Posts tagged with "Employment"

Fifteen Tips for an Effective Job Search

Job searching isn’t easy, but it doesn’t have to feel overwhelming, either. There are many factors to consider when you’re looking for your next position, but you can break them down into three basic stages: assess, research, and apply.

By working through these stages, you can significantly decrease stress and find your next job quickly. Let’s get started!

Stage 1: Assess

Before you update your LinkedIn account or start searching job boards, begin by deciding what qualities you’re looking for in a job.

Get out a journal and your colored pens, and work through the following brainstorming questions to set a solid foundation for yourself. You’ll use these notes to filter possible jobs later on in the research stage.

  1. Check Your Hours

Job hours vary widely. Consider the difference between a regular 9-to-5 and a job waiting tables or working retail. Ask yourself the following questions to decide what kind of job would work best for you:

  • How many hours a week do you want to work? Remember to consider other responsibilities, and don’t overload yourself if you can help it.
  • What kind of job hours have you worked before, and what did you like/dislike about them?
  • Do you prefer a regular, dependable schedule or schedules that vary week to week? 
  • Are you okay with overtime?
  1. Consider Pay

Next, think about compensation. Don’t shortchange yourself, but do be realistic about what companies offer, especially if this is your first job. To get a better sense of your paycheck goals, ask yourself these questions:

  • What are my living expenses month-to-month?
  • What are my savings goals?
  • What percentage of my paycheck will go to taxes (local, state, and federal)?
  • Do I have a buffer in case of emergencies?

While you’re thinking about pay, also consider company benefits:

  • Do you want a pension, 401(k), or a company savings plan?
  • What kind of health care package do you need?
  • How many days of paid time off would you like?
  1. Integrate Personal Goals

Think about how you’d like your job to connect with the rest of your life. Do you have personal goals that you can combine with work?

  • Do you want the option of a raise in the near future?
  • Do you want to go back to school eventually?
  • What personal growth goals do you have for yourself?
  • What positive benefits do you hope to receive from your job, other than financial pay?
  1. Determine Your Working Style

Learning about yourself and how you work best is a life-long process. Start with what you already know and consider what kind of job environment would best suit you. Below are some questions to help you get started:

  • What are your strengths and weaknesses?
  • Do you enjoy working with others or by yourself?
  • Do you operate better in quiet or crowded settings?
  • How much oversight do you need to feel motivated?
  • How do you communicate with others best?
  1. Decide on Location

Location is another essential factor to consider during the assessment stage. Many people move when they get a new job. However, in the last few years, remote work options have increased. Answer these questions next:

  • Does working remotely sound amazing to you?
  • Are you excited to work in an office?
  • Would you be willing to move for a job?
  • If so, where would you be excited to move?

Stage 2: Research

Great work! Now that you’ve considered your side of the working relationship, it’s time to look at your potential employers. Take a break, grab a coffee, and get started!

  1. Keep a Record

Before you start searching, make a spreadsheet to keep track of what you find. Add categories for company names, job roles, pay, benefits, hours, notes, and your current application status. 

Filling out this spreadsheet as you go will save you a lot of time and confusion later.

  1. Search Job Boards

Now that your spreadsheet is all set up, you’re ready to start searching! Here’s where your notes from earlier come in handy. Use the filters offered on the job sites below to streamline your searches based on personal preferences. This list of job sites is by no means exhaustive, but it’s an excellent place to start:

  • Indeed
  • SimplyHired
  • Handshake
  • LinkedIn
  • Monster Jobs
  • Glassdoor
  • Hired
  1. Talk to People

Don’t conduct all of your research over a computer screen. Talk to people you know and let them know you’re job searching. Many work opportunities come through word of mouth. Consider taking these additional steps to round out your research:

  • Message an employee over LinkedIn and ask for a phone call.
  • Schedule an in-person peer interview.
  • Talk to people you know who work for the company or work similar jobs.
  • Go to networking events and career fairs.

One thing that sometimes goes unsaid is to ask for help if your mental health is affecting your search. Finding gainful employment is essential, but it shouldn’t come at the cost of your well-being.

  1. Dig Deeper

To get a better picture of the companies you’re considering, check their websites. Google them and read employee reviews on sites like Glassdoor. Just remember that for every angry review you read, there may be 10 happy employees.

Stage 3: Apply

Now that your research is complete, you should have new connections and a spreadsheet filled with multiple job opportunities. Time for stage three: applying. Here’s how to move through the application process and get hired.

