Posts tagged with "Latina"

Insuficiente by Sael and Beele cover art from Black Koi Entertainment via NV Marketing and Public Relations, LLC by Nini Veras for use by 360 Magazine

Sael and Beele – Insuficiente

Sael and Beele join their talents for the release of “Insuficiente”

Available on all digital platforms

Argentina and Colombia come together to give life to “Insuficiente.” The voices of Sael and Beele make the perfect match to this song that brings a positive message into today’s society and is now available on all digital platforms.

Inspired by female empowerment, Sael and Beele wrote this song for all women who, at some point in their lives, have felt “insufficient” next to their partners.

The song was born under the wings of the record label Black Koi Entertainment, with the production of Sael and Taiko and the co-production of Sky Rompiendo. “Insuficiente” begins as a sensual urban ballad that later becomes a powerful reggaeton, with a dynamic and commercial rhythm.

The song premieres with its official music video, shot in the beautiful city of Medellín, Colombia, under the lens of filmmakers Film by Dave and Lucas Emiliani.

Sael is part of the new generation of urban music interpreters. He is currently receiving great support from his fans, allowing him to make his born-country Argentina proud of his talents. So far, Sael has more than 45 thousand subscribers on his YouTube channel and his music videos collect millions of views.

Insuficiente by Sael and Beele cover art from Black Koi Entertainment via NV Marketing and Public Relations, LLC by Nini Veras for use by 360 Magazine

Guillen illustration

The Murder of Fort Hood Soldier, Vanessa Guillen

By Emmet McGeown


“How can this happen on a military base? How can this happen while she was on duty? How can this just happen and then let it go under the rug like it was nothing?” These were the words of Mayra Guillen, sister of Pfc. Vanessa Guillen, who has been missing for months and is now confirmed dead.  

On April 22nd, Pfc. Vanessa Guillen, a 20-year-old Hispanic Small Arms and Artillery Repairer, went missing. She was last seen alive at a parking lot at squadron headquarters in Fort Worth, Texas. For months, Pfc. Guillen’s family held out hope that their beloved was still alive, yet the discovery of remains near the Leon River, north of Austin, has vanquished that hope. While the FBI is still awaiting a positive DNA analysis, the family believes that the remains belong to Vanessa.  

Yet, this story does not begin with her disappearance nor does it end with her death. Prior to her vanishing, Pfc. Guillen, according to her sisters, was having difficulties with sexual harassment while stationed at Fort Hood, outside Killeen, Texas. The attorney representing the family in the case revealed that Guillen had confided to her sisters and several other soldiers that a superior had walked in on her while taking a shower and that he proceeded to sit down and watch her. Other relatives and Pfc. Guillen’s boyfriend have noted on social media that something is “not right” and that Vanessa felt unsafe at the military base.  

However, during a press conference on Thursday, July 2nd, senior special agent for the Fort Hood Army Criminal Investigation Command (CID), Damon Phelps, reported that there was no evidence backing the claim that she had been sexually harassed. He affirmed that “there has been no information — and we have interviewed hundreds of people… There is no credible information about that.” Despite this rebut by CID, family attorney, Natalie Khawam said, in an interview with PEOPLE, that she believes Pfc. Guillens was sexually harassed by Spc. Aaron David Robinson.

Spc. Robinson was the leading suspect in Vanessa Guillen’s disappearance, and as authorities caught up with him on Tuesday evening, he shot himself. It has since been revealed that Robinson was, in fact, responsible for the murder of Pfc. Guillen’s. Guillen’s was bludgeoned to death with a hammer in the armory where she worked, according to the family’s attorney. They made this discovery through an extensive investigation, in which witnesses divulged that they saw Robinson transporting a large box labelled “very heavy in weight.”

Then, after consenting to an examination of his cellphone records, court documents reveal, it was discovered that Robinson made several phone-calls to his girlfriend Cecily Aguilar on the night of Apri 22nd and into the early hours of the April 23rd. After being interviewed multiple times, Aguilar finally told investigators that her boyfriend had murdered Guillen. She also revealed how she and her boyfriend had met up and dismembered Guillen’s body together with a “hatchet or machete type knife” and, after attempting to set her corpse on fire, buried Guillen’s body parts in three different holes. Texas Rangers have since arrested Aguilar and she now faces up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000.  

The issue of sexual harassment within the Army remains a problem in this case, given that Guillen’s family, according to their attorney, claimed that Vanessa was planning on reporting Robinson the day after she was murdered, and had delayed over fear of reprisal and inaction. Yet the Army says there exists no credible evidence that she was sexually harassed before her disappearance, and in a statement from the Fort Hood Press Center, officials said that the criminal investigation “has not found any connection between sexual harassment and Vanessa’s disappearance.” They plan to continue their investigation in light of new revelations. 

Lupe Guillen, another sister of Vanessa’s, told NPR that her sister wanted to be in the military since she was a little girl, “she wanted to be a fighter. She wanted to be a hero. She wanted to be someone in life. … The military failed her.

The family is now pushing for legislation to create an independent agency for soldiers who are victims of sexual harassment and assault. 

After a year Vanessa’s fiancé speaks out claiming “They failed us,” see the full ABC interview here.

For more updated information and to read other statements from family and friends click here.

It has been a year since Vanessa’s body was found and her family members, friends, and fellow military members still have many unanswered questions. While it is assumed that Vanessa’s killer was one of another soldier stationed at Fort Hood in Texas, Aaron Robinson, the army is still investigating. Her fiancé spoke to ABC last week, discussing his anger and frustration at the lack of answers and closure he, her family and friends have. Many are upset with how the Army handled the situation and investigation. Interrogating her friends instead of going after Robinson, who many suspected from the beginning.

