Posts tagged with "textiles"

Art illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for 360 Magazine

Jack, Larger Than Life

On view June 26 – September 5, 2021 in the LongHouse Pavilion, Jack, Larger Than Life, is an intimate portrait of creator-collector Jack Lenor Larsen (1927–2020). His innovative textiles are presented side by side with his various “enthusiasms,” the objects of craft and art he assiduously gathered, as well as the clothing he collected and wore.  Over 100 objects from the several thousand in LongHouse Reserve’s collection are juxtaposed with Jack’s pronouncements and videotapes of his interviews.

My acquisitions seemed to reinforce my own personal identity…

In collecting I found a quiet means of sharing enthusiasms

—Jack Lenor Larsen

In a period of increasing automation, Jack Lenor Larsen reintroduced handweaving techniques to the textile industry.  Established in the 1950’s, his eponymous brand presented a series of innovations, making Larsen one of the most prolific and respected American designers of his time. A proponent of craft before it was trendy, Larsen’s appetite for the handmade took him across the globe seeking both traditional techniques and modern interpretations. Jack had an insatiable hunger and curiosity for other cultures. Said Kate Irwin, Curator of Costume and Textiles at the RISD Museum, “From the beginning of his career to his last collection for Cowtan & Tout in 2019, Jack’s approach to textile design was innovative and technical, while steeped in hand-craftsmanship and global practices of making. Many of his early designs combined natural fibers with synthetic materials of varying textures, transforming age-old textile techniques into contemporary designs that softened the transparent glass and dense steel of modernist International Style buildings.”

Don’t be reverent. Be relevant. Keep on changing.

—Jack Lenor Larsen

Nearly fifty iconic Larsen textile lengths fill the gallery with color, texture, and pattern, including major commissions such as Leverlin for Lever House, New York’s first International Style high rise; Swazi Drapery for the Wolf Trap Theater; and Magnum, with light-reflecting mirror Mylar, for the Phoenix Opera House.

Organized according to the color stories Jack favored in his textile designs, exhibition groupings weave together a spectrum of Larsen textiles with garments from Jack’s wardrobe, furniture and art from his home, and sculptural objects from around the globe. Atop an angular Wharton Esherick table sits a Dale Chihuly silvered glass cylinder. The table was Jack’s first important purchase and started his extensive Esherick collection (the largest outside the artist’s own house museum). The Chihuly was the last of several gifts from the artist to his friend and mentor on the occasion of a milestone birthday. A graphic Japanese kimono rubs elbows with a Marc Leuthold-carved ceramic and Stephen Proctor mid-century table; metalwork vessels by Chunghi Choomingle with a Japanese indigo patched boro and West African resist-dyed textiles; Dawn MacNutt’s fiber sculpture keeps watch over a Sheila Hicks miniature and Toradja armor made of horn (a gift to LongHouse from playwright Edward Albee). As backdrop to these groupings, an entire wall is covered in a sensuous array of Larsen’s printed cotton velvets.

LongHouse provided a home and a stage on which Jack shared various passions. Honoring Jack’s generous, generative spirit, this exhibition is an invitation to “open eyes to alternatives.”

Perceiving lies in comprehending the whole, the essence of an object,

not just its outline or another superficial aspect.

—Jack Lenor Larsen

Jack, Larger than Life is curated by Wendy van Deusen and Sherri Donghia; Kate Irwin, Exhibition Writer, and additional support from Caroline Bauman, Alexandra Munroe, and Lee Skolnick.

The exhibition is designed by Lee Skolnick, and his firm, SKOLNICK Architecture + Design Partnership.  Design team members included Jo Ann Secor, Director of Interpretive Services, Scott Briggs, Associate Principal and Project Manager, Katie Ahern, Senior Manager, Content and Visitor Experience Design, and Vonn Weisenberger, Exhibit Designer.

This exhibition was made possible in part by the generous support of Cowtan & Tout / Larsen, Amita Chatterjee, and Nina Gilman.  Public Programs are funded in part by Suffolk County and LongHouse Reserve Members and Supporters.

