Posts tagged with "mtv"

QxA Davis Mallory

By Vaughn Lowery and Hannah DiPilato

Davis Mallory from MTV’s The Real World, discusses his struggle with alcoholism as well as how far he has come in his career. 

360 Magazine recently had the opportunity to sit down with Davis Mallory, a contestant from The Real World on MTV. He is now pursuing a music career while educating others about alcoholism. As an openly gay Christian, he hoped to share his story with others as a television personality as well as a musician. 

What was it like being on MTV’s The Real World Season 18? Any regrets? Do you still stay in contact with other cast members?

I was a senior in college, 21-years-old, when I auditioned for and was cast on MTV’s 18th season of the Real World, located in Denver Colorado. I was a fan of the show and had just come out of the closet to my classmates that summer. I felt that I had an interesting story to tell – being a Christian and openly gay was not something I had not seen on TV before – and I wanted to prove you could be both, while also showcasing a more masculine image of homosexuality than was often shown on TV.

Immediately after the show ended I flew around to colleges in the USA discussing and often debating Biblical professors in front of a student body; dissecting Bible verses and their interpretations on homosexuality. My grandfather James Davis Mallory JR (whom I’m named after) is a Christian author and psychiatrist – and so I was raised very orthodox – Southern Baptist. I found this time to be very rewarding and something I’m proud of – to date I still receive messages from viewers of the show expressing their gratitude for my story on The Real World.

I of course have regrets during my time on the show – I think most people who have done that show in their 20s will tell you they regret things they did or said. We were all heavily fed alcohol which created chaos, confusion, fights and hookups. I’m still close with several cast members, two of them live in Nashville so I see them most often. Tori Hall, who was on Road Rules and married Brad Fiorenza (I attended their wedding) and Brooke Labarbera, who was on my season of the Real World are two people I remain close with and I spent much of this summer 2020 with both of them!

What led up to you having an issue with drugs and alcohol? How’s life after sobriety? Are there any triggers that make it difficult to remain sober?

When I was younger (before trying alcohol) my mother told me to NEVER drink, instead of teaching me how to drink. This was because my parent’s divorce was caused in part by my father’s alcoholism. When I went off to college, I got drunk for the first time and I quickly progressed into blacking out when I drank. I would sometimes wake up the next morning and hearing stories from my friends about stupid things I said or did the night before. I tried to get that under control by lowering the amount of alcohol I drank and by not drinking hard alcohol.

I went through many chapters of my life taking breaks from drinking and reducing my alcohol intake. My father has now been completely sober for over a decade and his example is a big inspiration in my own decision to completely quit drinking. I’ve now been sober for 4 years. After reaching my 1-year mark of sobriety I had a big regret – that I hadn’t quit earlier. I felt so much better – I looked so much better and I just wished I had fully quit earlier in my life.

Thankfully, perhaps due to God or just growing up, I have ZERO temptation to drink anymore. I’m constantly reminded why I quit when I see other people’s struggles with alcohol. I have seen people wheeled off in an ambulance with alcohol poisoning, I’ve had close friends die from alcohol poisoning, a friend’s mother recently did; another close friend died from an overdose of drugs mixed with fentanyl recently. These everyday reminders keep me sober.

I really wish our society didn’t glorify drinking in movies/commercials/music, because the downfall from alcohol is not being taught to children: accidentally death, liver disease, the fighting it causes, relationships ruined, horrible, absent or addicted parents, job losses, physical damage it does to our bodies and faces are never shown in these alcohol commercials.

What was it like growing up with an uncle who had access to major recording artists like Wynonna Judd? Did that experience help shape you into the artist you are today? If so, how?

My uncle Chaz managed pop artist Amy Grant for many years and still manages Christian recording artist Michael W. Smith. My uncle John Mallory wrote songs for artists Wynonna Judd, Sixpence None the Richer, Ty Herndon and more. I  grew up in the music industry, attending a lot of these artist’s concerts and meeting them – I spent summers on Amy Grant’s farm in Nashville – I was a huge fan of her and Michael W. Smith.

As a kid I dreamt of being a singer and wanted to have careers like theirs – my positive message songs “Faith,” “Not That Far Away” “Lost” and “Somebody’s Watching” are examples of songs influenced by Amy & Michael’s music. I did not expect to become a songwriter. How songs were written was a mystery as a kid – I knew singers sang them but didn’t know how they were created. When I started out on this journey to becoming a recording artist I had to watch and learn from others in numerous songwriting sessions until I really got the hang of doing it myself.

During your first year in Nashville, one of your former cast members (Diem Brown) passed away from cancer. How did their loss impact your life at the time?

Diem Brown passed away in 2014 – I moved to Nashville at the end end of 2013 – so I had just started my journey into songwriting. My first original released song is titled “Beautiful Girl’s (Diem’s Song)”, a song I wrote about Diem with award-winning songwriters Ben Goldsmith and Tori Tullier. The song debuted in People Magazine, where Diem was a news reporter and received press in E! News, US Weekly and more outlets.

Diem and I grew up in nearby parts of Georgia (I’m from Marietta, she’s from Roswell – just 15 min away) although we did not meet until we did the show. Diem was a sorority sister with my mother’s best friend’s daughter, Carly Hartwick, who first introduced us over email prior to our meeting in person for the first time when Diem and I did an MTV Challenge together: The Duel II in New Zealand.

Diem and I gave a school speech together where she shared wisdom on pursuing one’s career goals by interviewing those with the same job, Diem becoming a News Anchor where she met her idol Katie Couric to ask questions on how to get to Katie’s place in life. Diem’s speech really inspired me as I chased after my own career dreams in music, so when she lost her battle to cancer I was deeply saddened and wrote the song to memorialize her through music. Her sisters’ often use the song on the anniversary of her death, which I’m always touched to see.

