Posts tagged with "fashion industry"

Law created by Gabrielle at 360 Magazine use by 360 Magazine

Fashion Nova FTC Settlement

Online fashion retailer Fashion Nova, LLC will be prohibited from suppressing customer reviews of its products and required to pay $4.2 million to settle Federal Trade Commission allegations that the company blocked negative reviews of its products from being posted to its website.

The FTC alleged in a complaint that the California-based retailer, which primarily sells its “fast fashion” products online, misrepresented that the product reviews on its website reflected the views of all purchasers who submitted reviews, when in fact it suppressed reviews with ratings lower than four stars out of five. The case is the FTC’s first involving a company’s efforts to conceal negative customer reviews.

“Deceptive review practices cheat consumers, undercut honest businesses, and pollute online commerce,” said Samuel Levine, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Fashion Nova is being held accountable for these practices, and other firms should take note.”

According to the FTC’s complaint, Fashion Nova used a third-party online product review management interface to automatically post four- and five-star reviews to its website and hold lower-starred reviews for the company’s approval. But from late-2015 until November 2019, Fashion Nova never approved or posted the hundreds of thousands of lower-starred, more negative reviews. Suppressing a product’s negative reviews deprives consumers of potentially useful information and artificially inflates the product’s average star rating.

The FTC also announced that it is sending letters to 10 companies offering review management services, placing them on notice that avoiding the collection or publication of negative reviews violates the FTC Act. In addition, the FTC has released new guidance for online retailers and review platforms to educate them on the agency’s key principles for collecting and publishing customer reviews in ways that do not mislead consumers.

This is the second case the FTC has brought against Fashion Nova in recent years. In April 2020, the FTC announced that Fashion Nova agreed to pay $9.3 million to settle allegations that the company failed to properly notify consumers and give them the chance to cancel their orders when it failed to ship merchandise in a timely manner, and that it illegally used gift cards to compensate consumers for unshipped merchandise instead of providing refunds.

Under the proposed settlement of the latest allegations, Fashion Nova will pay $4.2 million for harm consumers incurred. Fashion Nova will also be prohibited from making misrepresentations about any customer reviews or other endorsements. In addition, it must post on its website all customer reviews of products currently being sold—with the exception of reviews that contain obscene, sexually explicit, racist, or unlawful content and reviews that are unrelated to the product or customer services like shipping or returns.

The Commission is committed to ensuring that consumers and honest businesses are not cheated by dishonest review practices. In October, the Commission warned more than 700 businesses that they could incur significant civil penalties if they use reviews or other endorsements in ways that were found to be unlawful in prior FTC administrative cases.

The Commission voted 4-0 to issue the proposed administrative complaint and to accept the consent agreement with the company.

The FTC will publish a description of the consent agreement package in the Federal Register soon. The agreement will be subject to public comment for 30 days after publication in the Federal Register after which the Commission will decide whether to make the proposed consent order final. Instructions for filing comments will appear in the published notice. Once processed, comments will be posted on Regulations.gov.

Arab Fashion Week press photo via Weinsanto for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Arab Fashion Week FW 22/23

This March we see the scheduled return of Arab Fashion Week (AFW) spanning from the 24 to 28. Through collaborative efforts of the Dubai-central Arab Fashion Council (AFC) and the Dubai Design District (d3) this fashion week aims to highlight an array of designers devoted to elevating both art and culture.

View the full calendar for Arab Fashion Week HERE.

The Arab Fashion Week Women’s Fall/Winter 2022/23 consists of virtual and in-person runway shows held in d3 from 6 pm -10 pm throughout fashion week. Talent includes growing designers, luxury corporations and integral players in the fashion industry.

Dubai persists as an annual hub for massive spectators to gather for Arab Fashion Week. Celebrities, trendsetters and fashion fans travel to immerse themselves in the latest fashion trends for the upcoming season(s). This year shows have been grouped into three separate calendars: the couture, the ready-to-wear and the events, consisting of pop-ups, art encounters and roundtables.

Mohammed Aqra, Chief Strategy Officer of Arab Fashion Week, talked about the significance of the week, stating, “AFW has evolved throughout the years to establish a remarkable position within the international fashion calendar. Our mission remains to reinforce our commitment to empower and support designers operating in the Middle East and North Africa to adopt an innovative approach in their growth journey. Together with d3, we continue to champion Dubai’s role as the capital of the fashion industry in the region.”

Executive Director of Dubai Design District (d3) Khadija Al Bastaki spoke on the exciting week, stating, “Dubai has earned its growing renown as a global fashion capital in large part due to the relentless ingenuity and curiosity of our region’s creative talent.