 

Victoria Selbach for UNRAVELED Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art. For use by 360 Magazine

UNRAVELED: Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art

A Group Show Curated by Indira Cesarine

OPENING RECEPTION: April 17, 2021

VIP Preview 1pm – 3pm // Opening Reception 3pm – 8pm

EXHIBITION ON VIEW: April 17 – May 28, 2021

45 Lispenard Street, NYC 10013

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “UNRAVELED: Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art” group show opening on April 17 and on view through May 28, 2021. Curated by Indira Cesarine, the exhibition will feature textile and fiber-based artworks by 40 contemporary women artists. “UNRAVELED: Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art” explores in depth the themes and techniques of the medium through the works of female-identifying artists working with natural and synthetic fiber, fabric, and yarn. The exhibition presents figurative and abstract works that address our lived experience and history through the lens of women weaving, knotting, twining, plaiting, coiling, pleating, lashing, and interlacing. Narratives of self-identification, race, religion, gen­­der, sexuality, our shared experience, as well as protest and the patriarchy are literally “unraveled” through embroidery, felt, woven and hooked rugs, braided and sewn hair, sewn fabrics, discarded clothing, cross-stitching, repurposed materials and more.

Exhibiting Artists: Amber Doe, Carol Scavotto, Caroline Wayne, Christy O’Connor, Daniela Puliti, Delaney Conner, Dominique Vitali, Elise Drake, Elizabeth Miller, Hera Haesoo Kim, Indira Cesarine, Jamia Weir, Jody MacDonald, Julia Brandão, Kathy Sirico, Katie Cercone, Katie Commodore, Katrina Majkut, Katy Itter, Kelly Boehmer, Linda Friedman Schmidt, Lisa Federici, Marianne Fairbanks, Mary Tooley Parker, Melanie Fischer, Melissa Zexter, Mychaelyn Michalec, Mz Icar, Orly Cogan, Robin Kang, Rosemary Meza-DesPlas, Ruta Naujalyte, Sally Hewett, Sarah Blanchette, Sooo-z Mastopietro, Sophie Boggis-Rolfe, Stacy Isenbarger, Stephanie Eche, Victoria Selbach, and Winnie van der Rijn.

Curatorial Statement:

unravel [ uhn-rav-uhl ] to separate or disentangle the threads of (a woven or knitted fabric, a rope, etc.). to free from complication or difficulty; make plain or clear; solve: to unravel a situation; to unravel a mystery.

“UNRAVELED: Confronting the Fabric of Fiber Art” investigates the narratives of contemporary fiber artists. The exhibition brings together a diverse group of artists who each address through their own personal vision, materials, and methods, works that are deeply rooted in the history of feminism, in the intersection of art and craft, addressing our living experiences and personal languages. We live in a world of extremes – on one hand, the pandemic has brought forth an intensity on digital and online programming peaking with the emergence of NFT art, and on the opposite end of the spectrum we are seeing a return to the comforts of the home and along with it a renaissance of organic and handmade artworks that embody that spirit. The laborious and repetitive methods required to create one work of fiber art can take hundreds of hours, yet equally the creation process is often referred to as a mediative act of healing, allowing for an expressive personal and cultural interrogation.

Fibers have been an integral part of human civilization for thousands of years. Textile art is one of the oldest art forms, dating back to prehistoric times. Despite early works of textiles such as embroideries and tapestries having been made by both men and women, the tradition of textiles and needlework evolved into that of “women’s work” and was not only dismissed as not “important” but was literally banned from the high art world by the Royal Academy in the 18th century (circa 1769). With the rise of the women’s movement as well as technological advances, women reclaimed the medium, subverted its history as a lesser art form, and transformed it into a tool of expression, of protest, of personality. From early suffrage movement embroidered banners to the groundbreaking exhibitions and works of female pioneers such as Bauhaus weaver Anni Alber’s momentous solo show at the Museum of Modern Art in 1949, Lenore Tawney’s exhibition at the Staten Island Museum in 1961 to Judy Chicago’s groundbreaking 1979 work “The Dinner Party”, we have seen the medium evolve and inspire new generations of fiber artists.

“UNRAVELED: Confronting the Fabric of Fiber Art” explores this new wave of female-identifying artists who are using materials ranging from thread and yarn to human hair, fabrics, and discarded clothing, among a range of other components to unravel the “language of thread” with works that provoke and interrogate. Whether drawn from a deeply personal narrative, or rooted in political motivation, each artist weaves, spins, sews, and hooks the viewer with their detailed and intricate textures that communicate and empower. The exhibition presents two and three-dimensional pieces that explore with gravity and humor our contemporary culture, its beauty, flaws, and idiosyncrasies through murals, assemblages, fragile and gestural threads, meditative, and metaphorical fibers. “UNRAVELED: Confronting the Fabric of Fiber Art” pushes the boundaries, investigates ancient as well as new materials and techniques, and presents a contemporary universe of the language of women and their interwoven, progressive vocabulary.”– Curator Indira Cesarine