You grew up in Atlanta but now reside in Nashville. Do you prefer one city over the other? If so why?

I was born in Atlanta and raised in a suburb of Atlanta called Marietta. After attending college in Florida at Stetson University, I returned to Atlanta for 2 years before moving to NYC. I have not lived in Atlanta since 2009; however, I return every year to see my family who still live there. It’s changed a lot, the movie industry was not there when I left, and in my song titled “Atlanta,” the first song on my upcoming album Little Victory, I talk about my journey from Atlanta to New York and now Nashville with a longing for my hometown and noticing how much the city has changed.

I moved to Nashville to pursue a career in music, hearing it was a land full of songwriters. The things I really like about Nashville are the people and culture here. There are really great moralistic people here and I am thankful for that as it’s a safe great place to live. Nashville is like going to college in the music industry – people in all stages of their careers are here and many are willing to collaborate. I would not be where I am today if not for Nashville.

What are some of your musical inspirations? Can you name a few people that have inspired you or who continue to inspire you?

Aside from mainstream pop artists like Britney Spears, George Michael, NSYNC, Michael Jackson, Robyn, Prince, Mariah Carey, the real-life connections that have influenced my career include Parson James (vocalist on Kygo’s “Stole the Show”) who is one of the first people I wrote music with. We met in NYC in 2013, I followed him to Los Angeles to write with him and moved to Nashville prompted by advice from his then-manager who thought I sounded like a Country artist.

Roger Murrah (BMI Songwriter of the Decade and writer of several Country music #1s) is one of the first people I met when I moved to Nashville. At the time I was still learning how to write songs, so I watched him work in several sessions and I began to understand how to write the way he did.

Scot Sax (Grammy-winning songwriter for Tim McGraw/Faith Hill’s “Like We Never Loved At All”) is another person who was very influential on my songwriting journey – he taught me how the B52s recorded “Love Shack” in a go-as-you-flow style recording their ideas on the spot to build the song.

Aside from these few names, I have been in over 300 songwriting sessions, and I’ve traveled writing music in Europe (Berlin, Stockholm, Copenhagen, Malmo, London, Amsterdam), New York and Los Angeles. Everyone along the way has taught me something, a new trick or technique to writing music or producing music and I’m thankful for everyone who has worked with me.

As a songwriter, how do you come up with themes? Is your music based on an isolated experience or a chapter of your life?

I keep an ongoing note on my phone called Songwriting Ideas so that whenever I get an idea for a song I write it down there. I then bring these ideas into songwriting sessions to get something started. Sometimes I get a melody (occasionally during a dream) and record these on my phone, using it as another tool to get songs started.

In 2018 music publicist, Lyndie Wenner asked me what my most popular social media posts were – to which I replied: shirtless photos of myself. So she told me I needed to write a song called “Shirtless” and I did, releasing that song in 2019. This conversation with Lyndie changed the way I wrote songs. Before I was writing broader subjects, and after I began to write more about the things I saw my audience interested in. I still observe that the things I write about center around one of 4 themes: 1. God and my faith; 2. Love lost of found; 3. Partying and dancing, of 4. Overcoming addictions.

Another influential person in my songwriting career is PollyAnna (Dutch pop/EDM vocalist, songwriter of Paris Hilton’s new song “I Blame You”). I spent a summer writing with her in Nashville, Los Angeles and Berlin and  I observed her taking random phrases we said in conversations and writing them down for future songwriting materials. I now do the same, whenever something unusual is said in a conversation. PollyAnna and I wrote a song together in Berlin called “Without You, I Feel Good”, which has now been signed to Soave Records, produced by a DJ named Nexeri, and coming out on February 26, 2021.

What words of wisdom would you offer an emerging artist who is trying to break into the business?

The words “If you build it they will come” from the great baseball movie Field of Dreams, is a motto that holds a strong place in my mind regarding my strategy to release music and gradually having people discover your work. I have a business model of writing songs and selling them to DJ/producers and I think this is a great move for up-and-coming singers to build a name for themselves.

My first job after college (post-Real World) was a sales job that required reaching out to 100 potential customers every day with the expectation that between 1-10 would buy something – I now use this strategy in my music career in so many facets and find the same results.

Is there anything you would like to speak about that we didn’t already touch on? What can your fans look forward to?

2020 was set to have me perform in Germany, Boston, Chicago, Palm Springs, North Carolina but the shows were of course canceled due to the pandemic. I look forward to getting back to touring though and to meet more people who have been asking when I will be in their city. I have been spending the last year working on new music with DJs, finally releasing the sophomore album that I have been alluding to and even developing an idea for a third project of which some of the songs are ready 🙂

Little Victory is an upcoming single/video that you’re pushing. It’s an extremely inspirational piece of work about someone feeling like a fish out of water. What prompted such a piece?

I wrote “Little Victory” after returning from Israel where I had met and was at the time long-distance dating Israeli singer-songwriter Elhay Cohen, the song idea came from my co-writer: female Canadian producer and songwriter Robyn Dell’Unto. December 2020 French DJ RetroVision released a version of this song on Don Diablo’s record label Hexagon and the original version is going on my forthcoming album of the same name.