“Our mission at Dubai Design District has always been to enhance the visibility of our comprehensive design community and enrich their access to new partnerships and growth prospects. Arab Fashion Week is fast becoming a landmark event for creatives, brands and enthusiasts the world over, and every season reinforces Dubai’s position on the global fashion stage.

“We are confident this year will deliver on the promise of innovative and inspiring runway shows and our district’s commitment to rethink the regular through digital explorations, immersive activations, pop-ups and more.”

The online platform Meta will air live showings across their social media. Moon Baz, Creator Partnerships Lead, Middle East, Africa & Turkey at Meta, raved about the upcoming digital presence of Arab Fashion Week, stating, “We’ve been building support for creators and their aspirations for years, and we continue to put a ton of investment into improving and building out our foundational suite of tools so that creators can build and grow their communities and their business.

“Our goal is to help as many creators as possible find sustainable, long-term success on our apps. The next big opportunity for us all is the metaverse and we are keen to work with creators from all industries including fashion to help them realize its potential.” 

Aside from Meta, Arab Fashion Week has retained strong coverage through cooperation with Microsoft and GoDaddy.

GoDaddy’s MENA General Manager Selina Bieber spoke on GoDaddy’s involvement with fashion week, saying, “We are excited to strategically support the AFC in fostering the growth of regional talent. Together, we will ensure our creatives are ready to embrace and conquer the global shift into tech.”

Watch the shows live HERE via Arab Fashion Week’s Facebook page, and HERE via Arab Fashion Week’s Instagram page.

Arab Fashion Week press photo via Death by Dolls for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Photo courtesy Death by Dolls
Arab Fashion Week press photo via Arab Fashion Council for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Arab Fashion Week press photo via Ilyes Quali for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Photo courtesy Ilyes Quali

Black Directory in Fashion

Leading Racial Justice and Fashion Leaders Launch First-Of-Its-Kind Directory of Black Professionals in the Fashion Industry

Color Of Change’s #ChangeFashion Initiative and Black In Fashion Council Will Provide Brands An Easy Way To Hire Black Talent 

Color Of Change and IMG’s #ChangeFashion and Black In Fashion Council announced the launch of the BIFC x #ChangeFashion Directory, the first directory focusing on increasing opportunities for Black professionals in the fashion industry. This project is the first resource to be released from #ChangeFashion to help organizations execute the goals laid out in the #ChangeFashion Roadmap. The Roadmap seeks to empower fashion industry allies to embark on the journey of systematically addressing inequity and the exclusion of Black talent.

The directory currently houses the profiles and resumes of over 300 Black professionals, featuring Black-identifying photographers, makeup artists, set designers, and more with a geographic reach that expands across the world. Brands want to make a commitment to racial justice, equity, and inclusion and our Roadmap provides a guide to do so. The directory allows brands to move beyond statements of solidarity to create an industry that fully embraces diversity and inclusion. Currently, the directory will only be available to brands that sign on to the #ChangeFashion Roadmap and have committed to working with Color Of Change to achieve racial equity within the fashion industry. 

“Performative activism for racial equity needs to go out of style,” said Amity Paye, Senior Director of Communications at Color Of Change. “Black people and people of color continue to push the fashion industry forward both in the spotlight and behind-the-scenes —  yet the legacy of the industry is one of racial exclusion. This directory is an invitation for the industry to easily hire Black talent and professionals after taking a pledge to commit to racial justice. Black people are not a trend to flaunt whenever it’s socially impressive. With this directory, we are calling on the industry to #ChangeFashion by moving from rhetoric to action, and by investing in Black talent and careers.”  

“Too often, we hear from brands that they can’t find Black talent or that their rolodex of talent needs to be more inclusive, but they don’t know where to begin,” said Lindsay Peoples Wagner and Sandrine Charles, Co-founders at Black In Fashion Council. “We are incredibly passionate about eradicating this problem and being a resource for companies to use a more diverse roster of talent and know that resources like this will make a significant impact in the industry.”

“We cannot create meaningful change without analyzing and overhauling the systems that brought us here in the first place,” said Romola Ratnam, SVP of Social Impact at Endeavor. “With this directory, we are further democratizing industry access by providing brands a comprehensive resource to change their hiring practices and ensure there is diversity both in front of and behind the camera.”

Along with being a resource for any brand committed to addressing historical racism and systemic inequality, it also aims to help fashion organizations and companies truly change the status quo, break patterns and set new norms that empower, finance, and reward Black people in the industry. There are no excuses as to why there is not an increased presence of Black artists and talent in the fashion industry. This directory will help the industry include more Black people, putting them at the center of the work. 

Learn more about the directory HERE

Color Of Change is the nation’s largest online racial justice organization. We help people respond effectively to injustice in the world around us. As a national online force driven by over 7 million members, we move decision-makers in corporations and governments to create a more human and less hostile world for Black people in America.

