Posts tagged with "Fashion designer"

AGATHA HARKNESS by Anthony Blackwood via 360 Magazine

AGATHA HARKNESS: NEW LOOK

AGATHA HARKNESS REVEALS HER SECRET PAST AND DEBUTS A NEW LOOK IN MIDNIGHT SUNS #2! Check out Agatha Harkness’ new design, appearing for the first time MIDNIGHT SUNS #2 on October 19!

MIDNIGHT SUNS #1 began a saga that will redefine Marvel magic! In the opening issue of this five-issue limited series, fans witnessed the rise of a new mystical threat and the impact it’ll have on prominent magic users across the planet including Agatha Harkness! In typical Agatha fashion, the ancient witch seems to know more than anyone about the dark power that’s been unleashed and has her own plans for dealing with it. To learn the mystery of her motives, writer Ethan Sacks and artist Luigi Zagaria will reveal more about Agatha’s shrouded past than ever before starting in MIDNIGHT SUNS #2. Is the Marvel Universe ready to learn Agatha’s secrets?

Fans can get their first glimpse at Agatha in her more youthful days right now in Zagaria’s original design sheet AND in a captivating variant cover for MIDNIGHT SUNS #3 by InHyuk Lee.

“Agatha Harkness has been a mysterious character that had Marvel fans under a spell long before her MCU debut in Wandavision,” Sacks said. “Getting to reveal some of her comics backstory, from her younger, more passionate, and less cynical days has been, well, magical.”

Since her first appearance in Stan Lee and Jack Kirby’s Fantastic Four #94, Agatha has played many roles from Franklin Richards’ babysitter to Wanda Maximoff’s mentor, but her journey in MIDNIGHT SUNS promises to usher in her biggest transformation yet! Be there when the sins of Agatha’s past finally catch up to her in MIDNIGHT SUNS #2!

Retailers, don’t forget to order your copies of MIDNIGHT SUNS #2 by Monday, September 19!

About Marvel Entertainment

Marvel Entertainment, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company, is one of the world’s most prominent character-based entertainment companies, built on a proven library of more than 8,000 characters featured in a variety of media for over eighty years. Marvel utilizes its character franchises in entertainment, licensing, publishing, games, and digital media.

For more information, visit Marvel.com.

Agatha Harkness Design by Luigi Zagaria, MARVEL
Gucci Exquisite campaign inside 360 MAGAZINE

Exquisite GUCCI

As first presented in the hall of magic mirrors during Milan fashion week, the Exquisite Gucci collection was designed by the House’s Creative Director, Alessandro Michele for Fall-Winter 2022. The emphasis on tailoring was the show’s organizing theme, but the headline was Michele’s collaboration with adidas. Merging sartorial tradition and sportswear codes, he added the brand’s trademark stripes and emblem to suits and an array of ready-to-wear.

A Note From Gucci’s Creative Director Alessandro Michele

I’ve always been charmed by cinema. For its power to tell stories that can probe human adventure and its drift. For its visionary power to dig up in the real, making it vertiginously imaginative and questionable. Such a careful look on the human, after all, is so close to me. I could never imagine clothes as severed from the story and life of the person wearing them. If you ask me, a garment is not, and never will be, just a piece of fabric. It’s rather the means through which we are able to unfold who we really decide to be, it’s how we shape our desires and the ultimate sense of our staying. That’s why I’ve always imagined my collections as films able to convey a cinematography of the present: a score of stories, eclectic and dissonant, that can sacralize the human and its metamorphic ability.

The “Exquisite” campaign is my tribute to cinema and to one of its brightest maestros, Stanley Kubrick. A philosophic filmmaker who, better than others, emanated the magic of that inextricable knot through which cinema exudes life and magnifies it. I’ve always admired Kubrick’s remarkable capacity in tackling very different subjects. His experimental drive goes beyond any possible categorization. Every film, in fact, digests the manifold souls where dystopia meets parody, drama becomes human comedy, horror looks like a psycho-philosophic treatise, the feeling of truth evolves into the uncanny. Kubrick was, in essence, a real sculptor of genres: the “cross-genre” director, ahead of his time. His ability to build stories that exceed significance, crossing borders and setting labels on fire, has always been deeply inspiring to me.

As an act of love, I decided to reinhabit Kubrick’s films, pushing to the core this incendiary approach. I took the liberty of disassembling, blending, grafting and reassembling them. Sticking to my creative praxis, I seized those movies, romanticizing them, populating them with my clothes. Trying to create short circuits where the adidas gown, that had already lost its status of sportswear to become a Victorian costume, appears as a new character in the script of Barry Lyndon. The dress designed by Laura Whitcomb, wearing which Madonna grabbed the New York spotlight in the nineties, fits in the gothic scenes of The Shining. The mysterious darkness of the enigmatic ritual of Eyes Wide Shut embraces a venus in fur, embellished with sensual bourgeois pearls. And more, the 90s shoes with a fetish flavor explode through the frames of A Clockwork Orange. Finally, the dreamiest evening dress dangled in soft tulle ruches bursts into the aseptic and dystopian space of the Discovery One in 2001: A Space Odyssey. This situationist game mixes historical plans, references, experiences. The past explodes into the present. Everything can become anything, or something else. As in that famous scene of Kubrick’s masterpiece, where the bone turns into a spaceship. As in life.

