Posts tagged with "Atlanta"

Seton Hall player illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Baseball’s All-Star Game

Majority of Fans Support Removal of Baseball’s All-Star Game from Atlanta, Possible Removal of Super Bowl from Arizona Over Voting Laws

Support for Boycott of Beijing Olympic Games Over Human Rights Issues; Support for Athletes, Leagues, Unions Championing Social Change

By a 55-31 percent margin, a new Seton Hall Sports Poll has found that sports fans across the country support Major League Baseball’s decision to move the All-Star Game out of Atlanta in the wake of Georgia’s new voting laws. Those who call themselves “avid fans” are even more supportive, agreeing with MLB by a 67-25 percent margin. 

The general population was also in support of the move from MLB by a 49-31 percent margin, with 20 percent indicating “don’t know/no opinion.” The “don’t know/no opinion” choice was recited by 14 percent of sports fans and only eight percent of avid fans.

These were the findings of a Seton Hall Sports Poll conducted April 23-26 geographically spread across the United States using a national representative sample weighted according to gender, age, ethnicity, education, income and geography based on U.S. Census Bureau figures. The Poll had 1,563 adult respondents with a margin of error of +/- 3.2 percent. 

Super Bowl Removed from Arizona?

Almost exactly the same level of support was shown for the possibility of moving the 2023 Super Bowl out of Arizona should that state follow Georgia with similar voting law changes. By 55-32 percent (13 percent don’t know/no opinion), sports fans would support moving the game, with avid fans in support of a move by 64-27 percent (9 percent don’t know/no opinion). Among the general public, there is also support for moving the game by 49-30 percent with 21 percent in the “don’t know/no opinion” category.

“When I had the profound pleasure of meeting with Nelson Mandela in 1993 as the Executive Director of the National Basketball Players Association, he encouraged us to use our positions in sport to become agents of change,” said Seton Hall Professor Charles Grantham, director of the Center for Sport Management within the Stillman School of Business. “It is perhaps a long time in coming, but there would seem to be more support than ever for that proposition amongst the leagues, the players and the fans as well as the general public. But so far, the moves are largely symbolic and will require the leagues to utilize their strong political lobby to effectuate legislative and policy change.”

An Olympic Boycott for Beijing Games?

Moving on to the global stage, respondents to the poll were also asked about a possible boycott of the 2022 Winter Olympics in China, a country often cited for human rights violations. Asked if they would support a boycott of the games, 55 percent of the U.S. general population said yes, with only 23 percent saying no, and 22 percent saying they did not know or held no opinion. Among sports fans, support for a boycott rose to 57 percent vs. 27 percent opposed to a boycott, and among avid fans, 65 percent said yes to a boycott vs. 23 percent saying no. The don’t know/no opinion responses were 16 percent and 12 percent respectively for these self-described fans.

With Allies?

When Americans were asked if they would support an Olympic boycott if multiple countries joined in, the “yes” numbers (in favor) rose to 60 percent for the general population, 62 percent for sports fans and stayed even at 65 percent for avid fans.

Should Athletes Be Able to Participate Independently if Their Countries Boycott the Olympics?

On the question of whether athletes should be able to compete without representing their countries (if their countries were boycotting), the general population said yes by more than a 2 to 1 margin (49-23 percent), with 28 percent registering don’t know/no opinion. Among sports fans, the yes margin was even greater at 54-23 percent (with 23 percent don’t know/no opinion). Support for athletes competing individually rose again among avid fans to 63-23 percent with 14 percent saying don’t know/no opinion.

Should Leagues and Teams Use Their Influence To Affect Social Change?

 Asked whether organizations (sports leagues and teams) should use their influence to affect social change, the general public supported such actions by a 48-36 percent margin with 16 percent answering don’t know/no opinion. The level of support for teams and leagues wielding their influence to affect social change rose to 52 percent for sports fans and 61 percent for avid fans. 

Should Governments Use Sporting Events To Influence or Affect Social Change?

Asked whether governments should use sporting events to affect social change, the general public supported such actions by a 43-38 percent margin with 19 percent answering don’t know/no opinion. The level of support for governments wielding their influence to affect social change through sport rose to 48 percent for sports fans and 61 percent for avid fans. 

Players and Players Associations?

Asked if athletes and/or players associations should use their influence to affect social change – 51 percent of the general population said yes, compared to only 35 percent no and 14 percent who said they did not know or had no opinion. Support for the players’ advocacy rose among sports fans to 55 percent with 34 percent opposing. Among those who describe themselves as “avid fans,” those in favor rose again to 65 percent with opposition declining to 28 percent (11 and seven percent, respectively, saying don’t know/no opinion).

“The question of moving major events in response to legislation or boycotting the Olympics gets to the heart of sports and society, and one influencing the other,” said Grantham. “If the leagues, teams and players continue to wield their economic and political power as agents of change, the potential for real and meaningful impact can be realized.”

Questions and charted breakdowns may be found below; an online version of this release may be found here.

ABOUT THE POLL

The Seton Hall Sports Poll, conducted regularly since 2006, is performed by the Sharkey Institute within the Stillman School of Business. This poll was conducted online by YouGov Plc. using a national representative sample weighted according to gender, age, ethnicity, education, income and geography, based on U.S. Census Bureau figures. Respondents were selected from YouGov’s opt-in panel to be representative of all U.S residents. This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls. The Seton Hall Sports Poll has been chosen for inclusion in iPoll by Cornell’s Roper Center for Public Opinion Research and its findings have been published everywhere from USA Today, ESPN, The New York Times, Washington Post, AP, and Reuters to CNBC, NPR, Yahoo Finance, Fox News and many points in between. 