Retrovision, Davis Mallory – Little Victory 

Little Victory Music Video 

Little Victory single 

Pre-Save for the album Little Victory

Here is a private SoundCloud tracklisting for the “Little Victory” album:

  1. Atlanta –a song I wrote about my hometown, my journey to NYC and Nashville to pursue music – with nostalgia for Atlanta – the city where I had my first heartbreak and how much the city has changed since I left (it’s now a film industry).
  2. Ain’t Afraid – features a big name in the EDM industry Luma (Seven Lions, Nurko, Zack Martino) – who I co-wrote the song with – it’s about not being afraid to fall in love
  3. Little Victory– co-written with and produced by female Canadian artist Robyn Dell’Unto – a remix of this song made by French artist RetroVision released on Don Diablo’s label Hexagon. “Little Victory” is about a summer romance with my Israeli ex who I met after I opened for Eurovision winner Netta who told me I had to visit Israel.
  4. Fire Signs – features Miss Audrey the Katy Perry-inspired Best Pop Artist at the Nashville Industry Music Awards, I wrote this song in Sweden about zodiac chemistry compatibility – I’m a Leo and Miss Audrey an Aries, we’re both Fire Signs.
  5. Shirtless– this is a new Countrified mix of the song that aired on MTV’s War of the Worlds and became the theme song for men’s swimwear line: Poolboy
  6. Heavy – features an all LGBTQ identifying cast – with vocalist Blake Leider and rapper Daisha McBride – discusses why relationships have to be so heavy, produced by Danish Aren Anderson and Ukrainian Depdramez.
  7. Can You Tell Me?– produced by Canadian artist BLEM and written in Berlin with Vincent Stefansson and Valentin Glage – “Can You Tell Me?” is about being ghosted. Where does all the love go in this modern era when two people separate and the romance suddenly dies.
  8. Say You Hate Me– written in Sweden the same week as “Fire Signs” “Shirtless” and previously released single “Jane Fonda” – “Say You Hate Me” is a very Britney Spears/NSYNC-style Swedish pop song co-written with and produced by Magnus Funemyr about a relationship that has grown stale.
  9. Sink or Swim – with references to Madonna, Beyonce’s “hot sauce,” and Whitney Houston’s “receipts” – “Sink or Swim” is about a cheating partner and the end of a relationship, produced by Option A. Music video coming by Russian filmmaker Dmitry Zhitov.
  10. Forget You– co-written with Nashville female EDM vocalists Notelle & Luma, produced by artist Swiss DJ FENOX – “Forget You” is about the end of a relationship and having a hard time letting go of the memories.
  11. Broken Dreams– this unreleased version by Ukrainian producer Depdramez – was co-written with pop artist Drew Schueler – tells the story of all the hard work artists put into chasing their dreams of stardom.
  12. Faith – written in 2020 at the start of this pandemic with American Idol contestant Madeline Finn, “Faith” is an uplifting anthem giving hope for all to not lose their faith in these trying times, produced by Austrian producer Jakob Koller.

The music video for Can You Tell Me?” is scheduled to release on 2/19/2021

Hope Tala by Rosie Matheson for EP Girl Eats Up Sun as announced by 360 MAGAZINE.

Hope Tala x Anime – Cherries

Today, London-based up and comer Hope Tala reveals the official video for her latest single, “Cherries” feat. Amine, which is taken from her stunning new EP Girl Eats Sun, out now. The video was directed by Anna Fearon.

WATCH THE VIDEO FOR “CHERRIES” FEAT. AMINE HERE!
LISTEN TO GIRL EATS SUN HERE!

Girl Eats Sun solidifies Hope Tala as an artist set to do big things in 2021. The EP has already received praise from Billboard, Clash, Dork, MTV, Notion, The Line Of Best Fit, Wonderland and more, with LADYGUNN proclaiming, “Girl Eats Sun is a forever vibe,” and Euphoria Magazine stating, “Girl Eats Sun is a pure embodiment of the energy brought into it.”

With her unique blend of R&B and bossa nova, Hope Tala has crafted a sound that already feels recognizable to her, and there is plenty more on the way. Speaking on “Cherries,” Hope Tala states:

“Since I started writing music, I’ve used fruit imagery; I’ve always been inspired by the Garden of Eden and the story of Adam and Eve. I think of ‘Cherries’ as being a really corporeal song –  there’s a lot of lyrical content about how the body portrays feeling and emotion, and when I was writing it I used the symbol of cherries as my focal point to help me understand where these two worlds – material and emotional – collide.”

With EP track “All My Girls Like To Fight” currently spinning across BBC Radio 1 as Introducing Track Of The Week, Hope Tala has had a prolific couple of months, returning after a year away to reveal “All My Girls Like To Fight” and “Crazy” to widescale plaudits from press around the globe, as well as featuring on key Spotify playlists Pollen & Alternative R&B. Girl Eats Sun is the follow up to Hope Tala’s stellar EP Sensitive Soul, a project acclaimed by areas such as Rolling Stone, Vogue and more and featuring Hope Tala’s breakthrough single “Lovestained,” a track which has racked up over 10 million streams since last year. Speaking on Girl Eats Sun, Hope Tala explains:

“At the core of ‘Girl Eats Sun’ is an assertion of confidence and boldness. The title is a paraphrase of ‘if you can’t take the heat, get out of the kitchen’ – as the girl eating the sun I’m daring and fearless. I chose this title because I feel as if the songs and stories on this project are more vivid and inventive than anything I’ve released thus far, and I’ve pushed my sound in different, exciting directions.”

Now represented by Dina Sahim and Wassim “SAL” Slaiby at SAL&CO (The Weeknd, Doja Cat, Brandy, Bryson Tiller), Hope Tala is ending 2020 with a flourish. Look out for more in 2021.

Image courtesy of Rosie Matheson and Republic Records

Hope Tale - "Girl Eats Sun"  EP

Hope Tale – “Girl Eats Sun”  EP

Today, London-based up and comer Hope Tala continues to build the heat around her name with the reveal of her stunning new EP, Girl Eats Sun, featuring standout Aminé-collaboration, Cherries.”

