career as we head into 2022.

Carson can be found starring in East of the Middle West in the role of “Chris.” The film follows “Chris” as he navigates his life following his involvement in a fatal accident that leaves a mother and child dead. Through his interpretation of “Chris” in the film, Carson has been honored with the Best Actor award at the Montreal Independent Film Festival. Moreover, East of the Middle West was the closing film at the Chelsea Film Festival and won Best American Indie at the Fort Lauderdale Film Festival.

Carson additionally joined the cast of the withstanding Netflix series Locke and Key for both Season 2 and 3. The series follows the three Locke siblings as they work through their father’s peculiar murder. The siblings seek refuge in their mother’s ancestral home, also known as Keyhouse. Carson takes on the role of “Benjamin Locke,” a vague ancestor of the siblings, whose storyline is set in the 1700s. Season 2 of Locke and Key premiered in October 2021, and Season 3 premieres TBD in 2022.

Notorious for his role in DC Comics superhero movie SHAZAM!, Carson plays “Brett Breyer.” Carson can soon be found in the upcoming Netflix and Lionsgate thriller, Luckiest Girl Alive. 360 MAGAZINE had the opportunity to chat with Carson about his acting career, and what we can expect to see for the future of his career.

When did you know that you wanted to pursue a career in acting?

Before I realized how much work it would take to become one. When I was a kid, I would sit and watch movies and think “I could totally do that.” Little did I know just how much training goes into becoming an actor with even a basic level of competency. However, I knew I would pursue it for a living near the end of high school. Interestingly enough, it was once I started having to seriously work at the craft that I fell I became obsessed. A career is a kind way of putting what I lovingly refer to as an addiction. Once I fell in love with the work my course was kind of set for me.

What is the process that you go through to prep for a new role?

A lot of writing initially. I have a 5-page cheat sheet I made to ensure I always flesh out my characters, but that is only usually the initial prep. The fun work comes in the imagining of who my character is and why. Writing I find helps me organize my thoughts. It also ensures that any fleeting ideas I have to add depth to a role are jotted down for me to refer to later. Physicality is an important one for me, getting a character into my body as at the end of the day, that physical work is the majority of what the camera picks up. When I get my head around a character, get my body into the role and get my lines down, I just let it all go and have fun with it.

What is the greatest lesson you’ve learned from the acting world?

One of my personal favorites is the reminder to stay curious and imaginative through all assets of life. Curiosity of self, of others and of things is, in my opinion, one of the purest forms of purpose humans can have. Acting has forced me to question everything, oftentimes myself included, and plunge into characters with circumstances and motives far removed from my own. That curiosity I find is a stream to the more pleasant qualities of people such as empathy, perspective, and self-reflection.

What is a bucket list goal that you want to accomplish in your career?

I would love to star in something that I wrote. It would have to come down the line, as I still have a lot to learn as a writer, but to take a page out of Good Will Hunting, I think the chance to build-a-bear a role that I could then portray would be incredibly enjoyable. That, to me, is also one of the most terrifying tasks I can think of for myself, which is why I think it excites me so much.

What is your #1 piece of advice for aspiring actors/ actresses?

Number one is to always ask why. Ask it about everything, as curiosity and a questioning mind is what I found helped me grow the most as an actor. Another important one that I found helped me a lot is to not take yourself too seriously. Actors are asked to play make believe for a living, oftentimes in highly emotional situations. The industry and the world is going to be hard enough on you, and so I find it important to be forgiving and understanding with yourself if the industry starts to wear you down. Your instrument will grow much faster in a healthy mindset than in one that is self-deprecating or judgmental.

What was the biggest takeaway from being a part of “East of Middle West?”

Externally, a lot of friends. I wish I could have taken that whole cast and crew home with me back to Canada but alas, airlines have a baggage limit. Personally, East of Middle West helped me learn to trust myself. Our shooting schedule was incredibly fast paced, with emotional scenes and high stakes. With such little prep time, a large part of my process became just letting go and flowing within scenes and seeing what would happen. It was at first, terrifying, but as filming went along, I found it to be an incredibly freeing experience. It forced me to trust myself as our timing constraints allowed for no other choice.

How was your experience joining a withstanding show/ team on “Locke and Key?”

It helped that I could watch season 1 and get a sense for how I fit into the cast but more than anything, I noticed the benefits in how efficiently everything was running. Even with the added pressure that COVID put on the production, the whole set was one giant, well-oiled machine. Outside of the whole ‘acting; part of my job, I find that being on set can often feel like being a toddler sitting at the parents’ dinner table: don’t interject in the adult conversations you barely understand and make sure you stay in your spot and listen carefully to your parents’ direction. Locke and Key made me feel as if that internal child was being spoiled rotten at every step of the way. It was truly a joy to be part of such a talented team.