#ChangeFashion is a vertical within the Color Of Change #ChangeIndustries initiative dedicated to eradicating racism in the fashion industry. In partnership with the Black In Fashion Council, IMG, and Joan Smalls, its goal is to rally companies and talent across the fashion industry to restore equity and advance racial justice by moving from rhetoric to action.

Black In Fashion Council is a group of editors, models, stylists, media executives, assistants, freelance creatives, and industry stakeholders aiming to build a new foundation for inclusivity in the fashion industry.

Endeavor is a global sports and entertainment company, home to the world’s most dynamic and engaging storytellers, brands, live events, and experiences. The company is composed of industry leaders including entertainment agency WME; sports, fashion, events, and media company IMG; and premier mixed martial arts organization UFC. The Endeavor network specializes in talent representation, sports operations & advisory, event & experiences management, media production & distribution, experiential marketing, and brand licensing. 

IMG is a global leader in sports, fashion, events, and media. The company manages some of the world’s greatest athletes and fashion icons, owns and operates hundreds of live events annually, and is a leading independent producer and distributor of sports and entertainment media. IMG also specializes in licensing, sports training, and league development. IMG is a subsidiary of Endeavor, a global entertainment, sports, and content company.

Anne Klein Spring ’22 Collection via Daniel Jackson for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Anne Klein SS22 f/ Joan Smalls

Clothes won’t change the world. The women who wear them will.” – Anne Klein

The established American fashion brand Anne Klein joins forces with supermodel, actress and activist Joan Smalls, naming her the face of their Spring 2022 campaign.

After debuting their Spring campaign on February 11 during New York Fashion Week, Smalls is highlighted in a See It Now, Buy It Now look book/video exhibition available on the CFDA’s Runway 360 virtual stage Runway360.cfda.com.

Anne Klein’s Spring ‘22 collection can be found for purchase on AnneKlein.com.

Smalls has been named the first showcase in a multiyear campaign that is set to platform an impeccable woman and celebrity each season.

Born and raised in Puerto Rico, Smalls is not only a renowned supermodel. She, too, serves as an advocate, having donated 50 percent of her income to generous foundations during the second half of 2020. During 2021, she supported the #ChangeFashion program set to eliminate racism in the fashion industry.

While joining Anne Klein on their Spring ’22 collection, Smalls has another upcoming charitable project that will be revealed soon.

Effy Zinkin, Chief Operating Officer at WHP Global, owner of the Anne Klein brand, spoke on the excitement of adding Smalls to their brand, stating, “We are excited to have Joan Smalls showcase the brand this season as she exemplifies the multifaceted empowered woman Anne Klein serves. Joan’s work in the fashion community and beyond exemplifies Anne Klein’s mission and we look forward to working with her to further support charitable endeavors.”

The brand-new buyer campaign from Anne Klein showcases a series of portraits and profiles from prominent woman that use their platforms to advocate for change. Each woman uplifted through the campaign will receive commemoration in print, video and virtually, offering a wide range of marketing tactics to highlight the ways that they increase awareness for differing missions and foundations.

Upcoming for the Fall ’22 campaign is Actress Gina Rodriguez, while Anne Klein has been named for Spring and Fall ’23.

To know more about ANNE KLEIN and to browse the new collection, including Handbags, Jewelry, Shoes, Sunglasses and Watches, visit www.AnneKlein.com.

About Anne Klein

Operating as a distinguished women’s fashion brand since 1968, Anne Klein’s objective is to deliver timeless American style to women across the globe. Anne Klein herself created the brand to produce classic sportswear for women, elevating the way in which women imagine and consume clothing.

Modernly maintained presently by WHP Global, the Anne Klein brand dresses women who influence causes around the world. Anne Klein is sold throughout North America, Chine, Korea, Philippines, Mexico and additional countries. For more information, visit www.anneklein.com, @AnneKlein on Facebook or @AnneKleinOfficial on Instagram.

Anne Klein Spring ’22 Collection via Daniel Jackson for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Anne Klein Spring ’22 Collection via Daniel Jackson for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Anne Klein Spring ’22 Collection via Daniel Jackson for use by 360 MAGAZINE

The Spring 2022 Collection campaign was photographed by photographer Daniel Jackson in New York City.

esther perbandt image for use by 360 magazine

Esther Perbandt Q×A

By: Kai Yeo

Born in Berlin, Esther Perbandt studies fashion design at the Berlin University of the Arts and polished a master’s degree in Fashion and Textile Design in Paris. In 2020, she made it to the finals of international designer show “Making The Cut” with Heidi Klum and Tim Gunn, supported by Naomi Campbell.

