Posts tagged with "Fashion designer"

Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week 2022 runway image via Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week

Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week just completed their successful series of runway shows, highlighting 18 top-tier Vietnamese, Italian and Australian fashion designers at the Military Zone 7 Stadium in Ho Chi Minh City.

Showcasing to an audience of 750 per seating of Vietnam’s leading celebrities, influencers and high-profile fashion personalities, the event spanned over 4 nights, from Thursday, March 26th to Sunday, March 29th.  Its focus was the central theme #ReFashion, pertaining to the adoption and development of sustainable fashion in Vietnam, post pandemic.

Madame Trang Le, President of the Council of ASEAN Fashion Designers (CAFD), and President of Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week adds:

“The Covid-19 pandemic has made a dramatic impact on all our lives, and of course there have been significant changes within our fashion community because of it. Having finally emerged from what felt like seemingly endless lockdowns and stringent restrictions, I feel we should all try and shift our way of thinking (ReThinking), our way of doing (ReInventing) and our way of operating (ReGenerating). My hope is that our industry manifests a new and transformative commitment to the sustainable development of fashion (Sustainable Fashion), and this season’s event theme #ReFashion was implemented to relay this messaging to our Vietnamese fashion populace as our ‘new normal’.”

Wrapping its 13th season, Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week has been positioned as the premiere international fashion event in Vietnam. Its mission is to share the country’s leading fashion talent with a global audience and has earned the reputation as the principal international fashion week in the Southeast region, ranked 4th in Asia, behind Tokyo, Seoul, and Shanghai International Fashion Weeks.

The designer schedule was as follows:

THURSDAY:  Aquafina x designer Võ Công Khanh, Camicissima & Valenciani by Adrian Anh Tuấn.

FRIDAY: Tuyết Lê, Tracy Studio, I.H.F, Ivan Trần & Nguyễn Tiến Truyển.

SATURDAY:  Tiny Ink by Hoàng Quyên, 21Six, Lý Giám Tiền, PhuongLyly by Phương Hồ & Nguyễn Minh Công.

SUNDAY:  Hoàng Hải, Zimmermann, Happy Clothing by Thảo Nguyễn, Linh San Couture & Hoàng Minh Hà.

Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week 2022 runway image via Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week 2022 runway image via Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week 2022 runway image via Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Photos courtesy of Aquafina Vietnam International Fashion Week

LITTLEJOHN STYLE

This Man’s Brand is a collection inspired by the timelessness and ubiquity of denim, infused with a bold aesthetic. Sheers, netting, and vinyl are juxtaposed with poignant strapping details, color blocking, unexpected pockets, collars & cuffs. Provocative exposed zippers and subtle rhinestones complete the look. Each piece was handcrafted by the designer to unleash the hero or rockstar in you! Marc Littlejohn is a native Angeleno, who has been inspired by his international travels as well as the western films that are rooted in Hollywood.

ABOUT THE DESIGNER

Fashion Director and Star Designer Marc Littlejohn has over 20 years of experience in the fashion and entertainment industry. He clothed the following celebrities: Beyoncé, Vivica A. Fox, Eminem, Queen Latifah, Shemar Moore, Courteney Cox, Vanessa Williams, Snoop Dogg and Tyra Banks.

He attended the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising, where he obtained his degree in manufacturing management and fashion design. This is where he learned to be well-balanced in all aspects of fashion.

After working on Michael Jackson’s final tour, and later on Cher’s farewell tour, he extended his creative stream to include costume design and photography. At the helm of 360 MAGAZINE, he has stylized and photographed numerous artists including Steve Aoki, Jasmine V, and TYGA.

He has worked in costuming and styling for international ad campaigns for A&E Network, Lifetime, the CW, and lent his wardrobe talents to the fourth season of Netflix’s Narcos.

Marc continues to build on his multifaceted career in the fashion industry, allowing his skills and experience in these diverse disciplines to guide his creative vision.

Photos: Aaron Tyler

Zara Biggs, Nike Communications, for use by 360 Magazine

BOMBAY SAPPHIRE HOLIDAY DISPLAYS LIGHT UP NYC

BOMBAY SAPPHIRE hosted its inaugural holiday window display to honor and rejuvenate imagination and creativity in New York City. The BOMBAY SAPPHIRE holiday windows gain inspiration from the traditional 5th Avenue holiday window displays while serving a greater purpose. The intention of the displays is to revive the creativity that has been deprived of downtown Manhattan since the beginning of the pandemic.

The storefront series was held in SoHo through December 19, in partnership with artist Shavanté Royster, fashion designer Romeo Hunte and NYC dancer Nicole von Arx.