Camino Press Photo by Def Jam Recordings for use by 360 Magazine

Camino QxA

Camino, an Atlanta-based singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, is an inspirational, soulful pop and R&B powerhouse with his debut EP, Burning Fire, to be released on April 23. Burning Fire regales the tale of Camino’s past­– both painful and joyous­­­–as he struggled with homelessness after his move from Mississippi to Atlanta, followed his tenacious passion for music, and eventually landed an impressive record deal with Def Jam Recordings. Camino’s music is authentic, invigorating, and raw­. Here at 360 Magazine, we sat down with Camino to discuss how he found inspiration to pursue music in his darkest moments, dream music collaborations, and the upcoming release of his full-length album.

1. What response are you anticipating when your EP, Burning Fire, drops? 

Honestly, I don’t know. I obviously hope the response is amazing, but I honestly don’t know. I just hope people like it and find a way to connect to it.

2. How would you describe the sound of Burning Fire in three words? 

Cinematic, anthemic and vulnerable   

3. Who was your biggest musical inspiration in writing Burning Fire?

My aunt and uncle inspired the song, and it is about them and their story. But musically, Imagine Dragons and Adele, most definitely.  

4. What kept you going to pursue music when it may have felt like the odds were stacked against you? 

God and faith. I know I’m meant to do music. It’s the only thing I’m good at and it’s the only thing that makes me truly happy­­­­–like truly to my core happy.   

 

5. Who would be your dream artist to collaborate with? 

Billie Eilish, Adele, Sam Smith and Lewis Capaldi are all incredible. I’d love to collaborate with any of them. 

6. Did your move from Mississippi to Atlanta influence the music you were listening to and drawing inspiration from? 

Yes, absolutely. Coming from a small city like Jackson, Mississippi compared to Atlanta, Georgia was such a huge leap for me. It gave me more confidence to write the songs I wrote and instilled the passion in me to create the songs I did.  


7. How are you feeling about already being signed such a notable label as Def Jam Recordings? Incredible. God is the greatest. Def Jam is home. They are incredible and provide every resource I need. Shoutout to my team I LOVE Y’ALL!   

8. Looking ahead, do you have more plans for releasing any other music in 2021?  

Yes, full-length album coming. That is my true masterpiece. Just stay tuned–I’m so excited to share with the world.

Black Rob and Sean Combs illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Black Rob Has Passed Away

Black Rob, Rapper and Former Bad Boy Artist, Has Passed Away at 52 Years Old

Best known for his 2000 single “Whoa!” the rapper was recently hospitalized in Atlanta

Robert Ross, the rap artist known as Black Rob, died April 17 at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta. Fellow Bad Boy rapper Mark Curry stated the cause of death was cardiac arrest, according to Pitchfork. He added that Black Rob was dealing with a number of health issues prior to his death, including lupus, kidney failure, diabetes, and multiple strokes. Black Rob was 52 years old.

“I don’t know where to begin this, but I thank everybody for the donations. Rob passed away about an hour ago,” a teary-eyed Curry said in a video. “I need for his daughter, Iona Ross, little Robert Ross, y’all get in touch with me, please.”

In a second video, Curry stated that he had spoken to Bad Boy founder Combs for the first time in 15 years following Rob’s passing.

“I just want to say thank you. We really did some amazing stuff. RIP to my brother. I was dead with him, I was dead with him,” Curry said. “I ain’t talk to Puff in 15 years. We talked today. This is the beginning of a new us. Rob made sure he knew what he had to do before he parted this world to make sure we all alright — and that’s what he did. Bad Boy for life, yo.”

Diddy posted a tribute on Instagram, stating: “Rest in power King @therealblackrob! As I listen to your records today there’s one thing that they all have in common! You have made millions of people all over the world feel good and dance! You are one of a kind! GOD BLESS! Love. You will be truly missed!!!!”

Born Robert Ross in Buffalo, N.Y., the Bad Boy rapper grew up in East Harlem where he began rapping as a preteen leading to the formation of his first group, the Schizophrenics. He released four studio albums, his most successful being his 2000 debut “Life Story.” Rob is best known for his hit single “Whoa!” which peaked at No. 43 on the Billboard Hot 100. Along with Curry, Rob was featured on Sean “P. Diddy” Combs’ “Bad Boy 4 Life,” which charted at No. 33. Though he left Bad Boy Records in the mid-2000s, Rob reunited with the crew for select dates of the Bad Boy Family Reunion Tour in 2016.

Kevin Hart illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Kevin Hart Laugh Out Loud

KEVIN HART’S LAUGH OUT LOUD NOW AVAILABLE ON TUBI WITH MORE THAN 200 EPISODES
FROM THE POPULAR LOL! NETWORK LIBRARY

Variety of stand-up, interview and animated titles – including All Star Comedy Jam,
Comedy in Color, Cold as Balls, Def Comedy Jam, D.L. Hughley: Uncut and The PJs – are now available on FOX Entertainment’s free streaming service

Tubi, a division of FOX Entertainment, and Laugh Out Loud, the comedy brand and multi-platform entertainment company founded by Kevin Hart, today announced a content deal to bring more than 200 episodes from the expansive LOL! Network library to FOX Entertainment’s free streaming service. Beginning today, a variety of stand-up, interview and animated titles – including All Star Comedy Jam, Comedy in Color, Cold as Balls, Def Comedy Jam, D.L. Hughley: Uncut and The PJs – from the LOL! Network library now join Tubi’s vast library of more than 30,000 movies and television shows.

