Posts tagged with "Interview"

SK8 press photo via Jimmy Fontaine for use by 360 Magazine

SK8 – Taylor Gang

Omaha, Nebraska-born, LA-based artist SK8 has risen to acclaim with an insatiable desire for his craft. Beginning music in his early teens, the now 27-year-old recording artist has opened for the likes of Lil Wayne, Rae Sremmurd while also working with Wiz Khalifa.

SK8’s devotion to his music has been evident through the course of his career, earning him widespread success – which he doesn’t plan on ceasing anytime soon. 360 Magazine’s Vaughn Lowery had the opportunity to speak with SK8 regarding his rise to critical notoriety, where his creativity stems from and his star-studded new album Last Day on Earth.

Listen to SK8 on 360 MAG PODCAST HERE.

To truly understand the talent that is SK8, it’s important to appreciate his start in the music game. Nathan Maloley, also known as SK8, has had a passion for music his entire life. He began making his own music and downloading his tracks onto CD’s when he was in his early teen years.  

Even taking choir for a few years in school, SK8 remembers his early beginnings writing music. While growing up, he found “that [music] was almost my escape. I would always go home […] and look up YouTube beats and [begin] writing.”

Back in 2013 and 2014, artists were constantly being found online via social media. SK8 recalls searching for new artists to listen to, “I really wanted to find a new artist, like, who was the up-and-coming artist?” Little did he know, his time was swiftly coming.

Stuck in the middle between a potential basketball or music career, SK8 juggled his two loves throughout high school leading into college. The Omaha community knew about his dreams to become a rapper, and this led to further connections with the people around him.

SK8 attended Hastings College in Nebraska, a performing arts school which allowed him to also play basketball. During his freshman year, artists would frequently come perform at the school, which led to SK8’s early performance gigs. SK8 would open for the artists coming to the school, gaining him even more recognition within the music industry.

His freshman year, SK8, too, decided that he was going to go after his dream of chasing a professional music career, dropping out of college, and giving up basketball. Moving back home with his mother, SK8 dove into music, which took off quickly after.

His debut break into the scene came from his collaboration with Jack and Jack, popular Viners back in the mid 2010’s. The Viners went to SK8’s high school and decided to link up and work on music together. They came together to create “Like That,” a track that ended up going certified gold independently.

This collaboration ultimately kicked off his career, and SK8 joined Jack and Jack on their tour. Taking full advantage of his time on the road, SK8 made it his mission to connect with a new fanbase. “I was the guy that was opening up, like, yo ‘Imma get as many fans as I can.’” He remembers bonding with fans after the shows, gaining more of a following on social media after the tour closed.

Joining Jack and Jack on their tour opened even more opportunities than SK8 could have ever foreseen. Through the widescale exposure that he gained on tour, this allowed SK8 to connect and open for popular rap artists Rae Sremmurd and Lil Wayne.

Well on his way with a whole new set of fans, SK8 embarked on his first solo tour in 2016 celebrating his Skaterade project. The tour was a great time for SK8 to travel and meet his fanbase. He recollects the thrill, stating, “It was a really, really cool tour to see where my fans were at, and just [to] independently be on the road, it was a really good time.”

Soon after the tour wrapped up, SK8 began contemplating what his next steps were going to be. After accomplishing so much in the early stages of his career, what would come next? He had a longstanding dream of opening his own label, to which he began to pursue while connecting industry professional James McMillan.

McMillan and SK8 joined forces to start the imprint known as Alignment Records. The two began pitching their record label and found partnership with Atlanta Records swiftly after opening up Alignment.

Continuing further with the process, SK8 questioned who would help oversee the project, “Sh**, I got the label, but who’s gonna manage this sh**?”

And then, it seemingly all fell into place.

Having met Wiz Khalifa in Los Angeles a few times prior, SK8 recalled one late night in the studio where the two artists began their first collaboration track together. At 4 AM, Wiz happened to be at the same studio as SK8, where SK8 showed Wiz some of his new tracks. The pair started going back and forth in the studio, knocking out a hook and verse, completing their first joint track.

After this night, they kept in touch via Wiz’s manager Will Dzomback. Dzomback was very interested in SK8, inviting him to sign with Taylor Gang Management. Platforming SK8’s talents to a whole new level, this collaboration set his career to new altitudes.

Previously more immersed in the rap/hip-hop genre, SK8 showcases a newfound rock/pop punk era on his new album Last Day on Earth. He accredits his longstanding love for rock music back to his adolescence.

My dad listened to Bob Marley, that was his favorite artist, […] I grew up listening to Red Hot Chili Peppers, and also my hip hop inspirations too, I’ve always listened to a bunch of sh** like Nirvana and Kurt Cobain.”

The start of SK8’s transition to the rock/pop punk sound arrived after working with Machine Gun Kelly’s drummer, Rook, in the studio. Rook and SK8 met in LA a few years back and have stayed friends for quite some time.

Bouncing off of each other in the studio, they began recreating and mixing old rock classics. Popular tracks from artists like SK8’s beloved Red Hot Chili Peppers and Nirvana became completely transformed; SK8 had found his new sound.

“[Rook] started just playing some live instruments, […] he started playing some sh**, I think it was the ‘Pages melody, and that was kinda the first song that we were like ‘this is gonna be tight,’” said SK8. “I listen to a lot of old school stuff, […] I wanted to just strip the music, and not just go on beats. We really took the time, went in there with guitar riffs.”

