Posts tagged with "Italy"

Lamborghini Image provided by Katia Graytok and Kaleidoscope Luxury PR & Communications for use by 360 MAGAZINE.

Tonino Lamborghini: A Lifestyle Brand

When high quality meets bold design, a unique accessory is born!

Founded in 1981 by Tonino Lamborghini, 2nd generation of the LAMBORGHINI industrial dynasty, the company has evolved into a luxury lifestyle and design powerhouse, creating superlative watches, sunglasses, leather, smartphones, restaurants, jet-setters hotels, food, and beverage, from coffee to vodka and energy drinks, distributed in 40 countries around the world.

” In 1981, I started up my new Tonino Lamborghini Style and Accessories company. At the time, I assisted my father in the family group, but I felt the need to do something exclusively of my own, different from the world of engines. I have always been interested in design and accessories, and I took inspiration from my engineering background. I’ve always loved products linked to mechanics; thus, it was obvious that the first accessory I designed was a watch. And even today, in every product I create, there must not be missing a detail somehow related to my family’s automotive and engineering heritage. Uncompromising spirit, Italian ingenuity, and design – together with the timeless legend of a brand recognized worldwide: are the values that characterize my brand. My company’s mission is clear: to spread the passion and spirit of Italy with unique and distinctive products, inspired by Italian industrial design and the Lamborghini family’s story”

“Tonino Lamborghini in 2021 will celebrate its 40th anniversary. My father founded the Italian spirit to the world through a series of products that range from watches, eyewear, leather goods  three corporate core businesses furniture, hospitality projects, and branded beverages. A real lifestyle experience brand!”

With the support of the designers of its Centro Stile, constantly under the supervision of Tonino Lamborghini, the company has designed and manufactured timepiece models that have become real style icons over the years.

Following the Lamborghini family’s vision and constant inspiration, the company’s designers have created unique watches like the Spyder, a watch totally inspired by the shield of the brand’s emblem that encloses the “Miura raging bull,” or timeless pieces like the Cuscinetto, whose first edition goes back to 1983.

The new Tonino Lamborghini Swiss Watches collection has been completely conceived and designed by Ferruccio Lamborghini, Tonino’s first son, representing the third generation of the Lamborghini family. From his famous grandfather, Ferruccio has inherited the name and the passion for motorcycles and high speed: he is a motorcycling champion in the Italian Championship.

With a team of designers and a historic Swiss watch manufacturer, Ferruccio has created eight new lines of timepieces that elegantly combine his father’s past and his experience in the 2-wheels world. A brand-new range of performing Swiss watches dedicated to daring, bold, audacious, intrepid, fearless, and pioneering people, with remarkable resourcefulness.

Art by Kaelen of 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

Annual Ischia Film Festival

An unprecedented, intimate, deep and evocative company that takes shape from the talent and imagination of directors and screenwriters and translates that into new visions, under the moonlight of the Aragonese Castle of Ischia: there will be six Italian preview films selected in competition in the “Scenari Campani” for the nineteenth edition of the Ischia Film Festival, which will be held in the presence of the public and talent from 26 June to 3 July on the Covid free island.

It reconstructs the extraordinary work carried out in Campania by psychiatrist Sergio Piro, on the long wave of the Basaglia reform, “Al lupo bad”, by Chiara Tarfano and Ilaria Luperini. It is a film in 5 episodes “L’ardore dei timidi”, by Antonio Vladimir Marino, which reflects in a surreal way on the absurdity of existence. Historical suggestions and mystery mix in “Clarus”, by Michele Schiano. “The consequences of the actor – Little Michele Esposito”, by Daniele Chiariello and Pierfrancesco Cantarella, traces the short but significant career of a young man from Amalfi, an actor by chance in several popular Neapolitan films of the 1980s. “Estate Povera”, by Andrea Piretti, documents the commendable activity of Neapolitan volunteers committed to helping the poorest and most needy during the months of the pandemic. It recalls the Ischia of yesteryear, “Fragments”, by Boris Molinaro, in which some characters linked to the territory (the sculptor, the restaurant manager, the seafarer) are committed to preserving the historical memory of the island.