“We’re excited to be partnering with Laugh Out Loud to bring hundreds of hours of premium comedy free to Tubi viewers,” said Adam Lewinson, Chief Content Officer, Tubi. “Comedy has always been a top-performing category on our platform, and we know Laugh Out Loud’s popular titles will be a perfect fit for our viewers.”

Laugh Out Loud titles coming to Tubi in April include Affion Crockett: Mirror II Society, All Star Comedy Jam (I’m Still Laughing, Atlanta, Dallas, Las Vegas, Orlando and South Beach editions), Cold As Balls (Seasons 1 & 2), Comedy in Color (Seasons 1 & 2), D.L. Hughley: Uncut, Def Comedy Jam (Seasons 1-3), In Godfrey We Trust (Year in Review), Kevin Hart: Lyft Legend, The PJs (Seasons 1-3), Shaq & Cedric the Entertainer Present: All Star Comedy Jam, That’s Funny (Billy Sorrells, Capone, D’Lai, Karlous Miller and Rip Micheals editions) and What Now All Access.

“Laughter is a universal language. Our goal is, and has always been, to develop LOL into a global comedy powerhouse, and to keep the world laughing together,” said Laugh Out Loud CEO, Jeff Clanagan. “As we expand the LOL distribution network, we’re excited to partner with Tubi because it allows us to continue to reach our audience wherever they are with the best comedy out there.”

Later this year, Tubi will add more seasons of Laugh Out Loud’s Hart-hosted sports talk show Cold as Balls, Comedy in Color, and Def Comedy Jam, as well as additional LOL! Network titles, including Inglorious Pranksters, Mike Epps Presents: Live from Club Nokia, and Straight from The Hart.

With total view time surpassing 200 million hours of content streamed each month since April, Tubi has more than 30,000 movies and television shows globally from over 250 content partners, including every major studio. The service gives fans of films and television programs an easy way to discover new content that is available completely free.

Tubi is available on Android and iOS mobile devices, Amazon Echo Show, Google Nest Hub Max, Comcast Xfinity X1, Cox Contour, and on OTT devices such as Amazon Fire TV, Vizio TVs, Sony TVs, Samsung TVs, Roku, Apple TV, Chromecast, Android TV, PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X | S, and soon on Hisense TVs globally. Consumers can also watch Tubi content on the web.

About Tubi

Headquartered in San Francisco, Tubi, a division of FOX Entertainment, is an ad-supported video on demand (AVOD) service with movies and television shows from nearly every major Hollywood studio. Tubi gives fans of films and television programs an easy way to discover new content that is available completely free. The service is currently available in the US, Canada, Australia, and Mexico.

About Laugh Out Loud

Laugh Out Loud is a comedy brand and multi-platform entertainment company founded by the world’s top comedian Kevin Hart. Through comedy in color, LOL unites a diverse, global audience around an essential connective tissue: LAUGHTER.

From stand-up legends to the next generation of comedic talent, Hart and LOL curate comedy’s boldest voices to produce original scripted and unscripted series, stand-up specials, live broadcasts and experiential activations. To Laugh

Out Loud, Hart brings the groundbreaking social strategy that earned him 100 million+ followers, sold out 2018’s biggest comedy tour in the world, and continues to break box office records.

Markice Moore image by Starz for use by 360 Magazine

Markice Moore Q&A

By: Emily Bunn

The most sought-after ‘bad guy’: Markice Moore is a rising force to be reckoned with in Hollywood’s entertainment industry. Most notably recognized for his role as Ray Ray on the hit seriesSnowfall,” Moore is continuing to flesh out his acting resume with his upcoming involvement with 50 Cent’s show on Starz, “Black Mafia Family.” “Black Mafia Family” tales place in the late 1980s and is based on the story of two brothers, Demetrius “Big Meech” Flenory and Terry “Southwest T” Flenory, who had been involved in money laundering and drug trafficking schemes. We sat down with the rising star to discuss the relevance of “Black Mafia Family”’s themes in the present, Moore’s method acting experiences, upcoming music releases, and more.

Where were you when you received the call to join the cast of “Black Mafia Family”?

I was in Las Vegas at the craps table and I just lost $200. So when my manager called it was the best news ever!

What are you most excited about regarding your involvement in “Black Mafia Family”?

I’m most excited about working with 50 Cent again after working on “The Oath” with him for Crackle. His name rings bells in Hollywood now, so it’s an honor to be attached to his brand.

How do you feel about being popularly cast into roles as antagonists or villains?

Wow! I’m popularly casted! That’s kind of cool. I fucking love it! I love playing the bad guy, I mean, I think we all kind of relate to the bad guy. Some of us just don’t have the balls to do what he does, you know. To commit to antagonizing is a skill set.

What has been your favorite role you’ve ever played, and why?

Ryan Payne on The Paynes was my favorite character because he was so goofy and a nitwit. Even my mother called and told me, “You’re really acting now, Ryan is a dumb ass.”

Both “Snowfall” and “Black Mafia Family” revolve around crime and drugs in the 1980s. Can you speak on the relevance of these themes within the shows as still existing today?

Well if we may go a little deep, I believe it’s important to touch on these topics because our culture, African American culture, has been systematically targeted so heavily by oppressors using tactics like drugs and violence as conduits to control our narrative. It’s important that we take some of that power back and tell our sides of those stories. They use their mediums to paint a picture of us as only drug dealers, instead of humanizing us like they do their heroes.

How did your experience living in Atlanta compare to the experiences illustrated in your involvement with the film, “ATL”?