  1. Update Your LinkedIn Account

Four people are hired every minute through LinkedIn. Updating your LinkedIn profile makes it easy for recruiters to find you and gives them easy access to more information about you. Get professional headshots and update your LinkedIn profile before you start sending out applications.

  1. Revamp Your Resume

If you are applying to high-competition positions with many applicants, your resume may be read by a machine rather than a person. So, while it may be tempting to make your resume look stylish and artsy, it’s better for you to make it scannable. Use clear sections, a simple font, and dark headlines.

Avoid images and incorporate your LinkedIn account into your contact information instead. Tailor each resume you send out to fit the company role you hope to fill.

  1. Write Cover Letters

Personalize your application further by also including a cover letter. There you can share what you can bring to each company and why you’re excited to work with them.

Make it clear that you’ve researched their company and that you align with their values. Be clear and personable, and end with a thank you.

  1. Apply In-Person

If you can, deliver your resume and cover letter in-person. Making personal contact with your future employer makes it far more likely that they’ll hire you.

Hiring is a time-consuming and challenging process – it’s not fun for companies, either! Give relief to the hiring manager by making yourself an easy choice for the position.

  1. Pass the Interview

Interviews don’t have to be stressful. Remember: an interview is your chance to get to know a company just as much as it’s their chance to talk to you. Ask questions, listen, and be genuine.

Working with a company is a partnership, and an interview helps both parties know if it will be a long-lasting and successful one. Do your research and connect genuinely with your interviewers.

  1. Follow Up

After applications and interviews, send follow-up emails. This extra bit of human contact shows companies you care and reminds them of your name. You know that you’d be a fantastic employee – show them that by using your excellent people skills.

Be creative and take every opportunity to show companies that you’re personable, motivated, and genuine. Hopefully, you’ll hear back from several potential employers soon.

Congratulations!

At this point, you’ve done everything you can. Take a breather, and rest. Remember that it can take a long time for hiring agents to get back to you, so be patient.

It’s a good idea to repeat the cycle of assessing, researching, and applying at least once while you wait for responses. More experience with the process may have changed your priorities or opened up new questions. Don’t be afraid to branch out and try something you didn’t initially think would work for you.

Happy job searching!

illustration by Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

FACE to Kick-off LA County Youth Work AAPI Outreach

FACE to Kick-off LA County Youth@ Work AAPI Outreach Initiative To Address Racial Equity Gap in Services to AAPI Community

10,000 Internships In LA County and Private Employers

FACE will be joined by Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors Chair, Hilda L. Solis, Supervisor to the First District, LA County Department of Workforce Development, Aging and Community Services (WDACS), other County Departments, business partners, and youth participants to launch FACE’s AAPI Youth@Work program as part of its AAPI Career Pathways Initiative to reach more AAPI youth. The AAPI population make up 15% of the county population, yet only 3% of the Youth@Work are AAPI students. This initiative in partnership with WDACS is aimed at addressing this gap.

Youth@Work prepares underserved youth ages 14-24 who live in LA County for jobs and careers. The 120-hour internship provides students job training opportunities depending on their interest with one of 40 different departments in Los Angeles County or with private and nonprofit companies. Participants are paid $15/hour. In person and virtual job opportunities are available. Participants will also have the opportunity to connect with mentors and to attend leadership seminars.

Youth@Work pairs paid work experience for youth with a comprehensive and strategic set of employment, training, and support services provided through the County’s network of America’s Job Centers of California (AJCC).

Hyepin Im, FACE President & CEO, stated, “This past pandemic year, with over 6600 reported hate incidents only against AAPI, new awareness has risen of the disparities, suffering, and racial inequities experienced by AAPI communities.  Despite high educational attainment by many AAPI groups, they experience the lowest rates of being promoted to management. Our AAPI Youth@Work Initiative in partnership with LA County WDACS will allow a pathway for many AAPI youth to achieve their full potential. On behalf of FACE, we are thankful to partner with LA County to offer this excellent opportunity and also address the gap of low AAPI participation in the Youth@Work Program.

Visit the official website for more information about AAPI Youth@Work Program and to complete the interest form.

WHEN: Thursday, July 8 at 10:00am

LOCATION: 3580 Wilshire Blvd., 17th Floor Conference Room, Los Angeles, CA 90010

Members of the public may watch the kickoff here.