“This section intends to enhance the cinematographic works, whether they are fictional or use the language of the cinema of reality, shot in recognizable territories (not studios or interiors) of the Campania region or that have Campania as their main location”, underlines the artistic director of the Michelangelo Messina festival. “The Campania Region, which for four years has supported the festival under a cinema law that finances the entire audiovisual sector, has identified the cinematographic story as an important means of promoting tourism and cultural heritage. – Messina continues – It therefore seemed right to us, from the first year in which this important support measure was established, to dedicate a significant piece of the festival to those works that are often realized thanks to these financing measures. ”

To learn more about the Ischia Film Festival visit the official website.

Jack Savoretti via Chris Floyd for Universal Music Group for use by 360 Magazine

Jack Savoretti × Nile Rodgers – Who’s Hurting Who

UK singer/songwriter Jack Savoretti debutted the video for his irresistible new single “Who’s Hurting Who,” a disco-fueled pop track featuring the legendary Nile Rodgers. Watch the video HERE.

In creating the video for “Who’s Hurting Who,” Savoretti worked with famed director Giorgio Testi (The Rolling Stones, The Killers, Gorillaz, The 1975, Amy Winehouse, Adele). Complete with flashy vintage sports cars and a bombshell femme fatale, the wildly colorful video follows Savoretti on an adventure through the Italian Riviera and features a cameo from Rodgers. “Nile brings groove, glamour, and chic that is everything that Europiana is,” says Savoretti of his collaborator. 

“Who’s Hurting Who” is the first release from Savoretti’s forthcoming album Europiana, due out via Capitol Records on June 25 which is available to pre-order now.  

Co-produced by Rodgers and Mark Ralph (Tove Lo, MARINA), “Who’s Hurting Who” arrives as a gloriously upbeat piece of soul-pop, perfectly showcasing Savoretti’s alluring vocal presence. With its dance-ready grooves, glistening guitar riffs, and lavish string arrangements, the song fully embodies the elegant escapism of Europiana, an album Savoretti describes as “the music of my childhood summers, remade for today.” But despite its undeniably fun spirit, “Who’s Hurting Who” also bears an intense emotional power. “It’s my take on the great Kris Kristofferson’s song “Nobody Wins,'” Savoretti reveals. “About behavior I’m all too familiar with, but hopefully is behind me. It’s a serious song in shiny packaging.”

The seventh full-length from Savoretti, Europiana serves as the follow-up to his gold-certified album Singing to Strangers: a 2019 release that marked his first #1 on the UK album chart and earned praise from such outlets as The Telegraph, who hailed its, “heady love songs mixing lush orchestrations with a tight, electric band.” This time around, Savoretti recorded at the famed Abbey Road Studios with leading producers like Cam Blackwood (London Grammar, Florence + the Machine), approaching the album with more confidence and imagination than ever before. “Singing to Strangers was my first album that wasn’t all about me, which I loved,” Savoretti says. “Europiana pushes that further. There are more characters and bigger concepts. I’m looking out at the world, not inwards.”

Europiana artwork via Universal Music Group for use by 360 Magazine

Eurovision Singer Destiny illustration by Heather Skovlund (Photo Credit: Carlton Agius) for 360 Magazine

2021 Eurovision Song Contest

Will there be a shock winner at the 2021 Eurovision Song Contest?

The Eurovision Song Contest is one of the most popular annual events that takes place across Europe. Over 180 million people tuned into the 2019 contest, which was won by the Netherlands. The final of the 2021 Eurovision Song Contest final takes place on 22nd May in Rotterdam, where thirty-nine countries will take part in the live-streamed musical event.

The current favorites to win in 2021

There are a few acts that will be confident of winning the final, with the Eurovision song contest odds placing Malta as 4/1 favorite to win, who will be represented by their act, Destiny. They have never won the contest before but have finished in 2nd place on two occasions. Despite being the favorites, Malta will have to navigate a semi-final before they reach the main stage.

The second favorites to win are France, who are at 5/1 odds. Unlike the predicted winners, France has won the contest on five occasions, however, they haven’t won it since 1977.  Switzerland, Italy, and Bulgaria will also perhaps all fancy their chances of winning this year as well.

