Posts tagged with "USA"

Kaelen Felix illustrates Veterans Day for 360 Magazine

Remembering Veterans During a Strained Time

By: Elle Grant

Wednesday, November 11th marks the annual commemoration of veterans in the United States, aptly named Veterans Day. This year, in the unprecedented context of coronavirus, as well as intense political and social strife, the day takes on an additionally sacred context as a reminder of those who have served our country.

Veterans Day originated as “Armistice Day” on November 11, 1919, the first anniversary marking the end of World War I. Congress then passed a resolution in 1926 for an annual observance, with the day becoming a national holiday beginning in 1938. Similar to Memorial Day, which is an annual federal holiday in May, it celebrates veterans of the United States. However, the difference between them is that Veterans Day pays tribute to all American veterans, living and dead. Yet a particular focus is on those veterans still with us, who served their country with honor and distinction whether during war or peacetime.

Several countries have similar days commemorating their veterans that find their root in remembering World War I and World War II on or near November 11th. Canada has Remembrance Day, while Britain has Remembrance Sunday. World War I, as arguably the most brutal conflict in human history on the soldiers, is a devastating reminder of why countries celebrate those who serve.

2020 is a particularly remarkable year as it marks the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II, the 70th anniversary of the beginning of the Korean War, and the 30th anniversary of both the end of the Panama Invasion and the beginning of Desert Shield.

Veterans Day has been distinctly impacted by the coronavirus, still sweeping the nation especially in the Midwest. As such, celebrations and efforts of remembrance are being affected in large ways. Arlington National Cemetery, used to hosting hundreds of thousands of veterans, their families, and the families of veterans who have passed, has altered its yearly ceremony in context of the current pandemic. For the first time, it will be livestreamed, with certain areas closed off, and embracing social distancing and masked mandates. Furthermore, the beloved observance at Memorial Amphitheater has been closed off to the general public, yet the overall cemetery will remain open.

Yet it is no time to despair or to pause the nation’s respects. There are 18.2 milling living veterans who have served during wartime alive in the United States today, all deserving admiration.

Many businesses and restaurants salute veterans during this day with special deals for those who have served and their families. 360 Magazine thanks all veterans for their service.

Kamala Harris and Joe Biden illustration for 360 MAGAZINE by Kaelen Felix

Biden’s victory means workers once again have a seat at the table

Joe Biden’s election victory is one for working families throughout this country.

It brings with it a renewed sense of optimism that they will once again have their voices heard in the revered Oval Office. As we celebrate this victory, we know there is much work to be done, and we, the Office and Professional Employees International Union (OPEIU), look forward to working with the Biden administration to reestablish and further the interests of all working Americans.

Earlier this year, a survey of OPEIU members—the first-ever of its kind in our union’s history—showed a strong majority of us support the election of Biden as the forty-sixth president of the United States. OPEIU members throughout the country worked tirelessly in the months leading up to the election to help get out the vote for Biden and his vice-presidential running mate, Kamala Harris.

The democratic ticket is one of hope. Biden and Harris recognize the power of unions and worker organization. They promise that, as a part of their plan as leaders of the U.S., that they will “grow a stronger, more inclusive middle class – the backbone of the American economy – by strengthening public and private sector unions and helping all workers bargain successfully for what they deserve.”

His specific plan for doing is outlined on his website. Among his talking points, he swears to check the abuse of corporate power, encourage and incentivize unionization and collective bargaining, and ensure that workers are “treated with dignity and receive the pay, benefits, and workplace protections they deserve.”

“This is a historic day for working people. Not only has our members’ work to oust an anti-worker president come to fruition, but working people now have someone in the White House who will strive to protect America’s working families, not just the wealthy and powerful, and help bring our nation back together to heal after four years of divisiveness,” said OPEIU President Richard Lanigan.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Donald Trump has not protected workers. After the benefits of the CARES Act expired in July, which allotted citizens who filed for unemployment an extra $600 per month, Trump opposed its extension, leaving citizens without fiscal support from the government.

“Though we anticipate a wave of last-ditch legal challenges from the Trump campaign, our union will move forward knowing working people’s needs and struggles will be considered as President-elect Biden begins to assemble his cabinet,” he continued.

Trump has so far brought almost a dozen cases to smaller courts in Nevada, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Georgie, calling into question the validity of ballots and calling for the count to stop. Trump has made clear that he wants to take the election to the Supreme Court where it will determine a winner. But, according to the Associated Press, the margins with which Biden won the race make it difficult for Trump to build a case for himself.

“We congratulate Joe Biden and Kamala Harris on their victory,” he concluded. “Working people across the country, especially OPEIU members, are looking forward to fighting side-by-side as we confront the biggest issues facing our country today: the COVID crisis, the attack on workers’ rights, economic inequality, racial justice and climate change.”

Biden and Harris won the popular vote and the Electoral College, securing, as of now, more than 74 million popular votes and 279 electoral votes, and counting. The AP called the election for Biden today.

