Posts tagged with "AAPI"

David Alfonso ANNUKO Barbershop via ANNUKO for use by 360 MAGAZINE

SPOTLIGHT ON AANUKO

The innovative AANUKO saloon opens its doors in the heart of the art district of Culver City! Discover an invigorating yet bespoke habitat of Los Angeles, accompanied by unparalleled coiffeurs, a podcast room and a dedicated photo studio to document your hair journey.

Vaughn Lowery had the opportunity to chat with AANUKO’s CEO and President David Alfonso about the new shop in its entirety. Listen their full conversation on the 360 MAG Apple/Spotify podcast HERE.

Officially opening their doors on August 2, the AAPI-owned grooming facility is reshaping the barber scene from a previous dull, disengaging vibe one haircut at a time. AANUKO considers the relationship between the client and the hairdresser to be sacred. A symbiotic exchange of creativity and trust.

The living space that is home to AANUKO cultivates creativity and community, unlike other conventional barbershops. With a strong team of people taking care of clients, when walking into AANUKO, you’ll instantaneously feel at home. What began as a passion project has swiftly grown into a venture that aims to embody creativity and connection through the art of hair care.

CEO David Alfonso admits that AANUKO is passion project. He recounts, “I wanted to reimagine the barbershop concept by immersing it into an unfamiliar aesthetic, but with a strangely nostalgic aesthetic … as if we were walking towards ‘a Gucci Boutique in Paris or New York in the 1980s.”

Though the barbershop is tailored towards men’s haircare, AANUKO is a unisex enterprise. Each customer takes away much more than a haircut from each visit; they earn knowledge about their own hair types, strategies they can implement to treat their hair, and an overall sense of connection with their barbers.

Draped in jaw dropping interior, the barbershop is nestled in West Los Angeles. Alfonso explained that AANUKO aims to push the envelope and exceed what other Los Angeles spaces look like. Inspired by using color, the team at AANUKO employs the theme of approaching life with a rebellious mindset.

Immerse yourself in the unforgettable atmosphere with a French bohemian theme. Each trip to the barbershop invite’s customers into a fully immersive environment. From the beautiful café serving free cocktails to the photo studio where guests can indulge in content creation, haircut visits begin at $85. Barbers take careful time to relate with customers, ensuring they get the most out of their appointment.

Alfonso further elaborates, “It’s all about an artistic, rebellious approach to reimage what we think would be a really cool space to make people feel good while getting their haircut.”

While the styling of AANUKO definitely sets it apart from other spots, Alfonso made sure to emphasize the true highlight of the design at the barbershop. To Alfonso, their eccentric, groundbreaking approach, “sets the stage, because I think the most important part of the décor is our team of barbers.”

Alfonso continued to rave about the talent of the workforce behind AANUKO. With a varied range of individuals that work together to ensure success, they all have a few things in common. From their impeccable physical skillset as artisans, to their crucifixion for their craft, each unit of AANUKO is dedicated to delivering a transformative impression.

David Alfonso asserts, “AANUKO provides a communal space for networking, content creation, and personal growth for the greater Los Angeles.” In addition, he adds, “Like god’s brand for all men’s hair … [we will] create an intimate connection with our brand with our customers.”

AANUKO celebrates their grand opening on August 2 at 5790 Washington Blvd. Their hours are 10 AM to 7 PM PST every Tuesday to Saturday. Reservations can be made HERE. Walk-ins accepted.

Article: McKinley Franklin, Andrea Esteban, Vaughn Lowery

ANNUKO Barbershop via ANNUKO for use by 360 MAGAZINE
ANNUKO Barbershop Interior via ANNUKO for use by 360 MAGAZINE
NIKI artist image via Gabriel Chiu for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Before – NIKI

Today, Jakarta-born, LA-based singer-songwriter, and producer NIKI unveils her new single and accompanying video for “Before.” The track is the first single from her forthcoming album Nicole. NIKI first announced the album on her social media pages earlier this week, read more HERE.

Stream/download the track HERE.

Watch the music video HERE.

The reflective record is tinged with nostalgia and sees NIKI yearning for a past relationship that has come to an end and grappling with navigating her feelings and how to let go. The reverb-drenched and scaled-back production of the track highlights NIKI’s lyrical ability to evoke strong emotions and sentimentality through her music.

“Before” continues to see NIKI shine revisiting her singer/songwriter roots through her genuine storytelling as seen on previous singles like “Split” released late last year.

In the accompanying music video, NIKI flies across the globe to the United States in an attempt to rekindle a relationship, but something feels amiss. The video is directed by Isaac Ravishankara and stars Indonesian-American actor Peter Adrian Sudarso opposite NIKI.

On the track, NIKI says “‘Before’ is the irresolute ending to my very first love story. I wrote it as a means to create the kind of closure I never had. I also feel itߣs ironically poetic to open this new chapter by telling you how it ends first. I’m so proud of it, and I can’t think of a better song to introduce the ultimate break-up record I’ve always fantasized of putting out but somehow haven’t until now.”

The release of “Before” comes fresh off the heels of NIKI’s unforgettable performance at Coachella in April, where she became the first Indonesian artist to ever perform at the festival, alongside Rich Brian. NIKI will follow up her Coachella appearance with a performance at 88rising’s 2022 Head in the Clouds Festival this August at Brookside at the Rose Bowl. NIKI previously performed at the 2021 Head in the Clouds Festival last November with a striking set that received acclaim from MTVFlaunt, and The AV Club who hailed her a “goddamn superstar.”

