Posts tagged with "commercial"

Sean Perry Film a photo art book by 360 MAGAZINE.

SEAN PERRY FILMS

Listen to Sean Perry have a heart-to-heart with Vaughn Lowery on 360 MAG Apple/Spotify podcast HERE.


‘My practice provokes character development through the use of photography and cinematography. Often, I experiment with various hues to enamor viewers and exhibit immense emotion within each frame captured. Collaborating with fellow visual architects to create innovative work is something I practice frequently. Working as a team allows me to create the unimaginable.’

Sean Perry

Sean Perry provokes character development through the use of photography and videography. He experiments with various hues to enamor viewers and effortlessly exhibits immense emotion within each frame captured. Perry consistently collaborates with fellow visual architects to fabricate the unimaginable.



For additional information on SPF go HERE.

Purchase SPF Photo Book on Amazon.com.

Purchase SPF Photo Book on Barnes & Noble.

Purchase SPF limited edition image wrapped hard jacket HERE.

360 Magazine produces Sean Perry Films photo book for Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.
360 MAGAZINE presents Sean Perry Films photography book. Available for purchase at B&N.

SPECIAL THANKS:

RaQuise Bowen

Theresa Hayes

CJ Hart

Greg Emmanuel

Denzel Bryan

Valentine Rontez

Altea Kelly

Mio Almonte

Morgan Bentley

Amizero O’Donnell

Neon Baez

Jada Kobie

Paola Rodriguez

CBD Gif by Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

Weedmaps Commercial

WM Technology, Inc. (“WM Technology” or the “Company”) (Nasdaq: MAPS) and Weedmaps, the company’s leading commerce-driven marketplace and premier destination for cannabis consumers, debuted a digital commercial spot timed to television’s most-watched event of the year, which addresses the current advertising restrictions imposed on legal cannabis businesses and brands for marketing their products and services.

Weedmaps’ digital ad personifies cannabis as a character named Brock Ollie. Resembling a head of broccoli, the vegetable emoji commonly used as a visual representation of cannabis in marketing, the 30-second spot provides viewers with insight into a day in the life of Brock Ollie, whose superfood identity is up in smoke as he is repeatedly mistaken for cannabis. The advertisement is a humoristic take on the challenges imposed on the broader industry, which include social media censorship and a lack of consistent advertising regulations, thus restricting cannabis-related spots during nationally televised events, like the big game. Brock Ollie shines a light on the marketing hurdles that continue to impede industry growth and consumer education as well as make space for the existing stigma associated with cannabis to thrive.

“Despite three quarters of the country having legalized cannabis and the bipartisan enthusiasm we continue to see in support for change at the federal level, the industry continues to face roadblocks that inhibit competition in the legal market and stifle opportunities to educate,” said Chris Beals, chief executive officer of Weedmaps. “There’s an irony in the fact that the biggest night for advertising will feature an array of consumer brands in regulated industries, from beverage alcohol to sports betting, yet legal cannabis retailers, brands, and businesses have been boxed out.”

Although acceptance around cannabis consumption continues to grow, with nearly three out of every four (72%1) cannabis consumers saying that everyone or almost everyone knows they consume cannabis, fewer than half (49%2) of cannabis consumers say they are experts or proficient when it comes to cannabis knowledge. Despite consumer appetite and demand for more information, industry players continue to face roadblocks as they navigate not only how to reach consumers, but also how to empower them to make informed purchasing decisions.

“Advertising restrictions are simply one part of a much larger issue,” Beals continued. “Objective and reliable information about cannabis is integral to the sustained growth of this industry. The deficiency of such information and the current limitations that hinder cannabis education continue to negatively impact other areas, such as medical research, and it’s time we begin to address them.”

Weedmaps’ ad encourages viewers to consider why it’s necessary for the cannabis plant to be replaced with items such as broccoli, trees, maple leaves, clouds, and other references in order to navigate the restrictions encountered in the marketing and advertising space. The message is best summarized by the call to action at the end of the spot; “Cannabis is here. Let’s talk about it.”

To watch the digital commercial, please click HERE. Join the #SaveBrockOllie conversation on Twitter, or follow them on Instagram for more information.