Not only is she a contemporary fashion designer, but also a visionary, performer, and mistress of ceremonies. Esther Perbandt describes her fashion as an act of (post)feminism irrespective of gender: personality, autonomy and individuality are at the center of her avant-garde style. The non-binary silhouette is deconstructed and reframed with classical menswear details, however, maintaining timeless aspects of elegance and style.

360 MAGAZINE had the pleasure of corresponding with Esther to learn about her inspiration, goals, and much more. Read on to find out her answers!

What/who are your biggest inspirations?

The joy of life is my greatest inspiration. This motor is so big that I can’t imagine running out of ideas at some point. I like doing two things for a living: sleeping and dancing. Many ideas come to me when I fall asleep or wake up and when I can dance without restraint.

How did Making The Cut (MTC) change your view of the fashion industry? 

When I studied fashion design in Berlin and Paris in the nineties and early noughties, the term “digitalization” was not really an issue in the fashion industry. I founded my own label over 17 years ago, which has grown very slowly on its own. Until I took part in MTC, I didn’t have an online shop, or only one that didn’t work. But I knew that if my brand was to survive the next 30 years, I had to change and become more digital. Who should I learn from, if not the biggest?

From a show like MTC of course you don’t only learn, you see what’s possible with a lot of money. But if you manage to transfer what you have experienced and seen at the highest level and translate it to your very own DNA, you can take the next steps. I don’t think there is a right or a wrong way in the fashion industry. There are an incredible number of individual paths. Depending on what the goal is.

After coming back from the MTC shoot, I didn’t do anything creative for 8 months, I just prepared business-wise for the airing of MTC: New website, new online store, new strategy. Today, I work with my pattern maker with avatars and digital fittings. This saves us a lot of time and resources.

How has the newly found attention changed/shaped you?

The new attention was a boon for my brand to finally grow. Many things have become a little easier professionally. But the pandemic probably slowed down the speed of this growth a bit and still does. Personally, I only got a limited amount of that attention. When the first season of MTC came out, which I was part of the cast of, the world went into its first hard lockdown. For months, I just worked a lot with my small team and sent packages all over the world every day, but especially to the US, without having the opportunity to meet many people. Germany is a grateful or ungrateful country, depending on how you take it, when it comes to addressing public figures. In the meantime, I had the feeling that hardly anyone in Germany had seen the show.

You were unsure about whether or not to take part in Making The Cut. How do you feel about it now?

Yes, I was indeed very unsure when I received the first request to participate in MTC 1. For 16 years, I had been flying the flag for a freer, more unconventional and uncommercial way in the fashion industry, which also had a stronger connection to art. I felt it wasn’t for me or would betray my brand. But quite the opposite. It was the best decision I made for my business, but also for my life in general. In the last three years, since shooting MTC 1, I have learnt an incredible amount and finally started to build a sustainable foundation for my brand. Every path in the fashion industry is very individual and mine is probably also an atypical one. But it’s fun to see myself making strategic and business decisions in a very different way now and to see that the word “commercial” is not a dirty word for me.

Do you have any moments in your career you look back to often?

Oh yes, of course. I often think today where I got the strength to hold out for so long and to go through all the deep valleys. For many years I called my studio the “Palace of Tears”. Every few days there were tears because I felt like I was standing on the spot or because it was financially on the brink. But somewhere deep inside me, I always believed that it would work out and become easier one day.

How would you describe your design aesthetic?

The signature of my brand has developed from the three cities in which I have lived in and which have been very important and inspiring for me: Berlin, Moscow and Paris.

Berlin, as the city where I was born, the city divided over the years with a great historical history, with its roughness, toughness, punk, subculture, snootiness. Moscow, with its avant-garde of the 1920s, the constructivists, high-necked, the uniforms and the austerity. And then of course Paris, as the city that gave me the finishing touch, the elegance, the femininity, and the glamor.

This special mix and the reduction to the color “black,” is meant to give my wearers a strength and make them grow. The focus on details should make the viewer curious to take a closer look at clothing.

What are the biggest challenges you have faced as a designer?

It has always been both a curse and a blessing that I have had to fight my own way through, especially financially. This has extremely slowed down the growth of my brand, but at the same time it has given me the chance and the time to carefully develop my signature and the DNA and to look closely at what I really want.

Do you think your surroundings and environment play a part in how you choose your designs?

Yes, definitely. As a creative, you unconsciously absorb everything you come across. I love observing people and thinking about why they wear the clothes they do. What identity do they have, and which one do they want to slip into? Dealing directly with my customers in the shop every day has of course influenced my choice of designs. Since MTC, I do a lot of styles in larger sizes and now a lot of women come and have my collection pieces made to measure. That’s a big market.

What are the next goals for your brand?

The USA has become my main sales market in the last two years. The next goal would be to open my own shop in New York for a while and then also produce locally so that customers who buy online don’t have to pay customs and the high shipping costs.