“To know the history of embroidery is to know the history of women.” – Rozsika Parker author of “The Subversive Stitch” (1984)

“I am a multimedia artist who uses sculpture and performance to bear witness to the experiences of black women even as American society aims to render us and our lives as invisible and meaningless. Despite the prevalent “urban black” narrative, my experience is tied to the natural world, and I use materials that reference my desert environment and my lived experience as a black woman with Indigenous roots.” – Artist Amber Doe

“I mix subversion with flirtation, humor with power, and intimacy with frivolity. My subject matter is frank and provocative, dealing with issues of fertility, sexuality, self-image, isolation, vulnerability, indulgence, and beauty in the mundane, which are designed to challenge social stereotypes embedded within childhood fairytales. My work explores the many flavors of feminism.” – Artist Orly Cogan

“I pull from my autobiography to illustrate stories of trauma, sexuality, intimacy, and growth. Detailed beading and cyclical patterning emphasize the consistent labor in the repetitive motion of handsewing, that which mirrors the emotional and psychic labor expended in order to manage the suffering a body can accumulate over time. My sculptures translate the life experience of a survivor of complex trauma through the lens of glittering beadwork in order to recount deeply traumatic stories for the same cultural collective that due to repression, denial, censorship and deliberate silencing…” –Artist Caroline Wayne

“This body of work scrutinizes the amalgamation of victim shaming tropes that men and women are taught throughout their lives, both passively and actively, through social norms, pop culture, our educational and legal systems, religious establishments, and familial influences and upbringing.” – Artist Christy O’Connor

“My work focuses on my personal experience living within the confines of a female body, exploring sexuality, religion, and body image. The shared narratives of childbirth, menstruation, dysmorphia, sexual violation, and societal scrutiny all come into play and find connections with the viewers in their shared commonality.” – Artist Dominique Vitali

“My textile works are hand-sewn, fabric based sculptural pieces made from recycled materials that have multiple uses as ritual talismans, wearables, ecstatic birth blankets, dreamcatchers and traveling altars”. – Artist Katie Cercone

“Discarded clothing is my paint. I give second chances to the worn, the damaged, the mistreated, the abandoned, the unwanted, and to myself. My emotional narrative portraits and figurative artworks examine the human condition through my own lived experience. The violence of cutting and deconstruction make way for the reconstruction and refashioning of a broken past.” – Artist Linda Friedman Schmidt

“We are drawn to the grand gesture, the loud assured voice, the bold move, the aggressive brush stroke. I celebrate the opposite: the small moments in our lives – the unremarkable… as Covid-19 took over, some of the things I was celebrating became even more pertinent; toilet paper, soap, hand sanitizer. These objects became signs of hope, of safety, of comfort.” – Artist Melanie Fischer

ABOUT THE UNTITLED SPACE

The Untitled Space is an art gallery located in Tribeca, New York in a landmark building on Lispenard Street. Founded in 2015 by artist Indira Cesarine, the gallery features an ongoing curation of exhibits of emerging and established contemporary artists exploring conceptual framework and boundary-pushing ideology through mediums of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, video and performance art. The gallery is committing to exploring new ideas vis-à-vis traditional and new mediums and highlights a program of women in art. Since launching The Untitled Space gallery, Cesarine has curated over 40 exhibitions and has exhibited artwork by more than 450 artists. Her curatorial for The Untitled Space includes solo shows for artists Sarah Maple, Rebecca Leveille, Alison Jackson, Fahren Feingold, Jessica Lichtenstein, Tom Smith, Loren Erdrich, Kat Toronto aka Miss Meatface, Katie Commodore, and Jeanette Hayes among many others. Notable group shows include “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Happiness” public art exhibition and group show presented in collaboration with Save Art Space, “IRL: Investigating Reality,” “BODY BEAUTIFUL,” “SHE INSPIRES,” Special Projects “EDEN” and “(HOTEL) XX” at SPRING/BREAK Art Show, and internationally celebrated group shows “UPRISE/ANGRY WOMEN,” and “ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE” responding to the political climate in America, as well as numerous other critically-acclaimed exhibitions. Recent press on Indira Cesarine & The Untitled Space includes Vogue (US), Vogue Italia, CNN, Forbes, Newsweek, W Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, Teen Vogue, New York Magazine, i-D Magazine, Dazed and Confused, and The New York Times among many others.

