Posts tagged with "Washington dc"

The Weeknd illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

The Weeknd Donates 2 Million Meals

Superstar The Weeknd Donates 2 Million Meals to Hungry People in Ethiopia Through the United Nations World Food Program

This $1 million donation will provide lifesaving food to those living in the Tigray Region

Multi-platinum selling singer, songwriter and record producer Abel Tesfaye, better known as The Weeknd, has donated $1 million to World Food Program USA, the U.S. affiliate of the United Nations World Food Program, which was the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, in support of hunger relief efforts in Ethiopia. The significant donation, which equates to 2 million meals, will provide lifesaving food to those affected by conflict in Ethiopia’s northern Tigray Region.

This generous gift will support the U.N. World Food Program’s efforts to ramp up emergency food assistance response to reach up to 2 million people in the next six months. So far, the humanitarian agency has provided corn, rice and vegetable oil to 60,000 people in towns in the eastern and southern parts of the region. In addition to delivering emergency food assistance in Tigray, the U.N. World Food Program has started providing nutrition support for vulnerable pregnant or breastfeeding women as well as children in the region, planning to reach 875,000 people. The U.N. World Food Program has also delivered three rounds of monthly food rations in the two accessible and operational refugee camps in Tigray.

“My heart breaks for my people of Ethiopia as innocent civilians ranging from small children to the elderly are being senselessly murdered and entire villages are being displaced out of fear and destruction. I will be donating $1 million to provide 2 million meals through the United Nations World Food Program and encourage those who can to please give as well,” said Abel Tesfaye (The Weeknd).

“We are extremely concerned about the food security situation in Tigray,” said World Food Program USA President & CEO Barron Segar. “As poor households exhaust food stocks, people will fall deeper into emergency levels of hunger. This generous donation from The Weeknd will provide immediate lifesaving food for people who need it urgently.”

The government estimates that 4.5 million people need emergency food assistance until late this year and has requested the U.N. World Food Program support 1.4 million of them. The outbreak of conflict in Tigray last November coincided with the peak harvest period, meaning employment and incomes were lost, markets were disrupted, food prices rose and access to cash and fuel became very difficult.

About the United Nations World Food Program/World Food Program USA

The United Nations World Food Program is the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and the world’s largest humanitarian organization, saving lives in emergencies and using food assistance to build a pathway to peace, stability and prosperity for people recovering from conflict, disasters and the impact of climate change.

World Food Program USA, a 501(c)(3) organization based in Washington, DC, proudly supports the mission of the United Nations World Food Program by mobilizing American policymakers, businesses and individuals to advance the global movement to end hunger. Our leadership and support help to bolster an enduring American legacy of feeding families in need around the world. To learn more about World Food Program USA’s mission, please visit this website.

About The Weeknd

Filtering R&B and pop through an ambitious widescreen lens, The Weeknd took over popular music and culture on his own terms. The multi-platinum and Diamond certified star is one of the most listened to artists in the world on Spotify (over 51 billion streams) and is a top 10 artist of all time for RIAA singles. His 2020 album After Hours is the #1 most streamed R&B album of all time (followed by his 2016 album Starboy at #2), and his 80’s nostalgic track “Blinding Lights” went 5X RIAA-certified platinum and broke the record for Billboard’s longest-running #1 on its US radio chart. The track quickly became his fifth to go #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Alongside his gilded musical career, he’s graced the covers of TIME, Forbes, Variety, Rolling Stone, Esquire, Harper’s Bazaar, and GQ along with late night TV stages with heralded performances on SNL, Jimmy Kimmel, Stephen Colbert and the VMA’s where he accepted the awards for Video of the Year and Best R&B. In recent times he has made acting appearances in TV and film with 2019’s film Uncut Gems as well as starring in and co-writing an episode of the hit show American Dad. He generously shares, with over $2M in donations made in 2020 to various charities. The continuous record breaking of charts, sales and streams, headlining the biggest festivals and stadiums in the world including this year’s Super Bowl, and his ever mysterious public persona combined solidifies The Weeknd as one of the most compelling and significant artists of the 21st century.

roadtrip illustration by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine

Women’s History Month Road Trip

CELEBRATE WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH AT SITES THROUGHOUT THE U.S.

Curated by the Holiday Rambler® Brand

This March, Women’s History Month is the ideal time to pack up the RV and delve into the history-making impact women have had on the United States for hundreds of years.

Exploring several Women’s History Month stops is comfortable and easy in a Holiday Rambler. Holiday Rambler motorhomes are known for their innovation, quality, and value, and have received numerous industry awards.

The 2021 Nautica model from Holiday Rambler just earned Best New Model from RV Pro and Top RV Debut from RVBusiness. Nautica is a Class A Diesel motorhome that is less than 40’,  and is built on a Freightliner Custom Chassis®. While the Nautica is shorter in length, it still boasts a roomy interior with lots of storage. Amenities include an electric fireplace, stainless steel appliances, pantry storage and full-extension drawers, a master bedroom suite with a skylight shower, and an exterior entertainment center with a 50” LED TV.

Holiday Rambler is a brand within REV Recreation Group, Inc., which is a subsidiary of REV Group, Inc. For more information, visit their website.

Each ‘Women’s History Stop’ has been researched but, due to COVID-19, be sure to call ahead to confirm hours of operation and secure tickets, since many sites require advance reservations. There are additional museums and sites that honor remarkable women but many, such as the Rosa Parks Museum, are closed or have gone virtual. For in-person travel, please be safe – wear a mask, practice social distancing, and wash hands frequently.

 

Statue of Liberty, New York, NY

The Statue of Liberty is one of the country’s oldest and most famous women. At a graceful 305’ tall, she is a towering symbol of American freedom. The statue was sculpted by French artist Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi and gifted to the United States by France in 1875 to commemorate the countries’ alliance during the American Revolution. In her right hand, Lady Liberty holds a torch above her head. In her left hand, she carries a tablet inscribed with JULY IV MDCCLXXVI (July 4, 1776 in Roman numerals), the date of the U.S. Declaration of Independence. 

The statue can be viewed from various vantage points along the Hudson River. For an up-close- and-personal look, take the ferry that departs from Battery Park to Liberty Island where the Statue of Liberty stands.

RVers can stay overnight at Liberty Harbor RV, which also delivers views of the Statue of Liberty and is next to Liberty Harbor Marina.