In fashion Esther Perbandt will continue to explore various paths, especially in creating haute couture looks for numerous events, as well as digging into costume design areas whenever projects allow for it.

It’s said that the future is unknown but at least with Esther Perbandt it will always continue to surprise and excite. We look forward to seeing more from her.

OTD Illustration by Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

OTD Season Debut

OTD (On This Day), founded by John Varvatos, announced the debut of its first season with an omni-channel introduction featuring the launch of their website and the opening of its flagship SoHo store. For the fall, the gender-inclusive brand presents a synergetic assortment of women, men, and unisex clothing as well as footwear, jewelry, and accessories.

Originating a narrative led by curiosity, creativity, and passion, OTD explores the modern experience of style and its inextricable connections to pop culture: traversing fashion, music, art, sports, film, television, architecture, etc. Through interesting stories that occurred “on this day” in the past, new stories are sparked in the here and now.

Storytelling is fundamental to the brand message, “As individuals, we instinctively create stories that define our past, allow us to make sense of the present and propel us into the future,” commented James Schuck, senior director of social media and special projects.

“In real-life everyday communications, storytelling not only reinforces and enhances our own personal narratives, it provokes opinions, interpretations and ideas. The crux of the message is: Write your own story, on this day and every day.”

OTD creates effortless-luxe pieces in elevated, unexpected ways. Their designs recall functionality, control, and tradition, but promote constant change, expression, and ideation. The brand flexes individuality with an ease, being intentional, yet welcome to interpretation. Pieces are ready to be mixed and matched with abandon.

To bring the vision to life, OTD tapped American photographer Mark Seliger. In a studio scene, imagery for autumn’s 2021 season drew on a simple visual concept to strike an impressive sense of energy. Dynamic movements and expressive poses are captured in assertive, yet playful moments to feel focused and eclectic. Unrestrictive compositions occupy the blank space, underscoring themes of possibility and experimentation. Created to reflect the lives of those lived in them, OTD reimagines essential silhouettes to feel fresh and modern.

For women, blazers, oversized knits and plaid overalls explore the qualities of androgyny. On men and women, tracksuits hit fall wardrobes with a denser, more structured take on sporty, available in interchanging jackets and pants. There are side-striped, racer striped, and multi-striped items, as well as color-blocked and paneled jackets in animal jacquard. In unisex, knits are easy wearing, yet surprisingly elevated. From reversible coats and shirt jackets to an ultra-cozy mohair sweater in 100% linen, the concept, “between-season dressing,” gets a multi-season update.

Function plays with form in sport-inspired pieces like french terry sweats, basketball tanks, and hockey jerseys in sweater constructions. As for jackets and coats, sleek leather informs both biker styles and traditional coat silhouettes. The micro-quilted jackets, a garment-dyed trench and plush velvet puffer style, upholds tactile characteristics. There comes a leisure twist in unrestrictive materials and modern proportions, interchangeably styled with OTD premium-crafted leather sneakers and combat boots. Its refined fabrications and thoughtful details keep the focus on wearability.

With this season’s lineup, OTD cements an existence at the convergence of tailored, sport, and casual cool. The company redefines expectations for style and culture, taking on a perspective as the agents of next. Their collaborations in art and design are available online and in stores.

The launch of the OTD × King Baby jewelry unveils an androgynous range of rings, bracelets, and necklaces. This collection unites the standards of OTD with the artisanship qualities of King Baby. Each piece is made from pure sterling silver, designed and handcrafted in the U.S. In stores, shoppers can purchase an exclusive selection of iconic photography, co-curated by Timothy White × OTD. The project will evolve with each season, like a rotating gallery, reflecting the brand’s innate connection to pop culture.

The brand opened its 4,000 square foot shop in the heart of SoHo, on the corner of Spring and West Broadway. Elements include wide widows open to a bright and airy space, revealing a structural framework of continuous, clean lines, natural light, and minimal concrete floors. The raw and natural elements of the space contain curvaceous design elements such as wavy light fixtures, unexpected pops of color, and a large infinity mirror. Distinct custom-made furniture pieces, two black-and-brass ribbon fixtures, an amorphic organic round table, and a white atomic-era jewelry case, speak to the brand’s penchant for intentional, yet unexpected designs. Coming soon, the brand will open its second location on Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood, Los Angeles.

How the Fashion Industry Made Running Cool

The fashion industry is hugely influential to the point that it can make or break trends in all sorts of arenas, even in those only tangentially related.

One of the biggest examples of this occurred when the rise of stylish sportswear suddenly made it cool to run. This fashion trend elevating running above the straightforward form of exercise that it had been seen as in the past.

Here’s a look at what enabled the running revolution and the role that fashion brands had in catalyzing it.

