Posts tagged with "Netflix"

Essence Magazine article for 360 Magazine coverage for Coming to America

Coming 2 America

ESSENCE MARCH+APRIL TRIPLE COVERS FEATURE STAR-STUDDED CAST OF THE HIGHLY-ANTICIPATED COMING 2 AMERICA – INCLUDING EDDIE MURPHY, ARSENIO HALL, JERMAINE FOWLER, KIKI LAYNE AND BELLA MURPHY 

Prepare the royal jet! Coming 2 America is finally arriving, with Eddie Murphy, Arsenio Hall and an all-star cast of returning and new faces—including Jermaine Fowler, KiKi Layne and Bella Murphy. It’s been more than three decades since the beloved original Coming to America hit theaters and became a true cult classic that has spanned multiple generations and demographics. Now, in the ESSENCEMarch/April issue triple cover article, The Fresh Princes of Zamunda, Regina R. Robertson talks to the cast about why this was the right time to do the sequel, their fave moments and what the film means to the culture: 

  • EDDIE MURPHY ON WHAT THE FILM MEANS TO THE CULTURE: “Coming to America is one of my films that has really worked its way into the culture. People get dressed up as the characters for Halloween, and they still walk around saying catchphrases like ‘Sexual Chocolate.’ So many people grew up with Coming to America and have a lot invested in it, so I didn’t want to taint that…Once the ideas started coming together, it took about four or five years to get the script all the way right. Once we got it right, I knew it was time…” 
  • ARSENIO HALL ON DOING THE SEQUEL: “A lot of people have posted about Coming to America and said things like, ‘Please don’t mess with my movie’ or ‘I don’t want no sequel!’ We’ve been pitched all kinds of ideas, but I remember reading the script in Eddie’s backyard and it was all making sense. That’s when I knew that this was going to be the sequel…”  
  • KIKI LAYNE ON PLAYING MEEKA: “Meeka is loyal to her family. I’m interested in showcasing strong Black women— and being a part of this film was an opportunity to play in such a classic world and also to work with straight-up legends, all the way around…”  
  • BELLA MURPHY ON PLAYING OMMA AND WORKING WITH HER DAD: “Omma is super-smart, a little bit of a badass, and she’s super-cool. Being able to do my first film with my dad is really special…I’m over the moon…”  
  • JERMAINE ON PLAYING LAVELLE—AND WATCHING HIS DREAM COME TRUE: “In some ways, Lavelle reminds me a lot of myself when I was growing up and trying to figure out life. As a fan of the original film, I was honored to be a part of this whole world—but when they told me how Lavelle becomes part of the story, I just laughed my ass off and thought, All right, let’s do it…” 
  • SHARI HEADLEY ON WHAT AUDIENCES WILL LOVE: “I’m as excited as the audience and have no doubt that this will be a film that people will love. I’ll venture to say they’ll love it even more than the first one…” 
  • WESLEY SNIPES ON JOINING THE FILM: “I was like, ‘Whatever the role is, I want to be in it.’ Later, I was told that I was going to be a General—but really, I could have played a zebra and been just fine…”  

For more on this issue, visit ESSENCE.com or pick up the March/April issue on newsstands next week.

TV2 illustration by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine

Brightback Reveals Shift in Subscription Economy

New Data Shows Permanent Turning Point for Subscription Services Industry Post-Pandemic and Strong Link Between Customer Satisfaction and Online Cancelation Flow.

Brightback released its State of Industry (SOI) report today, which revealed that 86% of respondents say they anticipate maintaining or even increasing their number of subscriptions over the course of 2021. Additional results include:

  • 98% now subscribe to streaming media (75% subscribe to two or more services, foreshadowing a greater propensity for hoppers to jump from service to service).
  • Up to 40% subscribe to online news, food, fitness, or curated box services.
  • 36% have subscribed to services since the onset of the pandemic that they would not have otherwise.

As retention remains the industry focus, the SOI report points to unexpected impacts of companies’ cancellation flow; suggesting that ease of cancellation influences a company’s re-engagement, brand perception, and more. According to the report, over 80% of consumers would be more likely to try or buy a new subscription if they could pause or cancel that service online. This data suggests subscription services should pivot to not only simplify their cancellation processes, but also to tout this for potential new customer acquisitions.