About Weedmaps

Weedmaps is a leading online marketplace for cannabis users and businesses, operated by WM Technology, Inc. WM Technology, Inc.’s (Nasdaq: MAPS) mission is to power a transparent and inclusive global cannabis economy. Now in its second decade, WM Technology has been a driving force behind much of the legislative change we’ve seen in the past 10 years.

Founded in 2008, WM Technology is a leading technology and software infrastructure provider to the cannabis industry, comprising a B2C platform, Weedmaps, and B2B software, WM Business. The cloud-based SaaS solutions from WM Business provide an end-to-end operating system for cannabis retailers. WM Business’ tools support compliance with the complex, disparate, and constantly evolving regulations applicable to the cannabis industry. Through its website and mobile apps, WM Technology provides consumers with the latest information about cannabis retailers, brands, and products, facilitating product discovery and driving engagement with our retail and brand customers.

WM Technology holds a strong belief in the power of cannabis and the importance of enabling safe, legal access to consumers worldwide. Since its inception, WM Technology has worked tirelessly, not only to become the most comprehensive platform for consumers, but to build the software solutions that power businesses compliantly in the space, to advocate for legalization, social equity, and licensing in many jurisdictions, and to facilitate further learning through partnering with subject matter experts on providing detailed, accurate information about the plant.

Headquartered in Irvine, California, WM Technology supports remote work for all eligible employees.

Green Car by Mina Tocalini

Sesquicentennial of Pirelli

“What an original stroke, don’t you think? Look at that P…it looks elastic, like rubber”. These are the words that launched the celebrations of 150 years of Pirelli, with the setting of the Piccolo Teatro of Milan where a theatrical story brought together testimonials, voices, and images to represent a history of industry, culture, tradition, technology, and passion that began on January 28, 1872.

The most significant moments were revisited by Ferruccio De Bortoli, Stefano Domenicali, Paolo Mieli, Renzo Piano, Ferruccio Resta, and Annamaria Testa, alongside the Executive Vice Chairman and CEO, Marco Tronchetti Provera, and Alberto Pirelli, representing the bond between family and company. The event, conducted by Ilaria D’Amico, recounted Pirelli’s journey across three centuries through the things that most distinguish it: international scale, factories, relationship with culture and artists, creativity in communication, presence in sport and motorsport, a constant search for innovation, and cutting-edge technology.

“Today we wanted to take a journey together through history but with our eyes on the future. Anticipating change is what Pirelli has done for 150 years thanks to the solidity of its entrepreneurial culture and ability to be a protagonist of the present. These things have allowed us to reach this milestone with a brand established around the world. We felt it important to share this story with our city, our country, and all the international groups and communities that we work with every day. A thank you to all the 30,000 people who every day at Pirelli build our history”, said Marco Tronchetti Provera, Executive Vice Chairman and CEO of Pirelli.

The History

On stage at the Piccolo Teatro, immersed in a set made up of five large screens, four actors told the story of Pirelli, beginning with its history. Images, videos, and photographs of the past and present alternated with the voices of the actors, who revisited the company’s different moments together with Ferruccio De Bortoli, Paolo Mieli, Alberto Pirelli, and Marco Tronchetti Provera. The dialogue centered on the figure of Leopoldo Pirelli and his father Alberto through the recollections of his grandson. His role in the company’s contribution to the modernization and industrialization of the country was discussed.

A journey, Pirelli’s, began on January 28, 1872, by Giovanni Battista Pirelli, who at only 23 years of age bet on something absolutely new: rubber. In the beginning, the company produced insulators for telegraphs and cables that linked the most distant points of the newly born Italy. It grew rapidly around the world and produced objects of everyday use (from swimming caps to toys to raincoats) and tires for wagons and bicycles. From its birth, it focused on innovation; the company offered products that also become symbols of the country’s progress. But even Pirelli encountered obstacles: the failed mergers in the 1990s with Dunlop and Continental and the plan to integrate networks and content in telecommunications, pursued from the early 2000s through Telecom Italia and cut short by external interference. Crises were overcome restarting from the core business, leading the company to focus on tires. 

The factories

The journey onstage at the Piccolo Teatro continued with the exploration of the company’s industrial tradition. Through its factories, Pirelli put down roots in many countries, currently 12, building plants that are light-filled, safe, and sustainable. They are welcoming places for people working with passion and for industry 4.0 with simulators, artificial intelligence, and robots like MIRS invented by Pirelli itself. In summary, there are 18 beautiful and efficient factories, with Settimo Torinese the model, designed and built by the architect Renzo Piano. 