It was literally the same. At the time of filming I was hustling, bootlegging liquor, and playing with guns. My Austin character kept me out of trouble.

Following your 2020 release of “Nervous,” are you looking to put out any more music soon?

Yes. Absolutely. I am one half of a rap group called Pool Boys.  We are releasing more new music this summer. Right now, we have “Nervous,” “Cold,” and another record called Clubhouse that’s going crazy!

Are there any other upcoming acting projects you’re working on to come in 2021 that you can tell us about?

Yes! I have a production company called, “TABLE READ PRODUCTIONS” and we are working on a movie made by people in the clubhouse called, “Green Bean Me.” So, be on the lookout for that.

End Gun Violence illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Boulder Shooter Kills Ten People

Colorado Supermarket Mass Shooting:

Gunman kills 10, including police officer

The series of mass shootings have continued within the United States, this time in Boulder Colorado at 3600 Table Mesa Drive. A gunman killed 10 people at a King Soopers supermarket on Monday afternoon. One of the victims included police officer Eric Talley who was first on the scene. Officer Talley was first to respond to report of gunfire at the grocery store. The workers and shoppers that survived were able to flee the scene and others were able to take shelter within the store – enduring the horrific violence that echoed throughout the store.

The shooting started shortly after 2:30 p.m. in the parking lot of King Soopers. Videographer Dean Schiller provided a livestream video showing what appears to be victims and an employee saying the shooter was inside of the store. Two roommates commented that “he just came in and started shooting” without saying a word. They went on to note that the gunman “let off a couple of shots, then was silent, and then he let off a couple more – He wasn’t spraying.”.

Survivor Ryan Borowski commented to CNN’s Don Lemon that he was still processing what happened. Borowski had just gone to buy some ice cream at the grocery store. He had changed his mind at the last minute and went down a different aisle. Borowski then heard the first gunshots, which he then started running to the back of the store. Borowski and several others rushed out of the store through the back, telling employees “Gun, gun, gun. Run, run, run.” Borowski went on to comment “I don’t remember anybody screaming. It was just go, go, go, get out of here… I knew I had to move.”.

Steven McHugh commented that his son-in-law and his two granddaughters were in the store as their dad got the vaccination for Covid-19. McHugh was told that his family watched people get shot and managed to run to a staff area to hide in a coat closet until police were able to intervene.

The 21-year-old suspect, Ahmad Al Issa, was taken into custody and treated for injuries, however, there are not many answers as to why the violent crime was carried out. Issa is facing 10 counts of first-degree murder and will be taken to Boulder County Jail. Officials say it will take days to investigate the crime scene thoroughly and notify families of the loss of their loved ones. Local, state, and federal agencies responded to the scene to aid in the investigation.

Officer Eric Talley had been with the department since 2010 and was very passionate about his job according to Officer Mark Bliley, head of the Boulder Police Department’s union. Bliley continued to say that Talley had a unique ability to connect with people; that he was a highly respected, well-loved person and officer – a solid person that everyone loved.

Kelli McGannon, King Soopers spokeswoman, said the company is working with investigators and will be deferring to law enforcement on all inquiries about the shooting. “Our hearts are broken over this senseless act of violence,” she said.

Former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords commented “It’s beyond time for our leaders to take action” on gun control. Giffords is a gun control advocate and mass shooting survivor. She went on to comment that “This is not normal, and it doesn’t have to be this way. This is an especially personal tragedy for me. I survived a shooting at a grocery store, in a tragedy that devastated my beloved community of Tucson. It’s been 10 years, and countless American communities have had to face something similar. Today it’s a tragedy in Boulder, Colorado. This past weekend it was a house party in Philadelphia. And last week it was an armed attack on Asian American women in the Atlanta area.”

The supermarket shooting occurred just seven days after the violent mass shooting in Atlanta where eight innocent people, including six Asian women, were killed when a gunman terrorized three spas. On March 17, five people were gunned down in a drive-by shooting while preparing a vigil in Stockton, California. Just a day later, four victims were shot in Gresham, Oregon. In Houston, five people were shot within a club during a disturbance on March 20. In Philadelphia, five people were injured and one murdered during a shooting at a party on the same day.

The Colorado Healing Fund is collecting donations for victims of the Boulder shooting. The Colorado Healing Fund is a non-profit organization created to support victims of mass tragedies.

Victims of the King Sooper’s Mass Shooting:

  • Denny Strong, 20 years old
  • Neven Stoanisic, 23 years old
  • Rikki Olds, 25 years old
  • Tralona Bartkowiak, 49 years old
  • Suzanne Fountain, 59 years old
  • Teri Leiker, 51 years old
  • Officer Eric Talley, 51 years old
  • Kevin Mahoney, 61 years old
  • Lynn Murray, 62 years old
  • Jody Waters, 65 years old
No More Hate illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Atlanta Shooting

By: Carly Cohen × Heather Skovlund

Early this week, a tragedy had occurred in Atlanta, Georgia. A total of eight victims were killed at the Georgia spa. Six of the eight victims were Asian, and when the suspect got caught, he claimed that “his actions were not racially motivated.” It was stated that it was too soon in the investigation to claim this shooting as a hate crime; however, the shootings were “aimed at a recent wave of attacks against Asian Americans that coincided with the spread of the coronavirus across the United States.” The suspect claimed that apparently “sex addition” drove him to commit these murders.

There were multiple incidents: the first occurred at Young’s Asian Massage Parlor in a mall off Highway ninety-two, about thirty miles north of Atlanta. When the police got the call, five people were shot, and two were dead while three were rushed to the hospital. An hour later, after this tragedy, two other shootings happened right across the street- one being on Piedmont, the other at the Gold Spa and Aromatherapy.