Watch her full performance at the festival HERE.

Most recently, 88rising and NIKI collaborated with Honda on a new docu-series that captured her journey to Coachella, storying her time leading up to her dazzling performance. 88rising is the first Asian music media partner to collaborate with Honda on their music program. The docu-series presented by Honda highlighted various firsts for NIKI from chronicling her first Coachella performance to watching her journey in her first car, a 2022 Honda CR-V Hybrid, capturing this full circle moment all while celebrating her Indonesian heritage, as both episodes were released last month during AAPI Month. Watch episode 1 HERE and episode 2 HERE.

To date, NIKI has accumulated over 1.8 billion streams across all platforms. Her hit single “Every Summertime” from the soundtrack of Marvel’s Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings recently went viral and currently has over 220 million streams and climbing. The track, written and produced by NIKI and longtime collaborator Jacob Ray is an exuberant love song with a throwback sound reminiscent of classic R&B and soul. Stream the track HERE.

The aforementioned “Split” comes from the upcoming Head In The Clouds 3 collaboration album, 88rising’s game-changing third installation of the world-building effort that brings together rising artists from East to West. A retro slowburn, complete with steel guitar and NIKI’s sweet rasp, “Split” sees the 23-year-old’s artistic force chronicling the ache of feeling split between two worlds and two homes. Like all her well-loved songs, “Split” leaves a mark

Listen to “Split” HERE.

ABOUT NIKI

With over 1.8 BILLION+ streams to date, 23-year-old NIKI has slammed the door on the conventions of pop stardomߞwriting, recording, and producing her music on her own. Born in Jakarta and based in Los Angeles, NIKI has captured the attention of audiences around the world, earning praise from Billboard “as one of the brightest rising stars.” Earning wide critical acclaim since her breakthrough “Zephyr”, and her debut album, “MOONCHILD”, NIKI has cultivated fans around the globe with her expressive voice, personal songwriting and genre-blurring artistry, becoming a vibrant symbol of and an advocate for a generation of Asian musical artists.

NIKI’s debut album “MOONCHILD” was released on September 10, 2020 and currently has over 172M streams to date. Complex called MOONCHILD “a full-length offering reflective of the Indonesian vocalist/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist growth and abilities.” i-D shared that NIKI’s storytelling on MOONCHILD was “something we can only aspire to do.” To date, NIKI has garnered over 1.8 B+ streams and received praises from outlets like Harper’s BAZAAR, Forbes, Teen Vogue, Hypebae, and more.

Most recently, NIKI’s song “Every Summertime,” which appeared on the Marvel, Shang-Chi Legend of The Legend Ten Rings Official Soundtrack landed on Spotify’s Today’s Top Hits and Pop Rising amongst others and has been streamed over 200 million times worldwide. She was also the first Indonesian artist, alongside Rich Brian to ever take the stage at Coachella. She is also currently the face of Guess Originals Spring campaign.

With her Indonesian heritage essential to her story, she feels “a social responsibility representing Asian artists, especially as a role model for girls.” For aspiring Asian and Asian American talents aiming to break cultural norms and overcome music industry under-representation, NIKI proves that the highest dreams are indeed within reach.

Gold House Gold Gala via Newswire for use by 360 Magazine

Gold House Gold Gala

 Gold House—the leading Asian and Pacific Islander (API) changemaker community that unites, invests in, and promotes API creatives and companies— debuted its first-ever Gold Gala, a historic gathering of API leaders and allies, on May 21, 2022. 

The Gala celebrated 2022’s A100 List, the definitive honor that recognizes the 100 APIs who have most significantly impacted American culture and society in the last year. The evening was hosted in collaboration with Meta — to further a long-standing partnership with Gold House thathonors and supports the API community through innovative programming, such as Meta Gold Talks, and convenes distinguished API voices in conversation as well as trains API-led start-ups in-depth. 

500+ API celebrities, cultural leaders, and business executives rounded out the guest list, including: Mindy KalingMichelle YeohHenry GoldingDaniel Dae KimAshley ParkStephanie HsuAuli’i CravalhoJimmy O. YangKelly Marie TranHarry Shum Jr.Bella PoarchLisa Ling, Prabal GurungJeannie Mai JenkinsPhillip Lim, Musa TariqChloe KimJay ShettyVersha Sharma, Michelle Phan, Andrew Yang, the casts of Never Have I Ever and Pachinkothe CEOs and founders of DoorDash, Match Group (Match/Tinder/Hinge), Hulu, Twitch, Classpass, Patreon, Airtable, Forbes, P&G, Brooks Brothers, Ancestry, Droga5, Publicis Groupe, Paramount, East West Bank, and more. 

These guests are at the forefront of “The New Gold Age,” the evening’s theme, which represents unparalleled API brilliance and defiance amidst continued violence and racism against the community. The theme was embodied in the modern Asian couture attire, which featured several custom outfits created specifically for the gala.

A100 A1 honorees Henry Golding, Simu Liu, Chloe Kim, Michelle Wu, and Payal Kadakia were recognized for being the most impactful individuals in their respective industries over the past year.

A major highlight of the Gold Gala was Mindy Kaling accepting the A100 Legend award for her lifelong dedication to creating and embodying affirming API characters and content. Maitreyi Ramakrishnan presented the award to her mentor in a heartfelt speech.