Shavanté Royster

The Brooklyn-based Shavanté Royster is a graphic designer and illustrator, working in the creative industry since 2009. Growing up in a military family, often having to travel during her life motivated Shavanté’s innovation. Through her art, Shavanté often takes inspiration from travel, expressing this through shapes and rich colors. Shavanté’s work is comprised of digital illustration, painting and mixed media.

Romeo Hunte

Romeo Hunte New York is a lifestyle apparel brand designed in NYC for consumers who appreciate sophisticated details. The edgy aesthetic that the collection radiates mixes both feminine and masculine characteristics. Romeo Hunte pieces blend lavish outerwear with contemporary apparel. The Romeo Hunte woman and man can be described as a “dynamic duo” that appreciates the arts and pop culture with a modern flare.

Nicole von Arx

Nicole von Arx (NVA) studied Ballet, Contemporary and Hip Hop in Geneva, Switzerland at Dance Area, shortly after traveling to New York in 2008 to attend school at the Alvin Ailey School, graduating in 2011. Currently based among NYC and Geneva, NVA is a dancer and choreographer in both dance scenes. NVA has collaborated with the most notable choreographers in New York as a creator, dancer and teacher. Continuing her career, NVA has also worked independently as a choreographer with musicians, film directors and photographers.

The visionaries that were created through the course of the display aimed to fill the empty storefronts with avant-garde ‘windows of art.’ The pandemic has transformed the lives of creatives, small businesses and retail in New York and all over the world. BOMBAY SAPPHIRE worked to ensure that the artistic society would be celebrated and uplifted this holiday season with their holiday displays.

Each window highlighted a winter dreamscape created by artist Shavanté Royster. Both Shavanté and Romeo Hunte’s creative point-of-views joined forces to emulate the holiday magic of 5th avenue. Live models were seen wearing Romeo’s winter apparel upon Shavanté’s backdrops, with performances by NYC dancers.

Romeo’s devoted window showcased people draped in his designs that were created personally for the display. Romeo set the scene of a holiday celebration before a show over cocktails. The garments were designed with inspiration from Shavanté, with the backdrop and fashion coinciding throughout the display.

Romeo spoke on the experience of designing for the holiday displays, stating, “It’s been a joy to work on BOMBAY SAPPHIRE’s Holiday Storefront Series which pays homage to exciting young creative talents everywhere and the tenacity of New York City coming back after the pandemic. It was refreshing to collaborate with artist Shavanté Royster and the dancers as mixed media has always been an important part of my work, so it was cool to build and see the narrative of the holiday windows come to life with them through different facets, such as the dancers wearing some of my designs. I hope everyone can leave the windows feeling a burst of creativity and inspiration for the holidays, and hope for the year ahead!”

esther perbandt image for use by 360 magazine

Esther Perbandt Q×A

By: Kai Yeo

Born in Berlin, Esther Perbandt studies fashion design at the Berlin University of the Arts and polished a master’s degree in Fashion and Textile Design in Paris. In 2020, she made it to the finals of international designer show “Making The Cut” with Heidi Klum and Tim Gunn, supported by Naomi Campbell.

Not only is she a contemporary fashion designer, but also a visionary, performer, and mistress of ceremonies. Esther Perbandt describes her fashion as an act of (post)feminism irrespective of gender: personality, autonomy and individuality are at the center of her avant-garde style. The non-binary silhouette is deconstructed and reframed with classical menswear details, however, maintaining timeless aspects of elegance and style.

360 MAGAZINE had the pleasure of corresponding with Esther to learn about her inspiration, goals, and much more. Read on to find out her answers!

What/who are your biggest inspirations?

The joy of life is my greatest inspiration. This motor is so big that I can’t imagine running out of ideas at some point. I like doing two things for a living: sleeping and dancing. Many ideas come to me when I fall asleep or wake up and when I can dance without restraint.

How did Making The Cut (MTC) change your view of the fashion industry? 

When I studied fashion design in Berlin and Paris in the nineties and early noughties, the term “digitalization” was not really an issue in the fashion industry. I founded my own label over 17 years ago, which has grown very slowly on its own. Until I took part in MTC, I didn’t have an online shop, or only one that didn’t work. But I knew that if my brand was to survive the next 30 years, I had to change and become more digital. Who should I learn from, if not the biggest?

From a show like MTC of course you don’t only learn, you see what’s possible with a lot of money. But if you manage to transfer what you have experienced and seen at the highest level and translate it to your very own DNA, you can take the next steps. I don’t think there is a right or a wrong way in the fashion industry. There are an incredible number of individual paths. Depending on what the goal is.

After coming back from the MTC shoot, I didn’t do anything creative for 8 months, I just prepared business-wise for the airing of MTC: New website, new online store, new strategy. Today, I work with my pattern maker with avatars and digital fittings. This saves us a lot of time and resources.