Culture, communication, and image

On its journey, Pirelli was always in dialogue with artists and intellectuals to keep an eye on society. It did so, and continues to do so, through innovative languages and instruments, such as the “Rivista Pirelli“, Pirelli Calendar, Pirelli HangarBicocca, publications and exhibitions of the Fondazione Pirelli, products of Pirelli Design, World Magazine, and the volumes of its Annual Report enriched with the contributions of artists and writers. The list to emerge from the Piccolo Teatro’s stage is rich and begins with the iconic Pirelli logo, born in New York at the beginning of the 20th century, with that long P which stretches as if it were rubber. The company experimented with new languages, produces tires, and interviews Umberto Eco. It talks with writers, philosophers, poets: from Carrère to Kureishi, from Elio Vittorini to Eugenio Montale and Salvatore Quasimodo. It hosts Luchino Visconti and John Cage and puts Carl Lewis in high heels.

These themes were addressed by Annamaria Testa, Ferruccio De Bortoli, Paolo Mieli, and Marco Tronchetti Provera—recounting different worlds with the underlying idea that when you are involved in the industry with passion you are also producing culture.

Motorsport and passion for sport

What is the passion that makes people excited at Pirelli? Motors. That is an area where technology is fundamental, as explained by Alberto Pirelli. Now, Pirelli is present in over 350 motorsport competitions. The Beijing-Paris of 1907 is particularly memorable. Prince Scipione Borghese, driving an Itala equipped with Pirelli tires, covered 17,000 kilometers to finish 20 days ahead of the team in second place. This was a great success that transformed mobility into innovation and spectacle, and competitions into open-air laboratories. The onstage discussion of the greatest motorsport competition involved Stefano Domenicali, who now heads Formula 1, on the eve of an important change: the introduction of 18″ tires in a competition where, in the midst of Italian flags, there is also Pirelli’s. For Pirelli, however, sport is not limited to motors, but also football, cycling, winter sports, and sailing, with Luna Rossa.

Innovation, research, product

History reveals that Pirelli is a company that always moves with its eyes on the future. “Look inside to understand, to discover new solutions,” was once said Mr. Emanueli, who signed many of the 6,700 patents registered by Pirelli in 150 years. A lesson told by Mr. Emanueli is now known by the over 2,000 people who work in Research & Development, a sector of fundamental importance for the company. Its collaborations with leading universities (over 50) are also fundamental, as explained by Ferruccio Resta, who tells Ilaria D’Amico also about the relationship of reciprocal inspiration that links Pirelli and the Politecnico di Milano.

The “heirs of Emanueli” are involved in managing the acceleration of innovation, as in the case of electric vehicles, where Pirelli is already present with Elect, a package of technological solutions ad hoc to handle the different weight, acceleration, and consumption of these vehicles. Also, new connected products like the Cyber Tyre, with sensors that supply real-time information to the driver, are being developed. 

At the center, as always, there is natural rubber with which Pirelli produced the world’s first FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) certified tire, testifying to a 100% sustainable supply chain. A great safeguard for the environment occurs, for example, with Pirelli’s participation in the Birdlife project to conserve biodiversity in Indonesia. Thanks to its commitment at the social, environmental, and economic levels, Pirelli finds itself at the top of the most important sustainability indices.

esther perbandt image for use by 360 magazine

Esther Perbandt Q×A

By: Kai Yeo

Born in Berlin, Esther Perbandt studies fashion design at the Berlin University of the Arts and polished a master’s degree in Fashion and Textile Design in Paris. In 2020, she made it to the finals of international designer show “Making The Cut” with Heidi Klum and Tim Gunn, supported by Naomi Campbell.

Not only is she a contemporary fashion designer, but also a visionary, performer, and mistress of ceremonies. Esther Perbandt describes her fashion as an act of (post)feminism irrespective of gender: personality, autonomy and individuality are at the center of her avant-garde style. The non-binary silhouette is deconstructed and reframed with classical menswear details, however, maintaining timeless aspects of elegance and style.

360 MAGAZINE had the pleasure of corresponding with Esther to learn about her inspiration, goals, and much more. Read on to find out her answers!

What/who are your biggest inspirations?