OPEIU stands ready to work with the Biden administration to expand workers’ rights, make billionaires pay their fair share, combat inequality in all its forms, and undertake the difficult but necessary work required to protect our planet for future generations.

ABOUT OPEIU

The Office and Professional Employees International Union (OPEIU) represents more than 103,000 working people throughout the United States, Puerto Rico and Canada. Representing employees in nonprofit organizations, credit unions, hospitals, insurance agencies, colleges and universities, hotels, administrative offices and more, OPEIU is committed to advancing economic justice for working people no matter their occupation.

Professional organizations and guilds affiliated with OPEIU are a diverse group that includes podiatrists, registered nurses, teachers, Minor League Baseball umpires, and helicopter pilots.

The first female, black and South Asian Vice President-elect.

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, COVID-19

How States Can Combat COVID While Fighting The Flu

United States of Care Offers Suggestions to States on How To Deal With the Seasonal Flu Amid a Pandemic

(Washington, DC) Today, United States of Care (USofCare) issued a “Preparing for COVID-19 and the Flu,” recommendations to states for dealing with the seasonal flu amid a global public health crisis caused by the novel coronavirus.

“States have a long history of successfully dealing with the flu virus, encouraging vaccines and stopping a widespread flu outbreak,” said Emily Barson, Executive Director of United States of Care. “This year is different, as the nation’s already taxed health care system faces the unprecedented double whammy of influenza and COVID-19. As an organization engaging in one-on-one conversations with people, policymakers, and various health care leaders throughout the pandemic, United States of Care offers a unique view on what people need to know and what states can do to combat COVID-19 while fighting the flu.”

United States of Care’s “Preparing for COVID-19 and the Flu” breaks down how states can prepare for dealing with the flu and COVID-19 simultaneously. It includes the following suggestions:

  1. Communicate Clearly: State leaders need to be clear in their communications about why protective measures, such as mask requirements and closures, are necessary to keep people safe from the flu and COVID-19. States can play a vital role in providing people with clarity about what to do if they are infected with either the flu or COVID-19, as they have similar symptoms
  2. Prepare for Increased Health Care Demand: States need to have contingency plans in place so that health care system resources can be efficiently allocated.
  3. Address the Needs of High-Risk People: States will need to continually rely on the latest COVID-19 metrics and data on the flu’s trajectory, especially for high-risk populations to take additional measures.
  4. Develop Plans to Increase Influenza Vaccination Rates: In a typical flu season, less than 50% of people get vaccinated, and the rate is even lower among people of color. Increasing this rate is essential to minimizing the strain on our health care system. Clear communications are also vital due to people’s ongoing concerns about receiving medical care during the pandemic. States will need to develop plans to distribute flu shots in safe-settings, including at home for vulnerable populations.
COVID Mask Care illustration by Mina Tocalini

Study Shows State-By-State Reopenings Exacerbate COVID

As Summer vacations end in Europe and in the United States and students return to college campuses and primary schools worldwide, fresh waves of COVID infections are causing renewed restrictions after loosening in the Spring and Summer. However, a new study shows that this uncoordinated opening, closing, and reopening of states and counties, is making the COVID problem worse in the U.S., according to the authors of a new study released today. Using methods from their previous work, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, MIT PhD student Michael Zhao and Sinan Aral, Director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy and author of the upcoming book The Hype Machine, have released the first comprehensive study of the impact of state-by-state re-openings on the COVID pandemic, spanning January to July, 2020 with surprising and troubling results.

After studying combined data on the mobility of over 22 million mobile devices, daily data on state-level closure and reopening policies and social media connections among 220 million Facebook users, the team found that reimposing local social distancing or shelter-in-place orders after reopening may be far less effective than policy makers would hope.

In fact, such closures may actually be counterproductive as they encourage those in locked down regions to flee to reopened regions, potentially causing new hotspots to emerge. This analysis demonstrates that travel spillovers are not only systematic and predictable, but also large and meaningful.

Arizona was one of the first states to open businesses, but in late June, bars, gyms, movie theaters, and water parks were shut down for 30 days as the state became one of the virus’s new hot spots. One month after dine-in restaurants, bars, and gyms were allowed to reopen in California, Governor Gavin Newsom made the country’s most aggressive reopening reversal amid his state’s spike in COVID-19 cases, shuttering all indoor dining, bars, zoos, and museums in the state. Similar reversals have occurred in Colorado, Florida, Louisiana, Michigan, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas, West Virginia among other states.

“We’ve seen a patchwork of flip-flopping state policies across the country,” says Sinan Aral, the senior author of the study. “The problem is that, when they are uncoordinated, state re-openings and even closures create massive travel spillovers that are spreading the virus across state borders. If we continue to pursue ad hoc policies across state and regional borders, we’re going to have a difficult time controlling this virus, reopening our economy or even sending our kids back to school.”