With “Exquisite” I carry on my attempt to mingle high and low, this time coherently and synergistically with the grammar of the great director. In the selected sequences it feels like Nietzsche, Kant and Freud speak casually to the people in the street. The biggest questions about the meaning of life become pop images. Complex transfigurations in terms of significance, get immediate access in terms of experience. Everything comes to be iconic, symbolically sophisticated, though able to reflect on a culture that we can definitely identify as pop. I chose Kubrick also for this, after all. What he created is part of our collective imagination. Since he was a diviner of vision, his works are as recognizable as the Sistine Chapel, the Virgin of the Rocks or The Simpsons. Manipulating his images, inside a brand new semantic framework, is like hacking La Gioconda. Plus the inspiration and the empathy only possible through the fictional cinematographic machine.

This involvement generates a change of state that is very significant for my job: clothes get closer to bare life again. They turn into highly imaginative functional prostheses, and they do so to tell a story. A story that shatters, enchants, tortures, ignites. Because it’s the story of the human that dwells in each and every one of us. As Stanley Kubrick knew too well. And also Milena Canonero, a very dear friend of mine, who accepted my invitation to go back over some of the scenes that hailed her as an undisputed star in the history of costume design. Her presence in this project is moving for me, a very precious gift.

– Alessandro Michele

Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey,” “A Clockwork Orange,” “Barry Lyndon,” “Eyes Wide Shut,” and “The Shining” are available to own today on Blu-ray and Digital.

CREDITS:

Creative Director: Alessandro Michele

Art Director: Christopher Simmonds 

Photographers & Directors: Mert & Marcus  

Make up: Thomas De Kluyver

Hair: Paul Hanlon

Exquisite GUCCI inside 360 MAGAZINE
Gustavo Cadile speaks to Vaughn Lowery about fashion industry, pandemic and Miami swim week via 360 MAGAZINE

FASHION DESIGNER GUSTAVO CADILE

Listen to Gustavo Cadile speak to Vaughn Lowery on 360 MAG Apple/Spotify podcast HERE.

Gustavo Cadile is an Argentinian-born fashion designer of Italian descent. Recently, he relocated from New York City to Miami to launch a new showroom and continue designing as well as launching stunning couture fashion collections. He combines Italian artistry with Argentinian imagery to create beautiful fashion designs, bridal gowns and swimwear. 

Additionly, Gustavo earned an Associate’s degree in Fashion Design from Miami International University of Art & Design; and he is excited to return to his alma mater to debut a new swimwear collection at 2022 Miami Swim Week.

Cadile has built a noteworthy name in the fashion industry as a highly sought-after fashion designer having dressed influential celebrities including Gina Rodriguez, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Eva Longoria, Reese Witherspoon, Kate Walsh and January Jones among others; both on the red carpet and in editorial pages. 

Gustavo Cadile has also been recognized for his craftsmanship and quality, earning him the New Emerging Designer Award in 2007 at the Gold Coast Awards in Chicago. He was nominated in 2008 and 2009 for the Fashion Group International’s Rising Star Award; and in 2013, Gustavo was awarded the Fashion Group International Award in Miami.

In addition, Gustavo’s noteworthy fashion looks have been featured in prominent media outlets including Elle Magazine, Vogue, Los Angeles Times, Ocean Drive Magazine, WWD and L’ People Magazine. To learn more about Gustavo Cadile, please visit his website HERE.

Follow Gustavo:

Instagram

Twitter

Articles in the Media:

Miami Living Magazine

McFly via 360 Magazine by 360 Magazine

SPOTLIGHT: MUGZY MCFLY

Fashion Designer × Stylist

New York designer and entrepreneur Jevaughn Williams, known as Mugzy McFly, is the co-founder and director of Signed By McFly.

McFly has made the Bronx his inspiration. Last June, he was interviewed by us and told us about his passion for fashion and explained what kind of design he creates for his clothing brand. Signed by McFly was created in 2013 with a single graphic t-shirt and has since increased into an extensive range of clothing pieces and accessories including joggers, sneakers, goggles and even cargo pants.

Listen to McFly talk with Vaughn Lowery about new designs lined up for the winter season and upcoming projects for 360 Magazine.