*Featured image artwork by Victoria Selbach for UNRAVELED: Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art. 

artwork by  Elise Drake, UNRAVELED Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art. For use by 360 Magazine

Artwork by Elise Drake, UNRAVELED Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art.

artwork by Indira Cesarine, for UNRAVELED Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art. For use by 360 Magazine

Artwork by Mary Tooley Parker, UNRAVELED Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art.

Design and cleanliness story illustration by Gabrielle Archuleta for 360 magazine

COVID GUIDANCE: The importance of TOP-DOWN CLEANING

Robin Wilson launched Robin Wilson Home in 2000 and created a conglomerate that covers eco-design, licensed products, interior design, and real estate development. Her brand has generated over $82 million in wholesale revenue from sales of cabinetry and textiles. She became the first Black woman with a line of hypoallergenic textiles sold nationwide at Bed Bath & Beyond (now in Wal-Mart), among other retailers. Her book, CLEAN DESIGN: Wellness for your Lifestyle was #1 on Amazon and focused on eco-friendly designs and hypoallergenic products for consumers.

Recently, the lifestyle expert introduced the practical aspect of Top-Down Cleaning. In this era of quarantines and lock downs, the last thing anyone wants to do is add to our work load – and a few simple tips will help you maintain a clean and healthier living space!

The Statistics

Sixty million Americans – that is one in five of us – have asthma and allergies. We sneeze, sniffle, and itch. Expose us to a whiff of dust, a gust of pollen, a sniff of perfume, or an encounter with an inquisitive dog or cat, and before we know it, our airways start to close up, and we begin to cough, wheeze or struggle to breathe.

With COVID in the air, the last thing we need is an inflammatory response. So cleaning your space has never been more important. Remember that asthma and allergies cannot be cured, but they can be managed. We can reduce symptoms by avoiding the allergens that trigger them. Unfortunately, the average home is full of allergy and asthma triggers, which means the place that should be your sanctuary can be a major source of allergenic triggers.

What is Top-Down Cleaning?

Most people create twice the cleaning work by first cleaning the floor, softa, tabletop or countertop and then cleaning the lights, ceiling fan or cabinets – only to see dust drift downward.

Solution: Clean from the top-to-bottom. In fact, if you have a second level, start upstairs and then work your way downstairs. Start at the highest point and make sure you have the following tools: paper towels, microstatic dust mitt/cloth, microstatic duster/floor sweeper, HEPA vacuum and a non-toxic cleaning solution. Cleaning solutions should include: baking soda, vinegar, toothpaste and Coca Cola.

Starting at the Top

We forget that walls are one of the largest surfaces in our spaces. Use a microstatic duster cloth/mitt to rub gently along the walls starting at the ceiling line and let the dust fall. As well, make sure to swipe over light receptables, ceiling fans or chandeliers.

Surfaces

Then clean the surfaces, starting with the highest-level lamp, bookcase, window treatments, cabinet or closet shelf. Allow dust/dirt to fall. As you work you way down, you will find that you need to vacuum or wipe down surfaces.

As mentioned earlier, there are a few tricks that involve cleaning solutions that are non-toxic.

1.       Toilet Ring Solution: Pour Coca Cola into your toilet overnight, and use toilet brush in the morning and the stubborn ring will disappear (may have to be repeated dependent on the level of stain) by morning.

2.       Crayon Marks: Use toothpaste. Smear on the mark and let sit for about 20 minutes. Using light brush strokes, and the crayon should be removed, or at least diminished.

3.       Stained Baking Sheets: to make them look new, use vinegar and baking soda. Coat pan with baking soda. Pour a layer of white vinegar on top. You may see slight bubbling. Let sit for 4 hours. Use gloves and a brush in circular motion. Watch the surface start to look new.

Finish at the Floor

The last thing that you need to do in your space is clean the floor.

1.       Make sure to invest in a HEPA filter vacuum as the dust and dirt is stored in a chamber (unlike older vacuum units that sometimes-added dust back into the space), and the canister can be emptied outside.

2.       Before you clean, you might want to make sure that you remove rugs and shake them outside.

3.       Run a microstatic dust cloth over the floor before you vacuum so that you can ensure that minimal dust flies around.