 WHO:

  • Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors Chair Hilda L. Solis, Supervisor to the First District
  • Otto Solórzano, Acting Director of the Los Angeles County Department of Workforce Development, Aging and Community Services (WDACS)
  • Hyepin Im, FACE President & CEO
  • Edward Yen, President of LA County Asian American Employee Association
  • Mike Fong, LACCD Member of the Board of Trustees
  • Jason Pu, San Gabrielle City Councilmember
  • Won Sik Myung, President of PAVA
  • Amanda Lee, Past Youth@Work Participant

*Some speakers may share some comments in other Asian languages

LGBTQ+ illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Corporate Leaders × Anti-Lgbtq Bills

Corporate leaders: Companies should work against anti-LGBTQ bills in Texas, other states 

Chris Adamo, vice president of Federal and Industry Affairs at Danone North America; Brad Figel, vice president of Public Affairs North America at Mars, Inc.; Molly Fogarty senior vice president of Corporate & Government Affairs at Nestlé USA; and Tom Langan, North America director of Sustainable Business & External Affairs for Unilever:

  • “As four of the largest food companies and major employers in the United States, we view the growing number of anti-LGBTQ+ bills under consideration in state legislatures, including those that target transgender people and particularly children, with increasing alarm.
  • “These bills are bad for families, for communities, for businesses and for the U.S. economy, all still reeling from the COVID-19 pandemic…This motivates us to continue using our influence to advocate for policies that establish full equality at the federal and state levels, including swift Senate passage of the Equality Act.
  • “Discriminatory legislation — in threat and in practice — directly and negatively impacts the ability of our businesses to compete. It undermines our ability to recruit our future workforces and retain existing talent in states like Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia, Texas and others enacting and considering draconian legislation.”
  • “Such policies are out of step with the views of most Americans. The overwhelming majority of Americans support full equality for LGBTQ+ people, according to recent data released by the Human Rights Campaign.”
  • Companies have a responsibility to actively work with federal and state legislators to advocate against bills that harm our employees and our customers, and to advance fairness and equality for all Americans”

We condemn dangerous, discriminatory legislation that serves as an attack on LGBTQ+ individuals, particularly transgender and non-binary people.

As four of the largest food companies and major employers in the United States, we view the growing number of anti-LGBTQ+ bills under consideration in state legislatures, including those that target transgender people and particularly children, with increasing alarm.

These bills are bad for families, for communities, for businesses and for the U.S. economy, all still reeling from the COVID-19 pandemic.

We condemn dangerous, discriminatory legislation that serves as an attack on LGBTQ+ individuals, particularly transgender and nonbinary people. Such laws not only threaten hard-won progress to bring greater awareness, support and equality to transgender Americans, they also threaten the livelihoods and safety of their communities and their families.

This motivates us to continue using our influence to advocate for policies that establish full equality at the federal and state levels, including swift Senate passage of the Equality Act.

Member companies of the Sustainable Food Policy Alliance, including Danone North America, Mars, Inc., Nestlé USA and Unilever United States, urge the entire U.S. business community to do the same.

This issue is not political. Providing the same basic protections to LGBTQ+ people as are provided to protected groups under federal law is the right thing to do for businesses and for society.

We employ tens of thousands of people in communities across the country. We embrace diversity in our workforces. Inclusive principles already guide the way we work, run our successful businesses, and engage with our employees and communities.

Discriminatory legislation — in threat and in practice — directly and negatively impacts the ability of our businesses to compete. It undermines our ability to recruit our future workforces and retain existing talent in states like Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia, Texas and others enacting and considering draconian legislation.

In Kentucky, for example, proposed legislation would allow health care providers to turn away LGBTQ+ and other patients, and bar trans youth from K-12 public school and university sports. Similarly, in Texas, legislators have proposed bills that would ban transgender girls from youth sports.

When states legislate this way, not only do they create an environment where not everyone feels safe and welcomed, they endorse it. Such environments deny transgender and nonbinary people the opportunity to fully contribute to the economies in places where they work and live. This harms them and their families and hinders businesses and local communities.

We applaud Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson’s decision this week to veto legislation that would have banned gender-affirming medical care for transgender youth. Unfortunately, the Arkansas legislature overrode the governor’s veto Tuesday.

Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves signs a bill in March 2021 to ban transgender athletes from competing on girls or women’s sports teams.

Such policies are out of step with the views of most Americans. The overwhelming majority of Americans support full equality for LGBTQ+ people, according to recent data released by the Human Rights Campaign.