LISTEN TO GIRL EATS SUN HERE!

Girl Eats Sun solidifies Hope Tala as an artist set to do big things in 2021. With her unique blend of R&B and bossa nova, Hope Tala has crafted a sound that already feels recognizable to her, and there is plenty more on the way.

“Since I started writing music, I’ve used fruit imagery; I’ve always been inspired by the Garden of Eden and the story of Adam and Eve,” Hope Tala states, speaking on ‘Cherries.’ “I think of ‘Cherries’ as being a really corporeal song –  there’s a lot of lyrical content about how the body portrays feeling and emotion, and when I was writing it I used the symbol of cherries as my focal point to help me understand where these two worlds – material and emotional – collide.”

With EP track “All My Girls Like To Fight” currently spinning across BBC Radio 1 as Introducing Track Of The Week, Hope Tala has had a prolific couple of months, returning after a year away to reveal “All My Girls Like To Fight” and “Crazy” to widescale plaudits from Billboard, Refinery29, MTV, Wonderland, The Line Of Best Fit, NOTION, DORK and CLASH, as well as featuring on key Spotify playlists Pollen & Alternative R&B. Girl Eats Sun is the follow up to Hope Tala’s stellar EP Sensitive Soul, a project acclaimed by areas such as Rolling Stone, Vogue and more and featuring Hope Tala’s breakthrough single “Lovestained,” a track which has racked up over 10 million streams since last year. 

“At the core of ‘Girl Eats Sun’ is an assertion of confidence and boldness,” Hope Tala explains, speaking on Girl Eats Sun. “The title is a paraphrase of ‘if you can’t take the heat, get out of the kitchen’ – as the girl eating the sun I’m daring and fearless. I chose this title because I feel as if the songs and stories on this project are more vivid and inventive than anything I’ve released thus far, and I’ve pushed my sound in different, exciting directions.”

Now represented by Dina Sahim and Wassim “SAL” Slaiby at SAL&CO (The Weeknd, Doja Cat, Brandy, Bryson Tiller), Hope Tala is ending 2020 with a flourish. Look out for more in 2021.

Connect with Hope Tala on Spotify, Apple, YouTube, Instagram, Twitter and Facebook

Twice – Eyes wide open

Twice released a brand new album Monday titled “Eyes wide open.”

It is their second studio album, and it is streaming now on all platforms. You can listen to it by clicking right here.

With this album, the superstar K-pop group set out to show transition and growth, both in maturity and in musical style.

Twice uses inspiration from 80s synths for the 13-track album, which offers a little something for everyone, including new fans as well as old.

“I CAN’T STOP ME,” the first song on the album, is a tone-setter, showing listeners that the album is about to step outside the box and encouraging them to do the same. You can see the music video for the song by clicking right here.

The album was made with the help of some of the music industry’s biggest stars. Dua Lipa worked with the band for “BEHIND THE MASK,” a song written by Heize. Twice is also coming off a YouTube Special Live showcase for “Eyes wide open” that has pulled in more than 2 million viewers. You can see it by clicking right here.

The band debuted in 2015 and found rapid success, gaining popularity in the United States and beyond. They were featured on the cover of Allure Magazine in May.

They’ve also received praise from Harper’s Bazaar, TIME, Billboard, MTV, Forbes, Teen Vogue, Elle and BuzzFeed.

They spent 2019 touring the world on their TWICELIGHTS tour, which sold out The Forum in Los Angeles, the Prudential Center in Newark and the Wintrust Arena in Chicago.

Next they will release a song titled “I’LL SHOW YOU” for Riot Games.

The entire track list for the album is as follows:

1. I CAN’T STOP ME

2. HELL IN HEAVEN

3. UP NO MORE

4. DO WHAT WE LIKE

5. BRING IT BACK

6. BELIEVER

7. QUEEN

8. GO HARD

9. SHOT CLOCK

10. HANDLE IT

11. DEPEND ON YOU

12. SAY SOMETHING

13. BEHIND THE MASK

You can follow Twice on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Julia Michaels – Lie Like This

Grammy® Award-nominated multiplatinum singer and songwriter JULIA MICHAELS releases the official video for her brand-new solo single “Lie Like This” today. The video, directed by Jason Lester, premiered today following a live Q&A with fans, and made its broadcast premiere on MTV Live and mtvU. The video is available to watch HERE.

Regarding the video, Michaels says “A lot of my fans know me as the awkward uncoordinated girl that has too many feelings. Well, I’m still that. But I got to shoot a music video where it was just me, in clothes that we’re so fun and way too tight and I loved every second of it! I’m still a long way from being a confident creature but I felt much closer to it when we shot this day. I hope everyone likes it and if anything, you find yourself dancing around too!”

ABOUT JULIA MICHAELS
GRAMMY® Award-nominated singer and songwriter Julia Michaels has transformed the pop music landscape not only from behind-the-scenes as one of the most in-demand songwriters, but also in the spotlight as a solo artist as well. In 2018, she garnered GRAMMY® Awards nominations in the categories of “Best New Artist” and “Song of the Year” for “Issues,” for her 5x-platinum selling debut single “Issues”.

In 2019, Michaels released Inner Monologue Part 1 and Inner Monologue Part 2, a series of critically acclaimed EP’s. She also embarked on The Inner Monologue Tour, which marked her first-ever headline tour throughout the U.S., following an enviable run touring the world with an incredible array of artists including Maroon 5, Keith Urban, Shawn Mendes, Niall Horan, and P!NK.