The joy of life is my greatest inspiration. This motor is so big that I can’t imagine running out of ideas at some point. I like doing two things for a living: sleeping and dancing. Many ideas come to me when I fall asleep or wake up and when I can dance without restraint.

How did Making The Cut (MTC) change your view of the fashion industry? 

When I studied fashion design in Berlin and Paris in the nineties and early noughties, the term “digitalization” was not really an issue in the fashion industry. I founded my own label over 17 years ago, which has grown very slowly on its own. Until I took part in MTC, I didn’t have an online shop, or only one that didn’t work. But I knew that if my brand was to survive the next 30 years, I had to change and become more digital. Who should I learn from, if not the biggest?

From a show like MTC of course you don’t only learn, you see what’s possible with a lot of money. But if you manage to transfer what you have experienced and seen at the highest level and translate it to your very own DNA, you can take the next steps. I don’t think there is a right or a wrong way in the fashion industry. There are an incredible number of individual paths. Depending on what the goal is.

After coming back from the MTC shoot, I didn’t do anything creative for 8 months, I just prepared business-wise for the airing of MTC: New website, new online store, new strategy. Today, I work with my pattern maker with avatars and digital fittings. This saves us a lot of time and resources.

How has the newly found attention changed/shaped you?

The new attention was a boon for my brand to finally grow. Many things have become a little easier professionally. But the pandemic probably slowed down the speed of this growth a bit and still does. Personally, I only got a limited amount of that attention. When the first season of MTC came out, which I was part of the cast of, the world went into its first hard lockdown. For months, I just worked a lot with my small team and sent packages all over the world every day, but especially to the US, without having the opportunity to meet many people. Germany is a grateful or ungrateful country, depending on how you take it, when it comes to addressing public figures. In the meantime, I had the feeling that hardly anyone in Germany had seen the show.

You were unsure about whether or not to take part in Making The Cut. How do you feel about it now?

Yes, I was indeed very unsure when I received the first request to participate in MTC 1. For 16 years, I had been flying the flag for a freer, more unconventional and uncommercial way in the fashion industry, which also had a stronger connection to art. I felt it wasn’t for me or would betray my brand. But quite the opposite. It was the best decision I made for my business, but also for my life in general. In the last three years, since shooting MTC 1, I have learnt an incredible amount and finally started to build a sustainable foundation for my brand. Every path in the fashion industry is very individual and mine is probably also an atypical one. But it’s fun to see myself making strategic and business decisions in a very different way now and to see that the word “commercial” is not a dirty word for me.

Do you have any moments in your career you look back to often?

Oh yes, of course. I often think today where I got the strength to hold out for so long and to go through all the deep valleys. For many years I called my studio the “Palace of Tears”. Every few days there were tears because I felt like I was standing on the spot or because it was financially on the brink. But somewhere deep inside me, I always believed that it would work out and become easier one day.

How would you describe your design aesthetic?

The signature of my brand has developed from the three cities in which I have lived in and which have been very important and inspiring for me: Berlin, Moscow and Paris.

Berlin, as the city where I was born, the city divided over the years with a great historical history, with its roughness, toughness, punk, subculture, snootiness. Moscow, with its avant-garde of the 1920s, the constructivists, high-necked, the uniforms and the austerity. And then of course Paris, as the city that gave me the finishing touch, the elegance, the femininity, and the glamor.

This special mix and the reduction to the color “black,” is meant to give my wearers a strength and make them grow. The focus on details should make the viewer curious to take a closer look at clothing.

What are the biggest challenges you have faced as a designer?

It has always been both a curse and a blessing that I have had to fight my own way through, especially financially. This has extremely slowed down the growth of my brand, but at the same time it has given me the chance and the time to carefully develop my signature and the DNA and to look closely at what I really want.

Do you think your surroundings and environment play a part in how you choose your designs?

Yes, definitely. As a creative, you unconsciously absorb everything you come across. I love observing people and thinking about why they wear the clothes they do. What identity do they have, and which one do they want to slip into? Dealing directly with my customers in the shop every day has of course influenced my choice of designs. Since MTC, I do a lot of styles in larger sizes and now a lot of women come and have my collection pieces made to measure. That’s a big market.

What are the next goals for your brand?