Legislation hurts states’ economies

The ramifications of these discriminatory bills on states’ economic and financial health are also well-documented. A UCLA study found that the social, economic and health effects of stigma and discrimination against LGBTQ+ people negatively impact Texas’ economy by tens of millions of dollars each year. Another study by the Texas Association of Business estimated that discriminatory legislation could result in an estimated economic loss to Texas’ gross domestic product ranging from $964 million to $8.5 billion.

The impacts of such bills are not limited to the states where they are passed. Researchers that studied 39 countries found a clear link between LGBTQ+ discriminatory practices and legislation and the corresponding loss of potential economic output. For LGBTQ+ youth, the study found that discrimination harms their learning, resulting in increased dropout rates and, consequently, reduced participation in the workforce.

We acknowledge that words are powerful. But for companies to engage new generations of workers and consumers, while fostering an environment good for people and for business, we must move beyond only public statements of support for LGBTQ+ issues.

Companies should protect employees

Companies have a responsibility to actively work with federal and state legislators to advocate against bills that harm our employees and our customers, and to advance fairness and equality for all Americans.

We four SFPA companies are committed to stepping up and taking action, including through our advocacy on this important issue. Doing so will support an environment in which all people can grow, thrive, compete and succeed as their true, authentic selves.

Chris Adamo is vice president of Federal and Industry Affairs at Danone North America. Brad Figel is vice president of Public Affairs North America at Mars, Inc. Molly Fogarty is senior vice president of Corporate & Government Affairs at Nestlé USA. Tom Langan is North America director of Sustainable Business & External Affairs for Unilever.

Corporate leaders: Companies should work against anti-LGBTQ bills in Texas, other states

Empowering women by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Lauren Rottet Pays Tribute

Architect and Interior Designer Lauren Rottet pays tribute
to Women’s History Month

Rottet’s ongoing commitment to her profession is female-forward

Lauren Rottet, FAIA, FIIDA, internationally celebrated architect, designer, and founding principal/president and owner of Rottet Studio, acknowledges Women’s History Month, and her continuing commitment to the design industry and to women who create public and private spaces.

A WBE-certified business, Rottet Studio occupies a unique place in the industry – over 60% of their full-time staff are female. Rottet is also the first woman in history to be elevated to Fellow status, the highest membership honor, by both the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and International Interior Design Association (IIDA).  In the past two decades, Rottet has broken new ground with award-winning furniture, office, workplace, and hospitality design.  Her firm’s output totals more than 65 million sq. ft. of built design.

“I was raised by a father who told me that there wouldn’t be a difference between men and women in my generation, and I needed a career so that I wouldn’t need to rely on anybody else.” This is how Rottet described her decision to study architecture, after forgoing a career in medicine. “Fewer than 10 percent of women graduated in my class, but I didn’t really think consciously about being a woman in architecture. I never really thought about it as a male field,” she adds.

“I think probably the best career advice I ever received, was just to listen. You want to immediately come up with a solution or an idea, and instantly respond, but I think if you sit back and listen to the parameters,
to what the client wants, what the surroundings tell you about a project, I think that’s probably the most helpful professional advice one can give.” 

“They always say, ‘Hire your replacement, because then you can do bigger and better things,’” she says about the hiring and mentoring process. “The key to being a good mentor is recognizing when you can’t do it all by yourself, and that you have to teach someone else how to do it. The education of our staff, and of our clients is absolutely key.”

Meet the Man Behind Bronx Night Market

By Hannah DiPilato

360 Magazine recently had the opportunity to sit down with Marco Shalma, founder of Round Seven Media and MASC Hospitality Group. He is responsible for beginning a food and culture festival in New York called The Bronx Night Market. In this interview, he talks about everything from advice for young entrepreneurs to his favorite food spots in New York. 

How did you begin Round Seven Media and why did you decide to start this?

I started in 2013, which was after my education at NYU for undergrad and pursuing a master’s degree in film and tv. Marketing was my passion, and I wanted to run a campaign in a different way. I wanted to use the concept of getting people into the mix of the story and I wanted to get that into a narrative for clients in marketing. In 2013, I sold my shares in restaurant groups and I wanted to begin marketing for myself. I went around and started looking for clients in restaurant and hospitality for about 20 years, which I had experience in. With the explosion of Instagram and technology, it was the perfect time to explore marketing opportunities.

When the company started, the first thing was to go find professional people with a school of thought from film and writing. Our business is known for being a launch campaign for ideas, projects, etc. and we will build an online presence for our clients by finding the key demographic. We are focused on the launch period so our work doesn’t really go further than the six month period.