The Power of Celebrity

It is impossible to talk about the rise of fashion-focused sportswear without touching on the rich and famous turning functional clothing into must-have garments.

Starting in the 1980s, professional athletes, as well as the stars of stage and screen, began to be seen in branded, designer sportswear. Manufacturers realized that if they could get their logos noticed by the public, they would inevitably sell more.

This time also coincided with an increased interest in health and fitness, especially amongst the middle classes. Of course, if you see celebrities out and about in the latest training tops, shorts and sneakers, then you will not only want to emulate their exercise routines, but also their workout wardrobes. In the modern age, celebrity endorsements and tie-ins take this even further.

The Affordability & Timelessness

Another aspect of why the fashion industry was so eager to push sportswear once it got its first taste was because of the inexpensive production costs. From the best sunglasses for running on the road to the top training shoes for the track, the relative simplicity of the designs – combined with the minimal materials needed to make them – meant that manufacturers could make a mint on the markup of designer sportswear.

Meanwhile, another perk from a design perspective is that while fashion in the sportswear sector does cycle quite quickly, the underlying designs for the key pieces required for running or any other activity do not need significant change. This timelessness continues to pay dividends from a cost-saving perspective for manufacturers, while also meaning that people who pick up gear can then keep using it for years without feeling like they are falling behind the times.

The Comfort

Sportswear did not just became fashionable because activities like jogging and running were made into mainstream hobbies for millions. The sheer versatility of this type of clothing allowed it to become accepted in a lot of other contexts too.

It is perfectly normal to see people wearing garments that are ostensibly designed for exercise in bars, restaurants and even business meetings. This is not just because of changing trends, but also as a result of how comfortable sportswear tends to be in comparison with traditional garb.

People who picked up running gear to fulfill their fitness goals can also happily slip into it for everyday errands and other occasions, while still feeling cool and en vogue.

The Tribalism

There is one final talking point relating to sportswear, fitness and the fashion industry – the kind of tribalism which is innate to humanity.

By designer brands entering the market and promoting their products against rivals, this could rub off on consumers, creating a kind of product fueled war of loyalty. Nike, Adidas and Reebok have all capitalized on this, but high end fashion houses are equally invested in this approach.

Running remains a pastime which is unavoidably associated with being seen by others, and if you can wear the colors and designs of a brand you love while doing it, then it’s all the better. And so, fashion and sportswear look set to maintain their close relationship indefinitely, even if specific brands may rise and fall.

illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Netflix’s Halston Recap

“You are only as good as the people you dress” – Halston.  

To the world, he is better known as Halston: the first American fashion designer who changed fashion forever. The new Netflix limited series Halston tells the story of fashion legend Roy Halston Frowick.

Created by Ryan Murphy and directed by Daniel Minahan, the five-episode series is adapted from the 1991 book Simply Halston: The Untold Story by Steven Gaines. It focuses on the rise and fall of the late designer (played by Ewan McGregor) known for dressing socialites and celebrities–notably Babe Paley, Liza Minnelli, and Jackie O.

With being the designer that brought American fashion onto the grid, many have been interested in Halston’s life. It is not the first time that his glamorous and tortured story has been put in the spotlight (2019 documentary Halston). But Ryan Murphy takes Halston and produces a version of him that does not try to escape his queerness. Some might not agree with this version of him, but Halston definitely shows us that with fame and status, stardom can also be very lonely.

Episode 1: “Becoming Halston”

The opening shot brings us to Halston’s hometown in 1933: a farm in Evansville, Indiana. Quite creative since his early days, Episode 1 shows Halston taking feathers from the chicken coop and making a hat for his mom. By 1961, he is known for designing Jackie Kennedy’s pillbox hats. Unfortunately, by 1968 Jackie O stops wearing them, and Halston’s hats become an afterthought.

The intro shows us how quick trends fade, and Halston sets out on his journey to rebrand himself. He tries to take a page from Ralph Lifshitz (now globally known as Ralph Lauren). Halston tries to create an exclusive American couture line for Bergdorf Goodman. However, the fashion world is not interested in his black and white dresses and not a single piece sells.

Unfazed, Halston meets up with illustrator Joe Eula (played by David Pittu), convincing him to join the Halston team. Eula tells Halston, “You want to be Balenciaga. There’s already a Balenciaga. What we need is to figure out your signature.” At the same time, Halston is introduced to Liza Minnelli (Krysta Rodriguez), who compares Halston’s pillbox hats to her famous mother Judy Garland: “You and me are living under the shadow of something, and we’re both trying to do the same thing.” Minnelli becomes Halston’s first muse, shaping her into a friend and collaborator over the course of the series.