The USA has become my main sales market in the last two years. The next goal would be to open my own shop in New York for a while and then also produce locally so that customers who buy online don’t have to pay customs and the high shipping costs.

In fashion Esther Perbandt will continue to explore various paths, especially in creating haute couture looks for numerous events, as well as digging into costume design areas whenever projects allow for it.

It’s said that the future is unknown but at least with Esther Perbandt it will always continue to surprise and excite. We look forward to seeing more from her.

Courtney Davis

Courtney was born and raised in suburban St. Paul, Minnesota, but always wanted to move to sunny L.A. She turned that dream into a reality when she was accepted to UCLA, where she obtained an undergraduate degree in economics. Courtney’s passion for fashion and modeling started very early on. After various shopping sprees with her mom, they would outfit her new clothes and partake in an impromptu photoshoot in their backyard. Courtney’s other interests include volleyball (which she competed in for seven years), yoga, karaoke, tennis, trying new foods and going to concerts.

Watch the Walk

height: 5’10”
hair color: blonde
eyes: blue-grey
bust: 32″
waist: 25.5″
hips: 33.5″
shoes: 7.5

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Courtney Davis, shot by Vaughn Lowery, for 360 MAGAZINE.

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Courtney Davis, shot by Vaughn Lowery, for 360 MAGAZINE.
Courtney Davis models for 360 MAGAZINE with Valentino purse in cornrows.
Courtney Davis, shot by Vaughn Lowery, for 360 MAGAZINE.

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sports illustration by Allison Christensen for use by 360 Magazine

Xfinity Olympic Games Ad

While the world prepares for what may be the most meaningful Olympic Games in recent history, Xfinity– the Comcast brand providing internet, video distribution, wireless and electronic home security services for Team USA (and for Team USA in 2022, 2024, 2026 and 2028)– will release an ad called “The Song.” This ad will air nationally tomorrow ahead of the opening ceremonies and continue through August 8. The ad – which was released earlier this month in select markets and digitally –takes the timeless tradition of the Olympic Anthem “Bugler’s Dream” and features people from all walks of life humming the iconic seven notes in E-flat major: BUM—BUM—ba-ba-ba-BAH-BAH!

To extend the campaign and spark pride and support for Team USA, Xfinity today launched the #XfinityFanthem Challenge which invites consumers to sing, hum, perform and play their own renditions of “Bugler’s Dream” via TikTok. Olympic Swimmer Brad Snyder, Winter Olympian Brianna Decker, NASCAR Driver Kevin Harvick, E-Sports star Bugha, TikTok Creators Luna the Pittie, Cole Brown, the Philadelphia Eagles Dance Teamthe Philly Phanatic and more have partnered with Xfinity to create content and share their take on the song at #XfinityFanthem starting later today.

Listen to “The Song” HERE.

Watch the #XfinityFanthem compilation HERE.

“The Song” and #XfinityFanthem was created with support from advertising agency 72andSunny.

by Universal Music for use by 360 Magazine

BRIAN MAY – DRIVEN BY YOU

Brian May announces re-release and new music video of his classic single 

DRIVEN BY YOU ahead of remastered Back To The Light album

“The song Freddie Mercury generously gave his blessing to be my solo track.”

Brian May’s first solo hit, and the unforgettable TV ad it was made for, came from the most unlikely of origins.

Driven By You is, without doubt, one of rock’s most rousing and lasting anthems. Originally written for a Ford car television commercial, the solo track was a worldwide hit when it first debuted as a single off May’s 1992 Back To The Light album. But the unforgettable song had its beginnings oceans away from the open roads of the UK countryside that were framed in that TV ad.

Originally released in November 1991, Driven By You saw success worldwide including reaching No. 6 on the UK Singles Chart and No. 9 on the US Billboard Album Rock Chart. Re-released to download on June 25 ahead of the forthcoming remastered reissue of May’s Back To The Light album on August 6, the reissue of the track comes with a scorching new 30th Anniversary video edit. The performance was originally filmed when the Queen legend sang the track live for the first time at the 1991 Guitar Legends concert in Seville, Spain, and during his 1992 South America tour.

The energetic footage features Brian performing the song with an all-star band including Cozy Powell on drums, Neil Murray on bass and Steve Vai on rhythm guitar. Plus, Rick Wakeman and Mike Moran on keyboards, alongside Maggie Ryder, Miriam Stockley and Chris Moran on backing vocals. That music video can be seen in its updated form here.