How has the newly found attention changed/shaped you?

The new attention was a boon for my brand to finally grow. Many things have become a little easier professionally. But the pandemic probably slowed down the speed of this growth a bit and still does. Personally, I only got a limited amount of that attention. When the first season of MTC came out, which I was part of the cast of, the world went into its first hard lockdown. For months, I just worked a lot with my small team and sent packages all over the world every day, but especially to the US, without having the opportunity to meet many people. Germany is a grateful or ungrateful country, depending on how you take it, when it comes to addressing public figures. In the meantime, I had the feeling that hardly anyone in Germany had seen the show.

You were unsure about whether or not to take part in Making The Cut. How do you feel about it now?

Yes, I was indeed very unsure when I received the first request to participate in MTC 1. For 16 years, I had been flying the flag for a freer, more unconventional and uncommercial way in the fashion industry, which also had a stronger connection to art. I felt it wasn’t for me or would betray my brand. But quite the opposite. It was the best decision I made for my business, but also for my life in general. In the last three years, since shooting MTC 1, I have learnt an incredible amount and finally started to build a sustainable foundation for my brand. Every path in the fashion industry is very individual and mine is probably also an atypical one. But it’s fun to see myself making strategic and business decisions in a very different way now and to see that the word “commercial” is not a dirty word for me.

Do you have any moments in your career you look back to often?

Oh yes, of course. I often think today where I got the strength to hold out for so long and to go through all the deep valleys. For many years I called my studio the “Palace of Tears”. Every few days there were tears because I felt like I was standing on the spot or because it was financially on the brink. But somewhere deep inside me, I always believed that it would work out and become easier one day.

How would you describe your design aesthetic?

The signature of my brand has developed from the three cities in which I have lived in and which have been very important and inspiring for me: Berlin, Moscow and Paris.

Berlin, as the city where I was born, the city divided over the years with a great historical history, with its roughness, toughness, punk, subculture, snootiness. Moscow, with its avant-garde of the 1920s, the constructivists, high-necked, the uniforms and the austerity. And then of course Paris, as the city that gave me the finishing touch, the elegance, the femininity, and the glamor.

This special mix and the reduction to the color “black,” is meant to give my wearers a strength and make them grow. The focus on details should make the viewer curious to take a closer look at clothing.

What are the biggest challenges you have faced as a designer?

It has always been both a curse and a blessing that I have had to fight my own way through, especially financially. This has extremely slowed down the growth of my brand, but at the same time it has given me the chance and the time to carefully develop my signature and the DNA and to look closely at what I really want.

Do you think your surroundings and environment play a part in how you choose your designs?

Yes, definitely. As a creative, you unconsciously absorb everything you come across. I love observing people and thinking about why they wear the clothes they do. What identity do they have, and which one do they want to slip into? Dealing directly with my customers in the shop every day has of course influenced my choice of designs. Since MTC, I do a lot of styles in larger sizes and now a lot of women come and have my collection pieces made to measure. That’s a big market.

What are the next goals for your brand?

The USA has become my main sales market in the last two years. The next goal would be to open my own shop in New York for a while and then also produce locally so that customers who buy online don’t have to pay customs and the high shipping costs.

In fashion Esther Perbandt will continue to explore various paths, especially in creating haute couture looks for numerous events, as well as digging into costume design areas whenever projects allow for it.

It’s said that the future is unknown but at least with Esther Perbandt it will always continue to surprise and excite. We look forward to seeing more from her.

illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Netflix’s Halston Recap

“You are only as good as the people you dress” – Halston.  

To the world, he is better known as Halston: the first American fashion designer who changed fashion forever. The new Netflix limited series Halston tells the story of fashion legend Roy Halston Frowick.

Created by Ryan Murphy and directed by Daniel Minahan, the five-episode series is adapted from the 1991 book Simply Halston: The Untold Story by Steven Gaines. It focuses on the rise and fall of the late designer (played by Ewan McGregor) known for dressing socialites and celebrities–notably Babe Paley, Liza Minnelli, and Jackie O.

With being the designer that brought American fashion onto the grid, many have been interested in Halston’s life. It is not the first time that his glamorous and tortured story has been put in the spotlight (2019 documentary Halston). But Ryan Murphy takes Halston and produces a version of him that does not try to escape his queerness. Some might not agree with this version of him, but Halston definitely shows us that with fame and status, stardom can also be very lonely.

Episode 1: “Becoming Halston”

The opening shot brings us to Halston’s hometown in 1933: a farm in Evansville, Indiana. Quite creative since his early days, Episode 1 shows Halston taking feathers from the chicken coop and making a hat for his mom. By 1961, he is known for designing Jackie Kennedy’s pillbox hats. Unfortunately, by 1968 Jackie O stops wearing them, and Halston’s hats become an afterthought.