What role, would you say, pushed you out of your comfort zone the most thus far?

Maybe because it’s still fresh in my memory, but my upcoming role in Luckiest Girl Alive. It is such a far cry from anything I have played before, with stakes higher and more brutal than a lot of my previous work. Not to mention the director, Mike Barker, was incredibly gracious in allowing me to experiment with improvisation in my scenes. Scary at first, but with time thinking about ‘what can I throw into this scene?’ became something I looked forward to every day.

What can we expect from Carson MacCormac in the future?

Luckiest Girl Alive, as I mentioned, is coming out sometime in 2022 and I couldn’t be more excited for audiences to see it. I think this film is necessary, timely, and pushes the industry as a whole in an important direction. It also just happens to be one entertaining ride. I worked on a show premiering in January called Astrid and Lily Save the World and boy oh boy, is it crazy. The show is outrageous, wild, and I’m thrilled to be part of it. I have a few projects coming out in 2022 that I can’t quite talk about just yet… and another feature film being released in 2023 that I am very excited to share…. Stay tuned!

Jonny Marlow for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Nightclub Gif by Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

MERGING VERSES NFT

The future of fashion is the merging of two verses, the virtual world (metaverse) and the physical world. We explore this through the unity of traditional photography and animation—where humans and AI co-exist.

The NFT world is something that is growing and still confusing for many people not directly involved in the producing and purchasing of these new age art pieces. 360 MAGAZINE was able to interview several people directly involved in the production side of NFTs, including producer and model Bee Davies and photographer Jacques Burga.

Interview with Bee Davies

  • What made you become interested in NFTs?

I became interested in NFTs when I started doing virtual production and realized that there was no marketplace for digital art. More than that, there was no fan base. We know famous photographers and people who collect their photographsbut there’s not the same kind of hype surrounding animators. An NFT marketplace not only legitimizes their work, but provides a platform that opens up the door for a whole new kind of collector.

  • How do you respond to people suggesting NFTs are overly expensive and pointless?

Couldn’t you say that about all collectibles? Digital art, like any art, is meant to be enjoyed; the NFT marketplaces and wallets allow you to do that much more easily.

  • What is your favorite NFT?

The one I produced with Jacques for 360, because it exemplifies the merging of the real world and the metaverse.

  • Was it odd to see yourself become an NFT?

Not at all. Since the dawn of social media we have all had virtual versions of ourselves, this is just an overt way of expressing it.

  • What are your biggest artistic inspirations?

I would like to create and produce a completely virtual fashion show for the industry’s top fashion houses (this means AI talent, virtual runways, and digital clothing/accessories…as well as an audience attending in VR). And of course, mint every bit of the digital experience so it can be enjoyed in the metaverse for eternity.

  • What are some upcoming projects you’re looking forward to?

I have a bunch of NFTs that will be dropping soon that I’ve collaborated on with different animatorssome of which feature the actors from the SciFi TV Pilot I created.

Interview w/ Jacques Burga

  • What made you become interested in NFTs?

It’s a whole new way of making business. I enjoy pushing boundaries when it comes to projects related to my field. It also makes me feel there’s always a next step to follow and to explore disciplines that I wasn’t precisely an expert in.

  • How do you respond to people suggesting NFTs are overly expensive and pointless?

To keep the mind open to new ways of mixing technology and creativity may be good advice.

  • What are your inspirations as a photographer?

I am inspired by People and Beauty

  • Why did you decide to blend photographic elements with virtual ones?

Our world has become very virtual. Photography gets elevated when it’s blend with other disciplines such as Art or Technology (virtuality.)

  • What is your relationship with digital artwork?

I’m working on digital projects related to Fashion and NFT. My relationship is continuously growing.

  • When did you become interested in photography?

When I left an internship at a high profile magazine in Paris and decided to become independent and nurture my desire to create fashion.

  • What, in your opinion, is your best piece of artwork/photography?

I cherish every project since it is composed of pieces that create a nice puzzle for me.

  • What projects can we expect to see from you in the future?

I will always want to explore and collaborate with new technologies and artists that share my vision of fashion and people.

NFTs available on OpenSea.