Netflix is considered to have the best cancellation experience: 23% of respondents ranked Netflix in the top spot for this category, more than 2x better than runner up Amazon at 10%. Additionally, the recent Netflix subscriber milestone of 200m further points to the link between company growth and ease of cancellation.

“Leading tech companies and subscription services understand that sheltered-in-place consumers want user experiences that make it easy to try, buy, use, and cancel online,” said Brightback CEO Guy Marion. “As more companies invest in digitizing their subscription experiences, they are using best practices to let customers quit online, with a concerted focus on retaining over acquiring customers.”

In the survey, a whopping 32% of respondents said that in the past 12 months they had changed their minds about cancellation after being offered an incentive. This finding should be encouraging for subscription businesses concerned about churn–at least a third of their cancellations can be prevented with well-timed, relevant offers.

The survey also shows the pandemic-driven growth of the subscription services industry is here to stay:

  • 8% anticipate having the same number of subscriptions 12 months from now.
  • 25% anticipate acquiring even more subscriptions within the following 12 months.
  • Only 14% of respondents anticipate having fewer subscription services by the end of 2021.

These findings suggest that the dramatic shifts in consumer behavior over the past year are permanent.

For the full findings, visit Brightback’s website.

About Brightback

Brightback is the first customer retention solution that automatically saves customers at the moment of cancelation. Trusted by high volume subscription businesses like MeUndies and Unbounce, Brightback helps retention leaders deflect churn with personalized cancelation experiences, optimize offboarding processes through testing and targeting and gather aggregated insights to drive product and company improvements. Headquartered in San Francisco, Brightback is a remote-first company with a team of subscription-industry veterans located across the United States.

 

vegetables by Nicole salazar for 360 magazine

Michelle Obama Encourages Picky Eaters

When I was a small child, I never ate the vegetables I encountered on my dinner plate, preferring instead to kick, scream, whine, and then feed the offending dish to the dog. How different things might’ve been if former First Lady Michelle Obama was the one gently encouraging me to eat my peas, using Muppet-adjacent puppets and her soothing presence! Unfortunately, I had to learn the hard way, but for the children of America who are now currently throwing handfuls of broccoli at their parents in protest, Obama’s new show, Waffles + Mochi, premiering on March 16 on Netflix, is here to save the day.

There’s little information about what this show will entail, beyond the above tweet, which features Michelle Obama cradling a small, winsome mochi in her hand, flanked on either side by an overzealous bee with glasses and some sort of Yeti-thing, whom I presume is Waffles, as it is wearing a scarf and a frozen waffle as an accessory. The show will be produced by Higher Ground, the Obamas’ production company. My assumption is that Waffles + Mochi is a reworked version of Listen to Your Vegetables & Eat Your Parents, which was reported in 2019 as the title of a half-hour children’s show that would take young children and their families around the globe on an adventure that tells us the story of our food.”

Again, we know very little about the show, because all we’re working with here is the former name and then the image of Michelle Obama flanked by Muppet-adjacent puppets, but what I’m hoping is that this culinary adventure will be a spiritual cousin to the earliest seasons of Sesame Street, which were quirky and weird and just as enjoyable to watch now, as an adult, as they were when I was a small child. Children’s television is at its best when it resonates with both children and adults who are lightly stoned.

Please read on in this article in Jezebel. 

movies, 360 magazine

Valentine’s Day Movie Favorites

The movie experts at Redbox have just released some interesting movie insights, just in time for Valentine’s Day. They asked movie watchers what their favorite romantic comedies are from the 1990s and 2000s. Redbox is also running a campaign where they are promoting the most romantic films for Valentine’s Day. Check out their list below which features movies for all of your romance movie needs.

Which is your favorite romantic comedy from the 2000s?

1.           Sweet Home Alabama

2.           My Big Fat Greek Wedding

3.           50 First Dates

4.           Crazy Rich Asians

5.           Hitch

Which is your favorite romantic comedy from the 1990s?