To round out the historic evening, A100 Legend Michelle Yeoh was the first-ever recipient of the SeeHer award at the Gold Gala for defying gender stereotypes throughout her career. SeeHer, the leading global movement of media, marketing and entertainment leaders committed to the accurate depiction of women and girls in advertising and media, presented the award along with filmmakers Jon M. Chu, Destin Daniel Cretton, and Jonathan Wang

The awards were custom designed by artist Maia Ruth Lee, an inaugural Gold Art Prize Awardee.

Throughout the evening, Gold House unveiled a suite of new initiatives to further its focus on uniting, promoting, and investing in API creatives and companies including:

  • Unity Marchin partnership with Asian Americans Advancing Justice, APIAVote, and a dozen other major nationwide organizations, Gold House announced a historic slate of policies and a convening event in Washington, D.C. on June 25, 2022.
  • Gold Storybook: Gold House launched the definitive guide and resource hub on authentic API portrayals in media, based on years of cultural consultation expertise with every major studio, streamer, and network. The guide was created with support from key partners like The Walt Disney Company and features additional resources through work with SeeHerP&G, and more. 
  • #WriteHerRight AAPI: SeeHer and Gold House also announced a major partnership to develop a guide focused on the importance of increasing accurate portrayals of AAPI women and girls in advertising and entertainment. A number of studios and networks, including AMC Networks and Paramount, are committed to participating in the guide, which will launch later this year.
  • Gold House Venture Networkon the heels of launching its $30M fund, Gold House Ventures, Gold House announced a new vehicle for executives, cultural leaders, and founders to invest in sought-after venture deals and procure prominent Board Director and Advisor positions.
  • Gold Rush Accelerator Food & Beverage and Women Tracks: as part of their community-leading accelerator, Gold Rush (whose alumni have raised $400 million+ in follow-on capital), presented two new tracks that provide funding, promotion, and distribution to culinary and women founders in partnership with Panda Express and Julia Gouw, respectively.

Gold House specially recognized Meta as a long-time supporter of advancing opportunity for all, and shared updates regarding their ongoing partnership to amplify, educate and grow influential voices across the Asian diaspora with a focus on unlocking economic opportunity. This included the launch of Meta’s SMB-focused channel — Meta Prosper — a new program to empower and uplift AAPI small businesses.

“We are proud to partner with Gold House on inspiring a new generation of API voices. It’s an honor to be a part of the inaugural Gold Gala and recognize some of the most influential change-makers in the community,” said Cat Coddington, Head of North American Gaming Creator Partnerships at Meta. 

Onsite experiences for attendees showcased an array of cross-industry excellence, featuring: an exclusive Super Bowl Vince Lombardi trophy viewing (generously loaned by the NFL in celebration with Taylor Rapp); crafted drinks, afterparty, and a towering ice bar hosted by Hennessy X.O; curated playlists spotlighting API artists by Spotify; interactive programming and special announcements with longtime partners like Disney; and meaningful resources to highlight the importance of API names from Procter & Gamble‘s pg.com/names campaign. Guests also got to watch the 2022 APAHM video featuring A100 honorees, produced by Gold House and Google as part of Google’s efforts to put Asian community and culture in focus.

After the gala, guests stayed on for the afterparty, hosted in collaboration with Hennessy X.O, with a curated late-night bites menu from Panda Restaurant Group and custom boba drinks from Bopomofo Cafe.

Both the gala and the afterparty were held at the historic Vibiana in downtown Los Angeles. Accommodations for award recipients were provided by Hotel Indigo Los Angeles Downtown and exclusive rides by BMW. The gala partnered with We Can Do This to amplify their vaccine and booster resources, without which, an in-person event would have been impossible. The evening was also made possible by Nordstrom, East West Bank, Warner Bros. Discovery, AMC Networks, and other partners featured HERE.

About Gold House

Gold House is the leading Asian and Pacific Islander (API) changemaker community, fighting together for socioeconomic equity. Through a suite of innovative programs and platforms, the organization unites, invests in, and promotes API creatives and companies. To learn more, visit HERE or follow @GoldHouseCo on InstagramFacebookTwitter, and LinkedIn.

Mindy Kaling and Maitreyi Ramakrishnan attend the House Gold Gala via Newswire for use by 360 Magazine
Auli'i Cravalho, Chloe Kim and Kelly Marie Tran Gold attend the House Gold Gala via Newswire for use by 360 Magazine
Photos courtesy of Newswire
Marvel Voices cover art via Anthony Blackwood Marvel Entertainment for use by 360 MAGAZINE

MARVEL VOICES: IDENTITY

This May MARVEL announces their brand-new VOICES: IDENTITY! In the second year of its edition, MARVEL’S VOICES IDENTITY #1 2022 platforms Ms. Marvel, Shang-Chi, Wong, Mantis and many more iconic Asian, Asian American and Pacific Island heroes in celebration of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month.

Editor Darren Shan spoke on the new release, stating, “Since last year’s Identity one-shot, the Asian super heroes of the Marvel Universe have become even more prominent in mainstream pop culture. That’s why I’m so excited to bring in these new and returning creators to the Marvel’s Voices fold to give new perspectives on these beloved characters!”

With representation at the forefront of priorities for Marvel, this upcoming edition highlights just that and more through including a vast array of Asian and AAPI creators on this project. Stay tuned for more information regarding the upcoming release of MARVEL’S VOICES: IDENTITY #1 2022, available on May 11. For more information, visit Marvel.com.