 

New-York Historical Society Museum & Library, New York, NY

The New-York Historical Society includes a Center for Women’s History with a plethora of exhibits, information, and artifacts from women who have shaped the United States.

“Women’s Voices” is a multimedia digital installation that includes profiles of: Sonia Sotomayor, the first Latina Supreme Court Justice; Barbara McClintock, a Nobel Prize-winning scientist; Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman to receive a medical degree in the U.S; Misty Copeland, a trailblazing dancer and principal ballerina; and Chien-Shiung Wu, the Manhattan Project physicist who was snubbed by the Nobel Prize committee.

RVers can stay overnight at Liberty Harbor RV, which also delivers views of the Statue of Liberty and is next to Liberty Harbor Marina.

 

Women’s Rights National Historical Park, Seneca Falls, NY

The fight for women’s right to vote began in upstate New York with the suffrage movement. In July 1848, two brave and determined women, Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, organized the first Women’s Rights Convention with approximately 200 women in attendance at Wesleyan Chapel.

At the Women’s Rights National Historical Park, “meet” the five women who organized the convention and Sojourner Truth, a former slave who became an abolitionist and women’s rights activist. Learn more about the convention, its organizers, and what they thought would happen after the convention.

Outside, the park includes Wesleyan Chapel (where the convention was held), the homes of three suffragists (Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Jane Hunt, and Mary Ann M’Clintock), and Declaration Park & Waterwall, which features the text and signers of the Declaration of Sentiments. The Declaration was written by Stanton to protest women’s inferior legal status and included 11 resolutions for equal rights.

Be sure to check the park’s website to experience one of the many ranger talks (conducted outdoors) about the pivotal events that happened on the park’s grounds.

RVers can spend the night at Hejamada Campground & RV Park, nestled in the beautiful Finger Lakes region of upstate New York.

 

The National Susan B. Anthony House & Museum, Rochester, NY

Susan B. Anthony can be considered one of the world’s greatest revolutionaries. She dedicated 50 years of her life to the women’s suffrage movement and was arrested for voting in the 1872 Presidential election in Rochester. After a two-day trial in 1873, she was convicted and sentenced to pay a fine of $100 and court costs. The museum shares Anthony’s inspiring story and preserves her National Historic Landmark home, which was the headquarters for the National American Woman Suffrage Association during her time as president of the organization.

She died at age 86 in 1906 after giving her “Failure is Impossible” speech in Boston.

RVers can spend the night at Southwoods RV Resort about 30 minutes from Rochester.

 

Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office Museum, Washington, D.C.

Born 200 years ago in 1821, Clara Barton’s humanitarian legacy continues today with the American Red Cross. In 1881, at age 59, she founded the American Red Cross and led it for 23 years.

Prior to establishing the Red Cross in the United States, Barton dedicated years of her life to the soldiers of the Civil War. She initially began by collecting much-needed supplies and later traveled to the front to deliver them and provide assistance in any way she could. Barton put herself in constant danger as she went to the major battles of the war to nurse, comfort, and care for wounded men. For her constant self-sacrifice, she came to be known as the “Angel of the Battlefield.”

After the Civil War, Barton established the Missing Soldiers Office to locate Union soldiers who hadn’t returned home. She and her team initiated searches on behalf of the women who were looking for their lost husbands or sons. Barton and her team wrote more than 100 letters a day to contacts in the U.S. Army and family and friends of the missing. By December 1868, she and her team had located more than 22,000 missing soldiers.

Visit the preserved rooms where Barton lived and worked during the Civil War and where she and her team spent thousands of hours in the Missing Soldiers Office.

RVers can spend the night at Cherry Hill Park that offers full hook-up sites.

 

Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, D.C.

Just outside of D.C., Arlington National Cemetery is worth a visit since a number of pioneering women have been honored with a burial at the Cemetery.

Lt. Ollie Bennett was the first female medical officer commissioned in the U.S. Army. During World War I when she joined the Army as a contract surgeon, she was told there were no uniforms for female surgeons, so she had to design one herself. (Section 10, Grave 10938-LH)

On February 14, 1870, Seraph Young became, according to many accounts, the first woman in the United States to vote under a women’s equal suffrage law. Two days earlier, Utah (then a U.S. territory) had passed legislation granting women the right to vote. Young, a schoolteacher, became the first woman to cast a ballot when she exercised her newly granted right in a Salt Lake City local election. (Section 13, Grave 89-A)

Major General Marcelite Jordan Harris retired in 1997 as the highest-ranking female officer in the Air Force and the highest ranking African American woman in the Department of Defense. A graduate of Spelman Academy, she was commissioned in 1965, rising through the ranks to become the first African American female brigadier general in the Air Force in 1991. Many of her assignments represented “firsts” for women in the Air Force. (Section 30, Grave 621)

RVers can spend the night at Cherry Hill Park that offers full hook-up sites.

 

Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historic Park, Church Creek, MD

Harriet Tubman, who was born into slavery in Maryland and escaped to freedom in Philadelphia, is the Underground Railroad’s best-known conductor. She risked her life many times, returning to Maryland to rescue at least 70 enslaved people, including her parents, brothers, family members, and friends. After the American Civil War broke out, her bravery continued as she became an armed scout and spy for the Union Army. In her later years, Tubman was an activist in the movement for women’s suffrage.

To see where Tubman was born, lived, labored, and where she fled from, follow the scenic, self-guided driving tour of the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway that includes 45 sites. The Byway winds 125 miles through the beautiful landscapes and waterscapes of Maryland’s Eastern Shore and continues for 98 miles through Delaware before ending in Philadelphia. A free map and audio guide are available on the Byway website.

On the Byway, don’t miss the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historic Park in Church Creek, MD, to learn about Tubman’s life and how her upbringing equipped her with essential outdoor skills that allowed her to successfully lead dozens of people out of slavery. 

RVers can spend that night at Fort Whaley Campground with a variety of amenities, including a private pool, dog park, and catch-and-release lake.

 

Helen Keller Birthplace, Tuscumbia, AL

The life of Helen Keller was full of hard struggles and amazing accomplishments. When Keller was just 19 months, she suffered a severe illness that left her blind and deaf. When she was six years old, her parents hired Anne Mansfield Sullivan as her teacher. Sullivan, who had partial vision, was 20 years old and a graduate of the Perkins School for the Blind. Miraculously, in less than a month, Sullivan was able to reach Keller through sign language and open the world to her.