1.           Pretty Woman

2.           There’s Something About Mary

3.           The Wedding Singer

4.           10 Things I Hate About You

5.           Sleepless in Seattle

Redbox is also running a swoon-worthy Movies You’ll Adore campaign now through 2/14, visit their website for more information. It includes:

  • Valentine Faves At The Kiosk: Wild Mountain Thyme, Love & Monsters, After We Collided, The Broken Hearts Gallery, The Photograph, Crazy Rich Asians
  • On-Demand Deals: Love Simon, The Other Woman, The Fault in Our Stars, 27 Dresses, This Means War
  • Meet Cutes: I Still Believe, The Secret: Dare to Dream, Overboard, Long Shot, When Harry Met Sally
  • Galentine’s Picks: Girls Trip, Pitch Perfect, Mean Girls, Bridesmaids, Legally Blonde
  • Teen Romance: Twilight, Words on Bathroom Walls, Cruel Intentions, After, The Perks of Being a Wallflower
  • Bromances: Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure, Top Gun, Friday, Step Brothers, Fight Club
  • Fantasy Films: The Shape of Water, Edward Scissorhands, Practical Magic, Ghost, Ella Enchanted
  • Break-Up Movies: 500 Days of Summer, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Forgetting Sarah Marshall, He’s Just Not That Into You
  • Romantic Thrillers: Fifty Shades of Grey, Gone Girl, Mrs. & Mrs. Smith, Unfaithful, Obsessed
  • Time Travel Love: Groundhog Day, 13 Going on 30, About Time, The Lake House, The Time Traveler’s Wife
  • Period Romances: Pride & Prejudice, Belle, Ammonite, Gone with the Wind, Shakespeare in Love, Sense & Sensibility
  • Tearjerkers: Titanic, A Star is Born, All My Life, Me Before You, Romeo + Juliet, City of Angels, A Walk to Remember, Brokeback Mountain
Serpant Image

The Serpent Soundtrack

Dubois Records releases a soundtrack album for the BBC and Netflix limited series The Serpent.

The album features selections of the show’s original music composed by Dominik Scherrer who has worked on The Missing, Primeval, Ripper Street, The Widow, and Requiem.

The Serpent is developed by Tom Shankland & Richard Warlow and stars Tahar Ramin, Jenna Coleman, Billy Howle, Mathilde Warnier, Ellie Bamber, Alice Englert, Gregoire Isvarine, Sahajak Boonthanakit and Fabien Frankel. The 8-part drama tells the true story of Charles Sobhraj, a murderer, thief and seductive master of disguise, who was the the chief suspect in the unsolved murders of up to 20 young Western travelers on Asia’s hippie trail in the mid-70s.

The Mammoth Screen production currently airs in the UK every Sunday night on BBC One and will premiere worldwide on Netflix later this year.

“This is a real story: a very fascinating one, but also an extremely disturbing and frightening one. The victims were real, and some of the characters are still alive. The material needed to be treated with respect and sensationalism avoided,” said composer Dominik Scherrer on his inspiration for scoring the serial killer drama.

Lead director Tom Shankland and I already discussed this project five years ago. It had been in preparation for a long time. In terms of the music, Tom wanted the story to be told through a haze of psychedelic 1970s upheaval: drugs, ruthless politics, the old world order changed,” continued Scherrer.

For a story set in the 70s, it would have been all too easy to resort to cliches such as funky Wah-wah guitars. We wanted the music to live in this tumultuous, cultural restlessness, and to create an environment, where Sobhraj’s brutality could breed, and go undetected for so long.

Charles Sobhraj was an admirer of Nietzsche, dominating and subjugating his victims, as if he saw himself perhaps as the superior ‘Ubermensch’. I was keen to infuse the musical strands with a kind of Zarathustran drive to banish otherworldly values. The young hippies were in search of these otherworldly values, they wanted to explore the teachings of Eastern spirituality, and Sobhraj put a brutal end to their journeys.