Comedy Invasians 2.0 via Matt Rivera for use by 360 Magazine

Comedy InvAsian 2.0

After a turbulent year of lows and highs for Asian-Americans and the AAPI community around the world, and on the heels of this year’s past AAPI Heritage month in May, executive producers Koji Steven Sakai (Liittle Nalu Pictures), Victor Elizalde (Viva Pictures) and Quentin Lee (Margin Films) felt empowered to team back up for Season 2 of Comedy InvAsian spotlighting a fresh cast of Pan-Asian/AAPI standup comedians. Please see the exclusive announcement in The Diaspora Times HERE.

Each episode will feature 30-minute sets from the breakout comedians. Four live shows will be taped on August 28th and 29th at the Japanese American National Museum. Tickets will go on sale HERE.

Comedy InvAsian 2.0 will feature up and coming comedians; queer HIV+ adovcate Korean-American comedian Aidan Park, Indian-American Vinayak Pal, Thai-American Eli Nicolas, former Chinese beauty queen Jiaoying Summers, Lin Sun of Cambodian descent juggling comedy and mommy duties, Vietnamese-American Rosie Tran by way of Louisiana, and veteran comedian turned skate coach George Wang Jr., and half-Indian/Pakistani-American Nishy XL.

Produced by Little Nalu Pictures with distribution by Viva Pictures Distribution LLC, Season 1 of Comedy InvAsian had its world premiere on Hulu as an exclusive in 2018. Season 2 sees Quentin Lee and Koji Steven Sakai producing through Sakai’s Little Nalu Pictures.

“Global audiences are demanding diversity and Comedy InvAsian is proving to be one of those outlets without compromising quality”, said Victor Elizalde, President of Viva Pictures, as well as producer and distributor of Entre Nos, the leading LatinX standup comedy show on HBO currently in its 5th season.

Comedy InvAsian 2.0 will feature original music created by The Slants, the legendary all Asian-American dance rock band who took on the supreme court and won the right to their name in a landmark case. The Slants’ founder Simon Tam and Quentin Lee are developing a scripted limited series about the band’s battle against the US Government to trademark their name.

Created by Koji Steven Sakai and directed by Quentin Lee, Comedy InvAsian 2.0 features the nations’ top and unique Asian-American comedians spotlighted with a 30-minute set each.

About Little Nalu Pictures

Writer/Producer Koji Steven Sakai is the founder of Little Nalu Pictures LLC. He has written seven feature films that have been produced, including, most recently, The Commando, a feature film starring Michael Jai White and Mickey Rourke which is being distributed by Paramount in the Fall of 2021. He also produced five feature films; a one-hour comedy special that originally premiered on Netflix, Comedy InvAsian, a television series featuring the nation’s top Asian American comedians, which premiered on Hulu and will be shooting a second season this summer; and Brash Girls Club, a limited comedy series that premiered on Tubi TV.

AZRA solo album cover for use by 360 Magazine

AZRA – SOLO

AZRA shares her upbeat and introspective new single, Solo. An anthem for independence, “Solo” celebrates not only self-empowerment, but also the journey we take to realize the powers that bind us and to break ourselves free from them.

“The process of creating this song was a mix of introspection and genuinely connecting with my listeners (aka Azradeities) about their own struggles in living their truth, finding self-worth, and dealing with societal expectations in the midst of all the external pressures,” shares AZRA“It’s an empowerment song claiming that we own our individuality and path through our lives.”

LA-based AZRA is an independent Korean American substance pop artist, performer, singer-songwriter, hip hop dancer, model, published author and motivational storyteller with a mission to inspire people to be their authentic selves and to empower others to live out their dreams unapologetically and boldly. Through bewitching music and memorable performances, she creates an experience toward a whole new state of mind: the 6th Dimension.

Audacious, spirited, and limitless, AZRA sees beyond what meets the eye. She grew up on musical theater, church choir as well as playing the piano, violin and hip-hop dancing and wrote the inspirational book The Cupcake Theory. This same fiery determination is what compelled her to reinvent herself to pursue her music career, no holds barred.

Her first single “Dimension” (2019) reached #1 on the Digital Radio Airplay Independent Chart, while her single “Dangerous” (2020) charted #1 on the Independent Digital Radio Airplay charts. She was selected as a ’20 and ’21 GRAMMY NEXT Artist by the Recording Academy and has garnered acclaim from publications such as Hollywood Life, LA Weekly, Celeb Mix and more.

Citing Freddie Mercury, Whitney Houston, Cher, Madonna, and Michael Jackson as her influences, AZRA has collaborated with some of the best names in the industry. She has opened for Plain White T’s and has toured for Pride Festivals all over the country. Her magnetic stage presence and infectious energy undoubtedly captivate audiences wherever she performs.

illustration by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

Chloe Flower – Chloe Flower

Genre-redefining pianist, composer, and producer Chloe Flower—whose sensational appearance with Cardi B stole the show at the 2019 Grammy Awards—has released her self-titled debut album on Sony Music Masterworks. Chloe Flower is available to stream and purchase HERE

In three acts—I. Innocence, II. Suffering and III. Hope—this sublime collection was composed, produced and recorded in the artist’s New York City apartment during the Covid-19 pandemic. It features spoken word from Deepak Chopra and an interpretation of Billie Eilish’s chart-topping hit “Bad Guy.” 