Keller became one of history’s remarkable women. She dedicated her life to improving the conditions of blind and the deaf-blind around the world, lecturing in more than 25 countries. Wherever she appeared, she brought courage to millions of blind people.                                                                                          

When visiting Keller’s birthplace, do not miss the water pump where Keller had her life-changing breakthrough. While cool water gushed over Keller’s hand, Sullivan spelled “water” into her other hand. Suddenly, Keller connected the spelled word with the flowing liquid. Keller immediately began touching the elements around her, wanting to learn their names. Keller’s home includes her complete library of Braille books, her original Braille typewriter, plus mementos and gifts from her travels around the world.

RVers can spend the night at Heritage Acres RV Park in Tuscumbia.

 

National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame, Fort Worth, TX

The National Cowgirl Museum is the only museum in the world to honor the courageous, resilient, and independent women who helped shape the West. Hands-on activities for adults and children, along with computer-enhanced archival photographs, bring these trail-blazing women and the rough-and-tumble time to life. Through a hologram, hear from sharpshooter Annie Oakley and learn about the Wild West Shows that traveled the globe from the 1880s to the early 20th century.

Be sure to visit the Hall of Fame that honors modern-day cowgirl Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, along with the winningest female roper in the world, an American equestrian and Olympic show jumping medalist, a cowboy hat designer, and a country music superstar.

RVers can spend the night at Sandy Lake RV Resort. The resort offers pull thru sites, sites with concrete patios, a fitness center, swimming pool, and dog park.

 

Amelia Earhart Birthplace Museum, Atchison, KS

Amelia Earhart demonstrated that the sky’s the limit for women. She was the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean and the first person to fly solo from Hawaii to the U.S. mainland. During her flight to circumnavigate the globe, Earhart disappeared on July 2, 1937 somewhere over the Pacific. She was just 39 years old. As a champion for women in aviation, Earhart was instrumental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organization for female pilots.

Visit her childhood home on a bluff overlooking the Missouri River to get a glimpse of life inside the Earhart family. Another Earhart attraction is an earthwork portrait of the aviator created in 1997 by Kansas artist Stan Herd. Made from plantings, stone, and other natural materials, the one-acre portrait is on a hillside overlooking Warnock Lake. A viewing deck is on a nearby hilltop. 

RVers can spend the night at Basswood Resort, a beautifully secluded spot with modern amenities. 

 

Sacajawea Interpretive, Cultural & Educational Center, Salmon, ID

This center pays tribute to Sacagawea (c. 1788 – 1812) and her important contributions to the team that surveyed the Louisiana Purchase and Pacific Northwest. Sacagawea was a bi-lingual Shoshone woman who accompanied the Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery expedition in 18051806. Her skills as a translator were invaluable, along with her intimate knowledge of the difficult terrain. Remarkably, Sacagawea made the arduous exploration while caring for her infant son, Jean-Baptiste, who had been born just two months earlier.

The Interpretive Center is part of a 71-acre park that includes a bronze statue of Sacagawea holding Jean-Baptiste and two scenic walking trails.

RVers can spend the night at Elk Bend RV Park located on a scenic Western drive. The area is famous for its abundant wildlife – elk, eagles, bighorn sheep, deer, and mountain goats.

 

Bennington Museum, Bennington, VT

While the museum is closed during Women’s History Month, it is reopening April 2 – just a few days after the month officially concludes.

Anna Mary Robertson “Grandma” Moses (18601961) started painting in her seventies and within years was one of America’s most famous artists. Moses, known as a folk artist, painted scenes of rural life that captured an idyllic, bygone era of the United States.  

The Bennington Museum has the largest public collection of paintings by Grandma Moses and a collection of artifacts from her life, including an 18-century tilt-top table she used as her painting table and her paint-stained apron. In addition, the museum is now home to the schoolhouse where she studied as a child.

 

About REV Recreation Group

REV Recreation Group, Inc. (RRG) is a REV Group® company and a leading manufacturer of Class A Gas and Diesel recreational vehicle brands. This company has one of the best and longest standing distribution networks in the industry and boasts some of the industry’s most recognized and iconic brand names such as American Coach, Fleetwood RV, and Holiday Rambler. REV Recreation Group is headquartered in Decatur, IN, which is also its principal manufacturing location. In addition, RRG operates two state-of-the-art service and repair centers and a genuine parts online warehouse.

 

About REV Group, Inc.

REV Group (REVG) is a leading designer, manufacturer, and distributor of specialty vehicles and related aftermarket parts and services. We serve a diversified customer base, primarily in the United States, through three segments: Fire & Emergency, Commercial, and Recreation. We provide customized vehicle solutions for applications, including essential needs for public services (ambulances, fire apparatus, school buses, and transit buses), commercial infrastructure (terminal trucks and industrial sweepers) and consumer leisure (recreational vehicles). Our diverse portfolio is made up of well-established principal vehicle brands, including many of the most recognizable names within their industry. Several of our brands pioneered their specialty vehicle product categories and date back more than 50 years. REV Group trades on the NYSE under the symbol REVG. Investors-REVG

 

 

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris Illustration by Kaelen Felix

The Presidential Inauguration

Today, Joe Biden was inaugurated as the 46th president of the United States which commences his four-year presidency and Kamala Harris as Vice President. 

Earlier it was revealed that former president Donald Trump would not attend the ceremony. Trump announced this on his Twitter account before the account was suspended. On January 8 he tweeted, “To all of those who have asked, I will not be going to the Inauguration on January 20th.”

Trump is the sixth outgoing president that did not attend the presidential inauguration. The last time this occurred was in 1921 when Woodrow Wilson did not attend the inauguration of Warren G. Harding because of poor health. 

“It’s usually a sign that American society is in the midst of major political feud,” the presidential historian Douglas Brinkley said in the New York Times. “The fact that the incoming and outgoing presidents can’t shake hands and co-participate in an inauguration means that something’s off-kilter in the democracy.”

President Biden took an upbeat approach while speaking to the public in front of the Lincoln Memorial at the “Celebrating America” concert. After  addressing many difficulties the nation has encountered recently, he asked if American’s were up for a challenge. 

“Will we meet the moment like our forebearers have?” he asked. “I believe we must and I believe we will. You, the American people are the reason why I have never been more optimistic about America than I am this very day.”