Will 2021 see a shock winner?

The United Kingdom hasn’t seen a Eurovision winner since 1997 – on that occasion, Katrina and the Waves won with the song “Love, Shine a Light.” The UK’s representation in 2021 will be James Newman, a singer-songwriter who has had a successful career in the industry – though many bookmakers believe that he is unlikely to win. 

Ireland is also seen as huge outsiders to win, but they are actually the most successful country in Eurovision’s history. They have won the competition on seven occasions, with the last success coming in 1996.

A previous shock winner

The 2011 edition was won by Azerbaijan, and it was seen as a huge shock at the time.  This was their first success in the competition, having only entered for the first time four years previously.

How many times has the host nation won Eurovision?

The host nation of the final has won Eurovision on seven occasions. The last time this occurred was in 1994 when the competition was won by Ireland. Looking back towards the upcoming contest, the Netherlands are, however, seen as huge outsiders to win.

A further brief history of Eurovision winners

The first edition of the contest was held in 1956. On that occasion, it was won by Switzerland. In 1969, four countries won the contest, which was the first and only time in which there were joint winners, all garnering the same score from international judges and the public vote. The United Kingdom, Spain, the Netherlands, and France all came in first place that year.

A few years later, in 1974, ABBA won their contest, and the Swedish pop group would go on to become music icons. Their winning song “Waterloo” is still popular all over the world.

There are several other countries that are yet to taste success in Eurovision. This list includes Iceland, Lithuania, Belarus, Poland, the Czech Republic, and Slovakia. Will the 2021 Eurovision Song Contest see a first-time winner?

Mare Monstrum/Drown in My Magic, a digital exhibition by David Uzochukwu on Artsy for use via 360 Magazine

David Uzochukwu – Mare Monstrum/Drown in My Magic

Mare Monstrum/Drown in My Magic, a digital exhibition by David Uzochukwu on Artsy

2016 – ongoing.
Italy, Senegal, Germany

Artist statement:

Mare Monstrum / Drown In My Magic channels the power of myth by explicitly visualizing Black merfolk. It envisions water as expanse which the characters can cut through, be safe in. No longer are they subject to whims of the tide, or drift into a void that holds the potential for destruction. Instead, the portrayed are equipped to survive and find freedom in the monstrous.

It almost seems as though Blackness is inevitably linked to a passage through the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean Sea, Evros River, whether historic or recent. The potential of self-actualisation lapping at someone’s feet always calls to mind the blood, sweat and tears of those who have come before them. Can new lore shift the entanglement of Black bodies and their environments, making unquestionably clear that they belong?

About the series:

David Uzochukwu’s photographs deliver you into warm and sensitive worlds where humans and nature entwine in search of belonging. Expanses of sand, water or sky embrace Black bodies emanating strength and resilience. Often their limbs morph into fantastical forms against hyper-real landscapes that offer a space for contemplation or escape. It’s this interplay between the natural and supernatural, between the visible and invisible, that imbues the artist’s images with an arresting presence.

Uzochukwu’s ongoing body of work, Mare Monstrum / Drown In My Magic, uses the central idea of Black mermaids to explore both the historical relationship between the African diaspora and the water, and contemporary politics around illegal migration. A great part of the images were made in Senegal in 2018 and show mermen emerging from the seas protecting and healing one another. The most recent images came together in Germany and introduce a whole community of hybrid merfolk in states of solace and rebirth. An incubated baby, a proud centaur and a tender couple, among others, inhabit a boundless realm.

The Austrian-Nigerian artist was born in 1998 in Innsbruck. His photographic practice began as a teenager with intimate self-portraiture that soon gained recognition. He’s enjoyed collaborations with artists including FKA Twigs, Pharrell Williams, Ibeyi and Iris van Herpen. Since joining Galerie Number 8, he’s exhibited at Bozar, Photo Vogue Festival, Unseen Amsterdam, Off Biennale Dakar and LagosPhoto. He was named ‘One to Watch’ by the British Journal of Photography in 2020, and his first co-directed short film, Götterdämmerung, was selected for Max-Ophüls-Preis in 2021. He is currently studying philosophy at HU Humboldt University of Berlin.