MEET THE TEAM

Media Partner: 360 MAGAZINE

Studio: Daylight Studio

Producer: Bee Davies / Hive Global Media

Photographer: Jacques Burga

Make-up Artist: Sarah Tweedy

Hair Stylist: Christine McManemi

Wardrobe Stylist: Yash Joshi

NFT Marketplace: Opensea

Digital Designer: Edward Harber

Model: Bee Davies 

Animator: Vizzee

Virtual Model Creator: Vizzee

Metaverse Creators: Vizzee / Mercedes Luna Larrahona / Zoë Jane Bernet

PA: Stefanie Murza / Aleko Syntelis

nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
Clubhouse via Dillon Mathew for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Clubhouse

By: Skyler Johnson

Indie pop outfit Clubhouse (Forrest Taylor, Ari Blumer, Zak Blumer, Forrest Taylor, Michael Berthold) recently released Are We Going Too Slow, featuring the song: “Home Videos.” 360 Magazine interviewed the band about their music, fame, and their midwestern upbringings.  

You all have been friends for a very long time? How did you meet? What are some of the most important memories you have together outside of the band?

[Max] I met Zak and Ari when we were in middle school, and we started playing together doing covers mostly. We started writing originals and taking things more seriously when we went to college, where we met Mike and Forrest. Some of our favorite memories together are from this big party we have every year for the holidays. All of our families get together to have the most ridiculous white elephant gift exchange.

What, as a band, are you most proud of having accomplished?

[Forrest] We’re really proud of this new EP. It’s the first true body of work we’ve done and we’re so excited to share it with everyone!

What would you say are the core things that inspire and drive the band?

[Zak] I think the biggest thing is that we’re constantly bouncing ideas off each other in the studio. We all co-write and produce, so being able to explore with everyone’s different styles is what drives the creative inspiration.

What was the inspiration behind the name Clubhouse?

[Ari] When we were younger, there was this separate little office/studio space in my backyard. In high school we hung out there all the time, so when we were thinking of a name, ‘Clubhouse’ just kind of felt right.

What are your favorite memories of being from the Midwest? What do you think the Midwest should be proud of/known for?

 [Mike] I’m from Cleveland so some of my favorite Midwest memories are getting together with friends and family in the fall to watch the Browns! My favorite part about the Midwest is that time of year, with the leaves changing color and the temperature getting a little cooler.

What is the best fan interaction you’ve had?

[Max] We had a fan reach out to us a while ago asking me to write out a lyric from The Weeknd in my handwriting and send it to her so she could get it tattooed on her!

What would you like to accomplish as a band? Are there any awards you’d like to win or a venue you’d love to play at?

[Mike] A venue I’ve always wanted to play at is Red Rocks. That would be so incredible!

How has the band adjusted or repositioned while dealing with Max Reichert’s cancer diagnosis? How has it made you closer or strong?

[Zak] Going through something like that together was the hardest thing imaginable. But through all of that I think we really found ourselves. We stopped caring so much about how we were going to define our music and just started creating for fun again. We bonded for life going through that.

What are you the most proud of when you look back at the creation of Are We Going Too Slow?

 [Forrest] We were really able to bring in all of the different sounds and styles we love on this project. We didn’t force ourselves into any box, just made the music we love.

Mike Mattison via Kailey Wolcott for use by 360 Magazine

POETIC SONG VERSE: Blues Based Popular Music and Poetry

While accepting the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2016, Bob Dylan quoted The Odyssey: “Sing in me, muse, and through me tell the story.” In their new book, POETIC SONG VERSE: Blues Based Popular Music and Poetry (University Press of Mississippi, November 9, 2021), renowned musician Mike Mattison and literary historian and beloved Catholic University professor Ernest Suarez offer an enlightening look at the artform that artists like Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Joni Mitchell, Gil Scott-Heron, Lucinda Williams and others used to tell their stories. Mattison and Suarez lay out the contours of what they see as a unique literary genre they dub ‘poetic song verse.’ This form was inspired by blues music and poetry, nurtured in the beat coffee houses of the 50’s and 60’s, and fully bloomed as it cross-pollinated with rock and roll. It goes far beyond the borders of popular entertainment, using voice, instrumentation, arrangement, and production to highlight evocative lyrics that resemble poetry. 

Synthesizing a wide range of writing and thinking, as well as their own experiences, (Mattison is a vocalist and songwriter for the Grammy-Award-winning Tedeschi Trucks Band; he wrote hits like “Midnight in Harlem,” “Bound for Glory”), the authors train a powerful lens on some of the most well-known songs of the 20th and 21st centuries. By demonstrating how the blues and poetry came together to birth a whole new genre of artistic expression, they shift the thinking on how we categorize lyrics—as literature, as music, or as a combined, innovative, new art form.