Tracks like “Girl Next Door” came out of this genre blend experimental phase that SK8 boarded on. “It was really cool bringing Wiz into that feel, too,” he says about combining hip-hop with rock influences, “I’ll have my whole album finished, and you know, I’ll have verses open just in case, […] he came to me and was like ‘Nah, that one right there, ‘Girl next door.’”

The addition of live instrumental pieces took the album to whole heights. SK8 accredits this while speaking about the vision for Last Day on Earth, stating, “The motivation really was like, yo, I wanna create something that’s authentic to me but still I wanted to, like, have live elements, […] I didn’t want to just rap and do melodies over just beats. I wanted to create something that had all live elements.”

In the works since the start of the pandemic, Last Day on Earth has been a long time coming. Taking over two years to perfectly craft and complete the body of work allowed SK8 to fully enjoy the experience of making the project.

“I really enjoyed making this project,” he begins, “I had a really, really good team around me that helped me bring this album to them, so I have to give props to them, for real.”

Considering what’s next for SK8, the sky seems to be the limit. At the forefront of his priorities is to stay consistent and continue pushing out new music that he believes in.

The two-year hiatus between his previous drops allowed SK8 to have “a good period of time to actually really find the sound that I wanted to find, and now that I found it, I’m really dialing in.” He remarks, “I wanted to tap into the real me, I didn’t want to tell a story that wasn’t me, I didn’t want to do nothing that wasn’t me.”

For those with aspirations of starting a career in music, SK8 has some great advice. “It may sound cliché, but never give up. If it’s something that you really, really enjoy and really love doing, just don’t give up, there’s been a lot of ups, there’s been a lot of downs […] don’t give up, your time is gonna come, you’re gonna get your break.

“You don’t have to be mainstream, you don’t gotta to be the biggest artist in the world, you can still make music and make money at the same time. That’s what I, like, wake up and am always grateful and blessed to wake up and do music, that’s what I love.”

Article by: McKinley Franklin x Vaughn Lowery

SK8 press photo via Jimmy Fontaine for use by 360 Magazine
SK8 press photo via Jimmy Fontaine for use by 360 Magazine
Photo Credit: Jimmy Fontaine
the Dress via London Flair PR for use by 360 Magazine

Tadeusz Lysiak Interview

The 94th Oscar nominations have been announced, and with the awards happening on March 27. 360 was able to speak with the director of one of the nominated films, Tadeusz Lysiak. “The Dress” is hoping to garner best short film at the event. Topics include the director’s start with film making, the film itself, and his plans for the future.  

1. How did you get into filmmaking?

It all happened after I watched Inglourious Basterds by Quentin Tarantino. I was probably 16 years old back then and I remember going out of the theater and having coffee with my family and telling them: I’m gonna be a filmmaker one day. They said that was a great idea and they gave me a lot of advice: they suggested that it’d probably be better if I wouldn’t go to film school just after finishing high school. They reasoned that, “if you’d like to tell stories about life, you’d have to experience life a little at first.” So that’s why I decided to study Cultural Studies at the University of Warsaw. And only after finishing… [was when I] applied to Warsaw Film School. And it was the best choice of my life, they taught me everything I know. Warsaw Film School is such a cool place!

2. A lot of your work covers sensitive topics. Why is that?

In WFS they always teach us to ask ourselves what bothers us with the world, what there is to change or repair, and to never tell stories that are not important to us personally. So that’s what I’m doing. I’m deeply interested in sensitive, social, or psychological topics, and that’s why my films are focused on them.

3. Why did you decide to create a film about disability and intimacy?

Because it is something that is not often talked about! I find it deeply disturbing that there are still some prejudices in that territory, and some really bad things are still happening to women with disabilities all around the world. University of Michigan says that 40% of women with any sort of disability are being sexually or physically assaulted during their lifetime. This is absolutely terrifying. 

4. How did you feel when you found out you received an Oscar nomination?

This is such a surreal feeling, especially because “The Dress” is a student project made just to pass an exam in Warsaw Film School. We were all hoping to get a good grade and that’s it. And now we are nominated for an Oscar. This is a story for yet another movie. 

5. How long did the filming process take?

I think you can sum all of it up in roughly one year. At first, it was a couple of months of research and writing the script, then further development, preproduction, and finally 6 days of shooting and three months of postproduction. It was a hard time since we didn’t have a big budget and too many resources.

6. What was your best moment on set?

I must say that the best moment was the last shot. It was 5 AM, we were all so tired and exhausted and I remember that as soon as we finished rolling I started crying, and we all cried so much, and then we hug[ged] each other and drank champagne and it was such a great moment of accomplishment and relief!

7. Who were your favorite people to work with on set?

I just loved everybody. Since it was a student project, most of the crew were my close friends. We were having a lot of fun, but also we worked so hard, driven by our passion to tell this story. I have to thank Konrad Bloch, my cinematographer, who is such a sensitive guy and a true artist. I think of him as an absolute co-author, …as well as Anna Dzieduszycka. It was a huge group effort.

8. Who are your influences?

I think I have many, but the most important ones are certainly: Stanley Kubrick, David Fincher, Roman Polański, Krzysztof Kieślowski, and Michael Haneke. I believe that all of them did in their films what I would like to do: they looked into people’s minds, they looked at what is hidden, what is repressed.