“The long history of oppression experienced by people of color in the West makes an unlikely context for art devoted to the fantastical. All the more so when you consider recent developments such as the racist rhetoric and anti-immigration policies of the Trump administration, the chilling roll call of African-Americans killed by US police (Freddie Gray, Eric Garner, Philando Castile) and the bigotries unleashed in Britain by Brexit (monkey chants at football matches and a spike in xenophobic hate crimes). Under such conditions, it’s worth asking if a turn to the fantastic by black artists is driven by a desire to escape from the charged and painful circumstances of daily life. Yet the opposite seems to be true. What characterizes much of the imagery being produced today is an eagerness to grapple with urgent questions of culture, identity and history– albeit through imagery that accentuates the extraordinary rather than the everyday. (…)

Ultimately, the Berlin-based David Uzochukwu – whose recent Drown in my Magic project situates a panoply of mythical water creatures within arid landscapes – may speak for all the artists currently finding inspiration in fantasy. The goal, as Uzochukwu puts it, is to reclaim the narrative of fantasy’ by embracing ‘the alien otherness projected onto black bodies in a way that could be read as pure empowerment.’”
-Extract of the essay “A Fantastic Turn” by Ekow Eshun for Unseen Magazine.

Drown in My Magic will go live starting April 16th 2021 on Artsy HERE.

Mare Monstrum/Drown in My Magic, a digital exhibition by David Uzochukwu on Artsy for use via 360 Magazine

Mare Monstrum/Drown in My Magic, a digital exhibition by David Uzochukwu on Artsy for use via 360 Magazine

THE OUTLIERMAN’S JAGUAR E-TYPE INSPIRED PRODUCTS image by The Outlierman for use by 360 Magazine

THE OUTLIERMAN’S JAGUAR E-TYPE INSPIRED PRODUCTS

THE 60TH ANNIVERSARY OF AN ICON: EXPLORE THE OUTLIERMAN’S JAGUAR E-TYPE INSPIRED PRODUCTS FOR THE DISCERNING AUTOMOTIVE ENTHUSIAST

In the 60th year of the Jaguar E-Type, The Outlierman – makers of handcrafted luxury driving accessories – has unveiled its full collection of Jaguar E-Type-inspired products.

The celebration of a legend

Launched in 1961 at the Geneva Motor Show, the E-Type’s arrival marked a turning point in automotive design – the coupe’s long flowing bonnet, gorgeous proportions, and powerful engine made it a game-changer. Dubbed “the most beautiful car ever made” by Enzo Ferrari, the Jaguar E-Type is a symbol of iconic British automotive design and has one of the world’s most recognizable silhouettes.

Using only the very best materials, The Outlierman has revealed its full collection of products inspired by the Jaguar E-Type, all entirely handmade in Italy by elite artisans in celebration of the British car. Included in the collection are t-shirts, scarfs, ties and pocket squares from The Outlierman’s World Beater and E-Type’s Portrait collections.

Andrea Mazzuca, founder of The Outlierman, said: “The Jaguar E-Type is one of my most favorite cars – the elegance, style and panache are all unrivalled. It’s a car I’ve loved ever since I was a child, so naturally, to celebrate the 60th anniversary I knew The Outlierman had to pay tribute in the only way we knew best – by producing the E-Type’s very own collection. Each item is lovingly handmade by our skilled and dedicated craftspeople, ensuring each product is of the highest quality.

“Alongside our beautifully crafted products, we have two Jaguar E-Types featured in our prestigious Rent & Drive service. It’s a vehicle loved by so many car enthusiasts all over the world and we are proud to feature it on many of our products.”

Highlights of the collection

Some of the best E-Type-inspired items from The Outlierman include:

E-Type’s Portrait – T-shirt with silk application – Limited Edition

Limited to just 50 examples, every piece features an authentic automotive art portrait created by The Outlierman’s talented design team, characterized by vivid brushstrokes and enriched by title and signature, for an even more exclusive result. Printed on a 100% silk satin patch that becomes the protagonist of a garment, with an elegant fit and versatile design, this t-shirt is suitable for free time as well as being worn under a jacket for an original and distinctive, smart, casual outfit.