The intro shows us how quick trends fade, and Halston sets out on his journey to rebrand himself. He tries to take a page from Ralph Lifshitz (now globally known as Ralph Lauren). Halston tries to create an exclusive American couture line for Bergdorf Goodman. However, the fashion world is not interested in his black and white dresses and not a single piece sells.

Unfazed, Halston meets up with illustrator Joe Eula (played by David Pittu), convincing him to join the Halston team. Eula tells Halston, “You want to be Balenciaga. There’s already a Balenciaga. What we need is to figure out your signature.” At the same time, Halston is introduced to Liza Minnelli (Krysta Rodriguez), who compares Halston’s pillbox hats to her famous mother Judy Garland: “You and me are living under the shadow of something, and we’re both trying to do the same thing.” Minnelli becomes Halston’s first muse, shaping her into a friend and collaborator over the course of the series.

Securing funding of $100,000, Halston gathers a small crew to set up shop: Joe Eula, model Elsa Peretti (Rebecca Dayan), and junior partner Joel Schumacher (Rory Culkin). Halston takes Schumacher’s idea of a flowy, dyed fabric and makes dresses out of them. Though the show doesn’t lead to any sales, it gains American socialite Barbara “Babe” Paley’s interest. During the meeting with Paley (Regina Schneider), Halston shows her Ultrasuede synthetic trench coats, claiming “It’s sexy. It’s comfort. It’s freedom.” She takes one in every color.

Episode 2: “Versailles”

The star of this episode is the iconic Battle of Versailles, which pitted French designers against American designers. In the French establishment is Yves Saint LaurentPierre CardinEmanuel UngaroMarc Bohan (Dior), and Hubert de Givenchy. The American establishment is composed of Oscar de la RentaStephen BurrowsBill BlassAnne Klein, and Halston.

Though at first, Halston was not interested in the 1973 fundraiser for the Versailles, which also doubled as a means to get the American fashion name out to the world. Despite every woman in Central Park wearing his Ultrasuede, Halston tells publicist Eleanor Lambert (Kelly Bishop) that he can’t do a fundraiser because he’s broke. Trying to balance art and commerce, Eleanor sets Halston up with David Mahoney who wants to buy Halston’s licensing, proposing mass production. However, Halston initially refuses, saying “you’re only as good as the people you dress.”

Norton Simon sponsors Halston’s team to go to the Versailles show, and Halston convinces Minnelli to tag along and perform for him. With his entourage, they travel to Paris with 24 designs in an attempt to show their worth to the fashion industry. While nothing seemed to be going right at first – the backdrop size is wrong, costumes have not arrived, looks need to be designed – Minnelli forces Halston to pick himself up as his nerves get the better of him. And Halston does, slaying the runway with a 70s purple sequin dress, topped with a feathered hand fan that gets him a standing ovation. Original designs can be seen here.

By the end of the episode, we see a glimpse of Halston wanting protection from his “magical” childhood that was actually lonely and scary. He signs the contract with David, “If I sign that contract, I must never, ever, be left to feel unappreciated, underfunded, unprotected, unsafe. Promise me that, David.” While not everyone agrees with him selling his name, Halston gets new cash flow at the expense of his trademark name, pushing him through to stardom.

Episode 3: “The Sweet Smell of Success”

Focusing on Halston’s first fragrance, the third episode reminds us of Halston’s roots and the scents that created him. In the opening scene, we watch Elsa design a sensual perfume bottle for Halston, though the gravity defying perfume stopper is not sold to Mahoney. In an interesting conversation about phallic symbolisms, Halston is told the stopper is impossible to manufacture.

Arguing that creativity wins commercialism, Halston writes a check for $50,000 to pay for his own manufacturer, unwilling to compromise the exclusivity of the design. To create his scent, we are met with Adele (Vera Farmiga), who forces Halston to dig into his past for scents that evoke emotions. Adele bends Halston to her demands, and we get to see Halston’s inner, broken child more than ever in this episode. They discuss different scents and the memories Halston has connected to them: his fascination with scentless orchids, spring grass, tobacco, and his lover’s jockstrap.

Liza is off getting married and Halston has a breakdown. His lover boy, Victor Hugo (Gian Franco Rodriguez), points out that Halston just wants yes men and loyalty, and not everyone can do that for him. While work-life balance is not something that Halston achieves, his perfume becomes one of America’s best-selling perfumes, achieving $85 million in sales within the first two years. This led Halston to launch a plethora of new products–including suitcases, sunglasses, and carpets.