One tech solution that many working from home families are investing is an electronic robot vacuum that can be programmed to work during the day in various rooms. Some floor robot vacuums have HEPA filters, and can be a great option if you have a pet and want to make sure to limit buildup of dander and hair on your floor.

[SIDE BAR] For a space that follows CLEAN DESIGN protocols, it is important to replace a few items:

1.       Change your older model vacuum to a HEPA vacuum to effectively limit dust in the space. Especially important if your home is near any location that had recent fires.

2.       Change your vinyl shower liner to a nylon shower liner to minimize mold.

3.       Review the window treatments and find options that can be laundered and are not ‘dust catchers’ or which can be easily vacuumed.

4.       Replace your pillow after 3 years if it has not been washed frequently or covered with a zippered liner.

5.       Think about using your window screens so that you can open your windows for 5 minutes daily.

SIDEBAR

Leading triggers include:

  • Dust mites in beds and pillows
  • Dander from pets
  • Mold growth in walls, bathrooms and basements
  • Pollen from outdoor trees and grasses in your hair that infiltrates your sleep space or living room sofa
  • Fumes from cooking and chemical cleaners
  • Toxic or environmentally unfriendly building materials that permeate indoor air

Remember, you can change that by using the strategies in the book, Clean Design: Wellness for your Lifestyle (Greenleaf, 2015). Create a healthy home environment that manages indoor air quality and protect your family from dust, mold, pollen, fumes, odors, airborne toxins, chemicals and other substances. Create a home environment that nurtures good health.

According to the American Lung Association, “poor indoor air quality can cause or contribute to the development of infections, lung cancer…headaches, dry eyes, nasal congestion, nausea, and fatigue” in anyone, not just those who suffer from asthma and allergies. We can all benefit from living in a more pure home environment.

More physicians are convinced that there is a link between environmental toxins, indoor air quality and allergies. Chemicals we are exposed to in our homes and offices have the power to make us sick, and we can improve our health and wellness using Clean Design principles.

Shopping for Hypoallergenic Options

The pandemic made both me and my clients realize that the CLEAN DESIGN HOME which sells our retail products is more important than ever – and that we should find non-toxic cleaning options and information for day-to-day living, especially since so many of us are working from home. I have pivoted to focus on building out the product line, and have just licensed our brand. So much information involves simple non-toxic options– the ideas are rooted in my bestselling book, Clean Design: Wellness for your Lifestyle.

About Robin Wilson

Her design projects including the White House Fellows office, a part of President Clinton’s Harlem office, and the rustic beach cottage of Robert DeNiro – each project had a very quick turnaround and exacting standards. She was named to the Top 100 Female Founders List in 2020 by INC magazine. Her eponymous licensed brands of textiles is sold at retail and hospitality. She is also in the process of creating Design+Build projects. She is author of two award-winning books: Clean Design She is the first woman with a branded line of custom cabinetry that was sold by over 400 independent kitchen dealers nationwide (2009-2018). First featured in Oprah’s magazines and extensive media coverage since 2005. In May 2013, her furniture line, Nest Home by Robin Wilson, premiered at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF) in New York. In 2014, she partnered with consumer products giant Panasonic to promote their latest line of cutting edge products for the home.She is an ambassador to the Asthma & Allergy Foundation of America, and previously served on the board of the Sustainable Furnishings Council.

LOEWE FOUNDATION

CHANCE ENCOUNTERS V 

3 DECEMBER – 31 JANUARY 

For Art Basel Miami Beach 2019, the LOEWE FOUNDATION will present the fifth exhibition in its Chance Encounters series, bringing together artists from various disciplines in unexpected conversations. This year British artist Hilary Lloyd will present a major site-specific textile, sound and video installation that will engage in dialogue with the monumental 18th-century Portuguese granary permanently installed. Large-scale ceramic sculptures by Ewen Henderson will also occupy the space.
 
‘The Chance Encounters exhibitions are an opportunity to create conversations across time, between artists whose work resonates strongly with my own creative approach’ says Jonathan Anderson, Creative Director of LOEWE. ‘Hilary Lloyd’s work is perfectly attuned to the contemporary moment and the way in which we engage with the visual world around us. It will stage a striking dialogue with Ewen Henderson’s bold materially-rich work.’
 