Q&A W/ Mike Mattison × Ernest Suarez 

What is poetic song verse, and how has studying and writing about it changed your appreciation of the artists who practice it?

We use the term “poetic” to describe lyrics that have literary intent and that consciously strive for aesthetic impact: linguistically rich compositions that operate on many levels simultaneously, incorporating image, metaphor, narrative, and play in ways that often deliberately correlate to broader cultural conversations. We’re talking about lyrics that seek to transcend the grasp-and-release mechanism of pure entertainment, lyrics that prick our curiosity and invite repeated visits and renewed scrutiny. Poetic song verse isn’t poetry set to music, like the Beats’ poetry with jazz accompaniment, but it sometimes takes a hybrid form in recordings like Gil Scott-Heron’s or Leonard Cohen’s. The distinction we draw rests on the symbiotic relationship that most often occurs when potent lyrics and sonics are developed together. By “sonics” we mean every aural dimension of song, including voice, instrumentation, arrangement, and production. In poetic song verse, sonics combine with verbal techniques often associated with poetry—imagery, line breaks, wordplay, point of view, character, story, tone, and other qualities—to create a semantically and emotionally textured dynamic.

The book argues that artists like Dylan, Joni Mitchell, and Jimi Hendrix were transformative in the development of poetic song verse, but there were allusions and poetic phrasing in lyrics long before them. What did they do that wasn’t being done previously?

Songs from many periods and in different styles contain compelling verse, but in the late fifties and the sixties blues-based popular music and the new American poetry—especially the work of the Beats—came into close contact, resulting in a concentration of songwriters who transformed songwriting from entertainment to art-that-entertains. 

Poetic song verse sprung from a confluence of the blues and contemporary poetry.  Both forms emphasize the sound of the human voice.  Poetry’s turn toward more accessible language and the blues’ origins in the sound of the human voice helped rock absorb poetic language and techniques, and provided a catalyst for Dylan and others to change rock into a more lyrically and sonically sophisticated art form. Think about it this way: If you were a reasonably intellectual young musician who had been turned on to the blues, traditional metrical verse, or high modernist poetry such as T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, this might provide an idea of how to use allusions in a song, or provide strategies for intermingling certain types of imagery (as in some of Dylan’s, Van Morrison’s, and Joni Mitchell’s verse). But the language in most traditional and modern poetry tends to be very different from the type of language that characterizes blues-based popular music. However, when that same blues-enthralled young musician heard Howlin’ Wolf or Willie Dixon and read and heard Beat and other contemporary poets, he or she was exposed to rich, sophisticated language based on rhythms of speech (i.e., material that could serve as a powerful source for lyrics). With different twists and turns this essentially was the case for Dylan, Mick Jagger, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Jim Morrison, and many others.  By examining the confluence of blues and poetry in various artists’ work, and by considering the creative practices of various seminal artists and the cultural conditions and landscapes in which they worked, we identify a relatively specific subgenre of song that’s also a form of literature.

What role did the coffee houses of the 50’s play in creating this genre? What does instrumentation add to the artform?

In the late fifties and the sixties Beat coffee houses, bookstores, and nightclubs sprang up across the United States and spread to Western Europe. Bob Dylan, Mick Jagger, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Jimi Hendrix, Van Morrison, Jim Morrison, Joni Mitchell, David Crosby, Neil Young, Stephen Stills, and others embraced the blues and Beat coffeehouse culture, where they encountered contemporary poetry, rural blues, and folk music.  After putting rock ’n’ roll of their youth aside for a handful of years, many sixties songwriters returned to the rebellious rhythms of fifties rock ’n’ roll and wedded it with verse inspired by contemporary poetry. In the mid-sixties Dylan’s rock ’n’ roll–Beat poet persona strengthened his already active sense of the possibilities between poetry and music and led to Bringing It All Back Home (1965), Highway 61 Revisited (1965), and Blonde on Blonde (1966), albums that ignited an explosion of poetic song verse. Instead of portraying themselves as the descendants of Woody Guthrie, Bukka White, and Pete Seeger, artists returned to the theatrics of Chuck Berry, Little Richard, and Jerry Lee Lewis but retained the cerebral, self-consciously artistic emphasis that characterized songs and poetry in Beat coffeehouses. This combination released Dylan and others from songwriting conventions that ranged from the length of individual songs to how albums were conceptualized, recorded, and produced. In essence, the Rolling Stones, the Beatles, the Doors, the Who, Jimi Hendrix, the Kinks, and others followed Dylan’s lead and expanded fifties rock ’n’ rollers’ sounds and emphasis on performance, assuming often extravagant yet artistically resonant personae that resulted in songs and albums replete with ambitious wordplay and sonic arrangements.