You also founded MASC Hospitality Group, what made you start another business as well?

MASC Hospitality is one of those situations that happened backward, meaning we first took on the Bronx Night Market project in 2017, which then branched out to many other events that were affiliated with the Bronx Night Market. At one point, we needed to incorporate all of these events, so we decided to create MASC Hospitality Group. If you think about it, MASC Hospitality is a company that basically creates different events while Round Seven Media is the one promoting these events. Sometime around 2018, I started taking fewer clients for Round Seven Media and started adding more of my own companies to Round Seven Media. 

What is your favorite event that MASC Hospitality Group is responsible for?

My favorite event hands down is Bronx Night Market. The Bronx Night Market is my baby, it’s a proud moment for me because it came from a vision of bringing something to the Bronx community, my community, that is a prideful event and a reason to be proud of the borrow, without needing to commute to Manhattan or Queens to experience a festival that celebrates culture, cuisine and commerce. 

We always say culture, cuisine and commerce because culture encompasses the diversity of the city with so many different flavors, cuisine because this is the grand unifier, everyone can enjoy a meal together no matter what skin tone or nationality and commerce is the idea of creating space for young entrepreneurs and small local businesses to present what they do to a large number of people and promote their business to help them move into the next stage of their success. This encompasses everything we are about, supporting small businesses, young entrepreneurship and of course, good, good food. 

Have you encountered any problems while being a business owner for these two organizations?

When you’re an entrepreneur or small business owner, you always encounter problems. It’s always a matter of hiring the right people, navigating through resources, financing and funding, but mostly it’s identifying and understanding the demographic. I think for me, as a serial entrepreneur, a good idea is a good idea, but you need to identify your key demographic. You need to identify what you do and who it’s for. Then, you work for months or years fine-tuning to make everything connect and basically build a community around your brand.

For example, Round Seven Media is a brand that understands the power of our way of doing business. We are known as one of the top agencies in New York to run launch campaigns for brands because we are dedicated to doing that. With something like The Bronx Night Market, it’s about identifying Bronx-based foodies and people that want to explore offerings and now they have the opportunity to do that in a place where they feel safe, secure and happy. The event is really designed for the community instead of something that could be done anywhere else. 

What do you look for in employees that you hire for your company? 

We hire on a regular basis, we continuously hire for different projects on behalf of companies. When we finish a launch campaign at Round Seven Media, we like to hire people to replace us, younger people, hungry people that can do social media for those brands. When we look at hiring, the most important thing for us at the moment is consistency and the ability to have a follow-up and a follow-through. I think those are the three very, very important elements because in today’s field of business, having consistency and bringing your A-game every time is something that is critical to the success of any business. I’ve unfortunately had to work with people that can bring 120% one day and 30% the next day. This also has a lot to do with company culture and the idea that you need to create an environment that allows people to be consistent.

Another big part is the ability to follow up and follow through. I can’t even tell you how many times you will be doing things where you need to follow up with clients and partners and sometimes it even takes up to 20 emails. Each and every opportunity for you to accomplish something or to create something if you don’t follow through, you have failed. We are also looking for employees that are super savvy with communications and social media because this is becoming a crucial part of any brand. The ability to understand how media works and how to maximize these services is important to our brand. 

What advice would you give to young entrepreneurs like you once were?

If I had to give one piece of advice to young entrepreneurs, it would be to not bite off more than you can chew: focus, focus, focus. I keep seeing a lot of young entrepreneurs that I work with trying to do too much. They try to put on six or seven different hats and be the CEO of the universe at the same time. I always say, focus on the one thing, take your time, become the best in your field and then explore from there. From what I’ve seen, the ability to focus and distill your message and brand into the simplest form and show it to other people such as the investors and partners, showing your dedication to a single idea is the most valuable.

When I used to work on movies, right after grad school, one of the exercises I had that influenced me completely was an exercise of writing a logline for a feature film. You have a script of like 90 pages that you need to turn in to a 25-word logline that will explain exactly what that movie is. It’s almost an impossible mission, but once you start on this, you understand how important the focus is. I now tell people you need to understand your business so well that nothing will get in the way. That’s how you get investors and money. 

I know you’re passionate about food, what are some restaurants you would recommend to our readers?

It’s hard to talk about restaurants right now when the restaurant industry is suffering so much. Every day we see another one of my favorite restaurants closing down and the industry is struggling especially when it seems like the industry won’t open soon. I’ll tell you about food in general, as a foodie the most important thing for me is not chasing trends, but a restaurant that has a focused menu, where they know what they’re doing and they’re focused on creating the best experience with a sense of consistency. I know I probably sound like everything is driven like that, but honestly, it’s so important.