“There isn’t anything we can’t do, if we do it together,” he added. 

“So thank you for this honor, I will give my all to you,” Biden concluded. 

The “Celebrating America” concert was star-packed and many celebrities came together to celebrate the inauguration of President Biden and Vice President Harris. Performers such as Bruce Springsteen, Jon Bon Jovi, Demi Lovato, John Legend and Katy Perry all had smashing performances. The celebration was hosted by Tom Hanks, who many sources noted as looking “freezing” because he didn’t have time to take a break in the heated trailers set up for performers. 

There was of course concerns because of the violence that recently occurred at the Capitol earlier in January, explained Adrienne Elrod, the director of talent for the Biden transition team. “What happened on January 6th I wouldn’t say derailed us, but it certainly caused us to take a step back,” she said.

This inauguration is monumental as the first female Vice President is sworn in inspiring girls throughout America. Many people showed heartwarming tweets of their daughters watching Harris as she was sworn in as president. It was also reported that Harris will not immediately be moving in to the Vice President’s residence at the Naval Observatory. 

In Harris’s first statement to the public in her role as Vice President, she encouraged the people of the United States to unite in this time of crisis. 

“In many ways this moment embodies our character as a nation. It demonstrates who we are, even in dark times. We, not only dream, we do. We not only see what has been, we see what can be. We shoot for the moon, and then we plant our flag on it. We are bold, fearless and ambitious. We are undaunted, in our belief that we shall overcome, that we will rise up. This is American aspiration,” Harris said.

Dr. Jill Biden tweeted a video of her and President Biden arriving at the North Portico of the White House as her first official tweet as First Lady. “Thank you for your faith in something that is bigger than all of us: that we will build a better world because we’re going to do it together,” the tweet read.

One unexpected part of the inauguration that has taken social media by storm is an image of Bernie Sanders sitting in a chair with mittens on. A huge number of memes have been created of Sanders in various locations and according to the Los Angles Times Sanders has also been laughing at the memes. 

A school teacher from Vermont was responsible for crafting the famous mittens and has since been flooded with requests from people that want to buy them. However, she has announced she is no longer selling them.

“Thanks for all the interest in Bernie’s mittens!” Jen Ellis wrote on Twitter. “I’m so flattered that Bernie wore them to the inauguration. Sadly, I have no more mittens for sale. There are a lot of great crafters on ETSY who make them.”

Sanders said he had no idea that the image of him would cause such an uproar on social media. “I was just sitting there trying to keep warm, trying to pay attention to what was going on,” he said during an interview on “Late Night with Seth Meyers” Thursday. Even celebrities like Reba and Sarah Jessica Parker joined in on the fun making memes of the image. 

Biden began his duties as early as Wednesday when he finalized over a dozen executive moves in the Oval Office. “There’s no time to start like today,” Biden told reporters as he began signing a stack of orders and memoranda. “I’m going to start by keeping the promises I made to the American people.”

Biden also made it clear during a swearing-in ceremony that his employees are expected to respect each other.”If you’re ever working with me and I hear you treating another colleague with disrespect, talking down to someone, I will fire you on the spot,” said Biden. 

The Biden administration has also put a plan in place to focus on specific issues that need attention. Starting on January 20, the Biden Administration began with Inauguration and four Crises to focus on.

They decided to pick a theme for the following ten days so they would be able to focus on specific issues each day. Some of these themes include Covid, Economic Relief, Climate, Health Care and Immigration. In February there is a plan to focus on restoring America’s place in the world. Throughout these days there will be a variety of executive orders depending on the theme.

Immigration illustration for 360 MAGAZINE

American Immigration Council

The American Immigration Council Announces Commitment to Fostering a More Welcoming Nation with Support of Ad Council’s “Belonging Begins With Us” Campaign

National initiative encourages welcoming attitudes and actions in communities across America
 
The American Immigration Council today announced its support of Belonging Begins With Us, a national campaign dedicated to fostering a more welcoming nation where everyone feels that they belong, regardless of their background or where they were born. Led by the Ad Council, the effort is supported by a broad coalition of foundations, corporations and non-profit organizations working to strengthen connections and promote belonging in communities across the country. 

The Belonging Begins With Us campaign will appear nationwide in time and space donated by the media across TV, radio, digital, print. and out-of-home placements. The American Immigration Council is among the campaign partners who have committed to encouraging a spirit of belonging within their communities and will share the campaign messaging and resources with their own audiences and stakeholders. 

“Everyone needs to feel like they belong and this campaign is asking people to consider who they include and exclude in their daily lives” said Wendy Feliz, Director of the Center for Inclusion and Belonging at the American Immigration Council. “This is about giving each other a sense of belonging, care, consideration, and community.” 

“Belonging Begins With Us reminds us that we all have the power to make others feel safe and welcome in our communities,” said Lisa Sherman, Ad Council President and CEO. “We are grateful to our partners for helping us all build more meaningful connections in our neighborhoods, cities and towns, regardless of background or country of origin.”

Created pro bono by ad agency Pereira O’Dell, the public service advertisements (PSAs) a new cover of the 1968 hit song “Walk a Mile in My Shoes,” recorded exclusively for the campaign by Lake Street Dive. The song and powerful visuals remind audiences that we all know what it feels like to be left out—and for people who moved to this country, that feeling can last more than a moment. By highlighting this shared emotional experience, the PSAs spark empathy and build stronger bonds between everyone who calls America home. The video PSA can be viewed HERE.

The PSAs direct audiences to the campaign website, BelongingBeginsWithUs.org, which features dozens of real stories of belonging from across the country. The website also highlights actions people can take to help others in their community feel that they belong.

The campaign was developed by the Ad Council, American Immigration Council and Welcoming America with financial support from the Carnegie Corporation, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, Einhorn Collaborative, Ford Foundation, FWD.us Education Fund and Stand Together. Additional partners who will share the campaign’s message and promote belonging in communities across the country include the American Alliance of Museums, the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities, Hello Neighbor, Looking for America, New American Economy, Over Zero, the Trust for Public Land, Western States Center, YMCA of the USA and Walmart Inc.