Despite all his success, we see that Halston does not find much love at Studio 54. In the heartbreaking final scene, we watch Hugo witnessing his lover having sex with another partner. While people are lined up buying products by Halston, he does not seem to have anything for himself.

Episode 4: “The Party’s Over”

Studio 54-era of Halston’s life: This episode shows Halston’s spiral into drugs and partying. The surplus and gluttony in overwhelming success and his cocaine addiction has him dropping the ball on his business, Liza faints on the dancefloor due to her drug habit, and there is a vent death at Studio 54.

Calvin Klein takes reign as top designer, and Halston spends his time cursing his competitor out. David Mahoney believes that jeans could be Halston’s next best creation and proposes the idea to Halston, in which is declined. As he loses his self-control, Halston designs have stopped selling at a growing rate. On the other hand, Elsa starts to be successful at Tiffany’s as a jewelry designer. Halston’s ego takes a problem with this, as he thinks he is the only one with talent and that Elsa should be thankful for him and give him credit. Belittling everyone around him due to jealousy, Halston pushes everyone away, left with nothing but his own name.

Halston’s mother dies unexpectedly, and this changes his mind about designing jeans when he sees a Calvin Klein commercial (starring Brooke Shields, originally from the 1980s). His ego takes a beating when David tells him he is “six months too late,” and Halston is no longer setting the fashion trends.

Things don’t look up for Halston either, as Mahoney tries to take Norton private and fails, resulting in a change of management. The AIDS pandemic is seen through the lens of Victor who tests positive for HIV, and Liza checks into rehab. Unsurprisingly, Halston is left in isolation by the end of it. With no other choice, he becomes the inhouse designer for JCPenney for some petty cash, and we no longer see the Halston that believed in exclusivity and creative control.

Episode 5: “Critics”

With designing how JCPenney, Halston is no longer having any fun. With pushing everyone around him away, he is only left with his assistant by his side and that is only because she is “getting paid to do so.” Halston begins showing up to the office at dinner, pushing off his deadlines, all while snorting large amounts of cocaine.

The company replaces Halston with designer John David Ridge (Jack Mikesell), the first person that lets Halston know he is an embarrassment, “How dare you be so irresponsible with the empire you spent your whole life working for?”

After being diagnosed with HIV and forced to retire, Halston’s life is put into perspective, and he really thinks about what he wants out of this life. Perhaps afraid that he might die without a final design to call his own, he seeks out his friend Martha Graham, and designs a spandex collection for her show. The reviews for this design gives Halston the acceptance that he was searching for the entire life and he finally admits that “Halston” was not just him, it was his entire team.

The series ends with Halston leaving to the West Coast and spending the rest of his days along the Pacific Ocean, mixed with tearful snippets of him watching Graham’s Persephone.

“We’re given one name… just one. And that’s all we have when we’re on the earth. And that’s all we leave behind us when we’re gone. I wasn’t precious enough with mine.” – Halston to Joe Eula, Halston Episode 5.

While five episodes is not enough to talk about Halston’s magnificent life, we get to see the grandeur of Halston’s reign in Ryan Murphy’s rendition. Captivating and intoxication, we see his friendships and intimate scenes unfolding in the series. While it may not be everyone’s cup of tea, you cannot deny the legacy that is Halston.

“Halston” premiered May 14 on Netflix.

image from Damien Testu for use by 360 Magazine

VAISHALI COUTURE FASHION WEEK SHOW

Breath is something that has remained unacknowledged in most of us. Ironically, we all feel it and it is the only thing that is happening every moment, continuously from the moment we were born. And still, its presence is taken for granted. It is the only inevitable exchange that is happening between us and the rest of the world. Why did we stop acknowledging the most prominent, evident and essential process that ensures our existence here?

Breath is the only thread that unites everything as one and supports life as whole. Handwoven fabrics from various states of India become a canvas to celebrate life and restore a zero-waste approach, preserving the museum-quality weave in innovative corded texture. This signature cording is braided along with Merino wools and Chanderi silks throughout the collection to remind us of the essence of all living beings around us.

Breath gives us the ability to form a connection with ourselves and others. This interplay is like the threads unraveling from a spool to form fabric that blends the weaves of India. A confluence of two world—traditional and modern on a platform of art and expression.

The collection embodies an artistic interpretation of handloom fabrics as our second skin, with a desire to wear ensembles created with nature itself  and is timeworn in its quality. With an ageless paradigm of Indian textile vocabulary, every thread and fibre sings the songs of lost tales and soil of the Indian lands.