Her family now hopes that the “I Am Vanessa Guillen” bill, which will make sexual harassment a crime in military law will be approved and help prevent other soldiers from being harassed while defending their country, and other families from feeling the loss they do.

Stay tuned to 360 Magazine for more updates and links to current articles and videos.

ABC will also be airing coverage every week until someone is convicted.

Cardi B Illustration for 360 Mag

21 in 21

21 Afro-Latinxs to celebrate in 2021 and beyond! 

By: Javier Pedroza

It’s Black History Month, which gives the planet time to reflect on how African American achievements have contributed to US history and how African achievements have contributed to the world. Although, don’t forget it is important to highlight and celebrate Black accomplishments year around. Due to the current global climate, it’s important to become more knowledgeable and celebrate the Afro-Latinx population for its contributions to US history and the world.

After 2020, it is an especially important time to embolden the community to take part in the celebration of Black culture. This year, the Black History Month theme is “Black Family: Representation, Identity and Diversity” which explores the African diaspora and their contributions.

To really understand the African diaspora it is essential to acknowledge that there were more African slaves to Latin America than to the United States. “There were 11.2 million Africans who came to the New World in the slave trade and of that 11.2 million, only 450,000 came to the United States,” Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. said in a discussion about his PBS documentary series Black In Latin America. He added, “The real black experience, in terms of numbers, is all throughout the Caribbean and Latin America.”

Today, Latinx should understand their roots, which have an undoubtedly long history of African heritage. Hispanics & Latinx identities are beautifully complex, multifaceted and multidimensional. A Pew Research Center survey of Latinx, adults shows that one-quarter of all U.S. Latinx self-identify as Afro-Latinx, Afro-Caribbean, or of African descent with roots in Latin America. This is the first time a nationally representative survey in the U.S. has asked the Latinx population directly whether they considered themselves Afro-Latinx.

Many Latinos identify with their ancestral countries of origin – Puerto Rico, Colombia, Mexico, Nicaragua, Cuba, Peru, the Dominican Republic, etc. Others may also identify with their Indigenous roots and all of these experiences made contributions to Black History. A goal to have moving forward is to celebrate global Black History and continue to recognize the contributions African-Americans have made to the world, including achievements made by Afro-Latinxs & Afro-Indigenous people. It’s imperative for Latinxs to acknowledge their African & Indigenous heritage given that history and cultures are inextricably linked to slave trade in the Americas, genocide and the African Diaspora. 

Here’s a growing list of amazing Afro-Latino (a,x) heroes and their contributions. 

1. Arturo Alfonso Schomburg

(January 24, 1874 – June 10, 1938)

Place of birth: Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Contributions: Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, born to a Black mother and father of German descent, was a historian. Mr. Schomburg is considered to be one of the Fathers of Black History & a key figure in the Harlem Renaissance. Schomburg’s lifework consisted of research and preservation—work that would lead him to become one of the world’s premier collectors of Black literature, slave narratives, artwork, and diasporic materials. 

2. Dr. Marta Moreno-Vega 

(January 3, 1942)

Place of birth: East Harlem, New York

Contributions: Dr. Marta Moreno-Vega is an Afro-Boricua who established the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute (CCCADI). Dr. Moreno Vega has been an advocate for cultural equity, cultural studies and education. As the second director of El Museo del Barrio, one of the founders of the Association of Hispanic Arts, Network of Centers of Color and the Roundtable of Institutions of Color, Dr. Moreno Vega has contributed to assuring that the contributions of African and African descendants are integral to the lives of civil society in the Americas. 

3. Celia Cruz 

(October 21, 1925 – July 16, 2003)

Place of birth: Havana, Cuba

Contributions: Celia Cruz was a singer & recording artist born and raised in Havana, Cuba. She was one of the most iconic artists of the 20th century. Her many honors included three Grammy Awards and four Latin Grammys for recordings such as Ritmo en el corazón (1988; with Ray Barretto) and Siempre viviré (2000).

4. Dr. José Celso Barbosa 

(July 27, 1857 – September 21, 1921)

Place of birth: Bayamón, Puerto Rico 

Contributions: Dr. José Celso Barbosa was a Physician, Sociologist and Politician.  Known as the father of the Statehood for Puerto Rico movement, Barbosa was the first Puerto Rican, and one of the first persons of African descent to earn a medical degree in the United States.

5. Ruth Fernández (Ruth Noemi Fernández Cortada) 

(May 23, 1919 – January 9, 2012)

Place of birth: Ponce, Puerto Rico

Contributions: Ruth Fernández, “El Alma de Puerto Rico Hecha Canción” (“The Soul of Puerto Rico Turned Song”) was a Puerto Rican contralto, actress, and a member of the Puerto Rican Senate. She was the first and only singer ever elected to the Senate of Puerto Rico. She was considered by many to be the Rosa Parks of Puerto Rico when she refused to enter the Vanderbilt Hotel in San Juan through its back entrance because she was a woman of color. The owners of the hotel stated that blacks had to enter through the rear of the building, but during one evening where she was set to perform at the hotel’s ballroom, she marched into the hotel via its front entrance. After this event, the hotel changed its policy.

6. Cardi B (Belcalis Marlenis Almánzar)

(October 11, 1992)

Place of birth: Manhattan, New York

Contributions: Afro-Latina Cardi B is a Dominican & Trinidadian rapper, songwriter, and actress raised in the Bronx, New York. Recognized by Forbes as one of the most influential female rappers of all time, Cardi B is known for her aggressive flow and candid lyrics, which have received widespread media coverage. She is the highest certified female rapper of all time on the RIAA’s Top Artists (Digital Singles) ranking, also appearing among the ten highest-certified female artists and having the two top-certified songs by a female rap artist.