The new study showed that while closures directly reduced mobility by 5-6%, re-openings returned mobility to pre-pandemic levels. Once all of a state’s peer states (in travel or social media influence) locked down, focal county mobility in that state dropped by an additional 15-20% but increased by 19-32% once peer states reopened. “State policies have effects far beyond their borders,” says Aral. “We desperately need coordination if we are to control this virus.”

When an origin county was subject to a statewide shelter-in-place order, travel to counties yet to impose lockdowns increased by 52-65%. If the origin had reopened, but the destination was still closed, travel to destination counties was suppressed by 9-17% for nearby counties and 21-27% for distant counties. But when a destination reopened while an origin was still closed, people from the closed origins flooded into the destination by 11-12% from nearby counties and 24% from distant counties. “People flee closures and flood into newly reopened states,” says Aral, “we can’t avoid the travel spillovers caused by our ad hoc policies.”

These findings highlight the urgent need to coordinate COVID-19 reopenings across regions and the risks created by ad hoc local shutdowns and reopenings. In addition, the results highlight the importance of taking spillover effects seriously when formulating national policy and for national and local policies to coordinate across regions where spillovers are strong.

Rita Azar illustrates an article about the American dream for 360 MAGAZINE

What is the American Dream in 2020?

We spend our whole lives working and earning money to support ourselves and our families. The term “American Dream” was coined in 1931 by James Truslow Adams, and it represented an idea of a land where there were loads of opportunities for people in accordance with their achievements or abilities.

According to him, this was not a mere idea of high wages and motor cars, but rather it was an idea of a social order in which every man and every woman would be able to attain the full stature they are capable of. This would be provided to them regardless of class, color, creed and socio-economic status.

With the advancement in technology, everything has changed, for the better or worse. The million-dollar question is: What is the U.S. Dream in 2020? Has it changed somehow, or is it still the same after all this time?

Let’s take a look!

The New U.S. Dream

The idea of the U.S. dream is a theme around the globe and across the globe. Every U.S. citizen has her or his own idea and version of it. The U.S. Dream of today hasn’t strayed very far from the vision that was set forth by the founding fathers.

Our founding fathers wanted to inculcate basic societal values in us, such as the creation of a meaningful life, as essential parts of society and community. In the new version of the idea, spending time with friends and family is becoming dominant.

With the advancement in technology, more opportunities have been created for the people. It is no longer about feeding the family every day. It is about creating a sense of peace and stability in the whole community.

Everyone needs to contribute to ensure that we all live in the best way possible. With all the hard work that American citizens put in, the result is going to be a nation that is happy, content and at peace.

American Dream and U.S. Presidents

After the Great Recession in 2008, the income inequality among different classes became even more pronounced. It seemed as if this idea was coming to an end for many people. However, in reality, only the materialistic part of the idea was nearing an end.

Around the turn of the century, a lot of U.S. presidents were in favor of homeownership as an important part of the U.S. dream. The presidential campaign plan of Hillary Clinton included homeownership, retirements and health insurance.

Furthermore, Obama passed the Affordable Care Act, commonly known as “ObamaCare,” which provided the right to healthcare for all U.S. citizens.

Important parts of the U.S. Dream

After decades of hard work, our founding fathers created a safe space for everyone, where the rights of everyone were respected, and the opportunities were abundant.

There are various factors that make this idea possible, such as:

·         Efficient Governance

·         Helpful and Friendly Neighbors

·         The abundance of Natural Resources

However, with the threat of climate change looming over our heads, the natural resources have started becoming scarce. Several papers about American Dream suggest that rising sea levels, food inflation as well as the health crises are already straining the funds of the U.S. government.

The founding fathers didn’t envision that even the right to have clean water, air and natural resources would become scarce. Therefore, there is a need for a new version of this idea that would help the citizens, even this time of economic crisis.

Every American citizen dreams of retiring in peace after working hard for years. The government, as well as the private organizations, are working hard to ensure that the idea of a Utopian lifestyle remains afloat.

How can we live the U.S. Dream today?

The entire U.S. population is united by a common political system, language, and shared values. The diversity in cultures and traditions adds to the overall strength of America. This gives various companies an opportunity to innovate so that every single person can benefit from their products.

Under this idea, everyone has an equal right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Happiness or lifestyle isn’t defined under the Declaration of Independence. Rather, U.S citizens are free to pursue their own vision of this idea. The new U.S. Dream promotes a free-market economy in which everything from the service to the price is controlled by the market and not the government. This gives everyone an equal opportunity for the creation of wealth and happiness.

With the advancement in economic growth, the idea of happiness and peace for the citizens of the United States has also changed. Every organization and enterprise is trying to give the best of their services to ensure that we become a satisfied population.

Education for all is also an important part of the American idea of happiness. If we send our descendants to colleges and universities, it is going to increase the standard of living, and thereby create a sense of fulfillment and contentment in the community due to economic opportunities.

Conclusion

This idea is not something that is set in stone. With changing times, the idea has also changed. Along with the collective idea about happiness, there is an individual idea of eternal peace as well, which helps us achieve our goals and targets in ways that suit us perfectly.