Is poetic song verse a uniquely American invention? How did America’s history of slavery, Jim Crow, war, and sexism affect its creation?

Poetic song verse sprung from a confluence of the blues—a quintessential American art form—and various types of contemporary poetry that developed in the United States.  That said, artists around the world quickly started to write songs in this mode, largely due to blues artists’ popularity in England and other countries, and to Dylan’s influence on the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and others.

The history of slavery had a profound influence on the blues, which grew out of nineteenth-century spirituals and work songs, much like those styles grew out of various African musical traditions.  Nineteenth century work songs and blues songs written during the era of Jim Crow often contained “coded” lyrics that indirectly commented on topics that would have raised the ire of their oppressors.  This practice melded with techniques employed by contemporary poets in the work of songwriters from Dylan to Joni Mitchell to Marvin Gaye to Bruce Springsteen to Grandmaster Flash to Lucinda Williams.

The War in Vietnam also had a strong influence on many songwriters.  They often combined surrealistic imagery that they encountered in contemporary poetry with imagery from various African and Western metaphysical traditions.  This combination led to songs like the Stones’s “Gimme Shelter.”

What artists do you see as the contemporary and future upholders of this new tradition? 

Lucinda Williams, Steve Earle, Kendrick Lamar, Norah Jones, Dave Grohl, Fiona Apple, Lorde, Aimee Mann, Fantastic Negrito, Josh Ritter, Lyle Lovett, Luther Dickinson, Jason Isbell.

Headphones illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Dr. Kraus

By: Skyler Johnson

Learning how to play an instrument can help with the development of the human brain, according to scientist, inventor and Northwestern University professor Dr. Nina Kraus. She outlines this research in her new book, Of Sound Mind: How Our Brain Constructs a Meaningful World. I had the opportunity to interview Dr. Kraus about the book and her findings. 

  1. Can you go over, briefly, what your newest book covers?

My book is a retrospective of what my lifetime researching sound and the brain has taught me. It covers a wide variety of topics ranging from the brain of a musician, to the link between sound and reading, to the perils of noise, to the wonder that is birdsong, to the aging brain. And much more.

  1. How did you get into that sort of research?

As a child, I was fortunate, from a sound perspective, in two ways. First, I was exposed to music at a young age. My mother was a pianist and my favorite place to play was under her piano, listening to her beautiful music. Second, I grew up in a household where more than one language was spoken, regularly traveling between the US and Italy, learning to navigate two different linguistic worlds. These early experiences with music and language left a deep imprint. They stuck with me as I made my way through college, looking for a way I could channel my interest in sound into a career. After a few starts, I got hooked up with a lab studying how sound acquired relevance in the brain. In other words, how the brain itself is changed by sounds it hears! And the rest is history.

  1. How often should people be playing music? 

The benefits of playing music are many, and certainly the more you play the more it enriches your sound mind. However, my research has told me you do not have to be a professional to tune your brain. I would say you need to play (practice) regularly, though. At least a few times a week.

  1. What types of instruments should people be playing to gain the effects? 

As far as I can tell, based on my research and others’, it does not matter. Any instrument, including voice, is a boon to your brain.

  1. When did you first start playing an instrument yourself?

Age 5. Piano. I also play some guitar and drums.

  1. Did your personal experience with playing music influence your desire to start your research?

In a way, I think it did. I did not start my career studying music. That line of work got rolling some 15 years ago. At that time, my research was examining the role of sound processing on literacy in school-age children. That got me connected with teachers and other educators and I was starting to hear the same thing over and over: “The kids that do best in school tend to be the ones who play an instrument.” And that just seemed right to me on a scientific-gut level. I can feel, on a personal level, that my music playing has been good for my brain. Soon, I made some contacts with educators who ran music programs and wanted to know whether and how playing music affected the brains of their young musicians. And, so this whole new rewarding line of research was born. Who knows? If I wasn’t a musician myself, my research would have taken some other course.

Melissa Snover via Caitlin Richards for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Melissa Snover

Everyone loves good vitamin gummies, but what if there was a way to customize them? That’s the idea behind Nourished, led by Melissa Snover, an entrepreneur and top UK female entrepreneur according to Business Leader. I had the opportunity to interview Snover about her career and Nourished. 