McFly confirms that this summer he has been able to see the trends that he had predicted at the beginning of summer in the streets of the Big Apple, “Quality, comfort and sustainable styles have been incorporated in bright and earth tones combined with eclectic sneakers. In addition, he adds that fabrics such as cotton have been the ones, he has seen the most. Listen to Mugzy McFly’s previous podcast with Vaughn Lowery on summer 2022 trends click HERE.

Instead, for the winter season he will incorporate designs with slightly more strange colors: mint. In addition, he wants to combine these colors in garments such as hoodies, for example he is very aware of the typical and traditional black hoodie, although he does not rule out adding more vivid colors such as yellow, pink, or purple. He foresees that the chosen material will be cotton again and something that he has in common with summer clothes is comfort. Even one of the star designs of his brand will be the bubble jackets not only for men but also for women. We can’t forget about footwear, a pedestrian accessory of Signed By McFly’s main clothing. This time it is a more functional shoe with a sporty touch. He is a basketball fan and would like to create ”those basketball player feet for next year”. For inspiration “I plan to go to the Flyers basketball tournament, which is completely decked out in my stuff.”

Accessories is one of the options that he is designing for this year. The theme: back to school. Own designs such as composition notebooks. In addition, the fanny packs are going to become a design and trend in his brand, for this he wants to design a classic PVP logo or an embroidered logo. Finally, hats will continue to be designed but this time with different textures than the previous ones.

Now, the designer is working on more graphic and higher quality clothes, ”I want to go back to looking for more graphics on things”, so he wouldn’t mind spending more money so he can design clothes that are better quality and different from what that people normally see.

Their designs are unisex with flattering silhouettes and elegant use of orange details. The style construction leans towards high-end clothing and high street.

Mugzy’s 2022 summer and winter collection are inspired by the slow and calmness of the previous years, aptly defined as “comfy elevated” with neutral earth tones and calm prints.

‘‘More Dreams, Less Sleep’’ Mugzy McFly.

Shop Signed By McFly.

Article: Andrea Esteban × Vaughn Lowery

Men’s Arab Fashion Week

Dubai Design District (d3), in strategic partnership with the Arab Fashion Council, will cut the ribbon on Men’s Arab Fashion Week Ready-To-Wear SS23 on June 28th evening. Staged within the city’s design and fashion pulse, a total of 12 designers will unveil their season’s best between June 28-30 (7-10 pm).

The event will present a curated roster of fashion-forward designers from the Middle East, as well as key industry capitals. Among them, Maison Du Mec (Lebanon), Tagueule (Lebanon), Emergency Room (Lebanon), Michael Cinco (UAE), Amato (UAE), Heyun Pan (UK), Rian Fernandez (The Philippines), KA-1 (UAE) and Anomalous (UAE).

In addition, and a notable first for Men’s Arab Fashion Week, will be three special guest designers presented by The Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la ModeLazoschmidl, Arturo Obegero and Valette Studio. The three dynamic Paris-based brands have been carefully selected by the chamber to represent France’s menswear sector and are set to showcase designs that embody a fresh sense of individuality of spirit, matched with high-end European craftsmanship and innovative textiles. 

Serge Carreira, Head of Emerging Brands Initiative at the Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode, comments: “While the world is evolving on a fast track and faces major challenges, emerging designers embrace these changes and contribute to rethinking fashion. They catch the zeitgeist and introduce it in their narrative with a bold and sensitive view. Fashion is about inventing a future; they make a better future. As we aim to support and empower our designers by forging promising commercial ties worldwide, our relationship with the Arab Fashion Council is important. It sees Parisian designers featured on the official calendar of Arab Fashion Week and vice versa for Arab designers who are members of the Arab Fashion Council.”

Also commenting ahead of opening night, Khadija Al Bastaki, Executive Director of Dubai Design District (d3) – a creative platform by TECOM Group dedicated to design, fashion, architecture, art and retail, said: “We are delighted to kick off this fourth edition of Men’s Arab Fashion Week, the only Men’s Fashion Week held throughout the Middle East and Asia, and our second edition this year. In addition to marking the 20th edition of Arab Fashion Week overall, the Spring-Summer 2023 Men’s Ready-to-Wear collections will bring an exciting mix of local, regional and international talent and opportunity to Dubai – to engage, rethink the regular, inspire and push the boundaries on the menswear fashion offering here in the region.

“Collaborating with the Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode, we are immensely proud to see the three special guest designers – selected by the federation – in the line-up, ready to take to our runway.  The trajectory for menswear globally is an exciting one and we, in strategic partnership with the Arab Fashion Council, are committed to being at the forefront of this flourishing sector across the region, cementing Dubai’s status as a global creative and fashion capital.”

Further highlights of the upcoming edition will be the participation of two official sponsors that will design novel looks for models showcasing this season’s collections.  All backstage hair will be done by SCHWARZKOPF, while Italian cosmetic company KIKO will create all the makeup looks showcased on the runways.