Here’s to the founding fathers of the U.S. who helped pave the way for freedom, happiness, and individuality for every American citizen!

Minority Report

A comprehensive report of the continuation and influx of unjustified treatment towards minorities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

February 23: 25-year-old Georgia resident Ahmaud Arbery was fatally shot while running unarmed. No arrests were made immediately, but Gregory and Travis McMichael, who claim to have been making a citizen’s arrest, have since been apprehended more than 2 months after the shooting and charged with murder and aggravated assault. The murder and its delayed action have sparked nationwide protests and calls for justice. The lawyer, hired by Ahmaud’s family, was also hired by another African American victim – Breonna Taylor.

March 13Breonna Taylor was shot and killed in her Louisville home after police entered the house on a search warrant. Taylor and her boyfriend believed they were burglars and began firing at the police. The shootout left 26-year-old Taylor dead and her boyfriend, 27, arrested and charged with assault and attempted murder of a police officer. Neither Taylor nor her boyfriend Walker had a criminal record, but Walker had a firearm license.

March 23: A newly released video shows a 68-year-old black Missouri woman by the name of Marvia Gray and her son Derek being forcefully arrested on the floor of a department store on March 23rd. The two were accused falsely of trying to steal a television and were injured when thrown on the floor by police, according to Gray. They were however, arrested for assault on a police officer and resisting arrest.

April 18Steven Taylor, 33, was shot to death by police in a California Walmart while attempting to steal from the store and threatening violent acts with a baseball bat. Taylor was fatally shot, however, after becoming a non-threat, it prompted the family to call for charges against the officers. Taylor was also allegedly in a mental health crisis and has a history of disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Taylor leaves behind three children and three siblings.

April 24: Austin Police murdered 42-year old Michael Ramos after a nearby 911 call about a possible drug deal. The police shot Ramos when he was out of his car, with his hands above his head. When Ramos re-entered his vehicle and began driving away, he was shot again and soon after, died. A later investigation found no sign of a firearm in the car.

April 28: A shootout with police in Florida killed 26-year-old Jonas Joseph after his car was pulled over. Joseph began firing at police, who returned fire and killed the young man.

May 6: 21-year-old Sean Reed was killed by police following a vehicle pursuit on the evening of May 6, 2020. The police pursued Reed after being seen driving erratically on the highway. The pursuit terminated, but when Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Assistant Chief Chris Bailey spotted the car parked, he approached. Reed tried to flee, but the confrontation left the young man dead. A crowd of protestors at the scene demanded the reasoning for the officer’s use of force.

May 9: 48-year-old Adrian Medearis was killed after being pulled over under suspicion of driving while intoxicated in Houston. The officer conducted a sobriety test, and attempted to arrest Medearis, a well-known local Gospel singer and choir director, but he resisted arrest and was fatally shot  in the ensuing altercation. His family and community are demanding the release of the video.

May 18: A Sarasota police officer was filmed using excessive force and kneeling on Patrick Carroll’s neck during an arrest. The video was put on social media and the officer in question has been put on administrative leave weeks after the event.

May 25: A woman named Amy Cooper called the cops on Christian Cooper, a Harvard alumnus and former Marvel Comics editor. The 57-year-old man was bird watching in Central Park when she approached him without her dog on the leash. After he asked her to put the dog on a leash, she called the police and claimed to be threatened. The altercation went viral after Christian Cooper posted a video of the event on social media, recording the woman aggressively restraining her dog and her saying, “I’m going to tell them [the police] there’s an African American man threatening my life.” Amy Cooper has since publicly apologized. But, Cooper has faced repercussions beyond negative comments on Twitter. She has been fired from her job at Franklin Templeton Investments, where she was vice president, and her dog has been rescued by a pet shelter.

Also on Monday May 25th, a Minneapolis man named George Floyd was murdered by police after an officer knelt on his neck despite his cries for help. Floyd was taken to a hospital where he died, and four officers were fired soon after the incident. A police statement says that Floyd was being investigated for a “forgery in progress” and resisted arrest. But, surveillance video of the arrest shows Floyd complying with the officers. On May 29th, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was charged with murder and manslaughter, four days after George Floyd’s death. On June 3rd, the other three officers involved in George Floyd’s murder, J.A. Keung, Thomas Lane, and Tou Thao, were arrested and charged with Aiding and Abetting Second Degree Murder and Aiding and Abetting Second Degree Manslaughter. Floyd’s murder sparked protests around the country with citizens looting and setting fire to buildings. The protestors have been met with tear gas and rubber bullets from police officers.

Allison Christensen, 360 Magazine, Vaughn Lowery

May 28: At a protest in Minneapolis, 43-year-old Calvin L. Horton Jr. was fatally shot and a suspect is in custody.

A Mississippi cop is on leave after a video is released of him choking a young suspect.