  1. How did you get into 3D modelling and nutrition? 

I founded my first company when I was 23 and have been developing innovative products to bring to the consumer market ever since. When running a gummy candy business called Goody Good Stuff, I became frustrated by the limitations of mainstream manufacturing and in 2015 started looking into 3D printing technology to create bespoke products on demand. This led me to launch Magic Candy Factory which 3D printed customized confectionery in retail outlets, amusement parks and private events – depending on the customer’s requirements. It was this technology that gave me the inspiration and foundation to create Nourished and personalize the way we take vitamins and make our nutrition regimes more enjoyable, convenient, and effective.

  1. What are the benefits of personalized gummies? 

Many of the vitamins made using traditional manufacturing methods can be largely ineffective by the time they reach the consumer. They often come from lengthy supply chains, are sat in a warehouse or on a store shelf for months and most importantly – are not produced with the individual’s needs in mind. At Nourished we combine 7 different superfoods, nutrients, and vitamins into one delicious and sugar free gummy, which are totally bespoke to the end user. We 3D print each stack on demand to ensure optimum efficacy and can change the customer’s customized blend each month as their goals and lifestyle also change.

  1. How did you develop the idea behind Nourished? 

I have been an avid consumer of supplements since my 20s and used to carry around with me a large transparent bag of various supplements and vitamins, and accidentally dropped it on the airport floor in security. Crawling round in my suit and heels picking them, I thought there must be a better way to do this and then I thought, well I have a 3D printing food business, maybe I can do it?

From there I sought to find a way to simplify the way we take vitamins and make the combinations 100% customized to the consumer.

  1. How did you feel about being included in Business Leader’s list of Top UK Female Entrepreneurs to Look Out for?

It was a huge honor to be recognized amongst such inspiring and impressive peers, and I am extremely grateful to Business Leader for celebrating female entrepreneurship. I am a passionate and proactive supporter of women in business, so this is very close to my heart, and I was delighted to involved.

  1. Why use the personalized packaging?

Personalization is at the heart of everything we do at Nourished, and we didn’t want to stop at our packaging! Each of our individual wrappers are printed with the name of the customer, as well as being 100% plastic free and home compostable in just 32 weeks!

  1. How important are visuals when it comes to Nourished products?

Our Nourished stacks not only taste amazing, but they also look beautiful as the 7 layers of active ingredients each come in a different, vibrant color. Our mission at Nourished is to change the way people think about nutrition, and this means upgrading from popping pills and choking back on tablets each day. Our 3D printed vitamin gummies are the perfect visualization of what the future of nutrition can look like.

  1. Why should people choose Nourished?

At Nourished we believe that of all the things we personalize – our health should take priority. We use only the highest quality ingredients and pioneering manufacturing methods to ensure our customers receive truly bespoke nutrition, with the highest impact possible. All our ingredients are vegan, GMO free, sugar free and free from all major allergens and our packaging is 100% plastic free; meaning Nourished is as good for the Earth as it is for our customers!

  1. Do you have plans to release new products in the future?

We are constantly launching new active ingredients into our product range and optimizing our technology to ensure we stay at the forefront of personalized nutrition. We are also currently developing a personalized protein range and are planning on breaking into the pet market next year!

Optimistic Vivacity via Tim Tadder for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Tim Tadder

If you have ever seen photos of an Olympic athlete, you have no doubt seen Tim Tadder‘s work. As a photographer, he has captured the likes of Michael Phelps and Simone Biles. Recently, Tadder hosted an exhibition at Avant Gallery in New York City. 360 was given the opportunity to ask him about his artistic inspirations and his style.

How did you get into art? Was there a moment you realized you wanted to do art professionally?

I’ve always been involved in some capacity with art as a major thematic in my life. It was always what I most enjoyed in school, as a hobby, & just overall being creative. I left a career as a teacher and pursued photography as a craft and a creative expression form when I was 27, after realizing I needed to enjoy my occupation and creating was a massive part of that. 

When did you realize art was the career choice for you? Was there a moment when you realized you were gaining recognition and success in the art world?

People see me as a highly creative photographer and artist. The way that I see the world has a particular point of view that is sought after. I think embracing that as who you are and what you do and how you perceive and see has value and therefore is a viable career once you can monetize that vision. Everything else falls into place from there. 

People will collect and want to own a piece of your vision and hang it on a wall, which ultimately empowers you as an artist to continue to create and explore your vision knowing that you have the financial support in order to do so. 

When ‘Nothing to See’ first was shared as large format prints, the response was overwhelming. It was at that point that I knew there was serious traction in a new marketplace, one that I had always dreamed of being a part of and was fortunate that this particular series of images was embraced by collectors and galleries. 