Arab Fashion Week-Men’s Spring-Summer 2023 is also an opportunity to highlight two remarkable collaborations that bring to the fore the Arab Fashion Council’s pioneering commitment to the worlds of sustainability and fashion tech.

Logistics company Aramex has teamed up with Lebanese designer EMERGENCY ROOM, who are leaders in the realm of upcycling and second-hand sourced fashions. The two will unveil, during Fashion Week, their campaign for the release of a collection that will be showcased in October.  The objective of this cross-industry collaboration is to highlight the importance – and urgency – of implementing viable, enduring sustainable practices into each branch of the fashion supply chain. Mike Rich, Chief Marketing Officer at Aramex, states: “We are pleased with our collaboration with Emergency Room, which underpins our strong belief in the importance of empowering entrepreneurs, creative and sustainable businesses, and supporting them to create their own opportunities. At Aramex, we truly champion all sustainable practices, and this is what upcycled clothing is all about. Through this collaboration, we are keen to facilitate access to various logistical services and solutions, and we look forward to playing a continued, key role in the success of the Arab fashion industry”.

Also forward-looking is the collaboration between Swiss label Ferronato, the first luxury accessories range with full data privacy protection, and Lebanese menswear brand Maison du Mec. Their collaboration will see the two brands integrate meta-fabrics into high-end, accessories that are ultra-fashionable all whilst blocking electromagnetic interferences and unwanted tracking via devices.  For the occasion, an opening surprise has been planned at the start of the Maison du Mec Spring-Summer 2023 fashion show.

“We very much enjoyed collaborating with Maison du Mec, and we believe our shared vision of aesthetics has succeeded in complementing both brands. With his design and our technology embedded, this new collection will be one of a kind,” said Alessia Ferronato, CEO of Ferronato. She continues: “Arab Fashion Week has a track record for connecting emerging brands with buyers in one place, driving awareness and commerce in a rapidly evolving market. We are elated to be taking part in Arab Fashion Week and look forward to a fruitful collaboration with Maison du Mec.”

Every year, the Arab Fashion Council, in collaboration with the Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode, hosts an exclusive showroom and presentation on the official Paris Fashion Week calendar aimed at providing a global platform to regional designers with a view to connect talent with international media and buyers.

The calendar for Men’s Arab Fashion week can be found here: www.arabfashionweek.org

Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week 2022 runway image via Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week

Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week just completed their successful series of runway shows, highlighting 18 top-tier Vietnamese, Italian and Australian fashion designers at the Military Zone 7 Stadium in Ho Chi Minh City.

Showcasing to an audience of 750 per seating of Vietnam’s leading celebrities, influencers and high-profile fashion personalities, the event spanned over 4 nights, from Thursday, March 26th to Sunday, March 29th.  Its focus was the central theme #ReFashion, pertaining to the adoption and development of sustainable fashion in Vietnam, post pandemic.

Madame Trang Le, President of the Council of ASEAN Fashion Designers (CAFD), and President of Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week adds:

“The Covid-19 pandemic has made a dramatic impact on all our lives, and of course there have been significant changes within our fashion community because of it. Having finally emerged from what felt like seemingly endless lockdowns and stringent restrictions, I feel we should all try and shift our way of thinking (ReThinking), our way of doing (ReInventing) and our way of operating (ReGenerating). My hope is that our industry manifests a new and transformative commitment to the sustainable development of fashion (Sustainable Fashion), and this season’s event theme #ReFashion was implemented to relay this messaging to our Vietnamese fashion populace as our ‘new normal’.”

Wrapping its 13th season, Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week has been positioned as the premiere international fashion event in Vietnam. Its mission is to share the country’s leading fashion talent with a global audience and has earned the reputation as the principal international fashion week in the Southeast region, ranked 4th in Asia, behind Tokyo, Seoul, and Shanghai International Fashion Weeks.

The designer schedule was as follows:

THURSDAY:  Aquafina x designer Võ Công Khanh, Camicissima & Valenciani by Adrian Anh Tuấn.

FRIDAY: Tuyết Lê, Tracy Studio, I.H.F, Ivan Trần & Nguyễn Tiến Truyển.

SATURDAY:  Tiny Ink by Hoàng Quyên, 21Six, Lý Giám Tiền, PhuongLyly by Phương Hồ & Nguyễn Minh Công.

SUNDAY:  Hoàng Hải, Zimmermann, Happy Clothing by Thảo Nguyễn, Linh San Couture & Hoàng Minh Hà.

Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week 2022 runway image via Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week 2022 runway image via Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week 2022 runway image via Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Photos courtesy of Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week

LITTLEJOHN STYLE

This Man’s Brand is a collection inspired by the timelessness and ubiquity of denim, infused with a bold aesthetic. Sheers, netting, and vinyl are juxtaposed with poignant strapping details, color blocking, unexpected pockets, collars & cuffs. Provocative exposed zippers and subtle rhinestones complete the look. Each piece was handcrafted by the designer to unleash the hero or rockstar in you! Marc Littlejohn is a native Angeleno, who has been inspired by his international travels as well as the western films that are rooted in Hollywood.