Hilary Lloyd (b. 1964, Halifax, UK) lives and works in London. For almost 30 years Lloyd has been working with film and video within sculptural installations. The idiosyncratic way in which her films are shot — making use of repetitive movements, jump cuts and sweeps — which often verge on the abstract, conjure both her own restless gaze and the experience of increasing speed that characterizes the way in which we consume images today. In recent years the technological apparatus foregrounded as part of her installations, block monitors and screens, have been accompanied by scatter-like installations incorporating curtains, frames and other set-like objects, that play with the idea of the space around the films being activated by the viewer. These installations reveal her interests in architecture, fashion, textiles and digital space.
 
For the exhibition, Lloyd will transform LOEWE’s Miami store through interventions of colour and textiles. Monitors will be presented throughout the space, on which she will present a new series of films shot in and around her studio in the Thamesmead area of London where her studio is located.
 
In and amongst Lloyd’s installation will be several large-scale ceramic sculptures by Ewen Henderson (1934 – 2000) – one of Britain’s most esteemed artists working with clay. Henderson studied under Hans Coper and Lucie Rie at the Camberwell School of Art in 1968 and was part of an illustrious generation of potters alongside Gordon Baldwin, Gillian Lowndes and Ian Godfrey, who explored a new sculptural language for ceramics. While often working with vessel forms and frequently creating vases and tea bowls, Henderson’s commitment to hand-building allowed him to freely manipulate the clay, often pushing his forms towards complete abstraction. Inspired by the material nature of clay itself, Henderson was interested in exploring ideas of the elemental and geological; his use of roughly-textured surfaces and layered colour often resembles the stratified nature of rock or earth. His totemic works which will be presented as part of the exhibition also evidence his interest in neolithic and ancient art, embracing the timeless quality of clay as one of the fundamental materials used by humankind.
 
#LOEWEprojects
#LOEWEFoundation
 
LOEWE FOUNDATION
The LOEWE FOUNDATION was established as a private cultural foundation in 1988 by Enrique Loewe, a fourth-generation member of LOEWE’s founding family. Today, the Foundation continues to promote creativity, organize educational programs and protect cultural heritage in the elds of poetry, dance, photography, design and craft. The Foundation was awarded the Gold Medal for Merit in the Fine Arts by the Spanish government in 2002.
 
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*Photo: Hilary Lloyd, courtesy  Sadie  Coles  Gallery, London

Mad About Jewelry

THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN’S ANNUAL EXHIBITION AND SALE OF CONTEMPORARY JEWELRY RETURNS WITH 55 ARTISTS FROM 18 COUNTRIES

LOOT: MAD ABOUT JEWELRY

April 8 – April 13, 2019

Opening Benefit: April 8

Featuring the announcement of the LOOT Acquisition Prize and the presentation of LOOT Awards honoring Adria de Haume and Josie Natori

The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) presents the nineteenth edition of LOOT: MAD About Jewelry, its annual exhibition and sale of one-of-a-kind contemporary jewelry. Open to the public April 9 through April 13, following the Opening Benefit on April 8, LOOT 2019 showcases the work of fifty-five emerging and acclaimed international jewelry artists and designers, most of whom have never been shown in New York. The event provides the rare opportunity for collectors and jewelry enthusiasts to meet and acquire pieces from some of the most innovative creators in the field.

“The jewelry content of LOOT 2019 is particularly noteworthy in two specific areas,” said LOOT Curator Bryna Pomp. “Firstly, this year’s exhibition presents a great number of outstanding young makers who are already creating groundbreaking work. Secondly, it features a larger presence of jewelry in precious metals, particularly in silver and in gold, often with semi precious and precious stones, that is exceptionally original in design.”

MAD is the only museum in the United States with a gallery dedicated to the display of both special jewelry exhibitions and its permanent collection of contemporary and modern studio and art jewelry. LOOT extends MAD’s commitment to presenting jewelry as an art form, and provides vital support for Museum exhibitions and programs.

“LOOT reflects the core of MAD’s mission to celebrate the creative process and connect audiences to contemporary art and design,” said Marsy Mittlemann, LOOT 2019 Co-Chair. “It presents an extraordinary opportunity for artists and viewers to interact with one another and engage in conversations around the work. I am honored to participate in an event that provides a platform for international talent while supporting MAD’s exciting upcoming initiatives.”

“LOOT is always exceptionally curated, and 2019 promises to be the best edition to date,” said LOOT 2019 Co-Chair Joan Hornig. “No other exhibition in the world brings viewers into contact with the diversity of design and designers showcased each spring at MAD. It is the perfect venue for both serious and first-time collectors to engage with global talent and purchase unique pieces of wearable art at every price point.”