9. What would you like to accomplish career-wise?

Ultimately, I would like to make films in the US, in English— for the simple reason that I want as many people as possible to watch them. I feel like I need to tell different stories and share them with others. This is a hunger that I cannot satisfy. My focus is now on working on my feature-length debut, which will be a psychological thriller.

10. What should we expect from you in the future? 

My full-length debut is at a fairly advanced stage of development, we are working on the script. The working title is “Obsession.” I have not yet decided whether I will want to do it in Poland or in the States. It’s a universal story, it would work anywhere. The film will tell the story of a young couple whose daughter one day disappears without a trace and both of them begin to fall into madness because of it.

11. Describe “The Dress” in one word.

Desire.

12. What do you want people to take away from “The Dress?”

I would like them to see that there is still a lot of evil in the world. That we still have a lot to fix. And that we should treat eachother with respect and dignity. This is especially important nowadays.

Sophia Pippen headshot via Jessica Cohen JC-PR for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Sophia Pippen Interview

Sophia Pippen has notarized herself in the entertainment industry at the mere age of 13 years old. Having worked with the crème of the crop in the business, you’ve seen Sophia grace your television screen on ‘Dancing with the Stars Juniors‘ where she partnered with Jake Moreal and dance guru Sasha Farber.

Accumulating a mass 150,000+ followers on Instagram, Sophia has also cemented her social media presence. Like her mother, reality TV housewife Larsa Pippen, Sophia’s passion for fashion has landed her spots on the frontpages of magazines and placements walking in numerous fashion shows. Interested in pursuing more modeling ventures in the future, this 5’8 Prada-loving superstar is swiftly emerging as a Gen Z fashion icon.

As a Capricorn, Sophia possesses a unique ambition and determination to excel in all of her projects. The passion and drive that Sophia has at such a young age resembles that of her NBA legend father Scottie Pippen. Her dedication to perfecting her craft sets her apart from other influencers, models and actresses in the same age range.

360 had the opportunity to chat with Sophia regarding her involvement in the industry, and just what we can expect to see from her soon.

Q: What has it been like growing up in the constant spotlight?

A: It was difficult when I was younger but surrounding myself with friends that are in the same situation has helped me change my perspective. I like being active on social media in hopes that I’m inspiring kids my age to follow their passions.

Q: What was your biggest takeaway from DWTS Junior?

A: DWTS Junior taught me the importance of hard work and dedication. After the show, I started taking more dance lessons because of how much I fell in love with it.

Q: Tell us about your past modeling experience.

A: I started modeling a couple of months ago, I recently did a photoshoot for a clothing line, and I also did one for my jewelry line in the summer.

Q: What goals do you have with modeling?

A: My goal is to be on the cover of magazines, walk on runways, and to do campaign shoots for brands.

Q: Would you like to pursue acting further?

A: I love the art behind acting which is why I’m currently taking classes to pursue an acting career.

Q: What is a new passion or interest that you would like to pursue in the future? 

A: I want to become an entrepreneur and pursue my passion in fashion and start my own clothing line. 

Q: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

A: I see myself modeling in the runway 10 years from now, having my own business and starting a charity.

Sophia Pippen headshot via Jessica Cohen JC-PR for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Netta Walker via Sarah Krick for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Netta Walker

All-American: Homecoming, spinoff series to The CW’s hit sports drama All American, recently aired the first episodes. Up-and-coming actress Netta Walker plays a large role in the series. She talked with 360 about the role, her life, and her career as an actress.  You can follow her on Instagram and Twitter, and you can find her biography HERE.

1. What was your upbringing like?

I grew up on Westside in Jacksonville, Florida with 3 older brothers (all 10 years plus older than me). We were military kids—my dad was in the Navy, he met my mom in Manila when they were basically teenagers. My mother moved to the states when she married my dad and brought all of her Cebuan/Tacloban culture with her to Jax. Culture, family, and tradition were wildly important in our house. Our Christmas meals consisted of crab boils, squid adobo, greens, lumpia, baked beans, sometimes chicken feet if we could afford it. We didn’t have much money, so on weekends my mom would set up a booth at the Romona Flea Market and we’d sell whatever she could make. At one point she was hand-making dresses for child pageants and had me walking around Wal-Marts with her while she handed out her business cards. It’s wild because my parents really taught us how to hustle and made sure we knew that culture, practical life skills, and intellect were the only things that couldn’t be taken from us. I attended two historically black schools in the area for both middle and high school. My middle school, James Weldon Johnson, was on an HBCU campus (Edward Waters University) at the time. Every morning we sang Lift Every Voice and Sing, and during PE we watched the University have marching band and majorette practice on the field next to us. My high school, Stanton College Preparatory, was the first school made for black students in Florida. Both were highly competitive academic magnet schools in all-black neighborhoods with black women principles—I got WILDLY lucky. My parents were very serious about my education, and my dad made sure I knew the importance of academics in southern black culture. He was one of the first black students sent to an all-white school in Jacksonville when white folk threw bricks at him for simply pursuing an education. He prepped me for a world that wasn’t guaranteed to be kind to me, he taught me that I’d have to work 3 times as hard to get where I wanted to and that I could never slip up. My mom was on the road to being an Olympic swimmer for the Philippines and was a model in Japan, but when she got pregnant pretty young she took to the life of raising us and making sure we would want for nothing. She taught me that love is what keeps us all connected, and that so long as I lead with love I won’t regret my life. I was raised by fighters.