Securing funding of $100,000, Halston gathers a small crew to set up shop: Joe Eula, model Elsa Peretti (Rebecca Dayan), and junior partner Joel Schumacher (Rory Culkin). Halston takes Schumacher’s idea of a flowy, dyed fabric and makes dresses out of them. Though the show doesn’t lead to any sales, it gains American socialite Barbara “Babe” Paley’s interest. During the meeting with Paley (Regina Schneider), Halston shows her Ultrasuede synthetic trench coats, claiming “It’s sexy. It’s comfort. It’s freedom.” She takes one in every color.

Episode 2: “Versailles”

The star of this episode is the iconic Battle of Versailles, which pitted French designers against American designers. In the French establishment is Yves Saint LaurentPierre CardinEmanuel UngaroMarc Bohan (Dior), and Hubert de Givenchy. The American establishment is composed of Oscar de la RentaStephen BurrowsBill BlassAnne Klein, and Halston.

Though at first, Halston was not interested in the 1973 fundraiser for the Versailles, which also doubled as a means to get the American fashion name out to the world. Despite every woman in Central Park wearing his Ultrasuede, Halston tells publicist Eleanor Lambert (Kelly Bishop) that he can’t do a fundraiser because he’s broke. Trying to balance art and commerce, Eleanor sets Halston up with David Mahoney who wants to buy Halston’s licensing, proposing mass production. However, Halston initially refuses, saying “you’re only as good as the people you dress.”

Norton Simon sponsors Halston’s team to go to the Versailles show, and Halston convinces Minnelli to tag along and perform for him. With his entourage, they travel to Paris with 24 designs in an attempt to show their worth to the fashion industry. While nothing seemed to be going right at first – the backdrop size is wrong, costumes have not arrived, looks need to be designed – Minnelli forces Halston to pick himself up as his nerves get the better of him. And Halston does, slaying the runway with a 70s purple sequin dress, topped with a feathered hand fan that gets him a standing ovation. Original designs can be seen here.

By the end of the episode, we see a glimpse of Halston wanting protection from his “magical” childhood that was actually lonely and scary. He signs the contract with David, “If I sign that contract, I must never, ever, be left to feel unappreciated, underfunded, unprotected, unsafe. Promise me that, David.” While not everyone agrees with him selling his name, Halston gets new cash flow at the expense of his trademark name, pushing him through to stardom.

Episode 3: “The Sweet Smell of Success”

Focusing on Halston’s first fragrance, the third episode reminds us of Halston’s roots and the scents that created him. In the opening scene, we watch Elsa design a sensual perfume bottle for Halston, though the gravity defying perfume stopper is not sold to Mahoney. In an interesting conversation about phallic symbolisms, Halston is told the stopper is impossible to manufacture.

Arguing that creativity wins commercialism, Halston writes a check for $50,000 to pay for his own manufacturer, unwilling to compromise the exclusivity of the design. To create his scent, we are met with Adele (Vera Farmiga), who forces Halston to dig into his past for scents that evoke emotions. Adele bends Halston to her demands, and we get to see Halston’s inner, broken child more than ever in this episode. They discuss different scents and the memories Halston has connected to them: his fascination with scentless orchids, spring grass, tobacco, and his lover’s jockstrap.

Liza is off getting married and Halston has a breakdown. His lover boy, Victor Hugo (Gian Franco Rodriguez), points out that Halston just wants yes men and loyalty, and not everyone can do that for him. While work-life balance is not something that Halston achieves, his perfume becomes one of America’s best-selling perfumes, achieving $85 million in sales within the first two years. This led Halston to launch a plethora of new products–including suitcases, sunglasses, and carpets.

Despite all his success, we see that Halston does not find much love at Studio 54. In the heartbreaking final scene, we watch Hugo witnessing his lover having sex with another partner. While people are lined up buying products by Halston, he does not seem to have anything for himself.

Episode 4: “The Party’s Over”

Studio 54-era of Halston’s life: This episode shows Halston’s spiral into drugs and partying. The surplus and gluttony in overwhelming success and his cocaine addiction has him dropping the ball on his business, Liza faints on the dancefloor due to her drug habit, and there is a vent death at Studio 54.

Calvin Klein takes reign as top designer, and Halston spends his time cursing his competitor out. David Mahoney believes that jeans could be Halston’s next best creation and proposes the idea to Halston, in which is declined. As he loses his self-control, Halston designs have stopped selling at a growing rate. On the other hand, Elsa starts to be successful at Tiffany’s as a jewelry designer. Halston’s ego takes a problem with this, as he thinks he is the only one with talent and that Elsa should be thankful for him and give him credit. Belittling everyone around him due to jealousy, Halston pushes everyone away, left with nothing but his own name.

Halston’s mother dies unexpectedly, and this changes his mind about designing jeans when he sees a Calvin Klein commercial (starring Brooke Shields, originally from the 1980s). His ego takes a beating when David tells him he is “six months too late,” and Halston is no longer setting the fashion trends.