In the 1970s, composers like Steve Reich and Philip Glass started to draw influence from Asian music. Their study of southeast Asian music, such as gamelan, on its subsequent influence on Western minimalism was an inspiration for the score of The Serpent. Their music felt forward-thinking, which was important as we wanted to avoid the notion of ‘retro’ throughout the score. ‘Retro’ would have resulted in cosy nostalgia, the opposite of what we wanted.

“Score recording took part in London  and Bangkok, where most of the filming took place as well. At Karma Sound Studios, some of the country’s finest singers and instrumentalists played gongs, ranat ek (Thai marimba), phin (Thai mandolin), khaen (Thai harmonica), together with a Western line-up, and myself on piano in the same room. Other solos were simply recorded in Bangkok hotel rooms. The idea was not to pursue ethnic authenticity, but to evoke the aforementioned cultural tumult clashing with the kind of eastern spirituality as explored by George Harrison and John Lennon.”

“Another influence were the new developments in advanced synthesis, which in the mid 1970s was seen a major new avenue in music creation and performance. In the early 70s, a huge, room-filling modular synthesiser called “Tonto” was built and musicians created extraordinary sounds with what is still now the largest polyphonic analogue synth ever built. It was subsequently used by Steve Wonder and Michael Jackson. It still exists, and our synth programmer Stephan Baer, who happened to use the same technician who also serviced ‘Tonto’, managed to recreate patches of that synth, which contribute to the sound of “The Serpent” with unexpected and brutal elements.”

Sight & Sound said, “Dominik Scherrer’s marvellous score, a riot of analogue synths and percussion drawing on exploitation movie soundtracks of yore to intoxicating effect, and adding just a hint of illicit viewing pleasure to spice up the schedules.”

About Dominik Scherrer:

Dominik Scherrer has created award-winning music for some of the finest film and television dramas in recent years. He was nominated for a Primetime Emmy for the critically-acclaimed series The Missing, and recently won his second Ivor Novello Award for his score on Netflix’s Requiem, which he co-composed with Natasha Khan, aka Bat for Lashes.

Dominik first won the prestigious British Ivor Novello Award and received a Royal Television Society (RTS) nomination for his riveting score on Ripper Street. He earned two additional Ivor Novello nominations for Amazon’s The Collection and the British crime series Agatha Christie’s Marple.

Dominik recently reunited with the Williams brothers to score Amazon’s thriller series The Widow, starring Kate Beckinsale. He also scored the landmark dramas An Inspector Calls and Monroe.

Equally accomplished in film scoring, Dominik’s credits include The Nine Lives of Tomas Katz for which Dominik won the Best Music Award at Spain’s Estapona Film Festival; Alice Through The Looking Glass starring Kate Beckinsale; Alina Marazzi’s Tutto Parla Di Te (All About You); and Scenes of a Sexual Naturestarring Ewan McGregor and Hugh Bonneville. He scored Appetitestarring Ute Lemper, and wrote the film’s title song which reached No. 2 on the UK classical charts.

Dominik also created, directed and composed the kinetic operaHell for Leather, which premiered at Sundance and won 10 awards on the festival circuit.

In addition to scoring film and TV, he produces sound design and composes for fine art installations – most notably for artist Suki Chan – and creates performance music for theatre.

Dominik is a British-Swiss composer and works from his studio in London.

Tracklist

1. He likes to Escape (1:50)
2. State of Flux (2:46)
3. Herman in the Rain (1:14)
4. Drive to Kanit House (1:08)
5. Discotheque Darkness (0:29)
6. Teresa Knowlton (3:47)
7. Afghanistan Driving (2:24)
8. Embassy Phone Calls (1:04)
9. Malevolent Beach Game (0:54)
10. Searching Apartment 504 (1:47)
11. Homocidal Übermensch (1:31)
12. Colonel Somphol of Interpol (1:59)
13. Dominique’s Passport (2:51)
14. Gem Dealers (2:42)
15. Front Page News (1:50)
16. Copy Shop (1:08)
17. Cashing Cheques (1:08)
18. Tihar Jail, Delhi (3:02)
19. Epic Journey (2:11)

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Streaming, tv, film, Nielsen story illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE

STREAMING PLATFORMS LEADING THE WAY 

IN ON-SCREEN DIVERSE REPRESENTATION

Diversity at all-time high due to growing television landscape but notable disparities persist

The explosion of new television platforms across broadcast, streaming and cable has led to an increase in on-screen representation of diverse identity groups, according to Nielsen’s latest Diverse Intelligence Series report: Being Seen on Screen: Diverse Representation and Inclusion on TV. 