May 29: CNN reporter Omar Jimenez and his crew were arrested while reporting on the protest in Minneapolis. Meanwhile, another CNN reporter, Josh Campbell, says he was treated very differently by police and allowed to stay and report. Jimenez is black and Latino whereas Campbell is white. All three CNN workers were released from custody an hour later.

21-year-old Javar Harrell was not protesting but was fatally shot near protests in Detroit. It is unclear if his death is tied to protests.

May 30: The “Rally To End Modern Day Lynching” took place in Harlem in honor of George Floyd. The rally emphasizes that participants should still practice social distancing and wear a mask. Also on May 30th, participants will honor Floyd at the site of Eric Garner‘s murder in 2014. These New York protests became progressively more violent into the evening. Governor Brian Kemp issued a state of emergency and curfew for Atlanta in preparation for planned protests on May 31st. After four days of protests, Governor Newsom declares a state of emergency in Los Angeles. The courthouse and city hall were set on fire in Nashville.

A 21-year old unnamed man was fatally shot at a protest in Detroit.

In Dallas, a machete-yielding storeowner confronted protesters and was then violently beaten by the crowd; the man is now in stable condition.

Chris Beaty, 38, was killed from multiple gunshot wounds and was pronounced dead at the scene in Indianapolis.

May 31: After setting fires and looting in Santa Monica, the city declared a curfew. Curfews have since been set all around the country.

Italia Kelly, 22, and another victim were fatally shot while leaving a protest in Davenport, Iowa.

In Victorville, CA, Malcolm Harsch, 38, was found hanging from a tree and authorities are investigating the event as a potential homicide. Harsch’s family says they are very skeptical of his death being by suicide.

June 1: In Minneapolis, a group of men attacked Iyanna Dior, a black transgender woman; Dior is okay and in stable condition now.

53-year-old David McAtee was shot as national Guard troops and Louisville police broke up a protest; some footage shows McAtee shooting at police but it is unclear who fired their guns first because the officers involved did not activate their body cameras. The Louisville Metro Police Chief, Steve Conrad, was immediately fired because of the officers’ unactivated cameras.

16-year-old Jahmel Leach was tased in the face by NYPD and could be permanently disfigured from the attack. It is unclear why the police officers used force to arrest Leach.

June 2: Six Atlanta police officers have been fired and arrested for using excessive force towards Messiah Young and Taniyah Pilgrim, two young black people leaving the protests.

77-year-old David Dorn, a retired St. Louis police captain, was fatally shot by looters of a pawnshop after responding to an alarm.

June 4: At 3:45pm, NAACP holds a moment of silence for 8 minutes and 46 seconds in honor of George Floyd live on their Twitter.

June 5: All 57 members of the Buffalo Police Department’s emergency response team resigned in protest for police brutality – particularly seen in a video of Buffalo police pushing an unarmed man.

Reddit Co-founder Alexis Ohanian resigns from the company’s board and urges the company to replace his spot with a black candidate.

In a YouTube video, Robert L. Johnson, the first black American billionaire and co-founder of BET, talks to The Breakfast Club about racism and reparations.

20-year-old Dounya Zayer was violently shoved by a police officer at a protest in Brooklyn, NY. 

June 6: Michael Jordan and Jordan Brand pledge $100 million donation over the next 10 years to organizations promoting social justice and racial equality.

A video shows protestors creating a human shield to protect NYPD officers fro rioters throwing objects at the policemen. 

June 7: Virginia governor plans to remove Robert E. Lee statue later this week.

CEO of CrossFit Greg Glassman’s insensitive tweet about George Floyd has caused Glassman to face serious backlash. Partners of CrossFit, like Reebok or Rogue Fitness, and athletes, including Brooke Wells and Richard Froning, released statements that they will cut ties with CrossFit.

BLM protestors in Bristol pull down statue of Edward Colton, a slave trader who transported nearly 100,000 slaves in the 17th century. 

Harry H. Rogers drove into a group of protestors near Richmond, Virginia. Rogers identifies as the leader of the Ku Klux Klan and prosecutors are investigating the assault as a potential hate crime.

June 8: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announces police reform legislation called The Justice in Policing Act of 2020 which would ban chokeholds, establish a national database to track police misconduct, and more.

Minneapolis City Council announce plans to defund the Minneapolis police department.

GoFundMe suspends Candace Owens’ account saying that Owens, “spread hate, discrimination, intolerance and falsehoods against the black community.”

June 9: Greg Glassman, the CEO and founder of CrossFit, retires after his inappropriate tweet about George Floyd’s murder.

New York Police Chief Mike O’Meara shames the press for vilifying police officers in a video here.

June 10: In Palmdale, CA, 24-year-old black man named Robert Fuller,  was found hanging from a tree in what was originally described as an apparent suicide. Citizens are demanding that Fuller’s death is investigated as a homicide.

June 11:  After Trump’s comments about Seattle protestors being “domestic terrorists” and that law enforcement must “dominate the streets” to “take back Seattle,” Seattle mayor Jenny Durkan clarifies that the protestors are not threatening and that the president’s claims are unconstitutional.