2. What is your relationship with Chicago, the city you worked and lived in?

Chicago is the city that made me the artist I am today. I can’t praise it enough. I always saw Chicago as the place artists go to get better at their craft, because lord knows we don’t go there to make money or get famous. The love people carry for their craft there is outstanding. I’d tell any young person aspiring to be an actor to go to Chicago and study. Go to Steppenwolf or The Gift and see the greats do the work up close and personal, and then decide if this is the field for you. I’d never felt so compelled to be an artist until I moved there and got to see the work the artists there create. It’s hands down one of my favorite cities in the world and I plan to rep it as mine for the rest of my life.

3. Who are your biggest influences?

My family. My parents showed me that the world wasn’t always going to be kind to me, but in spite of whatever it threw at me that I could still do anything I put my mind to. My dad encouraged me to remember how smart I actually am and to never back down from what’s right. He was the biggest influence in my life hands down. I live every day for him, in hopes of making him proud. My mom taught me how to live in love and solely move in love, she is truly my heart, I’d do anything for her. My brothers are the coolest men I’ve ever met, for real. My brother Eric is 10 years and 2 days older than me, so I’ve been trying to be him since I was 4. I dress like him to this day and watch only the anime he tells me to. My brother Anthony has inspired me by standing in his truth his whole life, I never would’ve learned how to trust and love myself without him. My oldest brother AJ showed me that we can make life whatever we dream of making it. My family has shaped every facet of who I am today and I love them all so deeply for it, as much as they get on my nerves.

4. Why did you decide to become an actress?

I had an incredible high school theater teacher, Shirley Sacks Kirby, who saw potential in me and was the first person to seriously encourage me to pursue a career in acting. She made me feel like I was actually good at something, and I never felt that way before. I was content in fading into the background and leaving my emotions to the side in my everyday life, but in theater, I was allowed to express all my pent-up emotions. She told my mom to put me in dance classes and voice lessons and monologue coachings, she helped me write and submit all of my college theater applications and put together all of my auditions. She shouted words of affirmations at me when I felt insecure and told me that I was special and talented when I felt like I wasn’t ever going to be good enough. She was my theater mom, and I owe my career to her.

5. You’ve been an actor for several years. What has been your favorite role?

My favorite role is always the next role, honestly. I love the challenges of diving into a new person, figuring them out, and falling in love with them—and exploring new characters feels like falling in love. But strictly speaking, Ophelia in Hamlet (at The Gift Theater directed by Monty Cole) may have been the most cathartic and challenging. My father had just passed that summer and playing a woman who loses herself in the grief of her father was really visceral and scary, but that excited me. Monty is also one of my favorite directors to exist, The Gift is my artistic home, and Shakespeare was how I started acting—so that role meant an indescribable amount to me.

6. What is your favorite part about being in All-American: Homecoming?

It feels like I’m participating in history. These stories, it’s an honor. The characters and their relationships feel monumental to me simply because we’re at an HBCU and representing culture.

7. Tell us a little bit about your character on the show?

Keisha is trouble, there’s no doubt about it. She’s a very strong and intelligent woman who isn’t afraid to stand on all ten toes and say “This is who I am, this is what I believe, and I’ll fight you if you have a problem”. She’s a pre-med major with an intense passion for dancing and a deep love for those she allows into her life. She’s the type to give you the shirt off her back—but also tell you how you can get your own shirt so we don’t have to do this again. She hits very close to home. I adore her.

8. On your Instagram, it’s clear you’re a big fan of Japanese anime. What are your favorite shows/movies?

Ah man, there are so many good ones. In terms of classics, Trigun hands down, it gives me hope and serves the retro style and storyline I adore. Inuyasha was my first anime crush, so Yashahime has also been nostalgic and sweet. My big brother Eric introduced me to Demon Slayer because he thought Nezuko reminded him of me so that show holds a lot of sentiment (my brother honestly is the reason I watch anime at all). Of course Attack on Titan and Sword Art Online, they both make me terribly anxious but I can’t stop watching them. The Boondocks isn’t Japanese but it makes me laugh like nothing else, it feels like an intersection of culture for me. Guilty pleasure watch is fully Ouran High Host Club, don’t judge me on that, I’m a romantic!

9. What’s your dream role?

I think my dream role is whatever thing is next. Getting to act is already such a dream, but I’m always dreaming about what story I get to tell next. There isn’t a definitive narrative to the dreams, but I do love playing characters who would never be in the same room together.

10. What’s next for Netta Walker?

We’re gonna see! Hopefully, I can scam my way into some exciting movies or into some provoking plays in New York. I’ve dreamed of being on Broadway for as long as I’ve wanted to an actor, so fingers crossed that happens! I never know what’s next honestly, my career has lowkey felt like a fever dream. But I’m so excited to see what the future holds.

Edmond Huot press photo via Claire Kivior (Forward Media) for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Edmond Huot Interview

The market of airline liveries is ever-growing and is a topic that has captivated the modern design world. What exactly is airline livery, and what do their designers do?

Well, we sat down with Edmond Huot, a Creative Director and Airline Livery Designer, to answer all our burning questions about his work field. Huot’s latest project was with Northern Pacific Airways, designing their brand-new livery in San Bernardino.

Let’s hear from Huot on his creativity, and how he got into such a niche workspace.

Q: How do you find inspiration as a creative director?

A: Being in the business for more than thirty years exposes you to a lot. I remain curious and open to the world—traveling, meeting people, and always framing and curating my experiences.