There were seven women and one man; most of them were Asian. The victims have been identified as Delainia Ashley Yaun, Paul Andre Michels, Xiaojie Tan, and Daoyou Feng.

Yaun and her husband, Mario Gonalez, were off work getting a couples massage at Young’s Asian Massage when the tragedy started. Her husband safely made it out of the salon, but he and his wife were in separate rooms when the shooting was started. They had a family together; a thirteen-year-old son and an infant daughter. It is sad to say that this woman was a victim in this shooting that not one person deserved -separating families, taking parents, taking siblings. It is a terrible, terrible thing that no one deserved. John Beck, Yaun’s manager, voiced to BuzzFeed News that “her heart was so big.” She would feed homeless people and offer them clothes and a place to shower. Hearing a person who is so kind and so pure as Yaun makes you ask the question, “why do bad things happen to good people.” It doesn’t make sense and is not fair.

Xiaojie Tan was the owner of Young’s Asian Massage as was another victim of the attack. She was known for being an extremely hardworking small-business owner and had such a big heart filled with love and kindness. Her client, Greg Hynson, stated that when he came for an appointment on his birthday a year ago, she had a birthday cake waiting for him. Another victim, Paul Andre Micheals, was a U.S Army infantry veteran married for more than two decades. He was a “dedicated, hardworking, loving man,” his brother stated.

These killings brought a “wave of outrage and attention to violence against Asian-American people.” As soon as social media was notified of the attacks and assumed to be focused on Asian’s, you could see all over the media celebrities, influencers, and people left and right posting regarding standing up for the lost lives and spreading awareness to this hate crime and all hate crimes in general. The media has been outraged and will continue to stand together.

Lucky Daye Table For Two shot by Mark Peaced

LUCKY DAYE’S NEW EP: TABLE FOR TWO

Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Lucky Daye shares his latest EP, Table For Two, out now on Keep Cool/RCA Records. The EP follows his 2019 highly acclaimed debut album,Painted and comes off the heels of standout new single “On Read” with Grammy-nominated East London prodigy Tiana Major9. The release, timed perfectly for Valentine’s Day, features powerful contributions from Ari Lennox, YEBBA, Mahalia, Queen Naija, and Joyce Wrice making this a mandatory listen for any and all music lovers across eras and genres.

Early on in life, Lucky Daye discovered his love of music and natural gift for singing and songwriting in the musical melting pot that is New Orleans, where he was born. Ultimately Lucky knew he wanted to pursue music as a career so he moved to Atlanta for a brief stint and eventually ventured to Los Angeles to pursue his dream. He was shortly thereafter picked up by Keep Cool under RCA Records, where he recorded his 2019 breakthrough hit “Roll Some Mo” which has aggregated over 60 million streams worldwide. Earning first ever GRAMMY nominations that same year, Lucky Daye raked in a grand total of four nominations for Best R&B Song, Best R&B Performance, Best Traditional R&B Performance and Best R&B Album. This widespread acclaim also came in from his selective feature choices with KAYTRANADA, Buddy, SG Lewis, Big Freedia, Kehlani, Kiana Lede, Babyface, Victoria Monet, and more. His critically acclaimed work has received unanimous praise from Rolling Stone, NPR,Noisey, Billboard, The FADER, and Daye has found himself in 2021 with his dreams being manifested. With praise such as:

“…Far ahead of his competition in the genre. Daye’s forlorn vocal manipulation has drawn comparison to Frank Ocean, but his versatility and strategic fusions of funk and jazz nod to how he might set himself apart…”– NPR

“Lucky Daye can do it all. The versatility of his music makes him hard to box in one genre [and] shows elements of his skillfulness with songs full of strings, funk and tempo.” – HYPEBEAST

TABLE FOR TWO TRACKLISTING:

How Much Can The Heart Take feat. YEBBA

On Read with Tiana Major9

My Window feat. Mahalia

Access Denied feat. Ari Lennox

Falling in Love feat. Joyce Wrice

Dream feat. Queen Naija

Stream it now here.

QxA Davis Mallory

By Vaughn Lowery and Hannah DiPilato

Davis Mallory from MTV’s The Real World, discusses his struggle with alcoholism as well as how far he has come in his career. 

360 Magazine recently had the opportunity to sit down with Davis Mallory, a contestant from The Real World on MTV. He is now pursuing a music career while educating others about alcoholism. As an openly gay Christian, he hoped to share his story with others as a television personality as well as a musician. 

What was it like being on MTV’s The Real World Season 18? Any regrets? Do you still stay in contact with other cast members?

I was a senior in college, 21-years-old, when I auditioned for and was cast on MTV’s 18th season of the Real World, located in Denver Colorado. I was a fan of the show and had just come out of the closet to my classmates that summer. I felt that I had an interesting story to tell – being a Christian and openly gay was not something I had not seen on TV before – and I wanted to prove you could be both, while also showcasing a more masculine image of homosexuality than was often shown on TV.

Immediately after the show ended I flew around to colleges in the USA discussing and often debating Biblical professors in front of a student body; dissecting Bible verses and their interpretations on homosexuality. My grandfather James Davis Mallory JR (whom I’m named after) is a Christian author and psychiatrist – and so I was raised very orthodox – Southern Baptist. I found this time to be very rewarding and something I’m proud of – to date I still receive messages from viewers of the show expressing their gratitude for my story on The Real World.