Encompassing sweet melodies, hip-hop, and trap beats, Chloe Flower is a modern-day classical sensation, pushing the boundaries with her unique self-created Popsical genre. Of her album Chloe states: “I want people to listen to the album as a whole body of work, which is why I have a prelude and a finale as well as the three acts. The ultimate goal was to make an album that inspires listeners, and makes people hopeful. It’s new, edgy and a sound that is authentic to me.  Even though my music has no lyrics, I still have something to say.”

In conjunction with the album release, Chloe has also unveiled the video for “When I See You Again” from the new album. With lush, dream-like visuals, Chloe Flower delivers an expressive performance emanating nostalgia and longing. Watch HERE.

“I wanted to write something inspirational and hopeful,” explains Chloe, who was moved to compose the track after a friend died of pancreatic cancer when he was too scared to visit a hospital due to the virus. “The melody is melancholy but also hopeful. One day, in this life or in some other way, we will meet our loved ones again.”

This video comes as a follow up to “Bohemia,” a dazzling and provocative music video showcasing the range of sound with hypnotic trap beats and seductive piano playing. Featuring Tony, Golden Globe, and Emmy winning actor Jeffrey Wright (James Bond, Westworld), the video was inspired by the 20th anniversary of iconic musical blockbuster Moulin Rouge and filmed at the notoriously exclusive New York City cabaret club, The Box.

About Chloe Flower

Chloe Flower is the most talked about pianist in the world following a show-stopping performance with Cardi B at the 2019 Grammy Awards. Chloe is an official Steinway Artist, composer, producer, activist, and fashion influencer who began playing piano at the age of two. Chloe Flower proudly celebrates her Asian heritage and culture and is a fierce advocate for women’s representation—particularly women of colour—in the music industry. Chloe sits on the board of directors for the Liberace Foundation and is a strong voice against human trafficking. She was honoured by the Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Activism (CAST) and has spoken at the United Nations as a music education ambassador. With her self-created Popsical genre—a blend of pop and classical—Chloe Flower is pushing boundaries and reaching new audiences. She has collaborated with Babyface, Nas, and Swizz Beats along with producers Tommy Brown (Ariana Grande/Meghan Trainor) and Mike WiLL Made-It (Beyonce/Miley Cyrus) to name a few.

illustration by Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

FACE to Kick-off LA County Youth Work AAPI Outreach

FACE to Kick-off LA County Youth@ Work AAPI Outreach Initiative To Address Racial Equity Gap in Services to AAPI Community

10,000 Internships In LA County and Private Employers

FACE will be joined by Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors Chair, Hilda L. Solis, Supervisor to the First District, LA County Department of Workforce Development, Aging and Community Services (WDACS), other County Departments, business partners, and youth participants to launch FACE’s AAPI Youth@Work program as part of its AAPI Career Pathways Initiative to reach more AAPI youth. The AAPI population make up 15% of the county population, yet only 3% of the Youth@Work are AAPI students. This initiative in partnership with WDACS is aimed at addressing this gap.

Youth@Work prepares underserved youth ages 14-24 who live in LA County for jobs and careers. The 120-hour internship provides students job training opportunities depending on their interest with one of 40 different departments in Los Angeles County or with private and nonprofit companies. Participants are paid $15/hour. In person and virtual job opportunities are available. Participants will also have the opportunity to connect with mentors and to attend leadership seminars.

Youth@Work pairs paid work experience for youth with a comprehensive and strategic set of employment, training, and support services provided through the County’s network of America’s Job Centers of California (AJCC).

Hyepin Im, FACE President & CEO, stated, “This past pandemic year, with over 6600 reported hate incidents only against AAPI, new awareness has risen of the disparities, suffering, and racial inequities experienced by AAPI communities.  Despite high educational attainment by many AAPI groups, they experience the lowest rates of being promoted to management. Our AAPI Youth@Work Initiative in partnership with LA County WDACS will allow a pathway for many AAPI youth to achieve their full potential. On behalf of FACE, we are thankful to partner with LA County to offer this excellent opportunity and also address the gap of low AAPI participation in the Youth@Work Program.

Visit the official website for more information about AAPI Youth@Work Program and to complete the interest form.

WHEN: Thursday, July 8 at 10:00am

LOCATION: 3580 Wilshire Blvd., 17th Floor Conference Room, Los Angeles, CA 90010

Members of the public may watch the kickoff here.

 WHO:

  • Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors Chair Hilda L. Solis, Supervisor to the First District
  • Otto Solórzano, Acting Director of the Los Angeles County Department of Workforce Development, Aging and Community Services (WDACS)
  • Hyepin Im, FACE President & CEO
  • Edward Yen, President of LA County Asian American Employee Association
  • Mike Fong, LACCD Member of the Board of Trustees
  • Jason Pu, San Gabrielle City Councilmember
  • Won Sik Myung, President of PAVA
  • Amanda Lee, Past Youth@Work Participant

*Some speakers may share some comments in other Asian languages

Taste of Love album art via Republic Records for use by 360 Magazine

TWICE × Taste of Love

TWICE’s new album, Taste of Love, marks their first Billboard Top 10 as the hit reaches #6.

Global K-pop icons, TWICE, officially reached the #6 chart-topping position on the Billboard 200 chart with their new album, Taste of Love, as well as #1 on the Billboard Top Album Sales Chart. This high Billboard 200 ranking marks a first for the group, jumping up 66 slots from their most recent #72 position for Eyes wide open. Taste of Love pushed the musical boundaries for the group, while in return earning TWICE their first top 10 album to date. The group initially ranked in the Billboard 200 chart in June 2020 with their album MORE & MORE, closely followed by Eyes wide open later that same year. To say TWICE had an impressive 12 months would be an understatement, but the group’s driving force remains the same. The focus has always been and will continue to be, the bond between TWICE and their fans, ONCE.