She is the only female rapper with multiple billion-streams on Spotify and became the first artist to top the inaugural Billboard Global 200. Her accolades include a Grammy Award, eight Billboard Music Awards, five Guinness World Records, five American Music Awards, eleven BET Hip Hop Awards and two ASCAP Songwriter of the Year awards. In 2018 Time magazine included her on their annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world, and in 2020, Billboard honored her as Woman of the Year. 

7. Rosa Alicia Clemente 

(April 18, 1972)

Place of birth: Bronx, New York

Contributions: Afro-Boricua Rosa Alicia Clemente is the 2008 United States Vice-Presidential Candidate, Producer, Journalist, Political Commentator & Scholar-Activist. Rosa is a graduate of the University of Albany and Cornell University. She is currently a doctoral student in the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies of University of Massachusetts Amherst. 

8. Congressman Ritchie John Torres 

(March 12, 1988)

Place of birth: Bronx, New York

Contributions: Ritchie Torres is an Afro-Boricua politician who is a member of the Democratic party. He is the US representative for New York’s 15th congressional district. Torres was the first openly gay candidate to be elected to legislative office in the Bronx, and the youngest member of the city council. Torres won the November 2020 general election and assumed office on January 3, 2021. This makes him one of the first openly gay Black men elected to Congress (along with Mondaire Jones). This also made Torres the first openly gay Afro Latino elected to Congress. As such, he is one of the nine co-chairs of the Congressional LGBTQ+ Equality Caucus in the 117th United States Congress. 

9. Zoe Saldana (Zoë Yadira Saldaña Nazario) *Trending Now

(June 19, 1978)

Place of birth: Passaic, New Jersey

Contributions: Zoe Saldaña is of mixed ethnic heritage, with her mother being of Puerto Rican descent and her father hailing from the Dominican Republic. Zoe is the only performer to get star billing in more than one movie that grossed over $2 billion worldwide with Avatar and Avengers: Infinity War. 

10. Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos 

(September 12, 1891 – April 21, 1965)

Place of birth: Ponce, Puerto Rico 

Contributions: Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos was a Puerto Rican attorney, social activist, nationalist and the son of a mixed-race mother who was the daughter of slaves and a Basque father from a farming and landowning family. The latter not only provided no financial support but also did not legally recognize his son until he was 19, and Albizu Campos grew up in poverty. In 1912 he was awarded a scholarship to study chemistry and engineering at the University of Vermont. He transferred a year later to Harvard University, majoring in chemistry and literature and becoming the first Puerto Rican Harvard graduate. Many people in Puerto Rico consider Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos the father of the Puerto Rican Independence Movement. 

11. Carmelo Kyam Anthony

(May 29, 1984)

Place of birth: Brooklyn, New York

Contributions: Carmelo Anthony is an Afro-Latino professional basketball player. He has been named an NBA All-Star ten times and an All-NBA Team member six-time Anthony also played in the 2016 Olympic Games, his fourth straight stint in the Olympics, which was a record for a US male basketball player, breaking the old record of having played in three Olympiads he shared with James and Robinson. He has celebrated his roots by giving back to Puerto Rico, remodeling basketball courts in a poor neighborhood 3 years in a row now. 

12. La La Anthony (Alani Nicole Vázquez) 

(June 25, 1981)

Place of birth: Brooklyn, New York

Contributions: La La Anthony is an Afro-Puerto Rican actress, host, producer and New York Times best-selling author. La La Anthony has supported charities such as the Elton John AIDS Foundation, Gabrielle’s, Angel Foundation, GLAAD and Voto Latino. 

13. Rosie Perez (Rosa María Perez) 

(September 6, 1964)

Place of birth: Brooklyn, New York

Contributions: Rosie Perez is an Afro-Latina actress, choreographer and community activist. Rosie was appointed to the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS by President Barack Obama in 2010. Among many honors, Rosie was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in Fearless as well as three Emmy Awards for her work as a choreographer on In Living Color (1990–1994).

Perez has also performed in stage plays on Broadway, such as The Ritz, Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune, and Fish in the Dark. In addition, she was a co-host on the ABC talk show The View during the series’ 18th season. 

14. MJ Rodriguez (Michaela Antonia Jaé Rodriguez) 

(January 7, 1991)

Place of birth: Newark, New Jersey

Contributions: MJ Rodriguez is an African American and Puerto Rican actress who is among the largest cast of transgender actresses on the show Pose. MJ made history by becoming the first Trans woman to ever sign a beauty deal with Olay Body. MJ was awarded the Hispanic Heritage Special Trailblazer Award at the 31st Hispanic Heritage Awards in Washington D.C. 

15. Ramon E. Contreras 

(22-years-old)

Place of birth: Brooklyn, New York

Contributions: Ramon Contreras is a young political activist, advisor and filmmaker who is changing the nature of civic engagement by championing and encouraging minorities to participate in politics. Ramon is a fierce gun control enthusiast and founded YouthOverGuns, a platform advocating for change in underserved communities of color. He led a protest of thousands across the Brooklyn Bridge and is the National Strategist for the nation-wide organization, March for Our Lives. 

16. Laith Ashley De La Cruz 

(July 6, 1989)

Place of birth: Harlem, New York

Contributions:  Laith Ashley is a model, actor, singer-songwriter and entertainer of Dominican descent. He was the first transgender man to be featured in a Diesel campaign. Laith has been on the cover of countless magazines and has had featured stories published on countless others all around the world; ie, British GQ.