It is essential to pay attention to this one outstanding process because through it, our existence has been challenged and proven. This collection is a statement and celebration of our existence through a simple action of taking a Breath.

image from Damien Testu for use by 360 Magazine

Photo Credit: Yannis Vlamos

image from Damien Testu for use by 360 Magazine

Photo Credit: Yannis Vlamos

image from Damien Testu for use by 360 Magazine

Photo Credit: Yannis Vlamos

Fashion illustration by Rita Azar for use by 360 Magazine

5 Steps to Become a Fashion Designer

Are you a creative person who loves clothes, bags, shoes and the changing trends that each season brings when it comes to new designs? If so, why not choose a career that allows you to express your individuality and explore your passion at the same time? Sound exciting? A career in fashion design might just be your calling. Let’s run through some of the essential steps you’ll need to take to make it in the ever-evolving world of fashion. 

Move to a Major City

If you live in a small town with zero opportunities to get valuable work experience, it’s time to consider moving to a major city. Yes, rent is expensive and you may need to take out personal loans from a private lender to cover the first few months of rent and living costs but it will be so worth it. Before moving, reach out to fashion outlets and well-known clothing manufacturers to see if there are any work experience opportunities available. You’ll learn so much from observing operations in a professional setting and you’ll get to work with all kinds of different materials and styles. This experience will prove invaluable when it comes to branching out on your own. 

Be Prepared Early On

Listen up high school students! The fact you’re even thinking about becoming a fashion designer at this young age is proof that this career path is for you. Start your prep early by signing up for drawing, art and design classes. A lot of fashion design programs require students to have artistic talent so learn early and your future self with certainly thank you for it. 

Get a Degree

You need to take this point seriously if you want to make noise in this competitive industry. Getting a degree in fashion design will teach you everything you need to know when it comes to creating a sketch and bringing that sketch to life. You’ll learn about the properties of different fabrics and you’ll get familiar with essential skills such as stitching, pattern making and draping. 

Create a Portfolio

All fashion designers create a portfolio early on in their careers. It’s what you’ll give to prospective fashion schools and employers so it’s got to showcase your best work. Treat each project in that portfolio like it was a major job for a real-world fashion designer and don’t cut corners when it comes to sketching and displaying your strong points. Be sure that the finished folder also demonstrates how good your communication skills are. 

Network

Yes, it’s time to mingle! Get involved in fashion shows and enter as many design competitions as you possibly can. Talk to people at these events and don’t be shy in showing off your skills and sharing your ambitions for the future. Sign up to fashion blogs and interact with like-minded people on social media and forums. Check for industry-related networking events in your local area and show up with a smile and a willingness to get involved. If there’s not much happening in your local town/city in terms of fashion shows and competitions, why not make a name for yourself locally and organize your own events? Doing so is a great way to demonstrate drive and tenacity, both of which are traits you’re your future employers will appreciate. 

Johnathan Marc Stein show image via 360 Magazine

Jonathan Marc Stein Autumn/ Winter 2021 Virtual Show Debut Filming

Loftily positioned above a beautiful residence in Studio City, celebrity fashion designer Jonathan Marc Stein unveiled his newest Autumn/Winter 2021 clothing collection on April 29. 360 Magazine attended the event to view Stein’s dazzling designs and learn more about his involvement with his show’s partner, the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). Stein’s show emphasized themes of inclusivity, the power of women, and the importance of discussing mental health.

A fleet of stunning, picturesque models show cased Stein’ brilliant, swoon-worthy designs at his collection debut. Adorned in flow-y tulle, vegan leather accoutrements, shiny suede, shimmering fabrics, sequins, bows, and more, Stein’s designs are a visual masterpiece. His Autumn/Winter collection takes into consideration the moody palettes that are typical of end of the year fashion, fabulously donning his models in gem-toned hues such as carmine, cobalt, silver, and deep emerald-green. His dress designs mixed a variety of fabrics together, creating eye-catching designs that only Stein would have the genius to combine.

Stein’s show was refreshingly inclusive, and hosted models with a variety of body types and ethnicities. His constant focus on making his shows diverse serves as inspiration for the rest of the fashion industry. Not only Stein’s designs, but also his presentation of such, are carefully planned and executed with the utmost professionalism and forethought.

Taking in consideration of his platform’s reach and emphasizing the importance of discussing mental health and practicing healthful introspection, Stein decided to partner with the National Alliance on Mental Illness. (NAMI) NAMI’s current “You Are Not Alone” campaign broadcasts the same sentiments Loftily positioned above a beautiful residence in Studio City, celebrity fashion designer Jonathan Marc Stein unveiled his newest Autumn/Winter 2021 clothing collection on April 29. 360 Magazine attended the event to view Stein’s dazzling designs and lear spoke about: the importance of regularly checking in with yourself and those that you hold closest. NAMI provides advocacy, education, support, and public awareness so that all individuals and families affected by mental illness and is now one of the nation’s leading voices on mental health.