ABOUT THE DESIGNER

Fashion Director and Star Designer Marc Littlejohn has over 20 years of experience in the fashion and entertainment industry. He clothed the following celebrities: Beyoncé, Vivica A. Fox, Eminem, Queen Latifah, Shemar Moore, Courteney Cox, Vanessa Williams, Snoop Dogg and Tyra Banks.

He attended the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising, where he obtained his degree in manufacturing management and fashion design. This is where he learned to be well-balanced in all aspects of fashion.

After working on Michael Jackson’s final tour, and later on Cher’s farewell tour, he extended his creative stream to include costume design and photography. At the helm of 360 MAGAZINE, he has stylized and photographed numerous artists including Steve Aoki, Jasmine V, and TYGA.

He has worked in costuming and styling for international ad campaigns for A&E Network, Lifetime, the CW, and lent his wardrobe talents to the fourth season of Netflix’s Narcos.

Marc continues to build on his multifaceted career in the fashion industry, allowing his skills and experience in these diverse disciplines to guide his creative vision.

Photos: Aaron Tyler

Zara Biggs, Nike Communications, for use by 360 Magazine

BOMBAY SAPPHIRE HOLIDAY DISPLAYS LIGHT UP NYC

BOMBAY SAPPHIRE hosted its inaugural holiday window display to honor and rejuvenate imagination and creativity in New York City. The BOMBAY SAPPHIRE holiday windows gain inspiration from the traditional 5th Avenue holiday window displays while serving a greater purpose. The intention of the displays is to revive the creativity that has been deprived of downtown Manhattan since the beginning of the pandemic.

The storefront series was held in SoHo through December 19, in partnership with artist Shavanté Royster, fashion designer Romeo Hunte and NYC dancer Nicole von Arx.

Shavanté Royster

The Brooklyn-based Shavanté Royster is a graphic designer and illustrator, working in the creative industry since 2009. Growing up in a military family, often having to travel during her life motivated Shavanté’s innovation. Through her art, Shavanté often takes inspiration from travel, expressing this through shapes and rich colors. Shavanté’s work is comprised of digital illustration, painting and mixed media.

Romeo Hunte

Romeo Hunte New York is a lifestyle apparel brand designed in NYC for consumers who appreciate sophisticated details. The edgy aesthetic that the collection radiates mixes both feminine and masculine characteristics. Romeo Hunte pieces blend lavish outerwear with contemporary apparel. The Romeo Hunte woman and man can be described as a “dynamic duo” that appreciates the arts and pop culture with a modern flare.

Nicole von Arx

Nicole von Arx (NVA) studied Ballet, Contemporary and Hip Hop in Geneva, Switzerland at Dance Area, shortly after traveling to New York in 2008 to attend school at the Alvin Ailey School, graduating in 2011. Currently based among NYC and Geneva, NVA is a dancer and choreographer in both dance scenes. NVA has collaborated with the most notable choreographers in New York as a creator, dancer and teacher. Continuing her career, NVA has also worked independently as a choreographer with musicians, film directors and photographers.

The visionaries that were created through the course of the display aimed to fill the empty storefronts with avant-garde ‘windows of art.’ The pandemic has transformed the lives of creatives, small businesses and retail in New York and all over the world. BOMBAY SAPPHIRE worked to ensure that the artistic society would be celebrated and uplifted this holiday season with their holiday displays.

Each window highlighted a winter dreamscape created by artist Shavanté Royster. Both Shavanté and Romeo Hunte’s creative point-of-views joined forces to emulate the holiday magic of 5th avenue. Live models were seen wearing Romeo’s winter apparel upon Shavanté’s backdrops, with performances by NYC dancers.

Romeo’s devoted window showcased people draped in his designs that were created personally for the display. Romeo set the scene of a holiday celebration before a show over cocktails. The garments were designed with inspiration from Shavanté, with the backdrop and fashion coinciding throughout the display.

Romeo spoke on the experience of designing for the holiday displays, stating, “It’s been a joy to work on BOMBAY SAPPHIRE’s Holiday Storefront Series which pays homage to exciting young creative talents everywhere and the tenacity of New York City coming back after the pandemic. It was refreshing to collaborate with artist Shavanté Royster and the dancers as mixed media has always been an important part of my work, so it was cool to build and see the narrative of the holiday windows come to life with them through different facets, such as the dancers wearing some of my designs. I hope everyone can leave the windows feeling a burst of creativity and inspiration for the holidays, and hope for the year ahead!”

esther perbandt image for use by 360 magazine

Esther Perbandt Q×A

By: Kai Yeo

Born in Berlin, Esther Perbandt studies fashion design at the Berlin University of the Arts and polished a master’s degree in Fashion and Textile Design in Paris. In 2020, she made it to the finals of international designer show “Making The Cut” with Heidi Klum and Tim Gunn, supported by Naomi Campbell.