This year, Michaels continued her reign as one of the top songwriters in the industry. She contributed three songs to Selena Gomez’s new album Rare, including “Lose You To Love Me”—which hit #1 on The Billboard Hot 100—“Look At Her Now,” and “Fun.” Additional songwriting credits include Dua Lipa’s “Pretty Please,” Zara Larsson’s “Love Me Land,” The Chicks’ “Julianna Calm Down,” “Tights On My Boat,” “Texas Man” and more. She also collaborated with singer, songwriter, and musician JP Saxe on the heart wrenching, platinum-certified, ballad “If The World Was Ending,” which connected with audiences all over the world during the Global Pandemic crossing over 1 billion streams.

As a songwriter, Julia has co-written 25 titles that have charted on the Billboard Hot 100, 14 of which have hit the top 40, including her debut single “Issues,” and two that have hit #1 (Justin Bieber’s “Sorry” & Selena Gomez’ “Lose You To Love Me”). She’s also written titles for artists including Britney Spears, Demi Lovato, Dua Lipa, Ed Sheeran, Gwen Stefani, Hailee Steinfeld, James Bay, Janelle Monàe, Jessie Ware, Keith Urban, Kelsea Ballerini, Linkin Park, Maroon 5, Nick Jonas, P!NK, Shawn Mendes, The Chicks and more.

WATCH “LIE LIKE THIS” OFFICIAL VIDEO HERE
Styling Credits HERE

SOCIALS: OFFICIAL // FACEBOOK // TWITTER // INSTAGRAM

Bea Miller – wisdom teeth

Bea Miller has released her new song wisdom teeth today, her first new music of the year. On the lush new track, Miller meditates on the lost innocence of her childhood as she recalls a time when she was four years old, staring at herself in the mirror in her tutu during her dance recital. Over the bouncy synths, she sings, I used to be so happy/No matter what happened to me/But when they pulled my teeth out /Lost the wisest part.

Listen to wisdom teeth here and view the official video, which had its broadcast premiere on MTV Live and MTVU and was directed by Gina Gizella, here.

In tandem with today’s release, Bea Miller has also announced that her new EP, elated!, will be released on October 23. With elated!, Bea sought to make her most honest body of work yet and gets even more personal and political while remaining as ferocious as ever. The new EP will feature wisdom teeth and several new tracks. More details, including the EP’s track listing, will be revealed soon.

In addition to releasing new music, Bea will return to the stage next weekend performing from Los Angeles’Teragram Ballroom for Save Our Stages#SOSFEST, a three day virtual festival (Oct. 16-18) from YouTube Music and the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA) to help save independent venues across the U.S. #SOSFEST will stream live on NIVA’s official YouTube channel here with Bea’s set simultaneously streaming on her YouTube Channel here

Declared a “force of nature” by Paper Magazine, Bea continues to demonstrate her maturity as both an artist and songwriter. While wisdom teeth is the first new music she’s released this year, her single feel something has become a massive streaming hit in 2020 with over 155 million streams since its release. Released in 2019, feel something has become a fan favorite on TikTok where the song has amassed over 3.4 billion video views and over 1.3 million video creations in part, thanks to the Euphoria Makeup Challenge.

ABOUT BEA MILLER: At only 21, Bea Miller has achieved impressive milestones including garnering over 2 billion streams to date. Paper Magazine included her in their Predictions: 100 People Taking Over 2019 and also named her one of 100 Women Revolutionizing Pop. Her 2019 single feel something has become a viral hit on TikTok nearly a year after its release and amassed almost 155 million streams worldwide to date. Her previous projects include aurora (2018) and the gold-selling single like that; three EPs released throughout 2017; and her 2015 debut LP, which charted top 10 on the Billboard 200 and featured two gold-selling hit singles. Miller has collaborated with NOTD on the global dance hit I WANNA KNOW, (which amassed over 239 million global streams on Spotify and nearly 20 million video views to date), and Jeremy Zucker on comethru.

Last year, she also teamed up with Jessie Reyez on FEELS LIKE HOME, 6lack on it’s not u it’s me and UK duo Snakehips NEVER GONNA LIKE YOU. In 2019, she also headlined her first tour, nice to meet u, selling out venues across North America. She made her festival debuts at Lollapalooza, Firefly, Outside Lands, Bumbershoot, Life is Beautiful and Austin City Limits among others. Bea wrapped up the year with a second successful headline tour, sunsets in outerspace, which not only hit venue across North American, but took her to Europe, making stops in London, Paris, Amsterdam and Berlin.

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Teen Pregnancy

By Cassandra Yany

Teen Pregnancy in the United States

In 2018, the birth rate among women aged 15 to 19 years in the United States was less than half of what it was in 2008, which was 41.5 births per 1,000 girls, as stated by the Pew Research Center.

In 2017, 194,377 babies were born to women in the U.S. between the ages of 15 and 19 years old, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The birth rate dropped seven percent from 2016, with 18.8 babies born per 1,000 women in this age group. This was a record low for the nation.

The teen birth rate has been declining since the early 1990s, and this decline accelerated after the Great Recession. A 2011 Pew Research Center study connected the decrease in teen births to the economic downturn of the recession. The rate has continued to fall even after the economy’s recovery.

Evidence suggests that the declining birth rate is also partly due to more teens abstaining from sexual activity, and more who are sexually active using birth control than in previous years. Still, the CDC reports that U.S. teen pregnancy rate is substantially higher than other “western industrialized” nations.

DoSomething.org states that three out of 10 American girls will become pregnant at least once before the age of 20. About 25 percent of teen moms will have a second child within two years of their first baby.