About The American Immigration Council
 
The American Immigration Council works to strengthen America by shaping how America thinks about and acts towards immigrants and immigration and by working toward a more fair and just immigration system that opens its doors to those in need of protection and unleashes the energy and skills that immigrants bring. The Council brings together problem solvers and employs four coordinated approaches to advance change—litigation, research, legislative and administrative advocacy, and communications. 

Follow the latest Council news and information ImmigrationImpact.com and on Twitter @immcouncil.
 
About The Ad Council

The Ad Council has a long history of creating life-saving public service communications in times of national crisis, starting in the organization’s earliest days during World War II to September 11th and natural disasters like Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Sandy. Its deep relationships with media outlets, the creative community, issue experts and government leaders make the organization uniquely poised to quickly distribute life-saving information to millions of Americans.

The Ad Council is where creativity and causes converge. The non-profit organization brings together the most creative minds in advertising, media, technology and marketing to address many of the nation’s most important causes. The Ad Council has created many of the most iconic campaigns in advertising history. Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk. Smokey Bear. Love Has No Labels.

The Ad Council’s innovative social good campaigns raise awareness, inspire action and save lives. To learn more, visit AdCouncil.org, follow the Ad Council’s communities on Facebook and Twitter, and view the creative on YouTube.

Senate called on to include $200 billion for charities in relief package

A coalition of nonprofit groups is calling on the U.S. Senate to include a temporary emergency stimulus in its next pandemic relief package. The proposal would unlock $200 billion in charitable funds to assist charities overwhelmed by the pandemic, with updates to the laws governing private foundations and donor-advised funds (DAFs). The proposal would release more of the estimated $1.2 trillion they currently hold by increasing required distributions to 10 percent annually for three years.

“Nonprofits need emergency help right now. Millions of nonprofit jobs have been lost, one-third of them in health care. Up to 120,000 nonprofits are shutting down completely,” said Scott Wallace, co-chair of the Wallace Global Fund, a private foundation that committed to spend 20 percent of its own endowment in 2020. “We urge Congress to enact an Emergency Charity Stimulus to force philanthropies to increase their support for nonprofit organizations – immediately, urgently, and temporarily, to allow time for deployment of a vaccine and economic recovery.” 

“We are collectively facing the most dire moment that many of us have seen in our lifetimes, and it is likely the tip of the iceberg in terms of the challenges that await us as a society and a planet,” said Aileen Getty, founder and president of the Aileen Getty Foundation and granddaughter of billionaire J. Paul Getty.

“While some foundations and donors are stepping up at this moment, others continue to treat the five percent payout as a ceiling not a floor,” said Chuck Collins, director of the Charity Reform Initiative at the Institute for Policy Studies. ““Donors have already taken the tax break for these contributions. Congress needs to raise the bar for those donors who haven’t figured out this is no time to sit on your treasure.”

Led by the Charity Reform Initiative of the Institute for Policy Studies, Patriotic Millionaires, and the Wallace Global Fund, the groups first proposed the idea in May with a letter to Congress. The letter has now been signed by almost 800 philanthropists and leaders of foundations as well as several thousand nonprofit leaders and staff.

The proposal calls for a temporary doubling of private foundation payout from 5 percent to 10 percent for three years and would establish a similar 10 percent payout for donor-advised funds (DAFs) that currently have no mandate.

Researchers at the Institute for Policy Studies estimate these policies would unleash an estimated $200 billion in additional charity funds over three years, with no additional cost to taxpayers. The independent nonprofit sector is part of the front-line response to the pandemic and other natural disasters. The sector employs 12 million workers or more than 10 percent of the private workforce.

Prominent signers of the letter include: Scott Wallace, Wallace Global Fund (PA); Abigail Disney (NY); Aileen Getty, Aileen Getty Foundation (CA), Sara Miller, Miranda Family Fund (NY), Rory Kennedy (CA), Ning Mosberger-Tang (CO); Catherine Gund, George Gund Foundation (NY); Mary Mountcastle, Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation (NC); Anna Fink, Amalgamated Charitable; Ellen Friedman, Compton Fund (CA); Jerry Hirsch, Lodestar Foundation (AZ); Morris Pearl (NY); and Stephen Prince (TN). 

About the Charity Reform Initiative

The Charity Reform Initiative of the Institute for Policy Studies aims to modernize the rules governing philanthropy to increase the flow of resources to the nonprofit independent sector and protect the integrity of the tax system. 

About the Patriotic Millionaires

The Patriotic Millionaires are high-net worth Americans, business leaders, and investors who are united in their concern about the destabilizing concentration of wealth and power in America. The mission of The Patriotic Millionaires organization is to build a more stable, prosperous, and inclusive nation by promoting public policies based on the “first principles” of equal political representation, a guaranteed living wage for all working citizens, and a fair tax system. 

About the Wallace Global Fund

The mission of the Wallace Global Fund is to support people-powered movements to advance democracy and rights and to fight for a healthy planet.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

By Cassandra Yany

Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday after her long battle with cancer. The 87-year-old Supreme Court justice was a trailblazer who continuously worked to end gender discrimination and preserve our civil liberties. 

The Supreme Court announced Friday that Ginsburg passed away at her Washington D.C. home due to complications from metastatic pancreatic cancer. She had previously overcome lung, liver and colon cancer. In July, she revealed that the cancer had returned, but that she would continue to serve on the Supreme Court.

Ginsburg’s revolutionary career started when she graduated at the top of her class from Cornell University, earning a Bachelor’s degree in government. Two years later, she attended Harvard Law School with her husband, Martin Ginsburg. There, she was one of only nine women in her class of over 500 students, according to NPR.

During their time at Harvard, Martin was diagnosed with testicular cancer, so Ruth would take notes for the two of them and help him with his work, all while trying to juggle being a new mom. When Martin landed a job at a firm in New York, the family packed up and Ruth finished her education at Columbia University. 

Once Ginsburg finished school, she began to experience the discrimination that came with being a female lawyer. According to TIME, she was unable to secure a position at a premier law firm or one of the Supreme Court clerkships, regardless of the fact that she had been the first students to serve on both the Harvard and Columbia Law reviews, and graduated at the top of her class. These jobs were instead easily given to males who had ranked lower than her in school. This led her to work a lower court clerkship and teach at the Rutgers Law Newark campus.

At Rutgers, she co-founded the Women’s Rights Law Reporter. While she was there, she learned that she wasn’t earning the same wage as one of her male counterparts. The dean attributed this pay disparity to the fact that the male professor had a family to support, while Ginsburg’s husband already had a good-paying job. This type of discrimination caused her to hide her second pregnancy.