Sharing the backstory to Driven By You, May cites a Los Angeles pool bathroom as the unlikely starting point for his classic song.

“There’s a kind of mystery about writing songs. You never know where they come from. All I know is I was sitting around a swimming pool in Los Angeles with an ad producer. He’s sitting there sunning himself. I’m there with my future wife sunning myself by the pool, and we get talking. And he says, ‘Oh, you write songs, don’t you?’ I said, ‘Yeah, I write songs.’ He said, ‘Well could you write a song for an advert? Have you ever done that?’ And I went, ‘No, I’ve never done it.’ He asked, ‘Would you like to?’ And I said, ‘Yes, I’d be very interested.’ He then asked me how I would feel about a slogan that goes, ‘Everything we do, we do for you.’

“And I went, ‘Yeah, I could relate to that’ because I can feel that in my own mind about my own self. And it got modified later on. It became ‘Everything we do is driven by you’ because it was about cars, and I liked that even more. And as soon as he said that I went off to the bathroom with my little tape recorder and sang some stuff into the tape recorder. I sang most of the verse and a bit of the chorus, which is the way it happens with me. Suddenly a light goes on and I could hear it in my head, I could hear the whole thing, ‘Driven By You,’ and I wrote it for them, for the Ford Car Company, and completed it very quickly. I went into the studio when I got back, completed it quickly for them, and then they liked it.”

Revisiting Driven By You today, May has also revealed how the song helped create a special understanding with Freddie Mercury in his final days and how the Queen singer encouraged his dear friend and bandmate to ‘find his wings’ in his solo career.

Talking of Freddie, May says: “I played it to Freddie and I said, ‘Freddie, you know if this becomes a Queen track, which it might do, obviously you should sing it.’ He listened and went, ‘You’ve done it very well darling, and I think you should sing it’. Now whether that’s because he really did think I sang it well or just because he didn’t want to sing anything, I don’t know. But he said, ‘It’s beautiful, it’s great, it’s very complete in its own way, you should do it.’ And he said something very profound at the time. He said, ‘You know we’re all thinking and wondering what’s going to happen to me, and you don’t have to feel embarrassed about it. You know you should be thinking about your solo career at this time and if this is the beginning of your solo career then it’s a very worthy beginning. This is probably the beginning of your finding your wings as you need to do.’ So, Freddie was very far-sighted and very generous as always and sort of gave me permission to do this as a solo track, which I did.”

“I rewrote the words as a piece of relationship therapy, you know, ‘Everything I do is driven by you’ and put it out as a single and it was a hit. So, it was a nice boost to me to feel I could do things on my own. I wasn’t just a piece of Queen. And that’s what I believe about the core of songs; sometimes you don’t know why you’re writing them. You don’t know where it’s coming from, but it can be channeled into a way which makes sense in various ways. And things are always about life for me; they’re always about relationships. Either my relationships or relationships with people around me. It’s about humans interacting. That to me is the most exciting thing in the world; the most important thing and the hardest thing to get right in your life. A lot of people can do great stuff. You know, fly aero planes, go to the Moon. Relationships… not so easy. So, it’s about that as always.”

Out of the Light, the companion release available in the Back To The Light box set and on the 2CD and digital formats, features three alternative versions of Driven By You including the original Ford Ad Version and a Cozy (Powell) and Neil (Murray) ’93 version.

Driven By You is available to download and stream here.

Brian May’s Back To The Light remastered reissue is available on August 6 on CD, Vinyl, Cassette, digital download and streaming formats.

by CODAworx for use by 360 Magazine

California Artwork Up For International Design CODAawards

2021 People’s Choice CODAawards Vote On Favorite Community Artwork, A Global Competition

The general public has the opportunity to vote, June 18-30, on 100 large-scale community artworks from around the world, nominated for a People’s Choice CODAaward. Hundreds of commissioned art projects were submitted for the CODAawards, which are given annually to the remarkable works that successfully integrate art into interior, architectural, and public spaces. The two projects that collect the most online votes will receive a coveted People’s Choice CODAaward and be announced, alongside all of this year’s CODAaward winners (one in each of ten categories), in the August issue of Interior Design magazine.