Data shows that there are racial, ethnic and geographic disparities among teen pregnancies in the U.S. From 2016 to 2017, birth rates among 15 to 19-year-olds decreased 15 percent for non-Hispanic Asian teens, nine percent for Hispanic teens, eight percent for non-Hispanic white teens, six percent for non-Hispanic Black teens, and six percent for Native American teens. In 2017, the birth rate of Hispanic teens was 28.9 percent and of non-Hispanic black teens was 27.5 percent for non-Hispanic Black teens. These were both two times higher than the rate for non-Hispanic white teens, which was 13.2 percent. Among the different racial and ehtnic groups, Native American teens had the highest rate of 32.9 percent.

From 2007 to 2015, the teen birth rate was lowest in urban communities with 18.9 percent, and highest in rural communities with 30.9 percent— as reported by the CDC. During the same years, the rate among teens in rural communities had only declined 37 percent in rural counties, while large urban counties saw a 50 percent decrease and medium and small counties saw a 44 percent decrease. State-specific birth rates from 2017 were lowest in Massachusetts (8.1 percent) and highest in Arkansas (32.8 percent).

Socioeconomic disparities also exist among teen pregnancy rates. Teens in child welfare systems are at higher risk of teen pregnancy and birth than other groups of teens. Those living in foster care are more than twice as likely to become pregnant than those not in foster care. This then leads to financial difficulties for these young families. More than half of all mothers on welfare had their first child as a teenager, and two-thirds of families started by a young mother are considered poor.  

Teen pregnancy and motherhood can have significant effects on a young woman’s education. According to DoSomething.org, parenthood is the leading reason for teen girls dropping out of school. Only about 50% of teen mothers receive a high school diploma by the age of 22, while 90% of women who do not give birth during their teen years graduate from high school. Less than 2% of teen moms earn a college degree by age 30. 

Being a child of a teen mother can also have lasting effects on an individual. The children are more likely to have lower school achievement and drop out of high school. They are more likely to be incarcerated at some point in their lives and face unemployment as a young adult. They could also have more health problems and are more likely to become a parent as a teenager themselves. 

According to the CDC, teen fatherhood occurred at a rate of 10.4 births per 1,000 ranging from 15 to 19-years-old in 2015. Data indicates that these young men attend fewer years of school and are less likely to earn their high school diploma. 

A decline in teen pregnancy means an increase in U.S. public savings. According to the CDC, between 1991 and 2015, the teen birth rate dropped 64%, which led to $4.4 billion dollars in public savings for 2015 alone.

Global Teen Pregnancy

According to the World Health Organization, approximately 12 million girls 15 to 19-years-old and 777,000 girls under 15 give birth in “developing” regions each year. About 21 million girls aged 15 to 19 in these areas become pregnant.

Complications during pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death for girls age 15 to 19 years globally. An estimated 5.6 million abortions occur each year among 15 to 19-year-old girls, with 3.9 million of them being unsafe. This can lead to death or lasting health problems.

Additionally, teen moms face higher risk of eclampsia, puerperal endometriosis and systemic infections than 20 to 24-year-old women. Babies of these mothers face higher risk of lower birth weight, preterm delivery and severe neonatal conditions.

Across the globe, adolescent pregnancies are more likely to take place in marginalized communities that are driven by poverty, and lack of education and employment opportunities. In many societies and cultures, girls get married and have children while they are teenagers. In some locations, girls choose to become pregnant due to limited educational and employment prospects. These societies either value motherhood and marriage, or union and childbearing may be the best option available to these young women. 

Teenage girls in some areas may not be able to avoid pregnancy because they do not have the knowledge of how to obtain contraceptive methods or how to use them. There are restrictive laws and policies regarding provision of contraception based on age or marital status that prevent these women from access to forms of pregnancy prevention. 

Health worker bias also exists in these areas, as well as an unwillingness to acknowledge adolescents’ sexual health needs. These individuals also may not be able to access contraception due to transportation and financial constraints. 

Another cause for unintended pregnancy around the work is sexual violence, with more than one-third of girls in some countries reporting that their first sexual experience was forced. After pregnancy, young women who became mothers before the age of 18 are more likely to experience violence in their marriage or partnership.

The University of Queensland in Australia conducted a study that found children who experience some type of neglect are seven times more likely than other victims of abuse to experience teen pregnancy. They drew these conclusions by looking at data from 8,000 women and children beginning in pregnancy and moving into early adulthood.

According to News Medical, researchers found that neglect was one of the most severe types of maltreatment when compared to emotional, sexual and physical abuse. The study defined child neglect as “not providing the child with necessary physical requirements (food, clothing or a safe place to sleep) and emotional requirements (comfort and emotional support) a child should receive, as determined by the Queensland Govt. Department of Child Safety.”

CBS reported that an increase in calls to Japan’s pregnancy hotline since March indicates that COVID-19 has caused an uptick in teenage pregnancies there. Jikei Hospital in Kumamoto, Japan said that calls from junior and senior high school students hit a 10-year high back in April. Pilcon, a Tokyo-based non-profit that runs school sex-ed programs, said that it was flooded with calls from concerned teens after they used home pregnancy tests or they missed periods.

Global Citizen stated that 152,000 Kenyan teen girls became pregnant during the country’s three-month lockdown, which was a 40 percent increase in their monthly average. Data from the International Rescue Committee shows that girls living in refugee camps were particularly affected, with 62 pregnancies reported at Kakuma Refugee Camp this past June compared to only eight in June 2019.