Among the 300 most-viewed programs in 2019, 92% had some level of diversity in the cast (i.e. women, people of color or LGBTQ+). Whites, African Americans and LGBTQ+ had the largest overall share of screen while Women, Hispanics, Asians and Native Americans were underrepresented relative to their population estimates. The report uncovers notable differences in identity group representation across different platforms; with streaming over-indexing on representation for certain identity groups versus traditional broadcast and cable.

In this report, Being Seen on Screen: Diverse Representation and Inclusion on TV, Nielsen reports on scripted, reality, variety and news programming on key metrics: 

  • Share of Screen (SOS): composition of the top 10 recurring cast members in a program
  • Inclusion Opportunity Index (IOI): compares the SOS of an identity group (e.g. women) to their representation in population estimates
  • Inclusion Audience Index (IAI): compares the SOS of an identity group to their representation in a program’s audience.

The report is powered by Gracenote Inclusion Analytics, a new solution delivering cutting-edge metrics created from Gracenote content metadata and Nielsen audience measurement data, providing the industry with consistent and reliable measurement of granular viewing. The report also leverages Gracenote Video Descriptors, metadata relating to story, mood, character, theme and scenario in each program. 

Key insights from the report include:

Overall, representation of diverse identity groups in on-screen programming is low across all media platforms. Streaming fares better for inclusion followed by broadcast and cable. Viewing audiences are increasingly seeking content that tells their stories. As a result, people are migrating to platforms that have broad and more diverse content offerings. 

  • Representation by platform (Broadcast, Cable, Streaming): Nearly one-third of the content on cable doesn’t have parity representation of Indigenous, People of Color (Black, Native American, Asian & Pacific islander, Hispanic/Latinx, Middle eastern/ North African, Multiracial), Women or LGBTQ talent. 
  • Subscription video on demand (SVOD) programming represents several identity groups e.g. Blacks, Hispanic and Asians well, helping us understand, in part, why more diverse audiences are subscribing to streaming services than the general population.
  • Representation of identity groups by genre (e.g. comedy, drama, news): 
    • While women are not well represented in any single genre, the highest representation for women is in science fiction, drama, comedy and horror. 
    • Women have the lowest representation in news. 
    • People of color representation is at parity in music and drama, followed by science fiction and action and adventure.  
    • People of color have least relative representation in news. 
    • News does prominently feature LGBTQ talent on-screen. 
    • Reality and horror programming also prominently feature LGBTQ talent. 

All audiences, regardless of how they identify, like to see diversity in the content they view on TV. Programs that represent multiple identity groups evenly yield higher overall audience ratings for all viewers when compared to shows that have a significant over or under representation of any one identity group.  

Quality of representation matters too. The themes and narratives depicted on-screen can contribute to identity formation and social perceptions. As the industry seeks to improve diversity on-screen, content creators and publishers should consider the context in which women, people of color, and LGBTQ+ talent are presented. Equally important is investing in marketing those diverse programs so that they are watched.

  • Women insights
    • Comprise 52% of the U.S. population; show up on screen only 38% of the time
    • Women 50+ years old 
      • 60% less likely to see themselves in programming than in the general population, and 2x the representation of men 50+
      • Women 50+ comprise 20% of the population and 20% of all TV viewers, but have a SOS of less than 8%
      • Men 50+ years old are 17% of the total population and have SOS of 14%
  • LGBTQ+ insights
    • 1 out of 4 top performing programs across cable, broadcast and streaming have relative representation of LGBTQ+ cast members 
    • Total SOS for LGBTQ was 7%. LGBTQ people are 4.5% of the population so across all platforms we see fair representation
    • The highest level of representation is on SVOD (8% SOS), followed by cable (7%) then broadcast (5%). 