Celebrities such as Gretchen Rossi, Shannon Baker, and Megan Pormer also attended Stein’s show and commented on the importance of creating conversation surrounding mental health. Rossi commented, “I think it’s really important to talk to people if you really are struggling, or if you’re going through something more intense. There’s no shame in my game to say that. You know, I’ve spoken with therapists in my life to help talk through some issues or some struggles I was having. There’s just so many people out there that that struggle on so many levels and it’s sad to me that it’s not recognized more, it’s not talked about more. It’s such a taboo subject for so many people.”

Continuing that thought, Pormer spoke on the importance of staying connected during quarantine: “During COVID, I think every single human being on the planet got hit mentally one way or another, because we were forced to stay away from each other. We’re born as a pack… so… I personally had to rediscover myself and educate myself a lot more to make sure I could stay mentally balanced during COVID. I think mental health is the most important topic right now, and we have to focus on it. And what’s better than demonstrating your support for mental health than at a beautiful fashion show?” Pormer also mentioned her practice of transcendental meditation to remain centered and calm during COVID.

Finally, Baker spoke about reaching out to friends and maintaining connection while socially distanced: “I think mental health is a serious issue right now, especially during COVID. There’s a lot of spikes in like suicide rates and things like that. For me personally, it’s about making sure that I try to stay as balanced as I can. Whether it’s like playing video games, as a gamer, and doing things that I enjoy doing; or also checking in with my family and friends to make sure they’re okay. Just giving a call to someone that you may not have spoken to in a while to see how they’re doing…I always appreciate the calls that I get random friends. One thing that this experience the last two years has done for people is to [remind them to] make sure to reach out to people they haven’t talked to in a while. So, I think it’s in some ways it’s its brought people closer in making sure you’re talking to people that you haven’t talked to in a while. Connection so important.”

The presentation of Loftily positioned above a beautiful residence in Studio City, celebrity fashion designer Jonathan Marc Stein unveiled his newest Autumn/Winter 2021 clothing collection on April 29. 360 Magazine attended the event to view Stein’s dazzling designs and lear Marc Stein’s show was immaculate. Each model strutted down the runway with elegant poise, and every dress showcased more eye-catching and dazzling than the former. To see more of Stein’s work, you may visit his website.

NEGEV 2.0 DRESS & REVERSIBLE FACE MASK in TRI-COLOR PLAID SEERSUCKER by Saint Mojavi for use by 360 Magazine

LA ESCAPAR: SPRING SUMMER 2021

SAINT MOJAVI INTRODUCES SECOND SUSTAINABLE “MADE TO ORDER” COLLECTION

Last Fall, Saint Mojavi introduced their first “Made to Order” collection to consumers. The brand’s founder and designer, Teresa Pinedo, wanted to drastically cut waste and be more thoughtful with each style she created. After seeing the success of implementing this business practice, both in popularity with consumers and in the reduction of her eco footprint, Pinedo developed her second sustainable collection.

The Spring Summer 2021 “LA ESCAPAR” Collection is a collective of silhouettes designed for the jet-set fashionista who has been yearning for an escape. It is an uplifting collection full of color and playful prints to incorporate joy and hope after such a tumultuous year.

“There is a sense of spirituality behind every collection and this collection is for those who have been longing for a deeper meaning or just an escape,”  shares designer Teresa Pinedo.

Mixed media fabrics like the Green Polkadot Botanica and the Tri-Color Seersucker Plaid are just a glimpse of how picturesque this collection truly is. Reversible Facemasks and Elbow-High Gloves give you fashion with safety. The sustainably sourced pre-loved, recycled fabrics are from local markets in Los Angeles, making this collection apart of the global initiative to decrease waste and improve our efforts in climate change.

Shop Saint Mojavi’s collection HERE.

See who has been wearing the Saint Mojavi HERE.

BELLISI BUTTON-UP SHIRT in CREAM SILK EMBROIDERED POLKA DOT by Saint Mojavi for use by 360 MagazineDALMA TURTLENECK TANK DRESS in GOLDENROD CHEVRON KNIT by Saint Mojavi for use by 360 MagazineCARTAGENA COLLAR DRESS SHORT & BUCKET HAT in NEON TERRY CLOTH by Saint Movaji for use by 360 MagazinePARLA DOUBLE DRAPE DRESS in SEAFOAM PEACE SILK by Saint Mojavi for use by 360 MagazineLEON LONG SLEEVE DRESS in GOLDENROD CHEVRON KNIT by Saint Mohavi for use by 360 MagazineLANAUX BABYDOLL TIE-FRONT TOP in GREEN POLKA DOT BOTANICA by Saint Mojavi for use by 360 Magazine

TA3 Swimwear by Leila Shams for use by 360 Magazine

TA3 Swimwear

By: Leila Shams

As we near the end of winter, I’m sure we are all highly anticipating spring and summer. With the beautiful, warm weather rolling in comes the overwhelming need for a perfect beach body. What if we could eat whatever we want, work out less, and still look amazing on the beach? That’s where Leila Shams steps in and says “you can!” With her new swimsuit line, TA3 Swim, everyone can look and feel like a “Baywatch babe” walking down the beach.