“We look forward to growing more and more with our fans,” said TWICE in a group statement. “Thank you for being with us.” 

TWICE has worked diligently to get to this point. In 2019, the group successfully completed their World Tour, TWICELIGHTS, which included sold-out shows in the U.S. at The Forum in Los Angeles, the Prudential Center in Newark (where they performed in front of 11,000 fans), and a show at the Wintrust Arena in Chicago. In February 2020, TWICE signed with Republic Records and launched their original  YouTube series “TWICE: Seize the Light.” With the higher chart rankings coming in just this time last year, the group turned it up a notch with their recent broadcast hits. TWICE performed I CAN’T STOP ME off MORE & MORE for Late Show with Stephen Colbert’s #PLAYATHOME YouTube series. Within the last 6-months, TWICE has been gracing screens everywhere. They performed on the prestigious TIME 100 Talks, had their U.S. broadcast debut on The Kelly Clarkson Show, and last week performed their new single Alcohol-Free on The Ellen DeGeneres Show. 

Throughout the last six years, TWICE has become a globally renowned phenomenon, rapidly taking the U.S. and beyond by storm – including the moment they graced Allure Magazine’s May 2020 cover. Their 2020 chart-topping albums, MORE & MORE and Eyes wide open, were included in TIME, Billboard, Teen Vogue, PAPER, and BuzzFeed’s roundup of top albums of the year. MORE & MORE also marked the first time TWICE have been included in Billboard’s Artist 100 and Billboard 200 lists, becoming the fifth all-female musical act from their country to rank on the 200 charts. In addition, Eyes wide open, hit the top five slot on the all-genre iTunes US Album Sales Chart, debuted at No. 8 on Billboard’s World Albums chart, and ranked #72 on the Billboard 200 Chart.

“The collective continues its artistic evolution” – BILLBOARD

“The young women have shown their multifaceted approach to music and ability to showcase new charms with each release, with “Alcohol-Free” being no exception” – ROLLING STONE

“TWICE succeed in their desire to bring their fans ‘good vibes’ in unprecedented times” – NME

About TWICE:

Formed under K-pop powerhouse JYP Entertainment in 2015, TWICE is one of the best-selling K-pop girl groups of all time regarding physical album sales. The group first rose to prominence with their debut title song Like OOH-AHH, and the 2016 breakthrough single CHEER UP which went on to top multiple Korean pop charts and won ‘Song of the Year’ at the Melon Music Awards and Mnet Asian Music Awards. The group was also included in Variety’s Youth Impact Report as the only K-pop group included in the list. The group was included in Forbes Korea Power Celebrity issue in both 2019 and 2017; and was also included in 18th place and as the only Asian act in Billboard’s 21 Under 21 2017: Music’s Next Generation issue. In 2019, the group successfully completed their World Tour, TWICELIGHTS, which included sold-out shows in the U.S. at The Forum in Los Angeles, the Prudential Center in Newark (where they performed in front of 11,000 fans), and a show at the Wintrust Arena in Chicago. Last year, TWICE’s album MORE & MORE made its first ranking on the Artist 100 and Billboard 200 lists. Their second 2020 album, Eyes wide open, hit the top five slot on the all-genre iTunes US Album Sales Chart and debuted at No. 8 on Billboard’s World Albums chart; and the album’s lead track debuted in the top 10 of the all-genre iTunes US Song Sales Chart. The group hit their first top 10 album for Taste of Love, ranking it at #6 on the Billboard 200 chart. TWICE recently performed Alcohol-Free on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, CRY FOR ME on The Kelly Clarkson Show, I CAN’T STOP ME on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert’s #PLAYATHOME digital YouTube series, and DEPEND ON YOU on TIME100 Talks.

Joel Peterson photo via Deseret News for use by 360 Magazine

Joel Peterson x My Road to Cancellation

Joel Peterson, Stanford Professor and former JetBlue Chairman, writes about his experience navigating the minefield of woke hostility in his piece My Road to Cancellation:

“Wokeism,” America’s new civil religion, draws on elements of neo-Marxism, critical race theory, social justice and identity politics. Its adherents believe it will lead to a more just society. Its detractors, on the other hand, believe its “cancel culture” will push civil society to the brink. And, for the “woke,” either will do.

The roots of my own unlikely cancelation go as far back as 1987, when Jesse Jackson marched Stanford students up Palm Drive to a rhythmic chant of “Hey, hey, ho, ho! Western Civ has got to go!” The next year, I joined the advisory council of its Graduate School of Business where I was soon invited to fill a one-year faculty vacancy. To everyone’s surprise (including my own), I returned every fall for the next three decades to teach four courses to a generation of exceptional MBA candidates.

Then, last year, before a student-politician boldly posted that “White people need to be eradicated,” I was summoned to respond to an equally disturbing complaint over having “triggered” woke students. Because I didn’t think I’d done anything worthy of the summons and because I had received the distinguished teaching award from students, a “Silver Apple Award” from alumni and been appointed to a faculty chair, I wasn’t worried. Alas, I’d misjudged my peril.