Not only is she a contemporary fashion designer, but also a visionary, performer, and mistress of ceremonies. Esther Perbandt describes her fashion as an act of (post)feminism irrespective of gender: personality, autonomy and individuality are at the center of her avant-garde style. The non-binary silhouette is deconstructed and reframed with classical menswear details, however, maintaining timeless aspects of elegance and style.

360 MAGAZINE had the pleasure of corresponding with Esther to learn about her inspiration, goals, and much more. Read on to find out her answers!

What/who are your biggest inspirations?

The joy of life is my greatest inspiration. This motor is so big that I can’t imagine running out of ideas at some point. I like doing two things for a living: sleeping and dancing. Many ideas come to me when I fall asleep or wake up and when I can dance without restraint.

How did Making The Cut (MTC) change your view of the fashion industry? 

When I studied fashion design in Berlin and Paris in the nineties and early noughties, the term “digitalization” was not really an issue in the fashion industry. I founded my own label over 17 years ago, which has grown very slowly on its own. Until I took part in MTC, I didn’t have an online shop, or only one that didn’t work. But I knew that if my brand was to survive the next 30 years, I had to change and become more digital. Who should I learn from, if not the biggest?

From a show like MTC of course you don’t only learn, you see what’s possible with a lot of money. But if you manage to transfer what you have experienced and seen at the highest level and translate it to your very own DNA, you can take the next steps. I don’t think there is a right or a wrong way in the fashion industry. There are an incredible number of individual paths. Depending on what the goal is.

After coming back from the MTC shoot, I didn’t do anything creative for 8 months, I just prepared business-wise for the airing of MTC: New website, new online store, new strategy. Today, I work with my pattern maker with avatars and digital fittings. This saves us a lot of time and resources.

How has the newly found attention changed/shaped you?

The new attention was a boon for my brand to finally grow. Many things have become a little easier professionally. But the pandemic probably slowed down the speed of this growth a bit and still does. Personally, I only got a limited amount of that attention. When the first season of MTC came out, which I was part of the cast of, the world went into its first hard lockdown. For months, I just worked a lot with my small team and sent packages all over the world every day, but especially to the US, without having the opportunity to meet many people. Germany is a grateful or ungrateful country, depending on how you take it, when it comes to addressing public figures. In the meantime, I had the feeling that hardly anyone in Germany had seen the show.

You were unsure about whether or not to take part in Making The Cut. How do you feel about it now?

Yes, I was indeed very unsure when I received the first request to participate in MTC 1. For 16 years, I had been flying the flag for a freer, more unconventional and uncommercial way in the fashion industry, which also had a stronger connection to art. I felt it wasn’t for me or would betray my brand. But quite the opposite. It was the best decision I made for my business, but also for my life in general. In the last three years, since shooting MTC 1, I have learnt an incredible amount and finally started to build a sustainable foundation for my brand. Every path in the fashion industry is very individual and mine is probably also an atypical one. But it’s fun to see myself making strategic and business decisions in a very different way now and to see that the word “commercial” is not a dirty word for me.

Do you have any moments in your career you look back to often?

Oh yes, of course. I often think today where I got the strength to hold out for so long and to go through all the deep valleys. For many years I called my studio the “Palace of Tears”. Every few days there were tears because I felt like I was standing on the spot or because it was financially on the brink. But somewhere deep inside me, I always believed that it would work out and become easier one day.

How would you describe your design aesthetic?

The signature of my brand has developed from the three cities in which I have lived in and which have been very important and inspiring for me: Berlin, Moscow and Paris.

Berlin, as the city where I was born, the city divided over the years with a great historical history, with its roughness, toughness, punk, subculture, snootiness. Moscow, with its avant-garde of the 1920s, the constructivists, high-necked, the uniforms and the austerity. And then of course Paris, as the city that gave me the finishing touch, the elegance, the femininity, and the glamor.

This special mix and the reduction to the color “black,” is meant to give my wearers a strength and make them grow. The focus on details should make the viewer curious to take a closer look at clothing.

What are the biggest challenges you have faced as a designer?

It has always been both a curse and a blessing that I have had to fight my own way through, especially financially. This has extremely slowed down the growth of my brand, but at the same time it has given me the chance and the time to carefully develop my signature and the DNA and to look closely at what I really want.

Do you think your surroundings and environment play a part in how you choose your designs?

Yes, definitely. As a creative, you unconsciously absorb everything you come across. I love observing people and thinking about why they wear the clothes they do. What identity do they have, and which one do they want to slip into? Dealing directly with my customers in the shop every day has of course influenced my choice of designs. Since MTC, I do a lot of styles in larger sizes and now a lot of women come and have my collection pieces made to measure. That’s a big market.