Things don’t look up for Halston either, as Mahoney tries to take Norton private and fails, resulting in a change of management. The AIDS pandemic is seen through the lens of Victor who tests positive for HIV, and Liza checks into rehab. Unsurprisingly, Halston is left in isolation by the end of it. With no other choice, he becomes the inhouse designer for JCPenney for some petty cash, and we no longer see the Halston that believed in exclusivity and creative control.

Episode 5: “Critics”

With designing how JCPenney, Halston is no longer having any fun. With pushing everyone around him away, he is only left with his assistant by his side and that is only because she is “getting paid to do so.” Halston begins showing up to the office at dinner, pushing off his deadlines, all while snorting large amounts of cocaine.

The company replaces Halston with designer John David Ridge (Jack Mikesell), the first person that lets Halston know he is an embarrassment, “How dare you be so irresponsible with the empire you spent your whole life working for?”

After being diagnosed with HIV and forced to retire, Halston’s life is put into perspective, and he really thinks about what he wants out of this life. Perhaps afraid that he might die without a final design to call his own, he seeks out his friend Martha Graham, and designs a spandex collection for her show. The reviews for this design gives Halston the acceptance that he was searching for the entire life and he finally admits that “Halston” was not just him, it was his entire team.

The series ends with Halston leaving to the West Coast and spending the rest of his days along the Pacific Ocean, mixed with tearful snippets of him watching Graham’s Persephone.

“We’re given one name… just one. And that’s all we have when we’re on the earth. And that’s all we leave behind us when we’re gone. I wasn’t precious enough with mine.” – Halston to Joe Eula, Halston Episode 5.

While five episodes is not enough to talk about Halston’s magnificent life, we get to see the grandeur of Halston’s reign in Ryan Murphy’s rendition. Captivating and intoxication, we see his friendships and intimate scenes unfolding in the series. While it may not be everyone’s cup of tea, you cannot deny the legacy that is Halston.

“Halston” premiered May 14 on Netflix.

Armon Hayes is an emerging creative director for 360 Magazine

Armon

“I always pictured myself as a businessman in retail or fashion … Besides feeding my sweet design tooth, I enjoy developing ideas and working with others to help them achieve their dreams.”

Armon Hayes is a Creative Director for 360 Magazine and AOHSOA. Armon’s innovative eye for detail allows him to create long-lasting partnerships with clientele as he assists them in both their brand development and growth.

He offers an array of client services: wardrobe styling; custom and digital merchandising; brand management as well as campaign development.

Recent client(s)/projects for 360: LaJune, Land Rover’s Defender, The Bodega and #360TRAP.

Armon Hayes rocks Terry Singh's The New Suit during NYFW show for 360 MAGAZINE.
Armon Hayes models leather city jacket for 360 MAGAZINE.
Armon Hayes featured inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Armon Hayes spotted riding DYU e-bike for 360 MAGAZINE.
Armon Hayes in 360 magazine.
Armon Hayes on the runway headed to NYFW for 360 MAGAZINE.
Armon Hayes in Ivy Park and adidas for 360 MAGAZINE.
Ivy Park – shot/produced by Armon.
Armon Hayes shot in Sperry for 360 MAGAZINE.
Sperry – shot/produced by Armon.

Special assignments:

#LIVELOVELUBBOCK

BEBERET BY AOHSOA

Measurements:

Height 6’1
Weight: 170lbs
Jacket: 42L
Shirt: Large
Neck: 16.5
Sleeve: 32/33
Waist: 31
Inseam: 34
Shoe: 10

Book illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

ICONS WITH ATTITUDE SERIES

The Life, Work and Legacy: ICONS WITH ATTITUDE

Discover the life, work and legacy of Coco Chanel and Alexander McQueen in these snappy and stylish biographies about artistic spirit, influence and attitude.

WHAT COCO CHANEL CAN TEACH YOU ABOUT FASHION (Frances Lincoln / September 7, 2021 / $ 16.99) breaks down Chanel’s life and work into memorable mantras that epitomize her ground-breaking perspective – including Poverty Can Be Luxury, Rebel Against Your Rivals, Find Your Spirit Animal and Twist Textile Traditions. This book uncovers Chanel’s creative approach, her inspirations, her business acumen and the details that make her designs so timeless.

WHAT ALEXANDER MCQUEEN CAN TEACH YOU ABOUT FASHION (Frances Lincoln / September 7, 2021 / $ 16.99) is also available in the Icons with Attitude series. It breaks down McQueen’s life and work into memorable mantras – including Don’t be Scared of Fear, Challenge Gender, Add Volume, Then More Volume and Show Skin. This book uncovers McQueen’s creative flair, his inspirations, his business acumen and the details that make his designs so arresting.