After her son was born, Ginsburg began teaching at Columbia, becoming the university’s first tenured female professor. There, she also co-authored the first case book on discrimination law. She later went on to co-found the Women’s Rights Project of the American Civil Liberties Union in 1972.

During her work as a lawyer, Ginsburg established that equal protection under the law, as stated in the 14th Amendment, should extend to gender. She won five out of the six cases that she argued before the Supreme Court on gender discrimination. She often chose to find this prejudice in cases where males were the plaintiffs being discriminated against, as seen in the 2018 film On the Basis of Sex. 

In 1980, Jimmy Carter appointed Ginsburg as a judge in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. She became the second woman on the Supreme Court, and the first Jewish justice since 1969 when she was appointed by Bill Clinton in 1993. During her time, she eliminated almost 200 laws that discriminated against women. 

Ginsburg also fought for the rights of immigrants, the mentally ill, and members of the LGBTQ+ community. She approved gay marriage in the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, stating that if you can’t deny a 70-year-old couple the right to marriage due to their inability to procreate, you can’t deny a gay couple of that right either.

Ginsburg supported women’s reproductive rights, fighting for the coverage of contraceptives despite anyone’s religious beliefs. At the time of Roe v. Wade, she litigated a case where a pregnant Air Force captain was told she would have to have an abortion in order to return to her job. She noted the hypocrisy present in this case— that the U.S. government was encouraging abortion – and found that it served as a clear example of why women should have the right to make their own life decisions.

Ginsburg’s passing gives Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and President Trump the ability to appoint a new justice, despite her dying wish to not be replaced until after a new president is elected. This opportunity could make the Supreme Court more right-leaning and jeopardize cases like Roe v. Wade that are at the forefront of equal rights movements. 

This comes four years after McConnell’s 11-month Republican blockade of President Obama’s nominee for the court, where he argued “that a president shouldn’t be able to seat a new justice in the final year of their term.” Obama noted this in a statement released early Saturday, where he said “A basic principle of law— and of everyday fairness— is that we apply rules with consistency, and not based on what’s convenient or advantageous in the moment.”

After the news broke Friday night of Ginsburg’s death, hundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court to pay tribute and create a memorial on the building’s steps. Many signs have since been left outside of the court honoring her legacy.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Saturday morning that there will be a statue built in Ginsburg’s hometown of Brooklyn to “serve as a physical reminder of her many contributions to the America we know today…”

Trump issued a proclamation Saturday ordering flags to be flown at half-staff until sunset on the day of interment “As a mark of respect for Ruth Bader Ginsburg…”

RBG will be dearly missed by Americans on both sides of the aisle. We have lost a longtime champion of equal rights, but her legacy will never be forgotten.

Juvenile Law Center – Board of Directors

By Cassandra Yany

Juvenile Law Center announced Wednesday the appointment of four new members to the Board of Directors. Khaliah Ali, Daniel Okonkwo, Robert Parker and Eli Segal will join the governing body of the national organization, based in Philadelphia. The center is the country’s first nonprofit public interest law firm for children’s rights.

Meet the new members:

Khaliah Ali

Khaliah Ali, the daughter of boxing legend and social justice activist Muhummad Ali, is a fashion designer, author and humanitarian. She first connected with Juvenile Law Center after she read about the child abuse crisis at Glen Mills Schools in Delaware County, PA where she resides. This led her to begin speaking and writing in support of the organization’s fight for children in juvenile facilities.

“I am so honored to serve on Juvenile Law Center’s board,” Ali said. “Additionally as the daughter of the late boxer Muhammad Ali, I am honored to help curate my father‘s legacy through such a laudable cause.”

R. Daniel Okonkwo, Esq.

R. Daniel Okonkwo, Esq. is an attorney and public policy expert with significant experience in the policy, advocacy and nonprofit sectors. Okonkwo is the Vice President (Relationship Manager) in the Office of Nonprofit Engagement at JPMorgan Chase and Co., where he is responsible for building relationships with key stakeholders and grantmaking in the Mid-Atlantic region. He also manages a national grant portfolio that focuses on nonprofit capacity building and civil rights organizations.

“I am thrilled and honored to join Juvenile Law Center’s Board of Directors,” said Okonkwo. “The organization has been at the forefront of the work to ensure that young people are protected from unjust treatment in the various systems that impact their lives. Juvenile Law Center is an organization that I have admired for a long time and I look forward to supporting their work on behalf of young people across the country.”

Robert P. Parker

Robert P. Parker spent 14 years as a partner in the Litigation Department of Paul, Weiss before joining a D.C.-based technology/litigation focused firm in 2013. His practice centers on complex civil matters involving technology, regulatory and commercial issues. Parker represents some of the world’s most established companies, as well as start-up enterprises in a variety of commercial and litigation matters. He is ranked among Washington D.C.’s Super Lawyers in the area of IP litigation and has previously served as the chairman for the National Council of Adoption’s Board of Directors.

“Too often, children and teens become lost in the juvenile justice system – civil and criminal. The impact on their lives, their families, and society at large is beyond calculation,” said Parker. “I am delighted to join Juvenile Law Center’s efforts to ensure that no more juveniles get lost in our courts or in their placements.”

Eli Segal

Eli Segal is a partner at the law firm of Troutman Pepper, where he focuses on representing journalists in First Amendment matters, colleges and universities in their unique legal issues, and other businesses and individuals within the spectrum of commercial litigation. He is the co-chair of Troutman Pepper’s First Amendment and Newsroom practice.

“I volunteered at Juvenile Law Center years ago during college and law school and am thrilled to have the opportunity to contribute again to the organization’s vitally important work,” said Segal.

Juvenile Law Center says it is proud to welcome these distinguished individuals to its Board of Directors. “Our Board of Directors is an integral part of Juvenile Law Center and it is a joy and privilege to work with them,” said Sue Mangold, the Chief Executive Officer. “We are thrilled to welcome Khaliah Ali, Daniel Okonkwo, Robert Parker and Eli Segal. Each is already engaged in our work and brings valuable expertise and experience to our board.”

About Juvenile Law Center

Juvenile Law Center advocates for rights, dignity, equity and opportunity for youth in the foster care and justice systems.