Years after Jackson’s campaign to eliminate Stanford’s requirement to study Western civilization, an Iowa-born, New York Times reporter, Nikole Hannah-Jones, developed what she titled “The 1619 Project.” In it, she presented America as founded on slavery and stained by perpetual bigotry.

With boosts from the Pulitzer Foundation and from George Floyd’s tragic death, her social justice message struck a nerve. However, when a number of historians debunked the pseudo-history, Hannah-Jones repositioned her essay as “a work of journalism that explicitly seeks to challenge the national narrative.” She followed up with a New York Times Magazine article headlined “What is Owed” making a case for reparations, consistent with her 1995 letter to the editor in Notre Dame’s “The Observer,” in which she likened Christopher Columbus to Hitler.

With police departments defunded, monuments vandalized and cities torched, Dr. Seuss was soon condemned as racist, Mr. Potato Head scheduled for gender reassignment, and free speech restricted by social media oligarchs. So, it wasn’t a surprise to see social justice warriors on the previously welcoming Graduate School of Business campus.

Content of character vs. color of skin

In a class I teach, students objected when guest CEOs claimed to have been “color blind.” When I volunteered that I, too, had resisted hiring based on skin color, gender or quotas, and had relied, instead, on character, competence and commitment, some students were offended. To understand why those “triggered” would object to standards of character and competence being added to the emergent holy grail of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI), I turned to one of my own daughters.

Sensing my bafflement at the outrage, she immediately wrote back:

“I have known you my entire life, and I know by your words and deeds that you value all people of all races, ethnicities, and genders. I know you are constantly impressed and inspired by immigrants and their amazing stories of courage and perseverance. I’m proud of the work you’ve done. If this younger, ‘triggered’ generation pushes out of their lives all who seek to improve their understanding, teach them, and open their minds to broader ways of thinking, it will be to their detriment.”

I’d taught my kids – and, until now, my students — that talent, character, and competence are evenly distributed across every demographic. In response to my determination to be on the lookout for leaders without regard to identity, an offended gender-studies major wrote that she’d not known “whether to scream or throw up.” After all, it had been nearly 60 years since Martin Luther King had dreamt of the day when the content of one’s character mattered more than the color of one’s skin. But, by the time that day happily arrived, “wokeism” had hijacked his dream, re-elevating skin color over character.

As demands for skin-color diversity were broadened to include gender and sexual orientation, a student notified me that I’d called on more men than women in two (of four) classes. Knowing that I was no respecter of persons — whether by gender, race, sexual orientation, or anything else — I moved ahead with the course, suddenly aware that my interactions with students were being catalogued by identity.

Soon, a Black Lives Matter advocate asked, of all things, whether I would stand for the American flag. To provide context for my decision, I shared a story. As a toddler, I’d seen my mother take a call from the Department of Defense announcing that her fighter-pilot brother had been killed. Honoring her grief, I’d chosen to stand for the flag under which my only uncle had offered the ultimate sacrifice. The student’s response was presented as an irrefutable argument; my choice was “racist.”

Furthermore, in this woke new world, my professional experience was no longer relevant because of the race and gender I’d been assigned at birth. Despite having created tens of thousands of jobs, promoted women and minorities, and coached scores of entrepreneurs, I was deemed an “oppressor” in the catechism of “wokeism.” Furthermore, the penance for being raised in a “systemically racist” society — founded on millennia of Greek, Roman and Judeo-Christian antecedents, no less — was submission, and, if resisted, cancelation.

The reason behind such tyranny came into focus for me when Condolezza Rice, former secretary of state and current director of the Hoover Institution at Stanford, told me she’d shared with her students that the capture of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (9/11’s architect) had felt like “having Erwin Rommel under lock and key.” The blank looks on the faces of her very bright students revealed that they had never heard of WWII’s famous Desert Fox.

Until then, I’d traced the enmity to activists like Jackson and Hannah-Jones. Now, I could see that it also stemmed from students having swapped an education for indoctrination. Those enlisted as social justice warriors had avoided the lessons of history, missed out on refining skills that might have allowed them to judge assertions, and denied themselves the insights required to make wise trade-offs.

Because such uninformed activism brought with it a minefield of woke hostility, I kept to myself any reservations I harbored about critical race theory, gender fluidity, and climate alarm. And, when Stanford’s math department proposed achieving “racial equity” by eliminating AP math (as racist, no less), I also kept quiet. Instead, I hoped my hardscrabble climb to CEO might inspire those who saw themselves as victims of inequity. Ironically, those who strained to label my uphill journey a product of “white supremacy” were often the very beneficiaries of woke preferences.

Oppressor-victim

To understand this recipe for canceling predecessor generations, I spoke next with Stanford military historian Victor Davis Hanson. Because Hanson had written the following, I wanted his help in gracefully handling the oppressor-victim theme:

“We should not… allow a current affluent, leisure, and pampered generation to hijack the past, and damn it to perdition. (They have) not earned the right to… cancel… those of the past who won Gettysburg, or built the Hoover Dam, or produced a Liberty ship every week.”

While Stanford had long nurtured a remarkably diverse and admirably inclusive community, it nonetheless rejected Hanson’s counsel in favor of a now fashionable “institutional racism.”

When Graduate School of Business faculty were further instructed to avoid “racist and xenophobic rhetoric and actions against the Asian American and Pacific Islander community,” I found myself wondering if the addendum were a virtue-signaling accusation, or if it were based on something I’d simply never encountered in all my years at Stanford. And, when the facts behind subsequent murders (of a Capitol police officer and 10 Colorado shoppers) contradicted de rigueur narratives, I wondered if the time had come to move beyond racial memes.