Laith was on the cast of the reality TV series, “Strut,” executive produced by Whoopi Goldberg, and raised the heart rates of viewers in his appearance on hit series, “Pose,” on FX. Ashley is also an activist, particularly in transgender issues. He worked with FLUX, a division of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, which is dedicated to raising awareness and providing support to trans and gender-nonconforming people. 

17. Dianne Morales 

(June 21, 1967)

Place of birth: Brooklyn, New York 

Contributions: Double Ivy League graduate Dianne Morales is an Afro-Boricua with degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University. Dianne is the former CEO of several multi-million dollar social service nonprofits and is also the first Latina / Afro-Latina candidate for New York City Mayor. 

18. Johnny Pacheco 

(March 25, 1935 – February 15, 2021)

Place of birth: Santiago De Los Caballeros, Dominican Republic

Contributions: Johnny Pacheco was one of the most influential artists of Latin music. He was one of the creators of The Fania All-Stars and Fania Record (#latinmotown), the most successful record label in the history of Latin music. 

19. Aida Rodriguez (Aida Margarita Parada Rodriguez) 

(August 29, 1977)

Place of birth: Boston, Massachusetts

Contributions: Aida Rodriguez is a comedian, host, producer, actress and the first Latina / Afro-Latina (Puerto Rican & Dominican) to appear in two comedy specials airing in one month on both HBO and Showtime. Aida’s latest comedy special premiered on Netflix as part of the “They Ready” series hosted by Tiffany Haddish. Rodriguez has also appeared on Comedy Central’s This Week at the Comedy Cellar, The Nightly Show, five-time host of the PBS Imagen Awards, NBC Last Comic Standing’s finals, TRUtv’s Laff Tracks and is also a regular contributor for The Young Turks. 

20. Indya Moore 

(January 17, 1995)

Place of birth: Bronx, New York

Contributions: Indya Moore is of Haitian, Puerto Rican, and Dominican ancestry. They are an actor among the largest cast of transgender on the show Pose. Moore does not identify as a Latinx, and instead identifies as Afro-Taíno. In June 2020, in honor of the 50th anniversary of the first LGBTQ Pride parade, Queerty named them among the fifty heroes “leading the nation toward equality, acceptance, and dignity for all people.” 

21. Gina Torres 

(April 25th, 1969)

Place of birth: Manhattan, New York 

Contributions: Gina Torres is an actress and the first Afro-Latina to create, produce and star in her own show, ‘Pearson’. Torres won the ALMA Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Syndicated Drama Series for her role in Cleopatra 2525. Gina also received the Best Supporting Actress award by The Imagen Foundation (Spanish for “image”) Awards, the only premier Latino entertainment awards program dedicated to honoring the positive portrayal and creative excellence of Latinos and Latino cultures on screen. 

Fact Check: We strive for accuracy and fairness. If you see something that doesn’t look right, contact us!

Alondra Delgado shot by Tim Schaeffer, Makeup/Hair by Johnna J. Perez, Styled by Sean Dylan Perry. For use by 360 Magazine

Alondra Delgado Q&A

By: Javier Pedroza

From acting out telenovelas scenes on “The Island of Enchantment” to Hollywood, California…

Say hello to actress Alondra Delgado, born in Mayaguez and raised in Arecibo Puerto Rico. Ms. Delgado is very proud of her Latina heritage and can currently be seen as Vanessa Montes on the CW football drama , ‘ALL AMERICAN’  ’, which follows the journey of star player Spencer James (Daniel Ezra) as he is recruited away from his homeschool to play for Beverly Hills High. Vanessa is the daughter of the new head coach and the confident new girl at school who has a history with one of her classmates. The cast also includes Taye Diggs and Samantha Logan. The third season is airing now. While Delgado has guest starred, wrote, and produced other shows and short films, this role has introduced the young actress to an exciting new level of stardom. Here at 360 Magazine, we dished with Delgado about her role on All American, upcoming involvement in the film Safe House, her Puerto Rican heritage and Latinx idols, and more.

  1. How was your upbringing in Puerto Rico?

My childhood in Puerto Rico was beautiful. I love Puerto Rico. It involved a lot of dancing, since that’s what I started with first when I was two and a half years old, going to the beach, studying in a bilingual school, and acting on feature films when I was seven years old. It was great! 

  1. What are some of your favorite things about your community / culture?

I love the people and the warmth and passion we all have; and of course the food!  We always have a party in every activity. We are loud, passionate, and very prideful of our tiny Island! 

  1. What attracted you to begin a career as an actress?

Growing up I never liked cartoons that much. I was always fascinated with the Telenovelas and would play out scenes and act like the mean characters. My mom saw my passion so she put me with a talent agency. I did my first feature film when I was seven, and I fell in love. 

  1. Where were you and what was your reaction when you received the call from CW confirming your role as Vanessa Montes?

I was at my mom’s house with all my family decorating for Halloween. My manager and agents called me and I screamed and jumped and hung up the phone three times by accident. I was so excited! And it was great that my close family was there because we got to celebrate right away.

  1. How has your experience been, so far as the new girl at school on All American?

It’s been great! I’ve had a lot of fun and have learned a lot. It’s an experience I’ll never forget.

  1. Can you describe how you feel working alongside Taye Diggs and Samantha Logan?

It is amazing. At first I was a bit scared and nervous to be on set because this is a great cast. But once I was there, they were very nice to me and I’ve been learning a lot about them. 