Before covid I used to go to a restaurant once a month in West Harlem that used to make the most amazing eggplant pasta, there was also a place I used to go with the most amazing salmon dish and I used to go to another place with the most amazing pad thai. That’s the best thing about living in New York, you get exposed to so much food and you’ll try a lot of trends, but at the end of the day, when you hit something that you know is going to be just as good every time you get it, it becomes the place you go for that dish.

The older I get I realize that’s the most important thing because I want to go back to the restaurant five years later and get the same food and experience. I’m hoping we’ll come out of this soon and be able to go and enjoy restaurants again. Even if you don’t like restaurants and you’re a great cook, you miss sitting down with your friends in a restaurant, eating some food, enjoying a bottle of wine and sharing a good laugh. It’s not about the food, it’s about the experience. 

Where do you see yourself going next in your career? 

At the moment we are trying to get back to normal life especially with Bronx Night Market and other events that we have. I’m working very hard to define what we can do in public spaces to help restaurants and other brick and mortar restaurants come back to life.

At the moment, I’m really dedicating a lot of my time to working with city and state agencies to create programming that will allow brick and mortar businesses to have more visibility as well as helping small businesses that began at home during the pandemic. I like to call these businesses “homentrepreneurs” and they will need a place for their businesses outside to get more traction in the community once the pandemic is over.

I am taking my experience within marketing and media, my ability to push forth different agendas and my ability to plan different activities to bring these skills to neighborhoods around New York and support these businesses and give a place for new entrepreneurs to grow outside of their homes. This is something I have been very excited about for a few months. 

After Covid is over, are there any events you would hope for the MASC Hospitality Group to execute?

Help New Yorkers get back to normal as soon as possible. Possibly that will be creating open-air markets and events relating to many different niches, and just to let New Yorkers come to celebrate returning to normalcy. After covid, trying to figure out with different partners how to help businesses survive the next few months and thrive as soon as we get out of this crisis. This has been a focus for us to do. We have seen way too many friends of ours close shop and disappear. 

Be sure to keep up with Marco Shalma and the Bronx Night Market on Instagram. 

photo credit foodcre8tive
Photo credit to r.ace.me

THE NEW SCHOOL ZOOM WORKSHOP

ART • WORK • PLACE: EMERGENCY SESSION 

Tuesday, April 7, 2020
7:30 pm– 9:30 pm  EDT
Vera List Center for Art and Politics (via Zoom)
The New School 
Free with registration

As the COVID-19 pandemic worsens, cultural workers are experiencing mass layoffs, and it is clear the art world will never look the same. In the first hour of this emergency forum, speakers will present ten-minute reports from the field; the second hour will feature breakout Q&A sessions with the speakers as well as a labor lawyer and a children’s therapist.

Art • Work • Place was originally planned as a two-day summit on efforts to create a just and equitable workplace in the art world—union organizing at museums, protests against toxic philanthropy, challenges to institutional racism, and lawsuits against sexual harassment and gender discrimination. But the current health emergency has drastically changed our conversations and needs. This online forum will instead focus on the immediate moment, sharing concrete information and ideas: What is happening to workers at art institutions across the country? What coalition groups have been formed for solidarity and support? What are our strategies going forward?

Confirmed speakers include:

Ian Epps (Art Handlers Alliance) will explain what is occurring at the city, state, and federal levels to support precarious workers, and what actions we can take.

Michelle Millar Fisher (Art + Museum Transparency) will describe the layoffs, furloughs, and pay cuts taking place at museums and galleries, and the consequences for unionization.

Kate Zayko, LCSW,will answer questions about the new struggles parents and children are now facing.

The forum will be chaired by Nikki Columbus.

The organizers are reallocating the budget for the planned summit and speakers are forgoing their usual honorarium so that funding can be directed to aid groups and individuals in need. For more information and to apply, please click here

Organized by the PhD Program in Art History (CUNY Graduate Center), in collaboration with the James Gallery/Center for the Humanities (CUNY Graduate Center) and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics (The New School), where it is sponsored in part by the Helen Shapiro Lectureship.

GENERATION OF AUTOMATION: IS YOUR JOB IN DANGER?

Humanity has made great strides in the technical world and, as of late, those strides have begun affecting the livelihood of people directly. Technology, (specifically A.I.) has seen vast advancements in recent years, so much so that for some industries the threat of redundancy is becoming ever more real.