Aligning representative casting and content themes is an area of opportunity. In the programming where identity groups see themselves represented at parity, these are the themes that are most present: 

  • Latinas: dysfunction, emotional, suspenseful, melodramatic, police stations
  • Black women: emotional, personal relationships, sons, investigation, rivalry
  • Black men: investigation, thrilling, streets, pursuit, teamwork, discovery
  • East Asians: challenge, courage and bravery, justice, sons, discovery
  • South/Southeast Asian males: thrilling, awakening, offices, courtrooms
  • White women: friendship, family, love, husbands, daughters

Nielsen’s findings aim to show media owners the degree to which their programming is inclusive, coupled with the diversity of the audience they draw. Additionally, brands and agencies will now be able to measure their advertising investment and alignment to inclusive content. The identity groups measured included: Female, Male & Expansive Gender Identities, Black/African American, Hispanic, Asian & Pacific Islander, Middle Eastern/North African, Multiracial, White, Native American/Native Alaskan, and Sexual Orientation. The data, which was both intersectional and granular, enables Nielsen to look at specific identity subsegments like Afro-Latino or Southeast Asian. 

“At Nielsen, we believe that the audience is everything and that inclusion is a prerequisite of a healthy media ecosystem, ensuring all communities and individuals are heard and seen,” stated Tina Wilson, Nielsen EVP, Media Analytics and Marketing Outcomes. “The call for inclusive programming that breaks traditional stereotypes and gives a voice to underrepresented groups has never been louder.”

“This work underscores the essential importance of on-screen representation in an increasingly diverse audience landscape,” said Sandra Sims-Williams, Nielsen SVP, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. “Not only is the business case for inclusion made but it also provides practical recommendations on how media companies can address inclusion gaps. This is a must-read for any media professional who wants to be part of the change that today’s television viewers demand.”

For more details and insights, download Being Seen On Screen: Diverse Representation & Inclusion on TV. Please visit nielsen.com/inclusionanalytics to learn more. Join the discussion on Facebook (Nielsen Community) and follow us on Twitter (@NielsenKnows).

ABOUT NIELSEN 

Nielsen Holdings plc (NYSE: NLSN) is a global measurement and data analytics company that provides the most complete and trusted view available of consumers and markets worldwide. Our approach marries proprietary Nielsen data with other data sources to help clients around the world understand what’s happening now, what’s happening next, and how to best act on this knowledge. For more than 90 years Nielsen has provided data and analytics based on scientific rigor and innovation, continually developing new ways to answer the most important questions facing the media, advertising, retail and fast-moving consumer goods industries. An S&P 500 company, Nielsen has operations in over 100 countries, covering more than 90% of the world’s population. For more information, visit www.nielsen.com.

Rita Azar illustrates relationship article for 360 MAGAZINE

“If Anything Happens, I Love You”

By Hannah DiPilato

Warning: Spoilers Ahead 

Netflix has recently released the heart-wrenching short film, “If Anything Happens, I Love You.” The twelve-minute animation has gained immense popularity on social media and many people on TikTok are urging others to watch the film. 

Written and directed by Michael Govier and Will McCormack, the film looks into the life of two grieving parents. At the beginning of the film, it’s hard to tell what to expect. We see a couple that is visibly fighting and their shadows, which could represent their souls, leave their bodies, and interact with one another. We soon see foreshadowing that the loss of their child is causing the grief. 

The entire film is in black and white except for a few strategic placements of color. We first see this color on the side of the family’s shed, a large, blue spot that the father looks at as if the spot holds meaning. The next time this same blue hue appears is while the mom is doing laundry and finds a blue shirt in the grey pile of clothing. She embraces the shirt into her nose, another hint to the watcher that this family is grieving. 

A soccer ball then falls off the washer and rolls into an ominous room with a closed door. The family’s cat follows the ball into the room and the ball bumps a record player which begins the song, “1950” by King Princess. The mom follows the sound into the bedroom and is met with photos of a young girl with a toothy smile. The dad is close behind and the mother holds up the shirt she found while doing laundry, they share a sympathetic smile. 