June 12: Atlanta police fatally shot Rayshard Brooks, 27, at a Wendy’s drive-thru. Brooks’ murder caused Atlanta police chief Erika Shields to resign.

June 13: Patrick Hutchinson, a black personal trainer from London, rescued ‘far-right’ protester who was badly beaten during protest clashes in London.

A young, black FedEx driver named Brandon Brackins turned to social media to tell his followers how he was called racial slurs while working. 

June 16: A story resurfaces from 2006 when black, Buffalo, NY cop Cariol Horne was fired for stopping her white colleague from choking a handcuffed suspect.

Philadelphia court supervisor Michael Henkel is fired after video shows him tearing down BLM signs.

June 17: Quaker Oats plans to retire their Aunt Jemima branding and logo after acknowledging the racial stereotyping.

June 18: A Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department deputy fatally shot 18-year-old Andres Guardado.

June 20: Rioters storm the streets of Tulsa, Oklahoma during President Trump’s rally. 

June 21: A NYPD officer is on unpaid suspension after a chokehold incident in Queens.

June 22: Department of Justice is investigating a noose found in Bubba Wallace‘s NASCAR garage. Wallace is the only black driver in NASCAR’s top circuit. On June 23, the FBI determines that Wallace was not the target of a hate crime.

August 23: Jacob Blake is shot by Kenosha police officers after breaking up a nearby fight that two other women were having. Blake was unarmed and shot seven times in the back. He is currently hospitalized for his injuries.

 

 

Looking for ways to help? Here are some places to donate to:

George Floyd Memorial Fund

Minnesota Freedom Fund

Louisville Community Bail Fund

National Bail Out

Transgender Law Center In Memory of Tony McDade

Brooklyn Community Bail Fund

Dream Defenders

North Star Health Collective

The Louisville Community Bail Fund

The Freedom Fund

Northwest Community Bail Fund


Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine, BLM, black lives matter, protests, marches, change

Los Angeles Protests

By Emmet McGeown

Los Angeles residents continue their demand for racial equality

Breonna Taylor, a Louisville EMT, would have turned 27 years old on June 5th. Instead, on March 13th, Ms. Taylor was shot 8 times while asleep after police officers entered her home without knocking. The young woman was not forgotten at Friday evening’s LA protest. The administrators of the march passionately expressed how this case of police brutality is emblematic of the chronic racial inequality which has defined the US criminal justice system since the nation’s conception.

The atmosphere of the march was boisterous. The Five Stairsteps’ “O-o-h Child” played at the event and defined the hope for a better future omnipresent with lines like, “things are gonna get easier… things are gonna get brighter.”  Protestors fed off each others’ energies with chants of “No Justice, No Peace,” “Whose streets? Our streets,” mixed with an eclectic concoction of cheers. Indeed, the emphatic beeps of car horns, the banging of pots and pans from apartments above the street, and a sea of signs created a powerful spirit that, in the moment, felt indomitable.

One of the most inspiring aspects of the protest was the mélange of ethnicities in attendance. The multicolored faces of the crowds formed a microcosm of America – a new America. This diverse movement circled downtown Los Angeles, walking past boarded-up businesses that still bore the scars of previous nights. Much to the credit of the protest’s organizers, they were determined to reject the vandalism that had wounded the essence of the movement’s message earlier in the week. They wished to emulate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s tactics of non-violence, aspiring to make progress in King’s fight that must still advocated for.

At several points throughout the protest attendees were asked to take a knee. The profound purpose of this act was revealed at the conclusion of the event. “It’s uncomfortable isn’t it?” asked one protest organizer stuttering on her own passion, “Well imagine what it felt like for George Floyd for 8 minutes and 46 seconds!” Her vehemence echoed throughout the crowd as applause ruptured the silence of intent listening.

As the California sun dipped below the horizon, thousands ascended upon City Hall where a vanguard of LAPD lined the entrance. The protestors were nourished by a plethora of free snacks provided by supportive local vendors. The march culminated with a moving tribute to Ms. Taylor on the steps of City Hall. Here, the crowd sang “Happy Birthday” to yet another martyr of the African American community in what appears to be an endless struggle for equality. Stories like Breonna Taylor’s tell a hauntingly familiar tale of racism in our country, and these injustices haven’t ceased during quarantine. The 360 Magazine “Minority Report” details all of the acts of racial inequality during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The crowd was rife with enthusiasm for change but there was also a portentous understanding that this is not the last march for justice. However, the prevailing attitude was one of passion in hope that, despite the brutality of US history, America has finally reached a social crescendo free of the injustice that has characterized the country’s nascence.

So, what does all this mean? Well, the protestors and organizers were eager to proclaim a sizeable achievement they have garnered thanks to this movement. One of which is LA Mayor Eric Garcetti’s revision of the proposed city budget. In this revision, $150 million from the LAPD will be diverted towards healthcare, jobs, and education opportunities in communities of color. It is unclear whether stripping funds from the police will make the streets safer for people of color, yet protestors saw this as a victory for the Black Lives Matter movement.