Voters are encouraged to rally behind the work they like in the CODAawards categories of Landscape, Residential, Healthcare, Commercial, Institutional, Liturgical, Public Spaces, Transportation, Hospitality, and Education.

This year the 374 CODAawards entries represent $477 million in commission fees, and projects from 30 countries. The diversity of artwork includes “Please Be Seated,” a public art installation touring across Chinese Mainland; “Sea Change,” an interactive light-based artwork that activates the pedestrian experience within a bus exchange transit tunnel in North Vancouver, Canada; and “Eon,” a 30 x 9-foot digital installation commissioned for Welch Hall, the largest academic facility at The University of Texas.

Cindy Allen (EIC, Interior Design), Malene Barnett (Founder, Black Artists + Designers Guild), and Frances Bronet (President, Pratt Institute in New York City), are among the eighteen jurors, all leaders in the design and art worlds, who have spent weeks reviewing and scoring all entries. These jurors will agree on one winner in each category to create the 2021 CODAawards winners circle (plus the two People’s Choice CODAawardees that the general public will select).

“When artists, designers, industry resources, and clients work together, places are transformed into spectacular spaces. CODAworx is the hub of the commissioned art economy. Our CODAawards is a way to celebrate these works. The 12-day People’s Choice voting sprint (June 18 – 30) becomes quite heated and the heavy traffic occasionally brings the website down! It is an exciting race to the finish line – the art world’s equivalent of the Tour de France!” states avid biker and CODAworx CEO Toni Sikes.

About CODAworx

CODAworx, the hub of the commissioned art economy, is the place where architects, real estate developers, and public art agencies creative go to discover and hire talent for large-scale commission projects. They accomplish this by searching the vast treasure trove of over 8,000 projects that CODAworx members have published on the website. It is here that one can find and connect with artists who create amazing sculptures and wall work, as well as atrium and kinetic artwork, light and digital media, and structural designs such as bridges and buildings. The CODAawards are the industry’s prestigious awards program that celebrates the projects that most successfully integrate commissioned art into interior, architectural, or public spaces. CODAworx produces this nine-year-old recognition program, along with their National Media Partner Interior Design magazine, to honor the designers, architects and artists whose collective imaginations create the public and private spaces that inspire us every day.

California Nominees:

The Lader (San Francisco)

The Chronicles of San Francisco (San Francisco)

The Avery Dining Room (San Francisco)

Chase Center Seeing Spheres (San Francisco)
Chase Center Chandelier (San Francisco)

Retu(r)ned Oak (Oakland)

The Spring (Hollywood)

Reflecting Within Us (Los Angeles)

Material Girl (Los Angeles)

Launch Intention (Los Angeles)

Getting There (Los Angeles)

Flower Trail (Union City)

Cosmos (Sunnyvale)

Connecting Flights (Pasadena)

Better Place Forest (Point Arena)

Approach (Palo Alto)

 

Vote for your favorite starting June 18 here.

Apartment hacks illustration inside 360 MAGAZINE

Picking the Best Printer for Your Business

Starting a graphics and design business is easy as long as you do your market research properly beforehand. Besides knowing the legal requirements and other expected requirements, gathering the right tools for your business to run successfully is crucial. One of the most important items you need is a good printer. How do you settle for one when many of these items are being advertised in the market? Check out a few pointers to ensure that you choose the right printer to support your growing business.

Consider What Materials You Will Be Printing

You are likely going to be printing specific things on your printer. For instance, a black-only laser printer is excellent for when you need high quality black and white monochrome output for text proofing. On the other hand, when working with colors, you need something with color output offers. You can opt for an inkjet device or laser printer, and in other cases, a solid ink printer may work. If you print a lot of media and images, ink jet will still be the best option.

Gauge Output Resolutions

Whenever you print the final output, you will most likely need the results to be clean and crisp. A high-resolution device is what most professional graphics design businesses will need, especially if the goal is to end up with a proofing device that shows the design’s overall look. Always exercise caution when checking the resolution stats and specifications. Laser and inkjet printers may appear similar but have differ in their diverse technological functions.

Consider Your Output Usage

Have a list of all the things you intend to use the printer for when purchasing it. For instance, any heat-based lamination processes will require printers that are not inkjet. If you insist on using inkjets, then you should prepare for poor quality printouts. Any printer with a low melting point means that they are vulnerable to high temperatures. The last thing you want is a printout that is not moisture resistant.