How does knowing a multitude of art mediums help you with your artwork?

I come from a background of 20 years of creating advertising campaigns for the world’s biggest brands and our job is to create on demand art that sells a product. And in doing so, you learn to use all the tools at your disposal to make the most powerful image for that purpose. I have been able to use all of that skill and knowledge and channel it into my personal fine art work to create images that convey messages that are important to me and that should be heard around the world. 

What do you look at to get inspiration to create?

Pre-COVID I attended a lot of art fairs and contemporary museums to look at trends, masters, & to find inspiration on how people explore visual presentation. I found that going to those events and seeing the art in person really helped me refine my message and refine my voice. In a COVID world, I try to follow artists on IG and Twitter who I’m inspired by and keep abreast of their new work and from there I try to find my own lane to blend out, be distinct, and be noticeable. Right now there’s so many rabbit holes that one can go down to find inspiration, whether it’s instagram or twitter or the NFT space.

You use bright and vibrant color schemes in your artwork, when and how did that start? What’s your process when deciding about the colors you will use?  

I’ve always been attracted to bold use of color. It’s been a monochord in my commercial work since my career began. For me that’s an instinctual choice. To use bold colors to help story tell. In choosing, a lot of it comes from instinct and a lot comes from what those colors represent. For ‘Nothing to See,’ I chose the bed, black, & white hues because they were historically represented of fascist banners and that collection was born out of a desire to create iconic, anti-fascist imagery. 

You photograph both still-lives (mostly mannequins) and people. Is there one you prefer to photograph? What led to you choosing a humanoid inanimate object as your main subject in many photos/series? 

I choose to use real people and not mannequins. I select models that have very androgynous, mannequin-esque features because I want my images to represent humankind and not just a type of individual, which sometimes comes from casting talent with defining characteristics. It’s not a picture of someone, it’s a picture of something

You edit with high contrast, high-saturation as your signature style. What drew you to this editing style?

Instinctive choices. It’s how I see, it’s how I visualize, it’s what I as an artist feel is beautiful. It wasn’t a choice to follow a trend, it was my own visual aesthetic.

Casey McQuillen via PLA Media for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Casey McQuillen

By: Skyler Johnson

Since American Idol’s first inception in 2002, no one could have guessed how popular the show would be and how many new musicians would gain popularity through the years, including Kelly Clarkson, Adam Lambert, and Jennifer Hudson. Casey McQuillen performed on the show in season 13 and became a top 48 musician. Since then she’s done an anti-bullying concert series, and was interviewed by Kelly Clarkson, as well as released a lot of great music. I had the pleasure of interviewing McQuillen on her life and career up to this point.  

  1. How did you first get into music? 

I started writing music from a really young age!  It was when I learned to play some guitar around the age of 12, though, that I started performing and posting my music on the internet.  Since then, I’ve been lucky to have an amazing relationship with my audience, and many of my fans have been following my music for close to 15 years.

2. What, do you feel, is your biggest success as a singer/songwriter?

As a singer/songwriter, I think my biggest success has been writing about really difficult topics and conveying them on stage in a way that makes audiences feel connected and understood.  I wrote my song “Beautiful” at 17 about the pressures of conforming to beauty standards, and the response I’ve received from audiences all across the country inspired me to continue to be painfully honest in my writing.  The title track on my upcoming album “Can A Heart Go Bad?” addresses very personal and painful mental health issues, and though I’m a bit scared to share it the world, I’m confident my vulnerability will allow for a deeper connection with the listening audience.

3. Who are your biggest influences and why?

I would say Taylor Swift is my biggest songwriting influence because I’ve been listening to her music at every step of my career.  Other artists I feel very inspired by include Colbie Caillat, Kate Voegele (whom I had the honor of opening for), and Adele. All of these women write beautiful, complex stories into their songs, and I try to emulate that.

4. How important was it for you to campaign for anti-bullying?

I was picked on a ‘normal’ amount as a kid, but it was through self-reflection in songwriting years later that I realized how deeply I’d internalized a lot of the insecurities I’d developed in middle & high school, and how long those issues had continue to stick around in the back of my psyche.  Somewhere in my heart, I assumed the kids saying and doing mean things to me must be right, or why else would they treat me so badly?  In my anti-bullying concert series, I tell my story and sing the songs I wrote about growing up in that environment.  With perspective, we’re able to discuss that bullies bully because they’re insecure, not because there’s anything wrong with you.  And through these examples, I hope to help curb the cycle of internalized insecurity for the next generation.