In an online press conference, Dr. Manisha Kumar, head of the Médecins Sans Frontières task force on safe abortion care, said, “During the pandemic, a lot of resurces got pulled away from a lot of routine services and care, and those services were redirected to coronavirus response.” The growing economic, hunger and health crises worldwide due to the pandemic makes this an especially challenging time for pregnant teens. 

Both Marie Stopes International and the United Nations Fund warned that the new focus on the coronavirus in the medical field would negatively affect reproductive health. This included disruptions to family planning services and restricted access to contraception, leading to more unintended pregnancies.

Preventing Teen Pregnancy

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Evidence Review has identified a variety of evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs. These include sexuality education programs, youth development programs, abstinence education programs, clinic-based programs and programs specifically designed for diverse populations and locations. 

Resources that focus on social health determinants in teen pregnancy prevention, specifically at the community level, play a crucial role in addressing the racial, ethnic and geographical disparities that exist in teen births. The CDC also supports several projects that educate, engage and involve young men in reproductive health. 

According to the CDC, research shows that teens who have conversations with their parents about sex, relationships, birth control and pregnancy tend to begin to have sex at a later age. When or if they do have sex, these teenagers are more likely to do so less often, use contraception, and have better communication with romantic partners.

A 2014 report by the Brooking Insitution’s Senior Fellow Melissa S. Kearney and Phillip B. Levine of Wellesley College found that the MTV reality programs like “16 and Pregnant” and “Teen Mom” led to a 5.7 percent in teen births in the 18 months after the shows first aired. This number accounts for approximately one-third of the overall decline in teen births during that time period.

In locations where more teenagers watched MTV, they saw a larger decline in teen pregnancy after the introduction of the show. The show also led young adults to educate themselves more on birth control. Research showed that when an episode aired, there were large spikes the following day in the rate that people were conducting online searches for how to obtain contraceptives.

Contraception and Reproductive Rights

According to Power to Decide, contraception is a key factor in recent declines in teen pregnancy. Yet, over 19 million women eligible for publicly funded contraception don’t have access to the full range of birth control methods where they live.

Between 2011 and 2015, 81 percent of females and 84 percent of males between the ages of 15 and 19 who had sex reported using a contraceptive the first time. This number increased for females since 2002, when 74.5 percent used contraception. 

A sexually active teen who doesn’t use contraceptives has a 90 percent chance of becoming pregnant within a year. 

NPR reported that a challenge to the Affordable Care Act could reach the Supreme Court in the near future, which would significantly affect reproductive healthcare. This could make contraceptives unaffordable and unobtainable for some Americans, which would in turn affect the number of teenagers having unprotected sex.

Some also fear that the recent death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg will jeopardize women’s reproductive rights. If her replacement is opposed to abortion, it will most likely turn the court in favor of increasing restrictions on abortion, and could even go as far as to overturn Roe v. Wade. This would have the potential to increase the number of unsafe abortions among pregnant teens, or increase the number of teen births.

According to Kaiser Health News, there is a case waiting in the lower court that involves federal funding of Planned Parenthood in both the Medicaid and federal family programs. Ginsburg always sided with women on issues such as these, so her absence could mean a lack of access to education, family planning and contraceptives for teens.

Lewis Capaldi – Before You Go

Lewis Capaldi‘s hit song “Before You Go” finally hit No. 1 Monday on Mediabase‘s Top 40 and Billboard‘s Pop Songs and All Format Radio Songs charts.

Its 36-week climb to the top of Mediabase’s Top 40 and 37-week climb to the top of Billboard’s Pop Songs chart are the longest of both respective lists. The previous record was a 31-week climb up the Billboard Pop Chart set by “Eastside,” the 2018 hit from Benny Blanco, Halsey and Khalid.

Capaldi also joins Mariah Carey, Beyonce and Bruno Mars as the only artists to reach No. 1 with each of their first two entries, as “Someone You Loved” reached No. 1 in Dec. 2019.

“Before You Go” was first released Nov. 2019 on the extended version of Capaldi’s album “Divinely Uninspired to a Hellish Extent.” Since then it has done nothing but grow and spread, even cracking a billion streams.

Capaldi said “Before You Go” is about his aunt who died of suicide, also calling it the most honest and personal song he has ever written.

“It’s about loss, regrets and the fear that we sometimes never understand what someone is going through despite our best want to be everything that person needs,” Capaldi said.

Capaldi picked up a GRAMMY nomination for his song “Someone You Loved” and performed “Before You Go” at the 2020 MTV Video Music Awards where he was nominated for PUSH Best New Artist.

Instead of taking time to sit back and enjoy praise from outlets like Rolling Stone, The New York Times, Los Angeles Times and Entertainment Weekly, the Glasgow-born singer-songwriter is now working on his second album.

Seint Monet Releases “What Does It Mean” Today × EP Looms

Independent, rising soul-pop artist Seint Monet unveils her new track, “What Does It Mean,” today. The romantic track is about a boy she had never met before, but had grown quite strong feelings for. In conjunction, Seint Monet announced that her debut EP, Bloom, will be released next Friday, September 25th.

The glossy sound of Nashville’s Seint Monet is a new strain of American soul-pop. Check out the debut single by Seint Monet, whose own career in pop music is blossoming every bit like the love affair she details in her songwriting.

Click HERE to listen to “What Does It Mean.”

Seint Monet said about the song, “Looking back, it makes me laugh to think about how I put this guy on a pedestal. He started dating someone else and, at the time, it hurt like a bitch. But it was worth it, because it gave me this fucking beautiful song.”