Founded in 1975, Juvenile Law Center is the first non-profit, public interest law firm for children in the country. We fight for youth through litigation, appellate advocacy and submission of amicus (friend-of-the-court) briefs, policy reform, public education, training, consulting, and strategic communications. Widely published and internationally recognized as leaders in the field, Juvenile Law Center has substantially shaped the development of law and policy on behalf of youth. We strive to ensure that laws, policies, and practices affecting youth advance racial and economic equity and are rooted in research, consistent with children’s unique developmental characteristics, and reflective of international human rights values. For more information about Juvenile Law Center’s work, visit www.JLC.org.

Soccer illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

U.S. Soccer Foundation’s Soccer for Success

The U.S. Soccer Foundation adapted and launched its signature Soccer for Success program to fit ever-changing COVID-19 landscape.

The Foundation spent the past few months listening to its partners to best support the needs of soccer communities. By adapting its Soccer for Success curriculum, partners can run the program across a variety of settings. In lieu of the traditional in-person trainings, they are providing an online training that is specifically designed to prepare coach-mentors to deliver the program across these new settings. The 12-week curriculum consists of:

  • Thirty-six pre-recorded video sessions that can be sent directly to participants and their families to complete at a time that works best for them. The sessions are around 15-20 minutes in length, can be done at home with little space and equipment, and incorporate health and wellness tips and information.
  • Thirty-six practice session plans that provide coach-mentors with guidance on how to run 45-minute virtual sessions (in real time) with their participants. The practice sessions include both soccer activities and health and wellness teaching points.
  • Thirty-six practice session plans that provide coach-mentors with guidance on how to run 60-minute, in-person socially distanced sessions with participants. The practice sessions include both soccer activities and health and wellness teaching points.
  • Thirty-six traditional in-person practice and game day sessions.

This formatting gives our partners the flexibility to run Soccer for Success three days a week for a typical 12-week season in the way that works best for them and their community at any given time, said Sarah Pickens, U.S. Soccer Foundation Associate Vice President of Programs. 

In some places, space constraints may limit the number of in-person socially distanced participants allowed at one time. Fortunately, with this program, partners can alternate days that players can come in person, while still providing virtual lessons to any other students enrolled in the program. No matter what stage a given community is in, children have a way to participate in each session. This approach also anticipates the very real scenario that things will continue to change rapidly. Therefore, even if COVID-19 guidelines change, partners can still run programming virtually or through distribution of pre-recorded sessions without missing a beat.

Pickens added, This helps children have some sense of consistency, keeps them active, and keeps them connected to each other in a positive and fun way. The bottom line is that Soccer for Success keeps kids healthy in body and mind. In our current reality, this is more important than ever. 

About U.S. Soccer Foundation

The U.S. Soccer Foundation programs are the national model for sports-based youth development in underserved communities. Since its founding in 1994, the Foundation has established programs proven to help children embrace an active and healthy lifestyle while nurturing their personal growth beyond sports. Its cost-effective, high-impact initiatives offer safe environments where kids and communities thrive. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., the U.S. Soccer Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization.

Follow U.S. Soccer Foundation: Website | Twitter | Facebook

Must-See Places in DC via Bike

By Lia Summers

Loop of the National Mall

The National Mall is the most popular attraction in Washington, DC for good reason. The iconic buildings, memorials, and greenery are breathtaking. Biking is one of the best ways to see the glory of the National Mall. Start at the 15th Street bike trail on the Northeast Side of the White House and follow 15th street past the Washington Monument. Stay on the sidewalk and go clockwise to view the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Capitol, the Holocaust Museum, the Jefferson Memorial, and the George Mason Memorial to Ohio Drive. Continue on Ohio Drive and view the Potomac River, the Arlington Memorial Bridge and Arlington National Cemetery in the distance. Hang a right on West Basin Drive to see the FDR Memorial, MLK Memorial and the DC World War I Memorial. Hang a left onto Independence Ave to see the Korean War Memorial, the Lincoln Memorial and the Reflecting Pool and the Vietnam Memorial. Take Constitution Ave East and view the Federal Reserve, Constitution Gardens and the Lock-keeper’s House. Hang a Right onto 17th Street to get a close up view of the WW2 Memorial, the John Paul Jones Memorial and the Tidal Basin.

If you are feeling adventurous, cross the Arlington Memorial bridge on the North side into Virginia and cross to the West side of Jefferson Davis Highway to follow the trail to the Netherlands Carillon and a recently restored Marine Corps Memorial (Iwo Jima).

Another option is to take the South side path on the Arlington Memorial Bridge and merge onto the Mount Vernon trail. Take the scenic ride along the Potomac River to the 14th Street Bridge and ride East to land back in DC at the Thomas Jefferson Memorial.

Hains Point

Hains Point is the location where the Potomac and Anacostia rivers meet and the location of East Potomac Park. Now that the SW Waterfront has been redeveloped, there are beautiful views along the road that hugs the perimeter of the park. There are trees along the route including Weeping Willows, Horse Chestnuts, Buckeyes and the oldest section of surviving Yoshino Cherry trees on the National Mall. There are also several recreational activities in East Potomac Park including swimming, tennis and mini golf.

Pennsylvania Ave Capitol/LOC/SC

Head East from South Side of the White house to the center bike lane on Pennsylvania Ave to see the historic buildings on Federal Triangle, City Hall, the Old Post Office, the National Gallery of Art and the Capitol Building. Bike up the walkway around the Capitol to the see the East side, which is the front of the Capitol and where every presidential inauguration has been held until Ronald Reagan’s in 1981. Behold the beautiful views of the Capitol visitor center, the Supreme Court and the Jefferson Library of Congress on First Street. Bike North on First past the Senate Buildings to view Union Station.

Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens – Formerly known as Shaw Gardens, Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens is a historic water lily farm started by Walter and Helen Shaw Fowler. It is set in the Anacostia River Tidal Wetlands and is easily accessible on the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail North bicycle Trail. Water lilies bloom from early May to mid-September and enjoy the lotus seed pod heads for three seasons. Enjoy the beautiful marshes, bird watch, or have a picnic!

Anacostia River Trail South and Kingman Island

Starting at RFK Stadium there is a lovely bike trail that hugs both sides of the Anacostia River. This trail passes Kingman Island, several boating clubs, fishermen, and beautiful views on the West Side of the Anacostia River. Cross the Philip Souza bridge and go North on the West side of the river for a complete loop, or continue South on the East side to the Navy Yard.