LOOT 2019 features fifty-five artists from eighteen countries and territories: Austria (1), Belgium (1), Chile (2), Finland (1), France (2), Germany (6), Italy (2), Korea (5), Poland (1), Portugal (2), Spain (5), Sweden (1), Taiwan (1), Thailand (1), Turkey (3), the United Kingdom (14), the United States (6), and the US Virgin Islands (1). In addition to a diverse range of artistic practices, the jewelry on display encompasses a wide array of materials, from traditional metals to more unconventional media like leather, glass, porcelain, paper, silicone, resin, textiles, wood, horsehair, recycled skateboards, and ultraviolet-reactive nylon.

ARTIST HIGHLIGHTS

The jewelry artists and designers featured in LOOT 2019 include the following:

  • Italian designer Selvaggia Armani designs and produces textiles, including necklaces and brooches, for home and casual wear. On site at LOOT, she will create a new collection of jewelry made of hand-painted leather, building on her practice of “live” painting and customized bracelets.
  • Japan-born and Massachusetts-based artist Mariko Kusumoto prevails upon fabric to construct forms of elegant simplicity and evocative imagery. Using a proprietary heat- setting technique, she gives the fabric a new identity through reshaping it into three- dimensional forms. Her designs are incorporated into jewelry and sculptural pieces, as well as in collaborations with fashion designers; in January, her work appeared on the Jean-Paul Gaultier catwalk at Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2019.
  • Taiwanese jewelry artist Heng Lee juxtaposes traditional craft technique and cutting- edge technology to explore the relationship between nature and Internet culture. Using downloaded images, laser-cut metal, and hand embroidery, he creates visually striking pieces that are both digital and tactile. In a time when much of our information comes from social media, his work interrogates the divide between experience and technology, and encourages full awareness of the current moment.
  • Scotland-based artist Wanshu Li is largely inspired by the brilliant colors and sensuous movements of sea creatures like jellyfish and sea anemones. With her jewelry, she aims to create a multisensory wearing experience that involves visual enjoyment, tactility, and sound. Li’s fascination with dance culture, laser light shows, and stage performances inspired her to add a further visual dimension to her practice: she experiments with ultraviolet-reactive nylon and fluorescent paints, which combine to produce a remarkable intensity of color when the jewelry is illuminated with UV light.
  • Houston-based designer Mariquita Masterson creates handmade glass pieces that are vivid, unique, and energetic, and that unite the everyday with the exceptional. Masterson uses both recycled glass and glass from companies that produce a variety of colors and textures, and on occasion creates stunning pieces out of the fragments of broken antique vases. Most recently, Masterson has gained attention for the debut of one of her necklaces worn by Speaker of the US House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi during the President’s State of the Union address in February.

This year, LOOT will showcase the work of four 2018 graduates of La Escuela de Arte 3, in Madrid, Spain: Patricia Álvarez, Cristina Armesilla, Sonia Birndt Carrascosa, and Bárbara García. The jewelry of these emerging creators exhibits fresh expressions of color and form, and takes inspiration from music, technology, contradiction, and the city they call home.

In its first year, the LOOT Advisory Committee assists LOOT Curator Bryna Pomp with the selection of artists and designers. The LOOT Advisory Committee for 2019 includes Susan Ach, Michele Cohen, Marsy Mittlemann, and Barbara Waldman.

LOOT ACQUISITION PRIZE

Awarded annually by a jury, the LOOT Acquisition Prize recognizes a LOOT jewelry artist or designer whose work reflects maturity in artistry and concept, exhibits both a superior and an experimental understanding of materials and form, and demonstrates expertise in technique and execution. MAD’s permanent collection includes nearly one thousand pieces of jewelry, spanning the mid-twentieth century to the present day. The LOOT Acquisition Prize formalizes the Museum’s goal of enhancing its collection by acquiring jewelry from artists who have made significant contributions to the field and whose work provides historical context for MAD’s mid- to late-twentieth-century pieces, as well as from emerging artists who are an important force in the contemporary art jewelry scene.

The 2019 jury is chaired by Barbara Paris Gifford and Elissa Auther together with LOOT Co- Chairs Joan Hornig and Marsy Mittlemann, LOOT Curator Bryna Pomp, and Board Chair Michele Cohen. The 2019 LOOT Acquisition Prize will be awarded on April 8 during the Opening Benefit dinner.