Growing up on a rural farm in Canada, devoid of cable TV and city-living, I was extremely bored and, hence, was forced to use my imagination. As an early av-geek and disaster movie fan, I would lose myself in thought—creating entire story plots and visual scenes with model airplanes that I’d build, play with outside, and ultimately crash in some snow bank! I spent countless hours drawing planes on discarded paper bags and would act out scenes from Arthur Hailey’s Airport in my bedroom.

For me, creativity started with storytelling and creating entire fantasy worlds in my head. Years later, my talent for drawing and sense of theatrics led me to advertising, where those same core passions drive my professional pursuits to this day.

Q: Tell us your favorite part about having a career in such a creative filed.

A: Beyond the initial conceptual phase, where my team and I get to stretch our imaginations and aspirations, there’s nothing—and I mean NOTHING—that compares to walking into an aircraft hangar to see (for the first time) my design applied to a 137,000lb 155 ft long Boeing 757-200 series. The sheer scale of this aircraft in all of its aerodynamic and technological beauty is beyond extraordinary. It’s truly life-affirming!

Q: Can you explain exactly what an airline livery is?

A: A livery is synonymous with a ‘uniform.’ An airplane’s livery refers to the painted decal on the exterior of the plane. A plane wears a uniform the same way a chef or a doorman wears a uniform.

Folks within the aviation and travel industry are fascinated with plane liveries because not only a feat to paint such a large canvas but liveries are only changed once every 10-15 years.

Q: Did you encounter struggles while working on the Northern Pacific Airway livery?

A: A hurdle early on for me was understanding who the customer would be. Unlike larger, full-service multinational firms with the ability to cover more ground in terms of research and analysis, our agency is a smaller, more boutique company. We had to move fast, be resourceful, and quickly prioritize the core issues.

I worked closely with the client to better understand Asian cultural significance and hot points. At the same time, I was also speaking with the local team in Anchorage to highlight any concerns around misrepresenting their local indigenous communities.

Additionally, I developed a range of target profiling decks broken down into general categories such as leisure, business, and regulatory audiences. From there, I weaved all of those gathered quantitative insights into more contextualized thematic storytelling that gave a greater, more compelling meaning and purpose to the customer.

I titled the story: “We Are All Navigators.” So much of the subsequent design, including colors, typography, and positioning came from these valuable insights. By turning those data points into a greater story, I was able to elevate the brand in a more consumer-centric manner.

Another challenge that is often faced by start-up airlines involves maximizing relatively small resources. How do I make the most out of a budget? Both the investors as well as the operators are extremely sensitive to how we go about spending time and money. You’ve got to get it right the first time.

Q: What was the best part about creating for North Pacific Airways?

A: Northern Pacific will be the first airline that I fly on featuring my work. And for the record, when I say ‘my work,’ I really mean my team’s work. I could never do this without the help and dedication of some truly talented and inspired individuals. That is what’s really worth bragging about!

Q: What can we expect from Edmond Huot in the future?

A: I am looking forward to showcasing some new project work for another start-up airline based in Canada. Unfortunately, because of its sensitive nature, I can’t share any details at this point. I also want to expand my creative and design repertoire with travel and transportation-related assignments including private jet travel and environmental design application.

Northern Pacific Aircraft via Claire Kivior (Forward Media) for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Health clipboard graphic via Rita Azar for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Interview with Jonathan Scheiman

By: Skyler Johnson

If you’re an active person that’s ever wanted to increase your performance, you should check out Fitbiomics. They’re a small company helping athletes and health-driven people into a better lifestyle by improving gut health with a small, daily capsule. 360 was able to interview their CEO Jonathan Scheiman. Scheiman is a St. John’s and NYU graduate, who did his postdoctoral fellowship at the George Church’s lab at Harvard University. 

Can you tell me about your mission?

Our mission is to empower, educate, and elevate. We’re working to inspire and build a world where greatness is possible for everyone by driving transformation from the inside out to maximize human potential. FitBiomics is simultaneously bridging the gap between sports and science, bringing communities together, and inspiring the next generation of scientists. The new frontier of human health & wellness is Nella–a daily capsule of next-gen performance probiotics designed to help anyone pursuing a healthy and active lifestyle to a new frontier of personal best, from the inside out. Nella gives you the guts to defy your limits.

 Can you tell me about your probiotic?

With a new subscription price of $59, our daily capsule, Nella, is now easier than ever to add into a daily routine and positively impact health and wellness resolutions for 2022. The one-time purchase price remains at the current price of $75.

The product is manufactured using probiotics sourced from the microbiome of elite endurance athletes. FitBiomics supports that the source of the probiotic strains matters when it comes to athletic performance. The American-made, gluten-free, vegan probiotic is certified by Informed Sport, a service which identifies banned substances. 

The Nella probiotic supplement is trusted by elite competitors across the country, including Olympic medalists, professional athletes, and USA record holders. Additionally, FitBiomics is in partnership with and serves as the official probiotic of Fordham University Athletics and St. John’s University Athletics. 

What can we expect from your company in the next 6 months? What are your plans?

We have a lot planned as far as partnerships as well as new products in the pipeline. I can sum up the latter in one word: Veillonella. Yes, the lactic acid-eating probiotic that improves endurance and was published in Nature Medicine is in the commercial queue…so stay tuned.

What’s something about your company that people might not know about?

At our heart, we are a biotechnology company focused on continued microbiome R&D. We’re expanding our discovery platform for continued decoding of elite phenotypes to develop additional next-generation probiotics. Our mission is to improve human health and performance, holistically, across multiple functional applications.