5. What made you want to campaign for anti-bullying? 

It would have meant a lot to me as a young student to have a role model at school. I think I would have felt a lot less alone knowing that someone I looked up to had had similar experiences to me and made it out on the other side.  I want to be that person for these kids.

6. How was your experience performing on American Idol?

American Idol was great practice in performing under pressure.  I’ve found that my career cycles in these long preparation periods with my team, all culminating in big, high-pressure performances or interviews.  Being exposed to such high-stakes performances at such a young age on American Idol gave me a lot of confidence in my ability to be myself and have fun during those moments.

7. Was it odd seeing yourself on camera? 

I’ve been on camera most of my life, so I’m pretty used to it.  I started posting on YouTube and developing a following at a pretty young age, so it wasn’t that odd.  However, Idol was definitely the first time I’d ever been exposed to stage lighting and cameras, which are so bright and intimidating.  Before my Idol audition, they had me wait in this little box with a red light, and when it turned green, I opened the door and walked out onto the audition stage.  So, I truly hadn’t seen the lights until the moment the cameras were on me.  It definitely threw me for a loop!

8. How was being on The Kelly Clarkson Show, what was that experience like?

Honestly, it was one of the most surreal moments of my life.  It was very nerve-wracking, but Kelly Clarkson is the sweetest person and had even left me a hand written note in my dressing room welcoming me to the show and thanking me for my work in the community.  Small details like that really helped me feel at ease before the show, and she’s so friendly and funny that I felt like the interview was a breeze.  It was probably my favorite experience so far in my career.

9. Are you excited to go on tour?

I am PUMPED!  I was having so much fun touring with artists like Eric Hutchinson and Tyler Hilton before the pandemic, and it was so disappointing to have to cancel so many shows and stay off stage for so long.  But we are BACK baby, and I feel so honored to be hitting the road with the talented Clark Beckham this fall.  Come see us!

10. Are there any upcoming projects you’re allowed to tell us about?

My album “Can a Heart Go Bad?” will be coming out soon, so make sure to follow me on Apple Music and Spotify to stay up to date with all my releases.  I’m really proud of the album and I hope everyone will have a chance to hear it!

Image via Britney Falletta and Intelligent Threads for 360 Magazine

Q×A with Intelligent Threads

By: Matthew Anthenelli

Intelligent Threads is a new brand based from Kerrville, Texas that makes athletic oriented clothing with groundbreaking technology. Their athletic gear is designed to maximize recovery and help with body alignment while still being very modern and fashionable. We got the chance to talk with Intelligent Threads about their mission and what sets them apart in the athleisure fashion world. 

Intelligent Threads is an innovative company that provides clothing that stabilizes bone structure and improves body alignment while also being comfortable. Where did the idea for this product come from?

Synergy release method is a method that I developed to help stabilize the anatomical structure. But peoples muscles when under stress or repetitive motion or pressure will pull the bone structure out of place. I thought to myself if we can get the muscles to stay relaxed that’s going to help keep The anatomical structure in the right position. Which would prevent a multitude of structural problems in the body. So I guess the idea came out of necessity to help people stabilize their body to be able to feel better and perform to their full potential. 

Intelligent threads allow people like professional athletes to train and perform more comfortably. How does the apparel achieve this?

By a technology called Myo Equilibration.  We infuse at a quantum mechanics level Myo E into the fiber of our clothing. When Myo E is in close proximity to the body it will interact with the muscles that hold the structure out of place or pulls the structure out of place, causing the muscle to release. The reason we want this to happen is so now the body can self adjust and correct back into its anatomical neutral position. Helping all kinds of structural problems with the body.

In addition to athletes, Intelligent Threads offers support and comfort to those experiencing the difficulties of pregnancies. What specific issues can Intelligent Threads help prevent? 

The structure starts to shift and change farther into the pregnancies which can cause lots of structural issues. By Keeping the muscles relaxed IT helps the structural  changes before and after pregnancy To help prevent pain and everything else that goes along with it. 

What kind of research went into the design and manufacturing of the clothes made for both athletes and pregnant women?

I spent 15 years studying the body and how it works to come up with Intelligent Threads. The nice part is an athlete’s body and a pregnant lady’s body works the same so the technology crosses over to both. 

What differentiates Intelligent Threads from other athletic apparel brands?

Myo E is the difference. Athletic clothing doesn’t help the structure like Intelligent Threads does. Really the question is why would you want to wear clothes that didn’t have Myo E in it.

Where can we purchase Intelligent Threads and find out about upcoming releases?

Our website also the other social sites.

Make sure to check out Intelligent Threads via Facebook, YouTube and Instagram.