E-Type’s Portrait – Silk Scarf

The Jaguar E-Type: a car that has left a permanent mark on history, here portrayed as oil on canvas for a luxury and timeless silk scarf handmade in Italy like a piece of art. The hand rolled edges make the finishing of this silk scarf have additional high-quality detail.

World Beater – Silk Pocket Square – Yellow

Jaguar E-Type: The world-beater of its era marks this pocket square handmade in Italy with the perfect fit of its roundness. Like the E-Type’s Portrait silk scarf, the hand rolled edges further enhance the finishing of this pocket square.

World Beater – Silk Tie – Bordeaux

Authenticity is a route that only few have the courage to take, going beyond the ordinary. And the direction of this tie, handmade in Italy, could not be anything but against the tide.

The Outlierman company was formed with a mission to handcraft a range of accessories inspired by the breath-taking beauty, supreme quality and timeless appeal of the world’s most iconic cars.

The latest Outlierman products can be found here.

Nairy Baghramian, "Jumbled Alphabet" shot by Nick Ash, Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, for 360 Magazine

NAIRY BAGHRAMIAN – MISFITS

FURLA SERIES #03
NAIRY BAGHRAMIAN. Misfits
Curated by Bruna Roccasalva

Promoted by Fondazione Furla and GAM – Galleria d’Arte Moderna, Milan

GAM – Galleria d’Arte Moderna, Milan
NEW DATES: May 26 – September 26, 2021

From May 26 to September 26, 2021, Fondazione Furla and GAM – Galleria d’Arte Moderna, Milan, will present Misfits, the first solo exhibition in an Italian institution by Nairy Baghramian, curated by Bruna Roccasalva.

Part of the Furla Series program, Misfits is a project conceived specifically for the GAM spaces that explores some key themes of the artist’s research: from her interest in intervening in spaces that mark a boundary to the relationship between the artwork and its institutional context.

Misfits began with the specific urban setting of the GAM, that is, a garden open to adults only when accompanied by children. A series of large-scale sculptures will inhabit both the museum’s interior and exterior spaces, combining the idea of play with a reflection on the aesthetic experience of inadequacy and imperfection.

Furla Series #03 – Nairy Baghramian. Misfits is the outgrowth of a partnership between Fondazione Furla and GAM – Galleria d’Arte Moderna, Milan, with the generous contribution of Fondazione Henraux for the production of the works in marble.

Alfa Romeo x “Passione”

By: Emily Bunn

Love is in the air this Valentine’s Day with Alfa Romeo’s interactive e-book release, “Passione.” The Italian “Passione” translates in English to “passion,” inspired by Alfa Romeo’s roots in Turin, Italy. The brand’s iconic designs and craftsmanship over the past 110 years of automotive production have set Alfa Romeo apart, though the brand’s love for creating luxurious, beautiful vehicles has remained unchanged. Their new e-book looks to detail how key design elements have distinguished Alfa Romeo’s legendary automobiles, and how the company’s unparalleled approach has caught the eyes and hearts of Alfa Romeo fans, adoringly dubbed ‘Alfistis’, globally.

Upon opening the e-book, readers are met with a bold statement from Orazio Satta Puliga, Head of Alfa Romeo Engineering from 1946-1973.

“We are in the realm of sensations, passions, things that have to do more with the head than the heart.”

“Passione” looks to showcase the impressive history of Alfa Romeo, providing an exclusive look at renderings and sketches from AR’s designers at Centro Stile (Design Center) in Turin, Italy. The e-book looks to the past and future of Alfa Romeo, including ten chapters of diverse designs, timeless beauty, and Italian inspiration: “Italian roots”, “Heritage”, “Purity”, “Disruption”, “Red”, “Beauty Is Everywhere”, “Beauty and the Beast”, and “Design Melting Pot.” The informational text in the e-book chronicles the brand’s legacy, and is paired with beautiful imagery, inspired by 14th century Italian Renaissance art and design elements.