The shadow of a young girl pops up out of the record player and shares a heartwarming reconnection with the cat. The parents’ shadows come together and embrace the shadow of the girl and we see the parents finally reconnect since their argument. 

We get a few flashbacks and watch the couple’s daughter grow up. We see the family take a road trip, the girl learns to play soccer and the family celebrates her 10th birthday. We learn the spot on the shed came from the girl kicking a soccer ball too hard into the side. The parents then send their daughter off to school and this is when the tears really start flowing. 

The girl starts to approach the school and the shadows of the then naive parents are trying desperately to stop the girl from going. Of course, the shadows are unsuccessful and the girl waves goodbye as she walks into school, and impending doom. 

An American flag is seen hanging over the doors inside of the school and the red, white and blue pops against the grey background. This is another time the directors used a splash of color in the grey film. At first, the background noise is the basic sounds of a school such as chatter and slamming lockers. Then, we hear a gunshot. Two more gunshots blast in the background followed by the horror of screaming children. The screaming and gunshots continue and police sirens begin to blare while the screen switches to flashing red and blue lights.

While the chaotic background noise continues, a sketch of a phone appears with a bunny phone case. “If anything happens, I love you” sends from the phone and one final gunshot makes the screen go black. The audience finally connects the pieces of the film. The daughter has been killed in the school shooting. 

The text appears again and the letters fall turning to raindrops. The rain falls on the parents’ shadows as they sit facing away from each other on two sides of a piece of land. In the final moments of the film, we see the parents reunite thanks to the shadow of the daughter, and we see the parents finally find comfort in one another. 

It was shocking how much emotion could be fit into a twelve-minute animated film. There were many themes displayed in the film touching on family, loss, grief, trauma and love. This film also speaks out on the very important issue of gun control in America. For so many families, losing a child to gun violence in a school shooting is a harsh reality. A child’s life can be snatched away from them at an incredibly young age. 

With no dialogue and simple illustrations, the writers were able to convey an entire story that plays with the emotions of the viewer and evokes important conversations. The distress shown in the marriage after the loss of the daughter is something parents experience and may not necessarily want to talk about. It’s easy for the loss of a loved one to break people apart. 

The main takeaway from the film should be to hold your loved ones close because you never know what will happen next. In our fast-paced lives, we often take our lives and loved ones for granted. This film flawlessly shows how easily we can experience a loss that can make our world come crashing down. Remember, hold your loved ones close and tell them you love them, before it’s too late.

Watch the short animated film on Netflix now.

Ice cream illustration by Kaelen Felix for Ben and Jerry's story inside 360 magazine

Ben & Jerry’s “PUNCH LINE”

“What did the bourbon say to the almonds? Am I drunk or are you nuts?” 

That is just one of the many jokes Wanda Sykes riffed when she learned about Punch Line, the newest Ben & Jerry’s flavor in partnership with Netflix’s comedy brand Netflix Is A Joke. Good for the belly and good for a belly laugh, the new flavor is a comedic duo of brown butter bourbon and almond ice creams with roasted almonds and chuckles of cherries. That’s a mouthful of mirth.

1-866-PUNCHLINE – CALL NOW FOR YUMMY JOKES AND FUNNY ICE CREAM! 

In addition to delicious ice cream, Netflix and Ben & Jerry’s are teaming up to provide some much-needed humor through a new Punch Line hotline. Netflix’s hottest heckle-proof headliners, including comedians Wanda Sykes, Fortune Feimster and Aparna Nancherla, will have people doubled over with laughter when they call 1-866-PUNCHLINE. Some lucky fans may even discover a way to get a free pint of Punch Line – now that’s a call to action!

This fourth Ben & Jerry’s/Netflix flavor in 2020 continues to provide fans with something to look forward to. To hear more hilariousness from Wanda, Fortune and Aparna, you can find all three stand-ups on Netflix or the Netflix Is A Joke YouTube channel. Start planning which Netflix comedy special you’ll pair with a pint of Punch Line and in no time, you’ll be licking and laughing!