According to original research from MoneySuperMarket, driverless vehicles are growing in capability and becoming more popular among firms that traditionally employ large numbers of drivers. Such a transition could trigger large-scale redundancies by as early as 2020. But, which jobs are in danger of being automated first?

Is Your Job At Risk?

To date in the UK, many motoring jobs have already fallen victim to automation – and as many as 1.2 million face a 67% or higher probability of their jobs being automated – representing up to £23.9 billion in annual salaries.

Among professional drivers, only driving instructors have little to fear, with the 29,000 employed in the UK having only a 13% chance of replacement with a machine. However, there are many other driving oriented jobs that could be in danger of being automated such as:
1. Food delivery drivers – The takeaway delivery industry is likely to see replacements across the board, with a 98% chance of automation.
2. Waste disposal workers – Waste collectors face a 93% likelihood of having their roles replaced by a machine. Volvo showcased a prototype bin lorry that uses drones to identify nearby bins, although this wouldn’t completely replace the need for human workers.
3. Taxi drivers – As with bus drivers, there have been moves to automate private transport services. Notably, Addison Lee has stated that the company intends to have automated vehicles deployed in London by 2021. In Tokyo, meanwhile, an autonomous taxi service began operation in August, transporting passengers along a set route.
Even though, driverless technology advances with each passing year, there are some jobs in emergency services, that aren’t at high risk of being fully automated. Services such as, ambulances, police and the fire department are at less risk of being fully replaced due to requiring additional skills.

Tom Flack, Editor-in-Chief at MoneySuperMarket, commented:

“Automation will bring massive changes across the whole of society and those who drive for a living may be among the first to feel its effects. Tests of driverless vehicles are well-advanced and are soon to be on the roads – with future positions in commercial usage already identified.
“If businesses see an opportunity to save money by making drivers redundant, they are likely to grab it – that’s the nature of competition. We can only hope that automation brings with it fresh employment opportunities for those whose existing roles disappear.”

Be Your Own Boss – Tips for Starting Your Own Business

It sounds great, doesn’t it? No more 9-5 hours, forget the daily commute, and just work when you feel like it, but the reality of being your own boss is often very different. While choosing when to work, or not, is possible for some, there has often been a lot of hard work for them to get to that point. But, with now more people than ever declared as self-employed, it has never been a better time to be your own boss. If you are dreaming of quitting the day job, starting your own business and becoming your own boss, this guide gives you some tips on what you need to do.

Find the Right Business Niche

You might have some idea already about what area you want your business in, and that is great, as long as you play to your strengths. Pick a business niche that you are already knowledgeable about, because if you already have the expertise, then you are far, more likely to achieve success. Also, make sure you choose a business idea that you are really passionate about also. Otherwise, you might see your enthusiasm dwindle after a few months.

When deciding on a business niche, it is important to do your research and identify a gap in the market that your business can fill. It will be much harder to make a successful business if you are just doing what your competitors do. Offer something extra, and you will stand out.

Create a Business Plan

Having a solid business plan gives you a focused look at what your targets are for your business and the strategies to implement. Your business plan will have detailed information about your target market, and how you intend to sell to them. Not only does a business plan to keep your project on track, but it is also a worthwhile document to show to possible investors.

If you are not sure how to create a business plan, there are examples and templates you can use online, as a way to get you started. At first, your business plan might seem a little basic. But keep coming up with ideas and flesh it out as you learn. The more you learn, the quicker you will be able to grow your business.

Learn New Skills

So you might have a great idea for a business, but if you don’t know how to run a website or have any marketing experience, then that is going to be a weakness. You will also need to learn accounting skills to keep track of your business spending and keep records for tax purposes. Learn the basics before you start, and it will make running your new business much easier.

Finances

Financing a start-up business can be hard, so make sure you know exactly what you need to spend money on and what you don’t. It is a good idea to save up some funds before you start your business, to get you up and running.
If finances are tight, you could consider bootstrapping which where you build a business by only investing the profits it makes and keeping costs as low as possible, rather than spending a lump sum of your own, or an investor’s, cash. This might mean keeping your business small until you have raised enough to invest in growth, but you won’t be getting into debt to fund your business. If you are bootstrapping, it is often worth having another source of income to keep you afloat until your business is making more money. Don’t forget that you still have everyday living expenses to consider, so it might not be the right time for you to completely give up your day job. Try to begin your business alongside your regular job, or at least work part-time, so you still have a source of income.