Maria Becerra via Facci PR for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Maria Becerra

Maria Becerra, or “the Girl from Argentina”, is an up-and-coming pop star, who despite only being 21 years old has become Argentina’s most-streamed artist. Starting off as a YouTuber, she quickly rose to fame and is now signed to 300 Entertainment (Young Thug, Meghan Thee Stallion.) 360 got the opportunity to talk with her about her life and rise to fame.   

  1. How would you describe your style of music?

I think that I have a very melodic and versatile musical style. In the studio, we always try to ensure that each song has a varied melodic line, with different nuances, that above all… sounds familiar to the public. I have [traversed] several genres and in all of them, I was able to find how to make my style fit. I heard out there that they call me “The queen of weeping” [laughs] because I have many songs that are for dogging and dancing, and others that are a bit sad.

  1. How did you first become interested in creating music?

From a very young age, art was important to me. I learned how to sing, act, and dance. In my house, [we] listened to a lot of music. For a while I did covers and interpretations of famous songs, I think I was absorbing that and at one point I felt the need to start expressing myself with something of my own and I did. I was not 100% sure, I had many insecurities, I was afraid to know how… [people] …were going to receive my music, and also if this was really my path. Luckily things turned out… [positively] …and today I have no doubts that yes, I was born for this and I am very happy [making a] living from music.

  1. Which songs are you most proud of?

Mm, they are all special and fill me with pride. You can’t say just one. If I have to think quickly… [about] …which one I like the most, maybe… “Close to You” or “My Debility.” That song is very special. I cried a lot while making it and recording the video.

  1. You were a Youtuber before becoming a singer. How was the experience of transitioning from an influencer to an artist?

It was a beautiful experience, and I am grateful that it was like that. The change in my life was… [immense]. Being [on] YouTube gave me the opportunity to get to know me and lose my fear of exposure. …having had the experience of being a YouTuber served as the basis for everything that happened to me later.

  1. What is your favorite fan moment?

My favorite moment is when… [fans] …tell me… that my music… [is relatable] …to them. It’s amazing how something I do with all my love in the studio can reach so many people and positively influence their lives. ….we would…talk to …different fans, and at one point a girl told us that with “Tell me how I do”, one of my songs, she had declared her love to her girlfriend. I found it beautiful. Those moments fill me with happiness.

  1. How does it feel to have reached this level of popularity so young?

I still don’t think… [I’m famous]. It seems incredible to me, but I take it easy. I do not despair and try to have the same life as always. I surround myself a lot with my friends, my family, and my pets who are my ground wire and remind me of where I come from.

  1. Why do you refer to yourself as ‘The Girl from Argentina’? 

In general, it is known that many discoveries have occurred accidentally in the world, and this was no exception. [laughs] When we recorded “Animal” with Cazzu, at last, in the part of the song’s guidelines I said “Las Nenas de Argentina”… referring to the two of us. Apparently, people heard “La nena de Argentina” and everyone loved that I refer[red] to myself that way. From there I started to use it as my brand, and I feel that it gives me a special power for transmitting to everyone that my music is made and is from Argentina.

  1. Who are your influences?

Wow, many! But especially Ariana Grande, Beyoncé, and Rihanna. I think they are very important to me. I watch their shows and videos a lot.

  1. How did it feel to join a label as prestigious as 300 Entertainment?

[It was] an honor, I am very happy with them. They are also always very affectionate with me. Since their office is in Los Angeles, we don’t see each other that often, but when we do it’s very nice because they always surprise me. I know the whole team takes care of me and they want the best for me, so I respect them and thank them very much.

  1. Your most recent EP blended many different genres. Which genres would you like to experiment with in the future?

I like “Bachata”, I think more songs like… [that] …are coming, but as I said before, I don’t want to pigeonhole myself and today I am here to experiment. So, in 2022, you can be surprised. 

  1. What can we expect to see from you in the future?

I feel like it’s going to be a great year this year. We are working to make it so. I’m locked in the studio; some songs are coming out that are tremendous. I am already anxious for you to listen to them, so a new album is coming, trips and several shows in Argentina and Europe. We will be on the move. We hope to reach many places and have everyone dance and sing my music.

Japanese Breakfast Jubilee album art via Peter Ash Lee for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Japanese Breakfast

Tuesday, January 18, indie pop act Japanese Breakfast performed “Slide Tackle,” a track from their GRAMMY-nominated album, Jubilee, on The Late Show with James Corden. Michelle Zauner, applauded founder, did a ‘Bar Chat interview where she talked about these recent nominations and more. Watch Japanese Breakfast’s performance on The Late Show with James Corden HERE.

Jubilee released last June as one of the years leading, critically acclaimed albums. The album stole spots on Best Of lists for 2021 from Rolling Stone, People Magazine, Pitchfork, Entertainment Weekly, Billboard, NPR, Wall Street Journal, The Ringer, SPIN, Esquire, Vulture, The AV Club, Paste, Cosmopolitan, UPROXX, Consequence of Sound, Slant and Hypebeast. The album gained so much attention that it was even voted the #1 album of the year on NPR’s Listener’s Poll and #1 on UPROXX’s Critics Poll.

If that wasn’t enough success for one year, Zauner, too, published her New York Times Best Seller, Crying in H Mart, which is now being reworked for MGM’s Orion Pictures. The book is a moving memoir that captures Zauner’s experiences growing up Korean American, the struggles she went through with the death of her mother and how she navigated discovering her own identity.