To learn more, read Alfa Romeo’s “Passione” e-book here.

Alfa Romeo DNA (sketches by Centro Stile)

Purity: Alfa Romeo Giulia GT (rendering by Centro Stile)

Beauty for everyone: Alfa Romeo 8C Competizione and MiTo (rendering by Centro Stile)

Glastress illustration done by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE

2021 U.S. Premiere of Glasstress

Some of the world’s leading contemporary artists are invited to breathe new life into centuries-old glassmaking in Venice ― maestros of glassblowing from the legendary Berengo Studio residency help artists manifest their visions.

Among the 34 artists: Ai Weiwei, Fred Wilson, Joyce J. Scott, Jimmie Durham, Ugo Rondinone, Fiona Banner, Vik Muniz, Monica Bonvicini, Jake & Dinos Chapman, Laure Prouvost, Renate Bertlmann, Thomas Schütte, Loris Gréaud, and Erwin Wurm.

  • There is every reason this year to have a world view,” says Irvin Lippman, the Boca Raton Museum of Art’s Executive Director, as South Florida boldly ushers in the new year with the national premiere of Glasstress 2021 Boca Raton.
  • Three years in the making, with 2020 being such a challenging year to coordinate an international exhibition of this size and scope, the effort serves as an important reassurance that art is an essential and enduring part of humanity.”
  • “This is also a tribute to the resilience of Venice’s surviving the floods and continuing to make art through the pandemic,” adds Irvin Lippman.

The new exhibition runs January 27 through September 5, 2021 and the Museum will feature online initiatives for virtual viewing. Watch the video here featuring interviews with some of the artists in the new exhibition. The 34 artists in this new, never before seen edition of Glasstress were all invited by Adriano Berengo to work alongside his master glass artisans at the Berengo Studio on the island of Murano in the Venetian lagoon. Most of these works in glass have never been seen elsewhere, and were handpicked by Kathleen Goncharov, the Museum’s Senior Curator who traveled to Italy in 2019.

With incredible energy, the Studio has brought a new vision on how to stimulate today’s leading artists into thinking how the medium of glass can be made into dramatic and provocative works of contemporary art. Most of these artists have, during their careers, been invited to participate in the Venice Biennale. Some of the works were created during the pandemic lockdowns, with artists collaborating remotely via Zoom with their glass artisan partners after initial on-site work at the studio in Venice.

“Unlike the past and the present, what comes next for our world presents itself as constant possibility, always transforming as we move forward in time,” says Adriano Berengo. This concept of transformation has always held an affinity with glass, a medium which – as the name Glasstress suggests – exists in a state of constant tension. Life needs tension, it needs energy, and a vibrant exchange of ideas.”

The exhibition presents 34 new works that explore some of today’s pressing subjects, including human rights, climate change, racial justice, gender issues and politics. The Boca Raton Museum of Art has dedicated more than 6,500 square feet of exhibition space to this collection. A fully illustrated catalogue is also available.

The mission of Glasstress is to restore the visibility and reputation of Murano glass, after decades of closures of ancient, centuries-old glass furnaces. Instead of creating decorative objects with glass, these artists are invited to create original works, often on a massive scale. They collaborate with glass masters whose expertise has been developed over generations in Venice. Most of these artists have never worked with glass, so they unite their artistic ideas with the technical expertise of their skilled collaborators.

The results are breathtaking. The first installation visitors to the Museum will encounter is Sala Longhi by Fred Wilson. He created this series at Berengo Studio after the Biennale exhibited his work about Black residents of Venice from the Renaissance to the present. This installation features an ornate white chandelier with 29 glass panels that mirror 18th-century Venetian artist Pietro Longhi’s paintings. Instead of canvases, Wilson shows the viewer only the whites of the eyes of his Black subjects through cutouts in black reflective glass.

“We have brought Glasstress to countries around the world for ten years, seeking to expand and enliven international awareness of the variety and richness of contemporary artists using glass in their creative practices,” adds Adriano Berengo. “In the past, its place in the art world might have seemed uncertain. But now in this latest edition of Glasstress, the first after a global pandemic, one thing we know for certain: glass endures. Life is fragile, just as glass is fragile, yet in this fragility there is also strength.”