In 2018, the prize was jointly awarded to Isabelle Molénat and Sarran Youkongdee. Past LOOT artists who have had works acquired by the Museum include the well-established art jeweler Iris Nieuwenburg and the emerging jewelry artist Casey Sobel. Alena Willroth, who was awarded the inaugural LOOT Acquisition Prize in 2016, will be a returning artist this year.

OPENING BENEFIT AND LOOT AWARD

The LOOT 2019 Opening Benefit takes place on Monday, April 8, beginning with a cocktail hour and reception at 4:30 pm. The evening’s activities include first access to the LOOT exhibition and sale—an exclusive opportunity to meet this year’s artists and acquire their designs—as well as a dinner honoring the recipients of the LOOT Award.

The LOOT Award recognizes luminaries in the field of jewelry, including artists, collectors, and designers. This year’s honorees are jewelry designer and philanthropist Adria de Haume and jewelry and fashion designer Josie Natori. Past recipients include fashion icon Iris Apfel (2013), collector Barbara Berger (2013), jewelry designer Joan Hornig (2016), fashion designer Kay Unger (2016), and artists Joyce J. Scott (2014) and Axel Russmeyer (2012).

The LOOT 2019 Opening Benefit Host Committee comprises Susan Ach, Iris Apfel, Davina Benshetrit, Caroline Blackman, Noreen Buckfire, Marian C. Burke, Kathy Chazen, Michele Cohen, Paolo Costagli, Stacy Creamer, Emily Cutler, Marcia Docter, Patti Dweck, Beth Farber, Sandy Grotta, Joon Han, Jan Huling, Barbara Jacobs, Ann Kaplan, Wendy Tarlow Kaplan, Jane Koryn, Laura Kruger, Luisa LaViola, Bonnie Levine, Pam Levine, Tina Livanos, Jackie Martin, Stacey Mayrock, Ella McHugh, Robert Lee Morris, Edie Nadler, Michelle Perr, Linda Plattus, Andi Potamkin, Barbara Regna, Heidi Rigney, Deborah Roberts, Lela Rose, Jill Ryan, Bette Saltzman, Gail Shields-Miller, Angela Sun, Ted Taylor, Barbara Tober, Isabel and Ruben Toledo, Kay Unger, Barbara Waldman, Janet Winter, Marcia Celis Wirth, Pamela Workman, Jan Wysocki, and Lynn Yaeger.

To purchase tickets to the LOOT 2019 Opening Benefit, to be held on Monday, April 8, visit thestore.madmuseum.org/collections/loot-2019, or contact Rebekka Grossman at 212.299.7712 or rebekka.grossman@madmuseum.org.

PUBLIC EXHIBITION AND SALE HOURS

Tuesday, April 9: 10am to 6pm

Wednesday, April 10: 10am to 6pm

Thursday, April 11: 10am to 6pm

Friday, April 12: 10am to 6pm

Saturday, April 13: 10am to 6pm

Entrance to LOOT is included in the price of Museum admission: $16 general; $14 for seniors; $12 for students; free for MAD members and children under 18 years of age. To purchase tickets online, visit madmuseum.org/visit.

ABOUT CORPORATE SPONSOR: PAOLO COSTAGLI

Paolo Costagli New York returns as corporate sponsor of LOOT. The fine jewelry brand recognized for its sophisticated, modern, and distinctly bold designs, will debut Onde, its new collection of 18kt gold and diamond jewelry at LOOT 2019. The Onde collection, inspired by the waves of the Venetian Lagoon, introduces a variety of rings, earrings, bracelets, and necklaces. Featuring Paolo Costagli’s signature bold geometrics with a touch of fluidity, the collection presents effortlessly chic precious jewelry fit for all occasions, from everyday wear to a formal soirée.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN

The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) champions contemporary makers across creative fields and presents the work of artists, designers, and artisans who apply the highest level of ingenuity and skill. Since the Museum’s founding in 1956 by philanthropist and visionary Aileen Osborn Webb, MAD has celebrated all facets of making and the creative processes by which materials are transformed, from traditional techniques to cutting-edge technologies. Today, the Museum’s curatorial program builds upon a rich history of exhibitions that emphasize a cross-disciplinary approach to art and design, and reveals the workmanship behind the objects and environments that shape our everyday lives. MAD provides an international platform for practitioners who are influencing the direction of cultural production and driving twenty-first-century innovation, and fosters a participatory setting for visitors to have direct encounters with skilled making and compelling works of art and design. For more information, visit their website.