Navy Yard/Nats Stadium

The Anacostia river trail ends on 11th St SE. You can then cross the highway to the Navy Yard boardwalk and continue along the Potomac River and several historic military memorials to the boardwalk at Yards Park which hosts several restaurants and Nats Stadium.

Mt Olivet Cemetery and the National Arboretum

Mt. Olivet Cemetery is an underrated attraction that features some of the oldest graves in the city. Most importantly, they allow bikes on their main roads! This iconic cemetery is one of the oldest in Washington, DC and features rolling hills, ancient marble headstones and elaborate family vaults. It’s also the final resting place of Lincoln Conspirator, Mary Surratt and White House Architect, James Hoban.

This is a challenging ride with many hills, so it’s ideal for an electric bicycle. Mt. Olivet Cemetery is located in Northeast Washington, DC off of Bladensburg Road. It’s best to drive and park at the cemetery before you ride. The National Arboretum is across the street from Mt. Olivet Cemetery. Enjoy 400 acres of gardens, a world-class Bonsai collection, and a stunning display of the Old sandstone Capitol columns.

Kaelen Felix illustrates Amtrak for 360 MAGAZINE.

360 Magazine Marches on Washington

By Cassandra Yany × Armon Hayes, Vaughn Lowery

Recently, our team journeyed to Washington, D.C. for the National Action Network’s Commitment March. The August 28 march marked 57 years since the March on Washington where Martin Luther King Jr. gave his historic “I Have A Dream” speech. According to the National Action Network’s website, the goal of the march was to advocate for comprehensive police accountability reform, promote participation in the Census and motivate voters to cast their ballots in the upcoming Presidential election.

The National Action Network was founded by Rev. Al Sharpton in 1991. With nearly 100 chapters nationwide, the civil rights organization works in the tradition of Martin Luther King, Jr. to achieve “one standard of justice, decency, and equal opportunities for all people regardless of race, religion, ethnicity, criminal record, economic status, gender, gender expression or sexuality.”

The trip from New York to Washington, D.C. was made easy by taking Amtrak’s Acela service. Despite the higher price point, the Acela is newer and less crowded than regional trains. The express train eliminated the burden of tolls and stopped in only a few cities, arriving in D.C. after about three and a half hours. It can be stressful to travel right now, so it was a relief to see how clean the train was. The quiet car, basic free wifi and outlets on board provided the perfect environment to research and write articles on our tablets. We utilized our extra time to discuss with one another and prepare for our coverage of the march and our days in D.C.

The café offered coffee and various snack options, and the sliding glass doors made it easy for us to walk through the cars. The reclining seats were comfortable and allowed us to rest before our trip. There were also sections of four seats for those traveling in a larger group. Each passenger could bring two personal items weighing up to 25 pounds, and two carry-on bags weighing up to 50 pounds at no additional cost. Amtrak is currently offering reduced fares for two to six tickets purchased together where riders can save eight to 45 percent.

Kaelen Felix illustrates Amtrak story for 360 MAGAZINE

Luckily, we were able to call Amtrak in advance to ensure we could carry on our folding bicycles. With limited parking available in the city, electric bikes served as a great mode of transportation for many protesters. E-bikes such as the DYU Smart Bike and a custom scooter from Good Vibe Gliders were an affordable alternative to renting a car, and made covering and participating in the march much easier.

The Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off Our Necks started early Friday morning. Participants marched through the National Mall, many carrying signs remembering those whose lives have been lost in acts of police violence. Others displayed “Black Lives Matter” on flags, shirts and masks.

Some participants created street art during the event, voicing their support through their work. At one point, a number of demonstrators stood together in the Reflecting Pool in front of the Washington Monument. Marchers reached the section of 16 Street NW that has become known as “Black Lives Matter Plaza” around 3:30 PM before dispersing for the day.

Organizers of the march upheld COVID-19 guidelines and regulations. The National Action Network placed multiple signs throughout the National Mall encouraging social distancing, and took marchers’ temperatures as they entered the area. Face masks were distributed to people who did not have one, and visitors from high-risk areas were urged to join virtually from their homes. There was also a testing booth on site, as reported by WUSA 9.

Kaelen Felix illustrates Amtrak story for 360 MAGAZINE

The march was co-convened by Sharpton and Martin Luther King III. Among the thousands of attendees who gathered on the National Mall were the families of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner and Jacob Blake. Many members of these families gave speeches at the Lincoln Memorial, along with lawmakers from across the country. These congressmen and women pushed for legislation that would address cases of racial injustice.

Though she was not present, Vice Presidential candidate Kamala Harris shared her message to marchers via Twitter. In her speech, which was played at the event, she said, “…if we work together, to challenge every instinct our nation has to return to the status quo, and combine the wisdom of long time warriors for justice, with the creative energy of the young leaders today, we have an opportunity to make history, right here and right now.”

Yolanda Renee King took the stage to address the crowd, standing where her grandfather had led March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. In a video posted by CNN she said, “We stand and march for love and we will fulfill my grandfather’s dream.” She then led a chant of “Show me what democracy looks like; This is what democracy looks like!”

Friday was also the 65th anniversary of Emmett Till’s murder. The 14-year-old was lynched and thrown off a bridge while visiting family in Mississippi. He was abducted after “allegedly whistling at a white woman,” according to ABC 7 Chicago, and his body was found mutilated in the Tallahatchie River. Till’s family never received justice, as the two men responsible for his death were both acquitted. Till’s murder helped to spark the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s. Civil rights leader and former congressman John Lewis wrote that “Emmett Till was [his] George Floyd” in a New York Times essay that was published on the day of Lewis’ funeral.

The trip provided a meaningful experience to stand in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, as well as time to see local relatives. 360 President Vaughn Lowery visited his uncle Leroy Lowery, the former executive director of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial Project Foundation, who raised over $120 million for the Stone of Hope.

Leroy Lowery is the son of the late Rev. Joseph E. Lowery, a civil rights leader who helped Martin Luther King, Jr. establish the Southern Christina Leadership Conference, and received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009. Leroy Lowery attended the march with his father in 1963 and stated on Friday, “to see that we have to march [again] 57 years later is deflating.”

Kaelen Felix illustrates Amtrak story for 360 MAGAZINE