“It is in this spirit of experimentation that Glasstress Boca Raton 2021 explores the limitless potential of glassblowing. “We realize how far we have come as we approach the 60th anniversary of the American studio glass movement that launched in 1962 through the efforts of Harvey Littleton and Dominick Labino,” adds Irvin Lippman. “This presentation of Glasstress is also a tribute to them.”

This show also unveils the Museum’s new acquisition for its collection, created in the Berengo Studio – Glass Big Brother, a sculpture by Song Dong, one of contemporary Chinese art’s leading figures. The large-scale ceiling installation is 11 feet long and reaches all the way to the floor. Thirty surveillance cameras are ensconced from top to bottom, looking out at all directions around the chandelier.

The installation Rosemarie’s Divorce, by Renate Bertlmann, unites aspects from Rosemarie’s Baby (1983), her multi-part installation about the ambivalent relationship between mother and child, and Discordo Ergo Sum, a field of knife-roses she exhibited at the Venice Biennale in 2019. The monstrously enlarged glass pacifier is an image she has used since the mid-1970s referencing sexuality and motherhood. It is flanked by two knife-roses made of deep black glass.

The Italian artist Monica Bonvicini’s deeply psychological work addresses themes of sexuality, power, and relationships in male-oriented domains. Her visits to sadomasochist nightclubs with Gay male friends are the inspiration for Bonded. She won the prestigious Golden Lion award at the 1999 Venice Biennale. DNA HAS NO COLOR is a new statement from Nancy Burson that is a powerful work about the illegitimacy of racism. This is a continuation of the project that Zaha Hadid commissioned Burson to develop for the London Millennium Dome. Burson is known for biology-related work, including her use of cutting edge facial morphing technology for art that shows what individuals would look like as a different race.

The Pandemic Oculus, (2020), by Tim Tate, whose work explores the worlds of loss, memory, recovery, and hope. As an HIV-positive man, he lived through the worst of the AIDS epidemic during the 1980s and 1990s, and now through the current pandemic. In the Museum’s exhibition catalogue, the artist states that Pandemic Oculus also honors the many unsung heroes around the world: nurses, teachers, essential employees, grandparents caring for children so that parents can work, and so many more. Tate is the co-founder of the Washington Glass Studio in Washington, DC. He is also the co-moderator, along with William Warmus, of the 21st Century Glass group on Facebook, which has shared and discussed over 10,000 images of sculptural glass from around the world.

Erwin Wurm’s wry sense of humor permeates his most famous works and has served him well in creating a poignant cultural commentary throughout his career. Wurm produced this triad in cold hard glass at the Berengo Studio. They are smaller versions of the massive bronze sculpture of a hot water bottle with legs, Big Mutter, that he created for the Venice Biennale in 2020. In the exhibition catalogue, the show’s curator Kathleen Goncharov describes these “mothers” as neither warm nor comforting . . . their stubby little legs imply flight when called upon to be caregivers.

At the Berengo Studio, Jimmie Durham created a series of eight giant cougar heads suspended on metal armatures. Caught in suspension as they gaze at one another, their collective roar remains frozen between them. The cougar is one of the most sacred animals in Cherokee mythology, and the influence of Native-American culture vs. Western rationalism is evident in his work. The artist’s long trajectory includes his work during the civil rights movement and as a political organizer for the American Indian Movement. In 2019, Durham was the recipient of the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement award at the 58th Venice Biennale.

In the Museum’s exhibition catalogue, curator Kathleen Goncharov describes Prune Nourry as no stranger to illness . . . her work always dealing with science and bioethics from a feminist perspective, a focus that has intensified since her breast cancer diagnosis in 2018. At the Berengo Studio, she created River Woman, a transparent skeletal sculpture based on an anatomical drawing of the human vascular system. While its form may be human, the arteries resemble rivers, streams and trees that suffer in their own way too, from human abuse rather than disease.