Leila Shams is a seasoned fashion designer. She is founder and CEO of TA3 Swimwear–a fashion line that offers a newly innovative type of swimsuit that flatters your shape, regardless of body type. After a lot of hard work and dedication, she has created the world’s most sculpting swimsuits. Her exciting career has involved working for top brands such as DKNY, Express, and Tommy Hilfiger, but launching her newest swimwear line, TA3, has been the highlight of her career.

Leila created TA3 because she wanted to look good in a swimsuit and was inspired by her own insecurities. She wondered why women invest in shape wear for under their clothes, but then when they’re the most exposed on the beach, they wear some of the flimsiest garments ever.

“I see so many ‘inclusive’ swimwear brands showing a suit on a plus-sized woman that just doesn’t fit. If her bust isn’t supported, if there are bulges everywhere, then you’ve just sized up but you haven’t bothered to flatter her body” says Leila. Leila believes we should all be able to eat and still look hot at the pool or beach without having to stress. This is why she named the company TA3, which is “EAT” backwards.

It took Leila almost three years, hundreds of prototypes, and fittings to create a waterproof swimsuit that squeezes your body into a beautiful hourglass shape. TA3 suits are created from compression fabric, which Leila discovered after surgery when she had to wear a compression suit. Her swimsuit is a patent-pending construction that snatches your waist, flattens your tummy and lifts your bust.  Leila is a long-time fashion designer whose designs have clothed the biggest celebrities in the world including Kim Kardashian, Kendall Jenner, Kelly Clarkson and Nicki Minaj. Her products are sold in some of the best boutiques and on-line retailers. Even with her rich designer past, Leila feels that the greatest thrill of her career and life is being the reason that women loving the way they look in a swimsuit, and instilling a newfound confidence in her customers.

TA3 suits are sexy, fashionable, and give every woman the shape and curves they have been striving for their entire lives. Leila’s current, one-piece suit collection comes in all-black , and features three trendy styles: zippy, lacey, and high-cut zippy. The suits are so versatile that women can even wear this matte swimsuit as a bodysuit with a skirt or jeans–making TA3 swimsuits the “little black dress” of this years’ Summer wardrobe. This will be your new go-to piece. You no longer need to buy several different bathing suits.

TA3 Swim has customers raving about their new self-esteem boost. Whether it’s a postpartum mother or victim of the “Covid-15” weight gain, TA3 is bringing women back to the beach and pool by making them feel confident. TA3 swimwear is handing women back their power. Women can now confidently strut their stuff without a worry in the world.

Leila’s creativity, relentless drive, and sense of humor make her the perfect female disruptor who is reimagining the concept of a successful apparel industry. Leila claims, “the way we usually fit women’s clothing is so backwards.” Models are tall, hourglass shaped and “perfect”–but this is not what the average, everyday woman looks like. Women’s bodies can vary and differ in so many ways. What sets Leila’s apparel apart from other brands is that her suits are not very stretchy, and she molds her styles on women of all shapes and sizes. Over the past two years, she has taken in her customers’ feedback and tweaked the design to make necessary changes, which has led to the development of her current collection. Leila explains that making clothing used to be expensive and slow, which was annoying because trends would die out before companies were even able to launch a product. Nevertheless, she realized that clothing should be expensive and slow, because although you may like to design and shop, creating stuff that is quick and cheap is merely fun. In fast fashion, workers aren’t paid what they should be paid and companies produce a lot of waste. On top of that, people end up buying a bunch of clothing that they wear once and then quickly throw away.

Swimsuits are not where it ends for Leila Shams. She fully expects to expand and incorporate more categories focused on ultra-flattering fits for your body shape. She is adding more lengths and fits to her best-selling styles, as well as adding bodysuits. She is also expanding her team. Now with Leila’s new swimsuit line, TA3 Swim, women no longer need to worry about their bodies, jump on crazy diet fads, or work out until their limbs fall off trying to achieve an unrealistic, nearly unattainable body. Leila wants to be known as “the fashion designer that stopped shoving women into thin, stretchy, and unflattering clothing.” She is determined to change the way we fit and size clothing. We can now live in and be proud of our own bodies.

TA3 Swimwear by Leila Shams for use by 360 Magazine