Sometimes, new businesses face problems with cash flow, so you might have to supplement it with your own money. Or, you might be putting much of your own money into funding your business that you might temporarily be finding it difficult financially. If so, a short-term loan can be beneficial, such as from Bonsai Finance.

Entrepreneurial Mind-Set

Your attitude is what drives your business, so you need to get into the mindset of an entrepreneur to get success. That means having the will to succeed even when times feel tough. It also means having discipline in your working day to get tasks done and to also have the confidence to make decisions.

It takes effort and hard work to achieve anything worthwhile, but if you show up ready to work consistently, you will soon see your efforts pay off.

Don’t Overdo It!

Remember why you wanted to be your own boss in the first place? It was to get that work/life balance you have always dreamed of. So while it might be tempting to work all the hours you can to make it a success, remember to take regular breaks and days off. Too much work and putting pressure on yourself can lead to stress, and that is not productive for your or your business.

If you find yourself under pressure, delegate what you can. If you have clients waiting, call them to rearrange a time for completion of a project, or consider outsourcing work if you have too much.

Being your own boss gives you the opportunity to manage your own time, rather than being dictated to by regular employment. However, it does come with risks. If you get sick, you won’t get sick pay, there is no paid annual leave, and if you don’t make it a success, you could stand to lose any money you may have invested in it. Treat starting your own business with caution, but don’t be afraid to try! Every successful entrepreneur had to start somewhere, and most experience failure as well as success. If you believe in yourself and have the will to succeed, then you have already won half the battle.

DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT

“People with disabilities are entering the workforce in unprecedented numbers?” It’s worth looking at the reports that show how “no group has felt the benefits of accelerated economic growth more than Americans with a disability”

Indeed, people with disabilities experienced a four-fold increase in job opportunities last year – unprecedented growth

In states across the country, Governors are undertaking new efforts to expand job opportunities for all. For example, Gov.Edwards recently launched a task force focused on employment for Louisianans with disabilities. Gov. Walker just signed historic legislation that makes Wisconsin an Employment First and commits resources to expanding competitive, integrated employment. Remarkable progress and remarkable leadership.

During the Meeting of the National Governors Association (NGA), our team and partner organizations spoke 1-on-1 with thirty-four different Governors. In each meeting we advocated for policies and practices that will expand economic opportunities. For several Governors, we had the chance to honor them with an award for their leadership and their continuing commitment to these issues.

At the end of the day, there are hundreds of self-advocates, community organizations and state leaders in a position to drive this change forward. Your involvement can move progress even faster! Expanding opportunities requires leaders across the public sector, the private sector and advocates to join forces and find solutions. First, check out where your state ranks and what challenges impact opportunities. You can also see what your state has done or is already doing to expand jobs for people with disabilities. We have written in-depth reports about what each of the 50 states is doing to advance opportunities for Americans with disabilities. image-2018-04-18 (1)

Study says bosses need to stop doing THIS in 2018

Researchers Identify the Most Worst Boss Behavior

Leadership coach explains findings

Here is the most damaging boss behavior: A manager who has mood swings.

A recent study from University of Exeter found that leaders who exhibited “Jekyll and Hyde” behavior (switching between friendly and kind to volatile and critical) created the highest level of disengagement among employees.

“You might think that a boss who was sometimes friendly and magnanimous with his staff would earn some brownie points that would help ease hurt feelings when he later lost his temper,” says leadership coach Jack Skeen, who is the co-author (along with Greg Miller and Aaron Hill) of a new professional development book, The Circle Blueprint. “However, it’s just the opposite. Instead, employees begin to view their boss as unpredictable. Since they never know which boss they are going to encounter (the nice guy or the grouchy guy), they are constantly walking on eggshells and afraid to be themselves or voice their ideas.”

However, Skeen assures managers that they don’t have to be ‘one-note’ happy managers all the time, either. “Employees understand that their bosses are human and that they have bad days,” says the Fortune 500 coach, “But you can be disappointed or displeased with your staff without losing control and attacking your employees on a personal level.”

To help leaders grow into their full potential, Skeen has co-created a self-assessment tool to help leaders assess themselves in key areas, including their power, purpose, humility and independence. This assessment is available for free here, to anyone who has purchased The Circle Blueprint. “Until leaders are aware of how they are impacting the people around them, specifically their employees, they are going to continue hitting a professional plateau.”

For more on this topic or to speak with Jack Skeen, please contact me.

 

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