I of course have regrets during my time on the show – I think most people who have done that show in their 20s will tell you they regret things they did or said. We were all heavily fed alcohol which created chaos, confusion, fights and hookups. I’m still close with several cast members, two of them live in Nashville so I see them most often. Tori Hall, who was on Road Rules and married Brad Fiorenza (I attended their wedding) and Brooke Labarbera, who was on my season of the Real World are two people I remain close with and I spent much of this summer 2020 with both of them!

What led up to you having an issue with drugs and alcohol? How’s life after sobriety? Are there any triggers that make it difficult to remain sober?

When I was younger (before trying alcohol) my mother told me to NEVER drink, instead of teaching me how to drink. This was because my parent’s divorce was caused in part by my father’s alcoholism. When I went off to college, I got drunk for the first time and I quickly progressed into blacking out when I drank. I would sometimes wake up the next morning and hearing stories from my friends about stupid things I said or did the night before. I tried to get that under control by lowering the amount of alcohol I drank and by not drinking hard alcohol.

I went through many chapters of my life taking breaks from drinking and reducing my alcohol intake. My father has now been completely sober for over a decade and his example is a big inspiration in my own decision to completely quit drinking. I’ve now been sober for 4 years. After reaching my 1-year mark of sobriety I had a big regret – that I hadn’t quit earlier. I felt so much better – I looked so much better and I just wished I had fully quit earlier in my life.

Thankfully, perhaps due to God or just growing up, I have ZERO temptation to drink anymore. I’m constantly reminded why I quit when I see other people’s struggles with alcohol. I have seen people wheeled off in an ambulance with alcohol poisoning, I’ve had close friends die from alcohol poisoning, a friend’s mother recently did; another close friend died from an overdose of drugs mixed with fentanyl recently. These everyday reminders keep me sober.

I really wish our society didn’t glorify drinking in movies/commercials/music, because the downfall from alcohol is not being taught to children: accidentally death, liver disease, the fighting it causes, relationships ruined, horrible, absent or addicted parents, job losses, physical damage it does to our bodies and faces are never shown in these alcohol commercials.

What was it like growing up with an uncle who had access to major recording artists like Wynonna Judd? Did that experience help shape you into the artist you are today? If so, how?

My uncle Chaz managed pop artist Amy Grant for many years and still manages Christian recording artist Michael W. Smith. My uncle John Mallory wrote songs for artists Wynonna Judd, Sixpence None the Richer, Ty Herndon and more. I  grew up in the music industry, attending a lot of these artist’s concerts and meeting them – I spent summers on Amy Grant’s farm in Nashville – I was a huge fan of her and Michael W. Smith.

As a kid I dreamt of being a singer and wanted to have careers like theirs – my positive message songs “Faith,” “Not That Far Away” “Lost” and “Somebody’s Watching” are examples of songs influenced by Amy & Michael’s music. I did not expect to become a songwriter. How songs were written was a mystery as a kid – I knew singers sang them but didn’t know how they were created. When I started out on this journey to becoming a recording artist I had to watch and learn from others in numerous songwriting sessions until I really got the hang of doing it myself.

During your first year in Nashville, one of your former cast members (Diem Brown) passed away from cancer. How did their loss impact your life at the time?

Diem Brown passed away in 2014 – I moved to Nashville at the end end of 2013 – so I had just started my journey into songwriting. My first original released song is titled “Beautiful Girl’s (Diem’s Song)”, a song I wrote about Diem with award-winning songwriters Ben Goldsmith and Tori Tullier. The song debuted in People Magazine, where Diem was a news reporter and received press in E! News, US Weekly and more outlets.

Diem and I grew up in nearby parts of Georgia (I’m from Marietta, she’s from Roswell – just 15 min away) although we did not meet until we did the show. Diem was a sorority sister with my mother’s best friend’s daughter, Carly Hartwick, who first introduced us over email prior to our meeting in person for the first time when Diem and I did an MTV Challenge together: The Duel II in New Zealand.

Diem and I gave a school speech together where she shared wisdom on pursuing one’s career goals by interviewing those with the same job, Diem becoming a News Anchor where she met her idol Katie Couric to ask questions on how to get to Katie’s place in life. Diem’s speech really inspired me as I chased after my own career dreams in music, so when she lost her battle to cancer I was deeply saddened and wrote the song to memorialize her through music. Her sisters’ often use the song on the anniversary of her death, which I’m always touched to see.

You grew up in Atlanta but now reside in Nashville. Do you prefer one city over the other? If so why?

I was born in Atlanta and raised in a suburb of Atlanta called Marietta. After attending college in Florida at Stetson University, I returned to Atlanta for 2 years before moving to NYC. I have not lived in Atlanta since 2009; however, I return every year to see my family who still live there. It’s changed a lot, the movie industry was not there when I left, and in my song titled “Atlanta,” the first song on my upcoming album Little Victory, I talk about my journey from Atlanta to New York and now Nashville with a longing for my hometown and noticing how much the city has changed.

I moved to Nashville to pursue a career in music, hearing it was a land full of songwriters. The things I really like about Nashville are the people and culture here. There are really great moralistic people here and I am thankful for that as it’s a safe great place to live. Nashville is like going to college in the music industry – people in all stages of their careers are here and many are willing to collaborate. I would not be where I am today if not for Nashville.

What are some of your musical inspirations? Can you name a few people that have inspired you or who continue to inspire you?

Aside from mainstream pop artists like Britney Spears, George Michael, NSYNC, Michael Jackson, Robyn, Prince, Mariah Carey, the real-life connections that have influenced my career include Parson James (vocalist on Kygo’s “Stole the Show”) who is one of the first people I wrote music with. We met in NYC in 2013, I followed him to Los Angeles to write with him and moved to Nashville prompted by advice from his then-manager who thought I sounded like a Country artist.