What are the next goals for your brand?

The USA has become my main sales market in the last two years. The next goal would be to open my own shop in New York for a while and then also produce locally so that customers who buy online don’t have to pay customs and the high shipping costs.

In fashion Esther Perbandt will continue to explore various paths, especially in creating haute couture looks for numerous events, as well as digging into costume design areas whenever projects allow for it.

It’s said that the future is unknown but at least with Esther Perbandt it will always continue to surprise and excite. We look forward to seeing more from her.

illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Netflix’s Halston Recap

“You are only as good as the people you dress” – Halston.  

To the world, he is better known as Halston: the first American fashion designer who changed fashion forever. The new Netflix limited series Halston tells the story of fashion legend Roy Halston Frowick.

Created by Ryan Murphy and directed by Daniel Minahan, the five-episode series is adapted from the 1991 book Simply Halston: The Untold Story by Steven Gaines. It focuses on the rise and fall of the late designer (played by Ewan McGregor) known for dressing socialites and celebrities–notably Babe Paley, Liza Minnelli, and Jackie O.

With being the designer that brought American fashion onto the grid, many have been interested in Halston’s life. It is not the first time that his glamorous and tortured story has been put in the spotlight (2019 documentary Halston). But Ryan Murphy takes Halston and produces a version of him that does not try to escape his queerness. Some might not agree with this version of him, but Halston definitely shows us that with fame and status, stardom can also be very lonely.

Episode 1: “Becoming Halston”

The opening shot brings us to Halston’s hometown in 1933: a farm in Evansville, Indiana. Quite creative since his early days, Episode 1 shows Halston taking feathers from the chicken coop and making a hat for his mom. By 1961, he is known for designing Jackie Kennedy’s pillbox hats. Unfortunately, by 1968 Jackie O stops wearing them, and Halston’s hats become an afterthought.

The intro shows us how quick trends fade, and Halston sets out on his journey to rebrand himself. He tries to take a page from Ralph Lifshitz (now globally known as Ralph Lauren). Halston tries to create an exclusive American couture line for Bergdorf Goodman. However, the fashion world is not interested in his black and white dresses and not a single piece sells.

Unfazed, Halston meets up with illustrator Joe Eula (played by David Pittu), convincing him to join the Halston team. Eula tells Halston, “You want to be Balenciaga. There’s already a Balenciaga. What we need is to figure out your signature.” At the same time, Halston is introduced to Liza Minnelli (Krysta Rodriguez), who compares Halston’s pillbox hats to her famous mother Judy Garland: “You and me are living under the shadow of something, and we’re both trying to do the same thing.” Minnelli becomes Halston’s first muse, shaping her into a friend and collaborator over the course of the series.

Securing funding of $100,000, Halston gathers a small crew to set up shop: Joe Eula, model Elsa Peretti (Rebecca Dayan), and junior partner Joel Schumacher (Rory Culkin). Halston takes Schumacher’s idea of a flowy, dyed fabric and makes dresses out of them. Though the show doesn’t lead to any sales, it gains American socialite Barbara “Babe” Paley’s interest. During the meeting with Paley (Regina Schneider), Halston shows her Ultrasuede synthetic trench coats, claiming “It’s sexy. It’s comfort. It’s freedom.” She takes one in every color.

Episode 2: “Versailles”

The star of this episode is the iconic Battle of Versailles, which pitted French designers against American designers. In the French establishment is Yves Saint LaurentPierre CardinEmanuel UngaroMarc Bohan (Dior), and Hubert de Givenchy. The American establishment is composed of Oscar de la RentaStephen BurrowsBill BlassAnne Klein, and Halston.

Though at first, Halston was not interested in the 1973 fundraiser for the Versailles, which also doubled as a means to get the American fashion name out to the world. Despite every woman in Central Park wearing his Ultrasuede, Halston tells publicist Eleanor Lambert (Kelly Bishop) that he can’t do a fundraiser because he’s broke. Trying to balance art and commerce, Eleanor sets Halston up with David Mahoney who wants to buy Halston’s licensing, proposing mass production. However, Halston initially refuses, saying “you’re only as good as the people you dress.”

Norton Simon sponsors Halston’s team to go to the Versailles show, and Halston convinces Minnelli to tag along and perform for him. With his entourage, they travel to Paris with 24 designs in an attempt to show their worth to the fashion industry. While nothing seemed to be going right at first – the backdrop size is wrong, costumes have not arrived, looks need to be designed – Minnelli forces Halston to pick himself up as his nerves get the better of him. And Halston does, slaying the runway with a 70s purple sequin dress, topped with a feathered hand fan that gets him a standing ovation. Original designs can be seen here.