  1. Will we see more writing & producing any time soon?

I’ve been writing some things recently so that is definitely something that will come soon, hopefully. 

  1. Who are your role models in life?

There are many Puerto Rican figures that always inspire me, like Rita Moreno and Benicio del Toro, who have had a great career in Hollywood and always represent the Island. Someone I always look up to is Roberto Clemente, who had a huge passion for baseball and loved helping others. That is something I would love to do!

  1. With the lack of Latinx talent representation (in front and behind the cameras) in Hollywood, how would you advise “the industry” to move forward?

I think lately there have been a few more Latinos out there, but we definitely need more. I would say that we need to stop writing characters that are specifically Hispanic rather than giving roles to Hispanic actors. There is always this mindset that the character has to be this or has to be that, rather than hiring people because of talent and not looks. So many people have started to watch All American and are excited because there is more Latino representation now. We need to change our mindsets and hire because of talent! 

  1. Any advice for teenagers who dream of writing, acting and producing?

Go for it! If you have a passion, you have to try it. You have to have a positive mindset because it will not be easy and you’ll face rejection, but you have to learn how to trust and believe in yourself and your talent. If you work hard enough, you’ll make it. 

  1. What is one of your top acting tips?

I love to learn the lines and then just play with it. Read it with different people and you will find different things from each read that will help you create a character with more depth. 

  1. What can you tell us about your upcoming film Safe House?

I am so excited for this one! It’s an action film. I play Carla and she is the lead character. She’s a strong female lead with a lot of stunts and drama. People will love her! 

Alondra Delgado shot by Tim Schaeffer, Makeup/Hair by Johnna J. Perez, Styled by Sean Dylan Perry.

Top Latinx Influencers

360 Magazine is highlighting the top Latinx influencers within pop culture. 

By: Carly Cohen

 

Demi Lovato:  Demi Lovato is a well-known singer, songwriter, actress, and producer. Her early acting shows such as Camp Rock and Sonny with a Chance both were huge Disney programs. Demi dealt with addiction but has spoken about it and has made it very public after her overdose in 2018. She has thrived to do better and push her career and doing so has made her an inspiration to the public eye. 

Neymar: Neymar (Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior) is a Brazilian professional soccer player for Paris Saint-Germain. He is known as one of the best players in the world and has a massive following on Instagram with nearly 150 million. Neymar has competed with the title against Messi on ‘who is better.’ 

Jennifer Lopez: Jennifer Lopez is and always has been a huge American actress, singer, and dancer. She is engaged to the famous baseball player, Alex Rodriguez, and has two charming children. She has a following of 143 million on Instagram and is always staying up to date on the latest trends. Jennifer very recently came out with a new makeup line called JLo Beauty that has gotten great feedback from. 

Lele Pons: Lele Pons is the new face of the “ideal celebrity.” Influencers have taken over and Lele is one of many. She is available on platforms such as Youtube, Spotify, Instagram, etc. She consistently is showing her following vision in her personal life. For being somewhat new to the influencer world, she has a following of 43.5 million on Instagram. Lele has opened up about her battle with OCD, ADHD, and Tourette syndrome in a documentary posted on her YouTube channel called The Secret Life of Lele Pons.

Lejuan James:  Lejuan is a comedian and an influencer on Youtube. In 2019 he released his book called Definitely Hispanic which is a comedy and heartfelt book about Lejuan himself. The book walks the readers through Lejuan growing up Hispanic in the US. On his YouTube channel, he creates skits and small clips to express his enthusiastic personality. 

Camila Cabello: Camila Cabello is originally known for being a part of the girl group Fifth Harmony which was created on the  X Factor in 2012. When Camila strayed away from the group she created her songs and sang her music that wowed millions of people. Currently, she is recognized for being partners with the other musically talented, Shawn Mendes. Her socials show the raw, heartfelt women she is. Recently, she has shared many posts regarding her beliefs and what she stands for. She is using her platform to express and show social issues, politics, and pushes her viewers to make a difference in the world. 

Yuya: Yuya (Marind Castrejón Castañeda) is a YouTube star. Her content subsists of beauty tutorials, her authentic daily life, and her style inspiration. Her social media captures alluring photography of herself, styles, food, and a simple day in her life. Yuya has been featured on multiple Mexican television and also on Vogue.  

Bethany Mota: Bethany Mota is known as the Youtube star who raised us all. She started on Youtube sharing content relating to fashion advice, hauls, DIYs, and so much more. She continues to post on Youtube and other socials but has done a great job staying up to date on current trends involving fashion, lifestyle, and content. Bethany strained away from her usual content and was featured on Dancing with the Stars Season 19

Dulce Candy: Dulce Candy is a beauty and fashion vlogger. She has two channels on Youtube, one focuses on tutorial videos while the other focuses on her everyday life. Her socials consist of true and authentic life, have an influencer but also has a mother. 

Selena Gomez: Selena Gomez is one of many talents. She is a singer, an actress, and a producer. Recently she has also become an entrepreneur because of her new skincare brand RareBeauty which is based around mental health. Selena always uses her platforms for inspiring messages and spreading awareness which is why she has always had such a good look to the public eye. 

Leo Messi: Leo Messi is a professional football player for FC Barcelona. He is known as being the world’s wealthiest football player. His socials consist of ads, his family, and his life as a professional football player. An interesting fact about Leo is that he sticks to five key foods – water, olive oil, whole grains, fresh fruit, and fresh vegetables. 