Roger Murrah (BMI Songwriter of the Decade and writer of several Country music #1s) is one of the first people I met when I moved to Nashville. At the time I was still learning how to write songs, so I watched him work in several sessions and I began to understand how to write the way he did.

Scot Sax (Grammy-winning songwriter for Tim McGraw/Faith Hill’s “Like We Never Loved At All”) is another person who was very influential on my songwriting journey – he taught me how the B52s recorded “Love Shack” in a go-as-you-flow style recording their ideas on the spot to build the song.

Aside from these few names, I have been in over 300 songwriting sessions, and I’ve traveled writing music in Europe (Berlin, Stockholm, Copenhagen, Malmo, London, Amsterdam), New York and Los Angeles. Everyone along the way has taught me something, a new trick or technique to writing music or producing music and I’m thankful for everyone who has worked with me.

As a songwriter, how do you come up with themes? Is your music based on an isolated experience or a chapter of your life?

I keep an ongoing note on my phone called Songwriting Ideas so that whenever I get an idea for a song I write it down there. I then bring these ideas into songwriting sessions to get something started. Sometimes I get a melody (occasionally during a dream) and record these on my phone, using it as another tool to get songs started.

In 2018 music publicist, Lyndie Wenner asked me what my most popular social media posts were – to which I replied: shirtless photos of myself. So she told me I needed to write a song called “Shirtless” and I did, releasing that song in 2019. This conversation with Lyndie changed the way I wrote songs. Before I was writing broader subjects, and after I began to write more about the things I saw my audience interested in. I still observe that the things I write about center around one of 4 themes: 1. God and my faith; 2. Love lost of found; 3. Partying and dancing, of 4. Overcoming addictions.

Another influential person in my songwriting career is PollyAnna (Dutch pop/EDM vocalist, songwriter of Paris Hilton’s new song “I Blame You”). I spent a summer writing with her in Nashville, Los Angeles and Berlin and  I observed her taking random phrases we said in conversations and writing them down for future songwriting materials. I now do the same, whenever something unusual is said in a conversation. PollyAnna and I wrote a song together in Berlin called “Without You, I Feel Good”, which has now been signed to Soave Records, produced by a DJ named Nexeri, and coming out on February 26, 2021.

What words of wisdom would you offer an emerging artist who is trying to break into the business?

The words “If you build it they will come” from the great baseball movie Field of Dreams, is a motto that holds a strong place in my mind regarding my strategy to release music and gradually having people discover your work. I have a business model of writing songs and selling them to DJ/producers and I think this is a great move for up-and-coming singers to build a name for themselves.

My first job after college (post-Real World) was a sales job that required reaching out to 100 potential customers every day with the expectation that between 1-10 would buy something – I now use this strategy in my music career in so many facets and find the same results.

Is there anything you would like to speak about that we didn’t already touch on? What can your fans look forward to?

2020 was set to have me perform in Germany, Boston, Chicago, Palm Springs, North Carolina but the shows were of course canceled due to the pandemic. I look forward to getting back to touring though and to meet more people who have been asking when I will be in their city. I have been spending the last year working on new music with DJs, finally releasing the sophomore album that I have been alluding to and even developing an idea for a third project of which some of the songs are ready 🙂

Little Victory is an upcoming single/video that you’re pushing. It’s an extremely inspirational piece of work about someone feeling like a fish out of water. What prompted such a piece?

I wrote “Little Victory” after returning from Israel where I had met and was at the time long-distance dating Israeli singer-songwriter Elhay Cohen, the song idea came from my co-writer: female Canadian producer and songwriter Robyn Dell’Unto. December 2020 French DJ RetroVision released a version of this song on Don Diablo’s record label Hexagon and the original version is going on my forthcoming album of the same name.

Retrovision, Davis Mallory – Little Victory 

Little Victory Music Video 

Little Victory single 

Pre-Save for the album Little Victory

Here is a private SoundCloud tracklisting for the “Little Victory” album:

  1. Atlanta –a song I wrote about my hometown, my journey to NYC and Nashville to pursue music – with nostalgia for Atlanta – the city where I had my first heartbreak and how much the city has changed since I left (it’s now a film industry).
  2. Ain’t Afraid – features a big name in the EDM industry Luma (Seven Lions, Nurko, Zack Martino) – who I co-wrote the song with – it’s about not being afraid to fall in love
  3. Little Victory– co-written with and produced by female Canadian artist Robyn Dell’Unto – a remix of this song made by French artist RetroVision released on Don Diablo’s label Hexagon. “Little Victory” is about a summer romance with my Israeli ex who I met after I opened for Eurovision winner Netta who told me I had to visit Israel.
  4. Fire Signs – features Miss Audrey the Katy Perry-inspired Best Pop Artist at the Nashville Industry Music Awards, I wrote this song in Sweden about zodiac chemistry compatibility – I’m a Leo and Miss Audrey an Aries, we’re both Fire Signs.
  5. Shirtless– this is a new Countrified mix of the song that aired on MTV’s War of the Worlds and became the theme song for men’s swimwear line: Poolboy
  6. Heavy – features an all LGBTQ identifying cast – with vocalist Blake Leider and rapper Daisha McBride – discusses why relationships have to be so heavy, produced by Danish Aren Anderson and Ukrainian Depdramez.
  7. Can You Tell Me?– produced by Canadian artist BLEM and written in Berlin with Vincent Stefansson and Valentin Glage – “Can You Tell Me?” is about being ghosted. Where does all the love go in this modern era when two people separate and the romance suddenly dies.
  8. Say You Hate Me– written in Sweden the same week as “Fire Signs” “Shirtless” and previously released single “Jane Fonda” – “Say You Hate Me” is a very Britney Spears/NSYNC-style Swedish pop song co-written with and produced by Magnus Funemyr about a relationship that has grown stale.
  9. Sink or Swim – with references to Madonna, Beyonce’s “hot sauce,” and Whitney Houston’s “receipts” – “Sink or Swim” is about a cheating partner and the end of a relationship, produced by Option A. Music video coming by Russian filmmaker Dmitry Zhitov.
  10. Forget You– co-written with Nashville female EDM vocalists Notelle & Luma, produced by artist Swiss DJ FENOX – “Forget You” is about the end of a relationship and having a hard time letting go of the memories.
  11. Broken Dreams– this unreleased version by Ukrainian producer Depdramez – was co-written with pop artist Drew Schueler – tells the story of all the hard work artists put into chasing their dreams of stardom.
  12. Faith – written in 2020 at the start of this pandemic with American Idol contestant Madeline Finn, “Faith” is an uplifting anthem giving hope for all to not lose their faith in these trying times, produced by Austrian producer Jakob Koller.