The push to reduce police power will undoubtedly clash with President Trump’s call for “law and order.” Trump’s adoption of the infamous Nixonian verbiage and allusions to “vicious dogs” and “ominous weapons” has inflamed tensions in Los Angeles. In general, the president’s responses to BLM movements have done little to soothe California’s most populous city. A city, that only 28 years ago, was the epicenter of mayhem after a jury acquitted four police officers of using excessive force against black LA resident Rodney King. Thus, almost 30 years after the Rodney King riots and 50 years after the civil rights movement, one is still left wondering: do Americans trust law enforcement?

360 Magazine

W.E.B Du Bois Book

W.E.B. Du Bois spent many decades fighting to ensure that African Americans could claim their place as full citizens and thereby fulfill the deeply compromised ideals of American democracy. Yet he died in Africa, having apparently given up on the United States.

In this tour-de-force, Elvira Basevich examines this paradox by tracing the development of his life and thought and the relevance of his legacy to our troubled age. She adroitly analyzes the main concepts that inform Du Bois’ critique of American democracy, such as the color line and double consciousness, before examining how these concepts might inform our understanding of contemporary struggles, from Black Lives Matter to the campaign for reparations for slavery. She stresses the continuity in Du Bois’ thought, from his early writings to his later embrace of self-segregation and Pan-Africanism, while not shying away from assessing the challenging implications of his later work.

This wonderful book vindicates the power of Du Bois’ thought to help transform a stubbornly unjust world. It is essential reading for racial justice activists as well as students of African American philosophy and political thought.

The Author:

Elvira Basevich is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at University of Massachusetts, Lowell.

Reviews:

“Unique among books on Du Bois, Basevich originally and persuasively presents a liberal ideal of civic enfranchisement as the heart of Du Bois’ thought.”

Chike Jeffers, Dalhousie University

“A valuable and compelling addition to the literature on Du Bois. Both a useful introduction to those unfamiliar with his thought and an innovative interpretation that will hold the interest of experts, Basevich has achieved a remarkable feat—and produced an apt tribute to her subject.”

I’ll Benjamin McKean, Ohio State University

NYC, Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

The New Wave of Digital Working Nomads

By Vaughn Lowery

As of late, tons of youthful business people have commenced to take the path less taken – entrepreneurship. With an insurgence of virtual office spaces, this demographic, primarily generations X, Y as well as Z, has found a means to make money while on the go. These digital nomads run businesses which heavily impact society and provide an array of services which are unparalleled by most industry giants like Google, Amazon and Apple. In this piece of prose literature, you will find that a virtual office for digital nomads is the way to go.

Virtual office spaces offer an incubator-like environment where small to medium size businesses as well as independent contractors can freely roam the world, embarking on adventure while creating personal connections which last a lifetime. Subsequently, personal contact and the ability to be able to share an intimate exchange is what successful business owners constantly recite in tons of authoritative magazines like Entrepreneur, Inc. and Fast Company.

Being in a high powered independent contractor position has its share of ups and downs. The number one downfall of not receiving a solid location has always been the inability to having packages securely delivered to a location. The problem has been easily worked with virtual offices as a receptionist can answer the phone, take messages and store packages on behalf of your emerging brand. Some virtual offices can store packages (small or large) for up to 30+ days without having to return to sender. Storage fees may apply. And, if all else fails, you can grant them the ability to have the package forwarded to another address so that you can have access to your mail sooner than expected.

Not to cite, a ton of these virtual facilities have a network throughout the world and with a monthly subscription package you will have access to many of their locations. In addition, if you are in penury of a quiet meeting area, you can book the venue’s conference room for a few hours. Many of them are well-fitted with wifi and video conferencing as well.

Another pro of having a rotating office is that most of them come with office managers as well. Having someone to restock the printer with ink/paper, order supplies and execute events is almost ideal for someone seeking additional ways to connect with and accost new business. Just imagine if you’re a freelance journalist, graphic designer and/or advisor, you could attend a virtual office promotion and potentially meet a new client. In the past, many virtual offices have implemented office gatherings to increase office morale. Some of the best office gatherings have included spirit/wine tastings, game nights and office ice breakers. Moreover, traveling chefs and restaurants can also set up food tastings on the premise in hopes that you visit their establishments while on lunch breaks or dinner meetings.

Instead of orchestrating a webinar on smart business practices, many virtual office spaces have started to arrange roundtables. A roundtable is an opportunity to have a group of notable community leaders and business owners come into the facility to hold panels on ways you can reestablish your brand, redesign your website, effectively conduct public relations and marketing strategies as well as lower customer retention.

These type of group discussions can strike up meaning conversations while helping you increase revenue. Being in the presence of other individuals whom are having difficulty with maintaining their business while on the go, can help those in need of assistance find solutions to fix issues right away.