German Garmendia: German is a content creator who targets comedy. He shares content on his authentic daily life. German is now signed to WME talent agency

Maiah Ocando: Maiah is an express and an internet star. She has a background in Fashion Design and shares storytimes, makeup tutorials, and fashion advice on her youtube channel with 735k Subscribers. An interesting fact about Maiah is that she is the host of a web show on YouTube called Visto Bueno and is also a writer of a book called Visto Bueno.

Kathy Cano-Murillo:  Kathy Cano-Murillo is a creative genius! She is an author, and an artist and has created an award-winning brand called CraftyChica. CraftyChica is a space to express ingenuity. It consists of Latino crafts, activities, recipes and so much more. It is the perfect place to express oneself creatively. 

Jorge Narvaez: Jorge is a full-time creator and speaker. He posts content relating to his work and especially relating to his family. He is a first-generation high school and college grad. 

Andrea Espada: Andrea is best known for her modeling, an influencer, and a popular television star. She is always posting content that relates to workout tips and her adorable baby. Her Instagram is exciting and authentic to who she is. Andrea had her baby, Ferran in a past relationship, not with her current spouse. 

Salice Rose: Salice is an Instagram and video star. Her videos always focus on comedy and are super entertaining to watch. She has recently become popular on Tik Tok and has reached a following of 16.8 million. Salice is known for speaking her mind and posting exactly what she wants. She is a rising star. 

Ana Alvarado: Ana is also known as LipStickFables. She is beloved on socials such as youtube and Instagram. She is famous for her captivating and up-to-date videos. Ana gives an understanding of her Honduran life. 

Tiffany Garcia: Tiffany is best known for her gaming videos on her youtube channel IHasCupquake. She talks about different games and gives feedback and reactions to her viewers. She is visionary and has a joyous personality. Tiffany has been nominated such as Shorty Awards for Best in Gaming and Teen Choice for gaming. She is a big deal in the gaming community. 

Nicole Guerriero: Nicole is a fashion influencer with a following of 1.9 million on Instagram. She is always posting insight on her life, adept makeup looks, and outfits of the days. She is one of the original YouTubers in the beauty community. 

JLo illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Healthcare Equity article illustrated by Rita Azar for 360 MAGAZINE

The Importance of Education for Advancing Healthcare Equity

By: Maria Hernandez, Ph.D.

If you’ve been tracking the nation’s progress in the fight against Covid-19, physicians and public health officials of color have been highlighting the need for health equity in the national dialogue. As the data on mortality rates becomes clearer, there is no mistake that the pandemic is impacting African American and Latino communities to a much greater extent. Current mortality rates for Blacks and Latinos is almost 2.8 times that of whites suggesting significant health inequities exist. The discussion about why these inequities are taking place has been less clear and even less clear is how to address this reality.

The key may be in educating healthcare providers about the root cause of these inequities and empowering patients that access healthcare systems.

Health inequities are the differences in health outcomes due to unfair conditions or factors that different populations may face. These factors can include access to quality care, inadequate housing, lack of access to quality food, poverty and systemic racism. Public health researchers and healthcare providers have known about health inequities in the US for over 40 years and the research about what to do point to a confluence of factors that center on economic, educational and social change. Even before the pandemic, Native American and Black women are 2.5 times more likely to die in childbirth than Whites. Women are under diagnosed for heart disease.

Research points to the presence of unconscious and systemic bias as well as a lack of culturally competent care.

https://www.cbpp.org/research/poverty-and-inequality/tracking-the-covid-19-recessions-effects-on-food-housing-andThe pandemic exacerbated the impact of these factors in profound ways. If we look at the fact that essential front line workers–cashiers, bus drivers, food service providers, healthcare workers, postal carriers, warehouse workers, receptionists–have high concentrations of Black and Latino workers, it becomes much easier to understand why so many victims of Covid-19 are from these communities. And if we also explore the role poverty plays in the pandemic, we know that crowded housing conditions where social distancing is not possible has been a factor. The reality is that low income, hourly workers are not able to do their jobs remotely using telecommuting or video conferencing. Many of these workers also experience a harder time finding personal protective equipment that can be a burden for tight household budgets.

The pandemic has set the stage for profound changes in healthcare and its about time.

Two important responses that have emerged in the nation’s healthcare systems is an awareness that physicians, nurses and other caretakers must accept that–like all other human beings–they suffer from unconscious biases. It’s those snap judgements about a person’s race, ethnicity, age, ability, and socioeconomic status that enter into each encounter which can influence the recommended course of care. Those biases can be positive or negative but we all make those associations. The pandemic has accelerated the

extent to which hospitals are seeking training for front line staff and providers in order to reduce the likelihood of these biases and provide more culturally competent care.

These programs include an awareness of how bias impacts the experiences of patients and what may be important factors to consider in working with different populations. Culturally competent care encourages staff to look at how the patient may be experiencing their illness and what their own understanding of how to improve their health. It means taking into account the patients cultural of reference and listening to their unique needs.

Another response is the effort hospitals are making to partner with community clinics, faith based organizations and community organizations to win the trust of patients. This was present before the pandemic, but it has taken on a new sense of urgency as vaccine adoption rates have faltered in Black and Brown communities. Since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, not for profit hospitals which are the majority of facilities in the US have been asked to report what community benefits they provide to address known community needs.

Despite all of these approaches for improved healthcare services for diverse patients, it will take years before all health systems are aligned on their approach to advance health equity.

The most vulnerable patients need quality care now.