The music video for Can You Tell Me?” is scheduled to release on 2/19/2021

Q×A with Jerrimiah James

This holiday season, 360 Magazine had the chance to converse with up and coming sustainable designer and entrepreneur Jerry Buckner. Read our interview below, as well as about the brand, based in Atlanta

1. What was your defining moment regarding understanding the impact of the fashion industry on the environment?

My defining moment… After reading the report “A New Textiles Economy: Redesigning Fashion’s Future,” I realized two things; first, I tied success to wastefulness and secondly it didn’t matter what fight I was fighting, gay, black, growing up disadvantaged… none of it mattered if there wasn’t a planet with conditions healthy enough for the good fight to be won. I realized at the end of the day the throne means nothing because winter is coming.

2. What are your thoughts on the rise of the “eco-conscious” shopper? Is it a fad?

I think it’s going to take a complete dismantling and a rise is not the same as an overthrowing. Is it a fad? The better question would be can we afford another fad if it is?

3. Is eco-conscious retail inherently a luxury?

No not at all. When we know better we do better. Moreover, then we are more likely to do what is right. I’ve had the opportunity through my company Jerrimiah James to outfit men and women in pieces that they could otherwise not afford and here is how. When I select pieces from the closets of friends who have the luxury of shopping extensively I share with them the cost paid for these pieces to wind up in their closets unworn. It’s not about guilt its about empowering clients to share for the planet’s sake.

4. How has the Atlanta community responded to the venture?

It could not be better received. I’ve been asked to speak on the radio, participate in panel discussions, held a call to action event and have also gained the support of many Atlanta Influencers. I still have a long way to go before I have catapulted Atlanta to the forefront of the global fashion industry’s sustainability concern, but with continued support from the city in my endeavor to bring a“wear”ness to this issue I am confident I will make the experience of resale and rental a more desirable experience

5. Where do you see yourself and your company in five years?

In the next five years I see myself as a prominent voice and force in circularity in retail as well as an advocate for transparency in fashion, and for policy that does not allow for the creation of a product at the expense of the creator, that is planet earth.

6. Who are your style heroes?

It’s a privilege to wear the clothes, attend the parties, and meet the men and women instrumental in the Fashion culture. I’m grateful. If clothing brings us together then there must be enough minds in this group to solve the problems caused by the production of it. My style heroes are the men and women, shoppers and creative directors, courageous enough to go against the flock. Brands like Stella McCartney, Brother Vellies, Reformation, Grailed, and Toms.

JERRIMIAH JAMES LAUNCHED AS ECO-CONSCIOUS RETAILER AIMING TO SPREAD A “WEAR” NESS 

Buckner, founder of Jerrimiah James, has been in the fashion industry for over 10 years and has navigated the realm of high-end retail, moving within circles of influence and affluence. While outfitting the lifestyles of an upscale clientele including entrepreneurs, high profile actors, actresses, models, music artists and well-known athletes, Buckner gained an acute awareness of the connection between a steady increase in sales of designer garments and the subsequent discarding of those garments. Buckner realized how significantly a “single-use” wardrobe item contributes to the global waste problem. The textile industry, Buckner discovered, uses an incredible volume of non-renewable resources to produce clothing that is eventually lost to landfill and incineration. Additionally, nearly 93 billion cubic meters of water annually and 20% of global industrial water pollution can be attributed to the dyeing and treatment of textile products.

The over-consumption and underutilization of clothing led to Buckner’s founding of Jerrimiah James which creates a new standard for conscientious consumers by providing the opportunity for luxury shopping resale and rental. As a membership resale and rental fashion service, Jerrimiah James caters to Atlanta-based influencers, artists and creatives. This format emphasizes garment sharing through a platform that introduces a meeting of both the minds and style.

“I had never given it thought before and, that was concerning because I find that the things that often cause the most damage are the things that we do thoughtlessly. Our vision of a planet as beautiful as the fashion we wear is a real possibility if we bridge the gap by creating circularity in our use of apparel,” states Buckner. “Circularity is the new black!”

Through this peer-to-peer e-commerce wardrobe platform, Buckner introduces the street fashion individual and environmental enthusiast, an opportunity for consumers to choose the pieces that will make the experience a lasting one and a sustainable solution for the planet.

In 2020 Jerrimiah James was named as a finalist in The Fashion Group International’s 24th Annual Rising Star Awards’ “New Retail Concept” category.