About Michelle Zauner

The Korean American musician and author Michelle Zauner is renowned for her sonic demeanor. Born in Seoul, South Korea, Zauner grew up in Eugene, Oregon for most of her adolescence. Zauner took to music instantly, beginning to learn to play the piano at 5, later moving to the guitar at age 15. Her mother’s passing in 2014 lead to her starting Japanese Breakfast. She tells Teen Vogue, “I moved back to Oregon to care for her, and I kind of put the band on indefinite hiatus. Unfortunately, she passed away, and while I was in Oregon, helping take care of the house and being a support system for my dad, the only way that I could have something for myself was if I made my own record. So I kind of carved out some time to do that.” Japanese Breakfast’s debut came in 2016 with the hit album Psychopomp. Through the album, Zauner revealed the intense period that followed her mother’s death. Zauner’s unique perspective amongst mainstream pop music sets her apart from other artists, and she’s one you’ll want to take a listen to.

Jonny Marlow for use by 360 MAGAZINE

SPOTLIGHT: CARSON MACCORMAC

While chasing his dreams of becoming an actor, Canadian actor Carson MacCormac has established himself in the industry, and has plans to only expand his career as we head into 2022.

Carson can be found starring in East of the Middle West in the role of “Chris.” The film follows “Chris” as he navigates his life following his involvement in a fatal accident that leaves a mother and child dead. Through his interpretation of “Chris” in the film, Carson has been honored with the Best Actor award at the Montreal Independent Film Festival. Moreover, East of the Middle West was the closing film at the Chelsea Film Festival and won Best American Indie at the Fort Lauderdale Film Festival.

Carson additionally joined the cast of the withstanding Netflix series Locke and Key for both Season 2 and 3. The series follows the three Locke siblings as they work through their father’s peculiar murder. The siblings seek refuge in their mother’s ancestral home, also known as Keyhouse. Carson takes on the role of “Benjamin Locke,” a vague ancestor of the siblings, whose storyline is set in the 1700s. Season 2 of Locke and Key premiered in October 2021, and Season 3 premieres TBD in 2022.

Notorious for his role in DC Comics superhero movie SHAZAM!, Carson plays “Brett Breyer.” Carson can soon be found in the upcoming Netflix and Lionsgate thriller, Luckiest Girl Alive. 360 MAGAZINE had the opportunity to chat with Carson about his acting career, and what we can expect to see for the future of his career.

When did you know that you wanted to pursue a career in acting?

Before I realized how much work it would take to become one. When I was a kid, I would sit and watch movies and think “I could totally do that.” Little did I know just how much training goes into becoming an actor with even a basic level of competency. However, I knew I would pursue it for a living near the end of high school. Interestingly enough, it was once I started having to seriously work at the craft that I fell I became obsessed. A career is a kind way of putting what I lovingly refer to as an addiction. Once I fell in love with the work my course was kind of set for me.

What is the process that you go through to prep for a new role?

A lot of writing initially. I have a 5-page cheat sheet I made to ensure I always flesh out my characters, but that is only usually the initial prep. The fun work comes in the imagining of who my character is and why. Writing I find helps me organize my thoughts. It also ensures that any fleeting ideas I have to add depth to a role are jotted down for me to refer to later. Physicality is an important one for me, getting a character into my body as at the end of the day, that physical work is the majority of what the camera picks up. When I get my head around a character, get my body into the role and get my lines down, I just let it all go and have fun with it.

What is the greatest lesson you’ve learned from the acting world?

One of my personal favorites is the reminder to stay curious and imaginative through all assets of life. Curiosity of self, of others and of things is, in my opinion, one of the purest forms of purpose humans can have. Acting has forced me to question everything, oftentimes myself included, and plunge into characters with circumstances and motives far removed from my own. That curiosity I find is a stream to the more pleasant qualities of people such as empathy, perspective, and self-reflection.

What is a bucket list goal that you want to accomplish in your career?

I would love to star in something that I wrote. It would have to come down the line, as I still have a lot to learn as a writer, but to take a page out of Good Will Hunting, I think the chance to build-a-bear a role that I could then portray would be incredibly enjoyable. That, to me, is also one of the most terrifying tasks I can think of for myself, which is why I think it excites me so much.

What is your #1 piece of advice for aspiring actors/ actresses?

Number one is to always ask why. Ask it about everything, as curiosity and a questioning mind is what I found helped me grow the most as an actor. Another important one that I found helped me a lot is to not take yourself too seriously. Actors are asked to play make believe for a living, oftentimes in highly emotional situations. The industry and the world is going to be hard enough on you, and so I find it important to be forgiving and understanding with yourself if the industry starts to wear you down. Your instrument will grow much faster in a healthy mindset than in one that is self-deprecating or judgmental.

What was the biggest takeaway from being a part of “East of Middle West?”

Externally, a lot of friends. I wish I could have taken that whole cast and crew home with me back to Canada but alas, airlines have a baggage limit. Personally, East of Middle West helped me learn to trust myself. Our shooting schedule was incredibly fast paced, with emotional scenes and high stakes. With such little prep time, a large part of my process became just letting go and flowing within scenes and seeing what would happen. It was at first, terrifying, but as filming went along, I found it to be an incredibly freeing experience. It forced me to trust myself as our timing constraints allowed for no other choice.