The Bloom EP will include Seint Monet’s ethereal debut single and title track, Bloom, written by Camden Mueller (Prince Fox), Mia Shelton, Miette Hope, produced by Johnluke Lewis (LANY), and mastered by Chris Gehringer (Selena Gomez, Dua Lipa, Lizzo). Upon it’s release, the song received praise from American songwriter A1234 and Atwood Magazine, among others. The single’s music video is also currently being playlisted on MTV’s MTVU and Spankin New channels.

In addition, Seint Monet’s latest release, 32 Degrees, will also be featured on the EP. The track, written alongside Johnluke Lewis (LANY), Julius Rodriguez (Brasstracks, A$ap Rocky), Mike Malchicoff (Mark Ronson, Julia Michaels, Troye Sivan) and Miette Hope, continues to see the artist’s rapid rise. Click HERE to watch the nostalgia filled video.

Stay tuned for more to come from the rising star Seint Monet:

Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, TikTok

K-POP Star Announces First Livestream Concert

Singer-Songwriter-Producer, Wonho, announced today, via Rolling Stone, that he will be partnering with LiveXLive for a global pay-per-view concert. This will mark his first ever live solo act and debut performance for his first solo album ‘Love Synonym #1 : Right for Me.’ The concert is scheduled for Saturday, September 26th at 8PM EST/ 11PM EST / Sunday, September 27th at 12PM KST. Tickets will be open for sale on Friday, September 11th at 11AM EST / 8AM PST at LivexLive.com.

WATCH “OPEN MIND” MUSIC VIDEO HERE

STREAM HERE ON SPOTIFY

STREAM HERE ON APPLE MUSIC

FOLLOW WONHO ON SOCIALS:

TWITTER | INSTAGRAM | SPOTIFY | YOUTUBE

The livestream pay-per-view performance is Wonho’s much-anticipated return to live performing. Wonho recently debuted his first single “Losing You” on August 14th, earning many great reactions from his awaited fans. Following that release, Wonho dropped his first solo mini album ‘Love Synonym #1 : Right for Me’, featuring the title track “Open Mind” on September 4th, which topped the Worldwide iTunes Album charts; taking up the #1 spot under U.S. Pop Album Chart, K-Pop Album Chart in twenty different countries including U.S., and catapulting to #6 under the U.S. All Genres Album Chart.

Immediately upon release, “wonho” was trending #1 worldwide on Twitter, with “open mind,” “#OPEN_MIND,” and “#Love_Synonym” following closely behind. As Wonho makes his first step as a solo artist with this eight-track mini album, he showcases not only his vocal skills; but also his lyrical, compositional, and production skills.

The title ‘Love Synonym’ symbolizes a new start that is different from Wonho’s music style and performances that he has shown before. ‘Love Synonym’ is a new definition of love that Wonho created in order to show his pledges and determinations that he will communicate with his fans. Wonho expressed his earnestness by participating in writing and composing five songs, including the title track “Open Mind” and the pre-released single “Losing You.”

The full performance on LiveXLive will not only feature songs from Wonho’s new solo album among other original and cover songs and a unique PPV experience with behind the scenes footage, docureality-style coverage. Premium tiered pricing includes VIP experiences, exclusive merchandise, meet-and-greets, and other event-exclusive perks. “LiveXLive is fortunate to be able to support Wonho’s return to his fans, the WENEE’s, and the career he loves. Our platform is built for moments like these and we are excited to power this one-of-a-kind concert experience together. We saw an incredible response for the Monsta X live show and anticipate Wonho’s solo breakout performance is perfectly timed to serve as the encore of a lifetime!” stated Dermot McCormack, president of LiveXLive.

Buzz surrounding his pre-released single, “Losing You,” which was dedicated to the fans who thought they may have lost him, took the U.S. Market by storm. Upon release, #WONHO_LosingYou_MV shot up to the #1 Twitter Trend Worldwide; and received notable mentions from publications such as PAPER Magazine, MTV News, Access, iHeart, and Rolling Stone, who stated,

“Performed entirely in English, the sweeping, piano-driven ballad showcases Wonho’s delicate falsetto, as he sings about protecting a cherished love despite all costs.”

Wonho also spoke to Forbes and Teen Vogue about his solo ventures.

“While these weren’t easy moments to face and endure, it was a time that made me think a lot and that allowed me to develop and grow — that was very important and precious for me. I thought of the fans waiting and supporting me … I feel a little more mature, and like I have more to say to the world.”

Late last year, Wonho’s fans tirelessly put forth efforts to show him he wasn’t alone in this world. Their message was heard globally, loud and clear; with multiple hashtags trending worldwide on twitter for weeks on end, online petitions garnering half a million signatures, fans taking it to the streets of Seoul writing supportive notes, and putting up billboards in Times Square, China and all over the world to support him.

As told by Forbes, “…fans had shown their support for the artist by sending the 2017 song “From Zero,” a special track co-written and producer by Wonho, to No. 1 on Billboard’s World Digital Song Sales chart to help prove his continuing viability and commercial appeal as an artist, songwriter and producer.”

After months of fan-driven fundraisers, online petitions, Twitter trends and love; Wonho is thrilled to be giving back to his fans. His fanbase’s new name is Wenne; and the fandom name represents the special bond between Wonho and his fans, who have been there to support him through the ups and downs.

Wonho sings passionately on the track “Coz anytime or place I’d be your shield, when you feel, like you ain’t got the fight in you to heal.”

The release of “Losing You” is Wonho’s first step forward in his solo career after signing with Highline Entertainment, which is a subsidiary label of Starship Entertainment—the home to K-pop groups including Monsta X, WJSN and Cravity—and houses viral EDM star DJ Soda [Read HERE on Forbes]. Back in early April, Wonho also joined Maverick Management’s roster, alongside Britney Spears, Madonna, The Weeknd, and many more big-name artists.