Apparently not. With free markets also labeled “racist,” those of us with responsibilities outside the ivory tower began to feel our “diversity of optic” (based on long experience) had been dismissed in favor of a “diversity of identity” (rooted in ideology). So, while I care deeply about Stanford University, and like and admire its president, provost, and business school dean, I was beginning to feel isolated.

Their deference to selective diversity led me to reflect upon a meeting I’d conducted in Berlin as chairman of JetBlue Airways. After the meeting, I’d taken a stroll down Unter den Linden to the Bebelplatz, 500 yards to the east of Berlin’s famous Brandenburg Gate. It was at that plaza, on May 10, 1933, that newly empowered Nazi officials had orchestrated the burning of “objectionable” books. Later dubbed “The Night of Shame,” the conflagration eventually contributed to Germany’s liberal democracy turning a blind eye to Kristallnacht, the Holocaust and an appalling rationale for war.

While loath to compare such a long-ago shame with how I was currently feeling in Palo Alto, of all places, I remembered being impressed that, in Berlin, the survivors of that era’s cancelation had later inserted “stumbling stones” between pavers to ensure that all who followed neither forget, nor repeat, that calamity.

As I traversed the once-riven capital city, the ground-level reminders had provoked in me a surge of optimism. Surely, the world would avoid the sort of conflict for which my own father had gone to war. Surely, everyone realized by now that banning books, restricting free speech and stoking fear would lead to tragedy. And, just as surely, America would eventually reject totalitarianism, even in its “wokest” form.

Yet, here I was, only three years later, 6,000 miles to the west of Berlin, sensing I was perilously connected to a prior generation’s intolerance. Adding to my anxiety was a discovery that my grandchildren’s generation were being scheduled to view an honorable heritage through a lens cleverly manufactured to provoke shame.

Forced to consider moving to a less hostile teaching environment, I heard from former students. One female “of color” offered that, of all her professors, I’d been the most supportive of women and minorities. Another confirmed that the majority of his classmates felt silenced by the threats of a racist label. One student even scolded me for having allowed “the slings and arrows” of the woke to achieve their hoped-for effect.

I smiled wanly to see that Prince Hamlet had somehow survived Jesse Jackson. I, on the other hand, had failed utterly to anticipate the distorting polemics of identity politics. The script advanced during America’s annus horribilis had pitted race against race, gender against gender, and generation against generation, all risking a degradation of spirit worse than any virus.

As a former CEO, it seemed to me that the narrative had gone well beyond gaining political or market advantage. It had even exceeded antifa’s hope for French-Revolution-style anarchy. In fact, by 2021, it looked like a bold attempt at a hostile takeover of mankind’s best hope for peace and prosperity.

This conclusion led me to contrast two Americans best known for their connections to societal breakdown — a mid-19th-century Abraham Lincoln and a mid-20th-century Saul Alinsky. I selected Lincoln because he’d guided America through a civil war, and Alinsky because his dream had been to provoke civil unrest by inciting those he called the “have-nots” against those whom he called the “haves.”

President Lincoln’s observation of America’s vulnerability mirrored community organizer Alinsky’s precondition for a successful revolution. Thus, the warning attributed to Lincoln that “America will never be destroyed from the outside; if we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves” was the basis for the race and class warfare Alinsky welcomed by rewriting history, inciting envy and “canceling” a large portion of the population.

Whereas Martin Luther King had called upon our “better angels” to subordinate our differences to shared values and, thus, to overcome what Condi Rice called our nation’s “birth defect,” Alinsky chose to repudiate King’s redemptive dream. If he could get people to ignore e pluribus unum (America’s motto since 1782), he might be able to overcome the spirit under which the nation had thrived.

By 2020, the pandemic had offered activists a unique opportunity to cleave the nation along identity and tribal lines, skirting the 238-year-old aspiration that had been Alinsky’s steepest obstacle. Using a fear of cancellation to silence half the population, SJWs dismissed the steady social progress that was the trademark of the world’s most successful multicultural society. Instead of celebrating the progress flowing from our commonalities, they fomented division by pointing to historical injustices.

Between a pandemic, racial tensions and the absence of a Lincolnesque figure to bind up our wounds and bring us together, America was, indeed, vulnerable. As its citizens awakened to the soft tyranny promoted during the pandemic, many felt betrayed by institutions they’d once admired and leaders they’d once trusted. And, for my part, I discovered that the experience I’d had with cancellation in the academy was being repeated all across the nation.

While I may well survive, America will not survive the rewriting of its history, the violation of its Constitution and the abandonment of the freedoms it has promised to citizens of all political persuasions, ethnicities, genders and orientations. No matter our differences, unless we preserve free speech, secure our Constitution and re-enthrone individual responsibility over victimhood, all the king’s horses and all the king’s men will be unable to put Humpty Dumpty back together again.

And Alinsky’s vision will have canceled Lincoln’s.

Joel Peterson Bio

Joel Peterson is the Robert L. Joss Professor of Management at Stanford University, the former managing partner of the Trammell Crow Company, the former chairman of the board of Overseers of the Hoover Institution, the former chairman of JetBlue Airways and the founder and chairman of Peterson Partners, a sponsor for a quarter century of more than a dozen funds covering private equity, venture and real estate investments in hundreds of companies and real estate projects across the nation and throughout the world.