How was your experience joining a withstanding show/ team on “Locke and Key?”

It helped that I could watch season 1 and get a sense for how I fit into the cast but more than anything, I noticed the benefits in how efficiently everything was running. Even with the added pressure that COVID put on the production, the whole set was one giant, well-oiled machine. Outside of the whole ‘acting; part of my job, I find that being on set can often feel like being a toddler sitting at the parents’ dinner table: don’t interject in the adult conversations you barely understand and make sure you stay in your spot and listen carefully to your parents’ direction. Locke and Key made me feel as if that internal child was being spoiled rotten at every step of the way. It was truly a joy to be part of such a talented team.

What role, would you say, pushed you out of your comfort zone the most thus far?

Maybe because it’s still fresh in my memory, but my upcoming role in Luckiest Girl Alive. It is such a far cry from anything I have played before, with stakes higher and more brutal than a lot of my previous work. Not to mention the director, Mike Barker, was incredibly gracious in allowing me to experiment with improvisation in my scenes. Scary at first, but with time thinking about ‘what can I throw into this scene?’ became something I looked forward to every day.

What can we expect from Carson MacCormac in the future?

Luckiest Girl Alive, as I mentioned, is coming out sometime in 2022 and I couldn’t be more excited for audiences to see it. I think this film is necessary, timely, and pushes the industry as a whole in an important direction. It also just happens to be one entertaining ride. I worked on a show premiering in January called Astrid and Lily Save the World and boy oh boy, is it crazy. The show is outrageous, wild, and I’m thrilled to be part of it. I have a few projects coming out in 2022 that I can’t quite talk about just yet… and another feature film being released in 2023 that I am very excited to share…. Stay tuned!

Jonny Marlow for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Nightclub Gif by Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

MERGING VERSES NFT

The future of fashion is the merging of two verses, the virtual world (metaverse) and the physical world. We explore this through the unity of traditional photography and animation—where humans and AI co-exist.

The NFT world is something that is growing and still confusing for many people not directly involved in the producing and purchasing of these new age art pieces. 360 MAGAZINE was able to interview several people directly involved in the production side of NFTs, including producer and model Bee Davies and photographer Jacques Burga.

Interview with Bee Davies

  • What made you become interested in NFTs?

I became interested in NFTs when I started doing virtual production and realized that there was no marketplace for digital art. More than that, there was no fan base. We know famous photographers and people who collect their photographsbut there’s not the same kind of hype surrounding animators. An NFT marketplace not only legitimizes their work, but provides a platform that opens up the door for a whole new kind of collector.

  • How do you respond to people suggesting NFTs are overly expensive and pointless?

Couldn’t you say that about all collectibles? Digital art, like any art, is meant to be enjoyed; the NFT marketplaces and wallets allow you to do that much more easily.

  • What is your favorite NFT?

The one I produced with Jacques for 360, because it exemplifies the merging of the real world and the metaverse.

  • Was it odd to see yourself become an NFT?

Not at all. Since the dawn of social media we have all had virtual versions of ourselves, this is just an overt way of expressing it.

  • What are your biggest artistic inspirations?

I would like to create and produce a completely virtual fashion show for the industry’s top fashion houses (this means AI talent, virtual runways, and digital clothing/accessories…as well as an audience attending in VR). And of course, mint every bit of the digital experience so it can be enjoyed in the metaverse for eternity.

  • What are some upcoming projects you’re looking forward to?

I have a bunch of NFTs that will be dropping soon that I’ve collaborated on with different animatorssome of which feature the actors from the SciFi TV Pilot I created.

Interview w/ Jacques Burga

  • What made you become interested in NFTs?

It’s a whole new way of making business. I enjoy pushing boundaries when it comes to projects related to my field. It also makes me feel there’s always a next step to follow and to explore disciplines that I wasn’t precisely an expert in.

  • How do you respond to people suggesting NFTs are overly expensive and pointless?

To keep the mind open to new ways of mixing technology and creativity may be good advice.

  • What are your inspirations as a photographer?

I am inspired by People and Beauty

  • Why did you decide to blend photographic elements with virtual ones?

Our world has become very virtual. Photography gets elevated when it’s blend with other disciplines such as Art or Technology (virtuality.)

  • What is your relationship with digital artwork?

I’m working on digital projects related to Fashion and NFT. My relationship is continuously growing.

  • When did you become interested in photography?

When I left an internship at a high profile magazine in Paris and decided to become independent and nurture my desire to create fashion.

  • What, in your opinion, is your best piece of artwork/photography?

I cherish every project since it is composed of pieces that create a nice puzzle for me.

  • What projects can we expect to see from you in the future?

I will always want to explore and collaborate with new technologies and artists that share my vision of fashion and people.

NFTs available on OpenSea.

MEET THE TEAM

Media Partner: 360 MAGAZINE

Studio: Daylight Studio

Producer: Bee Davies / Hive Global Media

Photographer: Jacques Burga

Make-up Artist: Sarah Tweedy

Hair Stylist: Christine McManemi

Wardrobe Stylist: Yash Joshi

NFT Marketplace: Opensea

Digital Designer: Edward Harber

Model: Bee Davies 

Animator: Vizzee

Virtual Model Creator: Vizzee

Metaverse Creators: Vizzee / Mercedes Luna Larrahona / Zoë Jane Bernet

PA: Stefanie Murza / Aleko Syntelis

nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine
nft image for use by 360 magazine