Ugo Rondinone represented his home country in the Swiss Pavilion at the 52nd Venice Biennale (2007). In this work, the twelve glass horses cast in beautiful shades of blue all face different directions, creating delicate light games with their reflections and shadows in continuous motion. In the context of this installation, the reappearing motif of a horse (which has a long tradition in the history of art), evokes alienation and a subversive twist emblematic of Rondinone’s works.

Ai Weiwei's

DNA HAS NO COLOR, Nancy Burson (2019) for 360 Magazine

Purchase our Glasstress issue HERE.

The Concord Hotel, 360 MAGAZINE, New Hampshire, four diamond, aaa

Venice’s Hotel Ca’ di Dio May 2021

Venice’s newest 5-star hotel, Ca’ di Dio, will be born in May 2021. The hotel sits within a transformed ecclesiastical compound dating from 1272 that has hosted Crusaders, pilgrims and tourists for more than eight centuries.

“We are honored to have been asked to represent the Ca’ di dio,” says Geoffrey Weill, “particularly at this moment in history when revolutionary vaccines are combatting a pandemic that has crippled the travel business in Venice and throughout the world.”

Located on the Riva Ca’ di Dio, the hotel overlooks Venice’s legendary lagoon, and is located adjacent to the Arsenale and the gardens that house the city’s Biennale, one of the world’s most iconic art festivals and exhibitions. The Ca’ di Dio is an easy stroll along the waterfront from bustling St. Mark’s Square.

The 66-key Ca’ di Dio (pronounced Ka-di-dio) is one of a new class of properties managed by Italy’s VOI Hotels, to be known as V-Retreats. The Ca ‘di Dio, like all V-Retreats, is set to be an oasis of peace, a palace of timeless beauty imbued with the finesse and warmth of Italian hospitality. The hotel’s general manager, Christophe Mercier, has a rich history of managing some of Venice’s finest properties.

The creation of the Hotel Ca’ di Dio was entrusted to the studio of the internationally renowned Spanish architect Patricia Urquiola. “My goal was to create an original and distinctive concept,” says Urquiola, “a Venetian ‘mansion,’ deeply linked to the history of the city with fine woods, rich textiles, colors, finishes and Murano glass; each decorative, architectural and lighting element is the result of the skillful hands of skilled craftsmen who combine the passion for their work with the secrets and techniques of Venetian tradition.”

The Ca’ di Dio’s accommodations comprise 57 suites and nine Deluxe rooms, spread over three floors. Ten suites have a unique view of the lagoon and San Giorgio Maggiore Island; two of the suites have a large roof terrace overlooking the San Marco Basin.

Two internal courtyards are home to the hotel’s Alchemia Bar and the Essentia Restaurant, whose design combines Venetian tradition with Urquiola’s contemporary signature. The hotel’s indoor-outdoor VE-RO Restaurant overlooks the breathtaking Venetian lagoon. Named for its Venetian roots, its cuisine is inspired by traditional dishes of the Veneto, reset in contemporary tones, respecting the seasonality of fish and produce. Many of the ingredients will come from the Ca’ di Dio’s vegetable garden secreted within yet another internal courtyard.

The Ca’ di Dio will offer a state-of-the-art wellness program in its Spa Pura, and will welcome small meetings and events. The colors and comfort of the reading room provide the ideal location for contemplation. The hotel’s elegant boutique will offer a selection of Murano glass produced exclusively for the Ca ‘di Dio. The hotel’s side canal entrance provides direct docking for water taxis and the hotel’s water-transfer cruisers.

The opening of the Ca’ di Dio coincides with a new reclaimed future for the city of Venice. “I was in the city in October when the Acqua Alta threatened the customary flooding of the city,” says Weill, “and for the first time, the lagoon’s new high-tech water barriers were set in motion, saving the city’s treasures from the customary flooding.”

The Venice Biennale 2021 has been postponed to 2022 because of Covid-19. The Venice Architecture Biennale, is now slated for May 22, 2021 to November 22, 2021.
Full details of the new Hotel Ca’ di Dio are at https://www.lifestyle-voihotels.com/en/ca-di-dio/and will be expanded in coming weeks.