In short, people who work while on the go can finally be at rest knowing that their phones are being answered and packages are being received/stored and in some cases forwarded to another secure location. All this can materialize for a nominal monthly subscription fee while you enjoy all that your destination has to offer – outdoor adventure, food and nightlife.

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE, art, design

Famous actors with a flair for poker

We know them as famous faces from the silver screen, although away from their day jobs bringing different characters to life in movies and TV shows, many actors and actresses have a favourite hobby. For some of them, playing poker has even become much more than just something to enjoy in their spare time.

Ben Affleck

Celeb news and gossip site TMZ recently published images of Ben Affleck turning up at a Hollywood casino, shortly after leaving a Halloween party where he’d obviously enjoyed quite a few drinks. Despite being somewhat the worse for wear and barely able to sit straight at the poker table, the 47-year-old actor still managed to stagger away with $1500 in winnings, working the game for just 12 minutes after dropping $20,000 in chips on the table.

Later admitting that he’s a recovering alcoholic who had slipped off the wagon on that occasion, Affleck still managed to show that he’s an accomplished poker player. As a keen student of the game and having learned from some of the best players around, before his recent turn as Batman in the DC movie franchise, Affleck actually won the 2004 California State Poker Championship, walking away from that tournament with $356,400 in winnings.

While his portrayal of Batman didn’t bring many glowing reviews from the movie critics, at least Affleck has shown that he maintains a strong flair for poker. That said, pro poker tour player Tobias Reinkemeier believes there’s another former Batman who would make a formidable opponent at the table.

Having won some of the most lucrative tournaments in the world, when asked to name potential talented celeb poker players who might enjoy success at the table, Reinkemeier had just one name in mind. He chose British actor Christian Bale, highlighting that his level of “dedication and hard work” would translate well to poker, simply because of method acting approach to getting into the skin of characters he plays.

Tobey Maguire

Speaking of other actors who have donned the superhero spandex for some of their most famous roles, it’s quite possible that Tobey Maguire could well be one of the most successful poker players of all time. At the peak of his stardom and while playing Peter Parker in the Spiderman trilogy, he was also reportedly cashing in millions at high-stakes poker games around Hollywood.

During a period of three to four years, Maguire was apparently amongst a group of high-rollers at illicit “invitation only” poker games, which were reportedly taking place at some of the most luxurious hotels around Los Angeles. While there were a host of other A-list Hollywood celebrities regularly participating at these games, none are said to have enjoyed anywhere near the winning success of Maguire.

Although these underground poker games weren’t strictly legal, when reports came to light amongst a variety of media outlets including Huffington Post, they claimed that Maguire was regularly taking winnings of around $1 million each month. Stack that up over a period of three to four years, it’s estimated that he scooped somewhere between $30 and $40 million from these poker games.

While there were subsequent legal investigations, there was little chance the State of California would actually prosecute the celebrity players involved. Nevertheless, Maguire did face some legal challenges for part of the money he’d won, because amongst those he’d allegedly beaten at the poker table, some were bankers and lawyers, who had used “improperly-diverted” investor funds to fuel their own participation.

Jennifer Tilly

Just have a glance through the IMDB role archive for Jennifer Tilly, it’s easy to see that she’s enjoyed a great movie and TV career, consistently working since the early 1980’s and still in demand for a variety of different roles. Aside from critical acclaim and various awards, she’s also carved out a niche for herself in the horror genre, appearing in the popular Child’s Play franchise of movies, after they were rebooted in 1998 with Bride of Chucky.

Even if she hadn’t become a famous actress, it seems that Jennifer was always destined for fame and celebrity, thanks to her success at the poker tables. Apparently, her interest in the cards began with a World Series of Poker (WSOP) video game she played and enjoyed, bought by her father. From there, the passion for poker grew and became a favourite pastime, whenever she had the chance to play between acting jobs.

Jennifer has also proven that more than just being a hobby, poker can also become a professional vocation, providing you have talent and the dedication to keep improving your game. She was awarded the WSOP bracelet in 2005 after winning the Ladies’ No Limit Hold’em tournament back in 2005, whilst also collecting the $158,335 prize. Although she decided to “retire” from professional poker in 2008, the hobby has again become a vocation since 2010.

Of course, being surrounded by fellow poker afficionados will always help. Tilly was married to The Simpsons co-creator Sam Simon between 1984 and 1991, who was also very fond of casino gaming and poker in particular. Since 2004 she has been in a long-term relationship with Phil Laak, an internationally renowned poker star from Dublin, Ireland, who has enjoyed great success on the World Poker Tour over the years.

High-Stakes Hobby

Such is the thrill and excitement of playing poker, it’s hardly surprising that so many famous celebrities have tried their hand at the tables. Some have even ended up earning more from what started out as a hobby, than they’re paid for their acting roles. For sure, it helps to have a nice pot of cash available to play with, although there’s always plenty of lesser-known players ready to take it off them too!