Consider Page Sizes

Your printer choice should factor in the size of your output. For a letter or tabloid-sized pages, you should consider choosing broad-range devices. Always have the page size in mind when you are selecting a printer. Consider the specifications of the printer to know how much space it will print on paper.

Speeds Matter

Printer output speeds are crucial, especially if you choose a printer that will serve you in the workspace. Select a printer whose speeds match the work schedule you intend to handle once you are operating at optimum level. You should be prepared to pay more for extra fast speeds too. Choose a faster processor that can power heavy use proofer with the ability to print multiple page layouts with complex graphics. You can compare a catalog of office printers from Konica Minolta to choose the one that works best for you.

Many factors need to be considered when you are choosing a commercial printer. Make a point to go through this list, note the details, and check its boxes before making your decision. This way, you will be sure to find one that matches all of your needs.

Bud Light x Super Bowl x Post Malone

BUD LIGHT CALLS ON FANS TO HELP CHOOSE THE SUPER BOWL COMMERCIAL FEATURING POST MALONE

Bud Light Goes Inside the Brain of its #1 Fan, Post Malone, as he Stars In Two New Commercials for Bud Light and the Newly-Launched Bud Light Seltzer

NEW YORK, Jan. 29, 2020 — Today, Bud Light unveiled“#PostyStore” and “#PostyBar”, two new spots featuring Bud Light Seltzer and Grammy-nominated Bud Light fan, Post Malone. Instead of a traditional launch, the brand is opening up their biggest marketing moment of the year to the fans. Bud Light made two funny ads featuring Post Malone and cannot decide which one to take to Super Bowl LIV as their official in-game commercial. Now the brand is looking to their fans to share their input and help determine which commercial will air in the big game.

Starting this morning through Thursday, January 30, fans can visit Bud Light social channels to watch both commercials and share their input to help Bud Light make the decision on which advertisement to feature during Super Bowl LIV. Fans will need to tune in to the big game to learn which one Bud Light decided on.

“It feels cool to be in a Bud Light commercial, especially a Bud Light Super Bowl commercial, which is a huge deal,” said Post Malone. “I just love the taste and the camaraderie. So it’s a real honor and blessing for me to be able to be a part of such a big moment.”

Both advertisements take you into the brain of musician and Bud Light enthusiast, Post Malone. “#PostyStore” shows Post inside a convenience as he faces a decision a predicament: does he purchase his go-to drink Bud Light or the new Bud Light Seltzer? This predicament sparks confusion and mayhem in Post’s brain, and the store. Ultimately, he remembers that he’s rich and can afford to purchase both – who doesn’t love a happy ending? The second spot,“#PostyBar” follows Post Malone into a bar where he discovers Bud Light Seltzer Mango. Post goes in for a sip and his senses begin to determine what it tastes like, how it smells and if he likes it. Just like the rest of America, Post Malone and his taste buds give Bud Light Seltzer Mango his seal of approval.

“We are so fortunate to have two great Super Bowl spots this year, but only have room for one. We love this year’s Super Bowl campaign because not only does it feature our brand’s biggest fan, Post Malone, but we’re also giving people a chance to help us choose which spot to air,” said Andy Goeler, VP of Marketing for Bud Light. “Bud Light Seltzer offers another easy-drinking option that aligns with what our fans know, love and expect from Bud Light. We’re thrilled with the consumer response on the product so far and are excited to bring it to the Super Bowl stage with Post. The situation that plays out in Post’s head is one that many consumers might have too, but don’t worry, just like Post, you can get both Bud Light and Bud Light Seltzer too.”

“#PostyStore” and “#PostyBar”continues the campaign behind the Bud Light Seltzer narrative, previously introduced in the recent commercial “The Message” which ran during the NFL Playoffs, leaning into consumer’s questions of what is a hard seltzer and the difference between Bud Light and Bud Light Seltzer.

Bud Light Seltzer offers an easy-drinking hard seltzer with a hint of delicious fruit flavor to deliver the most refreshing taste possible. It is 100 calories, 5% ABV, has <1g of sugar and comes in four great flavors – black cherry, mango, lemon lime and strawberry.

To learn more about Bud Light go to www.budlight.com or follow Bud Light on Facebook, on Twitter at @BudLight and on Instagram at @BudLight