By the end of the episode, we see a glimpse of Halston wanting protection from his “magical” childhood that was actually lonely and scary. He signs the contract with David, “If I sign that contract, I must never, ever, be left to feel unappreciated, underfunded, unprotected, unsafe. Promise me that, David.” While not everyone agrees with him selling his name, Halston gets new cash flow at the expense of his trademark name, pushing him through to stardom.

Episode 3: “The Sweet Smell of Success”

Focusing on Halston’s first fragrance, the third episode reminds us of Halston’s roots and the scents that created him. In the opening scene, we watch Elsa design a sensual perfume bottle for Halston, though the gravity defying perfume stopper is not sold to Mahoney. In an interesting conversation about phallic symbolisms, Halston is told the stopper is impossible to manufacture.

Arguing that creativity wins commercialism, Halston writes a check for $50,000 to pay for his own manufacturer, unwilling to compromise the exclusivity of the design. To create his scent, we are met with Adele (Vera Farmiga), who forces Halston to dig into his past for scents that evoke emotions. Adele bends Halston to her demands, and we get to see Halston’s inner, broken child more than ever in this episode. They discuss different scents and the memories Halston has connected to them: his fascination with scentless orchids, spring grass, tobacco, and his lover’s jockstrap.

Liza is off getting married and Halston has a breakdown. His lover boy, Victor Hugo (Gian Franco Rodriguez), points out that Halston just wants yes men and loyalty, and not everyone can do that for him. While work-life balance is not something that Halston achieves, his perfume becomes one of America’s best-selling perfumes, achieving $85 million in sales within the first two years. This led Halston to launch a plethora of new products–including suitcases, sunglasses, and carpets.

Despite all his success, we see that Halston does not find much love at Studio 54. In the heartbreaking final scene, we watch Hugo witnessing his lover having sex with another partner. While people are lined up buying products by Halston, he does not seem to have anything for himself.

Episode 4: “The Party’s Over”

Studio 54-era of Halston’s life: This episode shows Halston’s spiral into drugs and partying. The surplus and gluttony in overwhelming success and his cocaine addiction has him dropping the ball on his business, Liza faints on the dancefloor due to her drug habit, and there is a vent death at Studio 54.

Calvin Klein takes reign as top designer, and Halston spends his time cursing his competitor out. David Mahoney believes that jeans could be Halston’s next best creation and proposes the idea to Halston, in which is declined. As he loses his self-control, Halston designs have stopped selling at a growing rate. On the other hand, Elsa starts to be successful at Tiffany’s as a jewelry designer. Halston’s ego takes a problem with this, as he thinks he is the only one with talent and that Elsa should be thankful for him and give him credit. Belittling everyone around him due to jealousy, Halston pushes everyone away, left with nothing but his own name.

Halston’s mother dies unexpectedly, and this changes his mind about designing jeans when he sees a Calvin Klein commercial (starring Brooke Shields, originally from the 1980s). His ego takes a beating when David tells him he is “six months too late,” and Halston is no longer setting the fashion trends.

Things don’t look up for Halston either, as Mahoney tries to take Norton private and fails, resulting in a change of management. The AIDS pandemic is seen through the lens of Victor who tests positive for HIV, and Liza checks into rehab. Unsurprisingly, Halston is left in isolation by the end of it. With no other choice, he becomes the inhouse designer for JCPenney for some petty cash, and we no longer see the Halston that believed in exclusivity and creative control.

Episode 5: “Critics”

With designing how JCPenney, Halston is no longer having any fun. With pushing everyone around him away, he is only left with his assistant by his side and that is only because she is “getting paid to do so.” Halston begins showing up to the office at dinner, pushing off his deadlines, all while snorting large amounts of cocaine.

The company replaces Halston with designer John David Ridge (Jack Mikesell), the first person that lets Halston know he is an embarrassment, “How dare you be so irresponsible with the empire you spent your whole life working for?”

After being diagnosed with HIV and forced to retire, Halston’s life is put into perspective, and he really thinks about what he wants out of this life. Perhaps afraid that he might die without a final design to call his own, he seeks out his friend Martha Graham, and designs a spandex collection for her show. The reviews for this design gives Halston the acceptance that he was searching for the entire life and he finally admits that “Halston” was not just him, it was his entire team.

The series ends with Halston leaving to the West Coast and spending the rest of his days along the Pacific Ocean, mixed with tearful snippets of him watching Graham’s Persephone.

“We’re given one name… just one. And that’s all we have when we’re on the earth. And that’s all we leave behind us when we’re gone. I wasn’t precious enough with mine.” – Halston to Joe Eula, Halston Episode 5.

While five episodes is not enough to talk about Halston’s magnificent life, we get to see the grandeur of Halston’s reign in Ryan Murphy’s rendition. Captivating and intoxication, we see his friendships and intimate scenes unfolding in the series. While it may not be everyone’s cup of tea, you cannot deny the legacy that is Halston.

“Halston” premiered May 14 on Netflix.