Punch Line is headlining store shelves across the country now with a suggested MSRP of $4.99-$5.49, but don’t dally! As a Limited Batch, when it’s gone, it’s gone! To learn more about Ben & Jerry’s, visit: benjerry.com

Jarry Lee Q×A

360 MAGAZINE was lucky enough to sit down with Jarry Lee, a model, actress, musician and influencer from the UK. Lee has over 700,000 followers on Instagram, 30,000 TikTok followers and more than 700,000 Spotify streams.

She has also been seen in VOGUE Italia, POPSUGAR, Mic, Elite Daily, NY Daily News, AM New York, Women Fitness Magazine, Cliché Magazine, The New York Times, Thrive Global and more. She will also be featured in two upcoming books, “Tell Her She Can’t” by Kelly Lewis and “The Little Things” by Oliver Charles.

Authority Magazine named her one of 2020’s “Inspirational Women in Hollywood” while StarCentral Magazine called Lee a “rising star to watch in 2020.” You can click right here to see everywhere she has been featured.

360: How did you find a creative outlet in journalism?

Jarry Lee: I’ve always loved writing (everything from poetry to screenplays), and it was my childhood dream to write professionally. I feel lucky that I was able to do so as a paid, full-time job and that I was able to pitch and take on stories I was personally interested in. Writing is a cathartic process for me.

360: What was the biggest hurdle transitioning from writing for BuzzFeed to being in front of the camera?

Jarry Lee: I didn’t have much prior experience beyond taking some acting classes in the past in school and performing in a playwriting festival in prep school that I wrote for, so I did dozens of test shoots with photographers to practice and learn my best angles and posing. Speaking on camera felt natural, but I had to learn how to pose more naturally.

360: How has your experience in telling stories as a journalist and analyzing stories as the Deputy Books Editor helped you to tell the stories of others as an actress and model?

Jarry Lee: It has definitely helped me with more easily imagining the inner lives and motivations of my characters. Every time I interviewed sources for an in-depth piece, I felt that I gained insight into how other people’s minds worked. When I was writing a feature about Instagram in 2017, for example, I interviewed over 30 individuals and a few businesses, and their stories were really fascinating and completely changed my understanding of how people interact with social media.

360: How has being an influencer and online personality changed through the pandemic?

Jarry Lee: There are almost no in-person events, so in that aspect it’s become less interactive, but there are also more people online since everyone’s bored indoors. I’ve adapted to become a lot more self-sufficient — I rarely work with outside photographers anymore and instead have learned to shoot myself. Earlier this year I bought professional lighting and photography equipment, and recently even purchased a green screen! I’ve really enjoyed honing my video production and editing skills this year. Maybe that’s one small silver lining to the pandemic.

360: What is your favorite platform for creating content and why?

Jarry Lee: I love Instagram for being so curated and aesthetic-focused, but Twitter is my favorite platform for sharing thoughts and seeing others’ (as well as for really silly memes). I originally joined Twitter in 2009, way before I joined Instagram (in 2013).

360: How does your time as a model help you as an actress?

Jarry Lee: I think acting helps more with modeling than vice versa, but becoming more comfortable on-camera as a model has definitely helped me act more naturally, as well. Both require drawing your inner emotions out, onto your facial expressions and how you hold yourself generally.

360: How do you use your platform and large reach to influence ideas and actions of your audience?

Jarry Lee: Three topics I try to bring more awareness to via my platform are: Asian representation in entertainment, bisexual/LGBTQ+ representation and anxiety/mental health. All three are still not spoken about enough, so I think it’s important to share my experiences with my audience. I still frequently receive messages about how I came out as bisexual on the Netflix show “Dating Around,” for example, and it has really resonated with some of my followers when I’ve shared my past experiences with panic attacks and anxiety. I try to show the behind-the-scenes of my entertainment career, in part because there were very few Asian public figures in the entertainment industry when I was growing up. I hope that my non-traditional career path inspires others to take a risk and pursue their passions.

You can learn more about Jarry Lee by clicking right here. You can also follow her on Instagram, Twitter, TikTok, Facebook and Spotify.