A visit to the doctor—even on-line—may require some key steps to ensure the best care is made available. Three steps that can make a big difference for patient visits. First, bring an advocate with you–a family member or friend who will join you in your visit and support your being heard or to help you ask the right questions. You’ll have to give them permission to be with you given privacy rules in healthcare but it’s worth it. Having a trusted advocate can be a big relief if there’s a lot of options to explore or if there’s different treatment steps involved. There’s a growing field of professional Patient Advocates — sometimes called Patient Navigators that help individuals with navigating treatment options, getting insurance payments, and arranging for home health care if needed. Your health may rely on having someone who understands the complexity of healthcare systems to support you.

Next, review the information your physician provides about the condition or illness and the medicines you may be asked to take. Ask your doctor what information you most need to understand for your treatment or what to do to support your health. Most physicians will provide information on a condition or point you to a reputable website for more information like the Mayo Clinic Review what your physician provides to be informed about the options and treatments presented.

Last, communicate with your care team throughout the course of your treatment or care. If you are struggling with side effects in your treatment or symptoms worsen, call your doctor or the nurse practitioner assigned to your care. Take an active role–with your advocate–to look at options for continued treatment. Poor communication with your physician can put you at greater risk for poor health outcomes. During these challenging days, preparing for each time you visit your physician can set the stage for you to receive the very best care available

About the author -Maria Hernandez, Ph.D., President and COO of Impact4Health is a thought leader in health equity and pay for success initiatives designed to address the upstream social determinants of health among vulnerable populations.  Maria currently leads the Alameda County Pay for Success Asthma Initiative which is testing the feasibility of reducing asthma-related emergencies using health education and proven home-based environmental interventions for children.  

JAJA Tequila by Mina Tocalini for 360 Magazine

Cocktail Recipes to Celebrate February 22nd

National Margarita day is NEXT WEEK, February 22! While this day of celebration might not take place in the traditional bar or club setting this year, that doesn’t mean an at-home fiesta isn’t off the table.

222 is an important number in Latino culture, representing that something good is coming your way. It also means to pay attention to important people around you and cultivate meaningful relationships.

Founded by Latino Harlem, NY native, Joe Cruz Jr., YaVe Tequila is the key to unlocking a guilt free laid-back drinking experience whether it is behind your camera on a Zoom with friends, or at a safe in-person setting. At only 60 calories a shot, unlike any other Tequila, YaVe offers a distinctly clean and ultra-smooth taste. Handcrafted and double-distilled with volcanic water, whether it’s sipped on the rocks or mixed in a drink, this smooth tequila will not disappoint.

Below are some festive drink recipes from YaVe that you can make to celebrate:

SKINNY MANGORITA

Ingredients:

  •   2 oz YaVe Mango Tequila (or YaVe Blanco tequila for a stronger punch)
  •   1 oz Mango Nectar
  •   1 oz Simple Syrup
  •   1 oz Lime Juice
  •   Soda Water
  •   Garnish with a slice of mango and lime

Preparation: Add all ingredients together EXCEPT soda water and shake in one glass. In another glass, pour the mixture over ice and then top it off with the soda water at the end for a refreshing drink!

LA BRIESA – JALAPENO MARGARITA

Ingredients:

  • 2 ounces YaVe Jalapeño Tequila
  • Muddled Red Peppers
  • 1 ounce Pineapple Juice
  • Lemon Juice
  • Lime Juice
  • Ice

Pro tip: Try adding Japanese shichimi or jalapeño salt for decoration and an extra kick!

TEQUILAJITO – TEQUILA MOJITO

Ingredients:

  • 2 ounces YaVe Coconut Tequila (or Blanco Tequila)
  • 1 ounce Pineapple Juice
  • .75 ounces Ginger Simple Syrup
  • 6 Mint Leaves
  • 4 Lime Wedges
  • Granulated Sugar
  • 1 dash of Fee Brothers W. Indies Orange Bitters
  • Mint Sprig Garnish
  • Ice

Pro tip: Muddle the mint, lime, and sugar first. Add remaining ingredients and shake with ice. Add bitters and garnish at the end.

Dominican Republic Flag illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Dominican Day Parade

This Sunday, thousands of New Yorkers and visitors would usually be flooding Sixth Avenue to celebrate the culture and heritage of the Dominican Republic at the Dominican Day Parade. 

While the event is going to be celebrated a bit differently this year, Presidente beer and Presidente Chairman, Alex Rodriguez, are giving fans nationwide a way of observing this day with those who share their passion for the DR’s rich culture with a virtual celebration where all are welcome!

Tune in on Sunday, August 9th at 3 PM EST as Presidente hosts an online celebration in partnership with Que Lo Que, a traditional Latin dance party created by the legendary APT.78, whose intention is to celebrate Latino culture through its gatherings. Participants will find themselves in attendance with former-New York Yankees legend and Chairman of Presidente, Alex Rodriguez! Activities will include:

  • A live, digital set from LA MEGA’s 97.9FM DJ Aneudy that will air on Presidente’s Instagram channel
  • Chances for fans to win Presidente swag for their attendance throughout the program
  • Including an exclusive line of NY-inspired Presidente T-shirts, hats, bandanas, and Drizly codes

 

Hispanic Heritage Awards

The Hispanic Heritage Foundation (HHF) announced today that the 33rd Hispanic Heritage Awards, presented by Target for the eight year, will be broadcast on October 6th on PBS stations and stream on PBS.org. The historic program, which was created by the White House in 1988 to commemorate the establishment of Hispanic Heritage Month in America, is among the highest honors by Latinos for Latinos and supported by 40 national Hispanic-serving institutions.   

In keeping with current COVID-19 mitigation guidance and with the safety of participants in mind, the Hispanic Heritage Awards and PBS broadcast will not include a live ceremony but will feature more intimately filmed performances and Honoree segments filmed on location across the United States and Latin America.    

“The Hispanic Heritage Foundation is thrilled to once again partner with Target and PBS to collectively celebrate and share the great promise, accomplishments, and cultural pride of the Latino community through the 2020 Awardees and powerful performances during Hispanic Heritage Month,” said Jose Antonio Tijerino, President and CEO of the Hispanic Heritage Foundation. “More than ever, it’s important to shine the spotlight on the tremendous value Latinos provide this great country we all share, especially during this pandemic which has tragically impacted the Latino community and other communities of color at a higher rate.”    

The 2020 Honorees will be announced over the coming months followed by the performers, hosts, presenters and other sponsors (visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C92ZiK5MxAs). 

“Target is excited to be the presenting sponsor of the Hispanic Heritage Awards for the eighth year in a row. We’re proud to be a part of a program that highlights the amazing accomplishments of the Latinx community and the lasting contributions it has had on our country and the world, especially those working on the frontlines during this pandemic,” said Laysha Ward, Target’s Executive Vice President and Chief External Engagement Officer. “We congratulate and thank all of this year’s honorees and we are inspired by their tireless commitment to service of others.” 

“While it would have been great to come together in person, we are delighted to join the Hispanic Heritage Foundation in this virtual celebration of Latino Americans and their extraordinary contributions to our country,” said Paula Kerger, President and CEO of PBS. “Building on our longstanding commitment to diverse stories and storytellers, we look forward to sharing the Hispanic Heritage Awards with our viewers during the sixth broadcast on PBS.” 

The Hispanic Heritage Awards serve as a launch of HHF’s year-round, award-winning programs which inspire, prepare, and connect Latino leaders in the classroom, community, and workforce to meet America’s needs as well as promoting cultural pride.  HHF is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.  For more information, visit www.hispanicheritage.org.  

Minneapolis-based Target Corporation (NYSE: TGT) serves guests at nearly 1,900 stores and at Target.com. Since 1946, Target has given 5% of its profit to communities, which today equals millions of dollars a week. For the latest store count or more information, visit Target.com/Pressroom. For a behind-the-scenes look at Target, visit Target.com/abullseyeview or follow @TargetNews on Twitter.

PBS, with more than 330 member stations, offers all Americans the opportunity to explore new ideas and new worlds through television and digital content. Each month, PBS reaches over 120 million people through television and 26 million people online, inviting them to experience the worlds of science, history, nature and public affairs; to hear diverse viewpoints; and to take front row seats to world-class drama and performances. PBS’s broad array of programs has been consistently honored by the industry’s most coveted award competitions. Teachers of children from pre-K through 12th grade turn to PBS for digital content and services that help bring classroom lessons to life. Decades of research confirms that PBS’s premier children’s media service, PBS KIDS, helps children build critical literacy, math and social-emotional skills, enabling them to find success in school and life. Delivered through member stations, PBS KIDS offers high-quality educational content on TV— including a 24/7 channel, online at pbskids.org, via an array of mobile apps and in communities across America. More information about PBS is available at www.pbs.org, one of the leading dot-org websites on the internet, or by following PBS on Twitter, Facebook or through our apps for mobile and connected devices. Specific program information and updates for press are available at pbs.org/pressroom or by following PBS Pressroom on Twitter.

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Positive Goya Illustration

Goya Boycott

By Eamonn Burke

A boycott of Goya foods, a major producer of beans and an essential good for many families, has launched after its CEO Robert Unanue praised President Trump in a speech at the White House on Thursday:

“We are all truly blessed … to have a leader like President Trump who is a builder,” said Unanue.

Immediately, many prominent Hispanic figures such as Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez denounced Goya and Unanue, and hinted in a tweet she would boycott the company. Julian Castro, a former Housing and Urban Development Secretary, urged people do to the same despite the prominence of Goya in Latin American homes. The resistance comes from the public as well, as the hashtags #boycottGoya and #Goyaway have trended in recent days. Meanwhile, President Trump took to Twitter saying “I LOVE @GoyaFoods!”

Unanue, however, is not apologizing for endorsing Trump and is labeling the boycott as a “suppression of speech”. He was proud to support Trump, and also to say that Goya would be donating 2 million cans of food to American Food Banks. He also stated that he would be “honored” to be a part of the Hispanic Property Initiative, which was signed by Trump at the event with a goal of expanding “access by Hispanic Americans to educational and economic opportunities.” The CEO also has a extensive history of donating to Republican candidates and initiatives.

“If you’re called by the president of the United States, you’re going to say, ‘No I’m sorry, I’m busy, no thank you?’ I didn’t say that to the Obamas and I didn’t say that to President Trump.” said Unanue in an interview with Fox News on Friday. Republicans like Ted Cruz and Matt Schlapp and publicly defended the CEO while denouncing “cancel culture” on Twitter.

The unwavering support of Unanue is perplexing, when considering Trump’s history against Latinx people. In 2016, his presidential campaign was largely structured on restricting immigrants, especially from Mexico. In one speech he referred to the people coming from Mexico into the U.S. as “rapists.” He has relentlessly tried to end DACA, a program which protects immigrants, and offered little support to Puerto Rico in the midst of hurricane devastation. The Trump administration works closely with ICE and has detained immigrants at the US-Mexico border in concentration camps with inhuman men conditions.

It is also confusing when considering Goya’s history as a company. Goya is currently the largest Hispanic-owned company in the nation, but it began as a small store in Manhattan run by Spanish immigrants

As for President Trump, who is already unpopular with Hispanic voters, it is possible that he sees a reduction in the 26% of Latinx voters who support him.