Posts tagged with "Katie Commodore"

Victoria Selbach for UNRAVELED Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art. For use by 360 Magazine

UNRAVELED: Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art

A Group Show Curated by Indira Cesarine

OPENING RECEPTION: April 17, 2021

VIP Preview 1pm – 3pm // Opening Reception 3pm – 8pm

EXHIBITION ON VIEW: April 17 – May 28, 2021

45 Lispenard Street, NYC 10013

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “UNRAVELED: Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art” group show opening on April 17 and on view through May 28, 2021. Curated by Indira Cesarine, the exhibition will feature textile and fiber-based artworks by 40 contemporary women artists. “UNRAVELED: Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art” explores in depth the themes and techniques of the medium through the works of female-identifying artists working with natural and synthetic fiber, fabric, and yarn. The exhibition presents figurative and abstract works that address our lived experience and history through the lens of women weaving, knotting, twining, plaiting, coiling, pleating, lashing, and interlacing. Narratives of self-identification, race, religion, gen­­der, sexuality, our shared experience, as well as protest and the patriarchy are literally “unraveled” through embroidery, felt, woven and hooked rugs, braided and sewn hair, sewn fabrics, discarded clothing, cross-stitching, repurposed materials and more.

Exhibiting Artists: Amber Doe, Carol Scavotto, Caroline Wayne, Christy O’Connor, Daniela Puliti, Delaney Conner, Dominique Vitali, Elise Drake, Elizabeth Miller, Hera Haesoo Kim, Indira Cesarine, Jamia Weir, Jody MacDonald, Julia Brandão, Kathy Sirico, Katie Cercone, Katie Commodore, Katrina Majkut, Katy Itter, Kelly Boehmer, Linda Friedman Schmidt, Lisa Federici, Marianne Fairbanks, Mary Tooley Parker, Melanie Fischer, Melissa Zexter, Mychaelyn Michalec, Mz Icar, Orly Cogan, Robin Kang, Rosemary Meza-DesPlas, Ruta Naujalyte, Sally Hewett, Sarah Blanchette, Sooo-z Mastopietro, Sophie Boggis-Rolfe, Stacy Isenbarger, Stephanie Eche, Victoria Selbach, and Winnie van der Rijn.

Curatorial Statement:

unravel [ uhn-rav-uhl ] to separate or disentangle the threads of (a woven or knitted fabric, a rope, etc.). to free from complication or difficulty; make plain or clear; solve: to unravel a situation; to unravel a mystery.

“UNRAVELED: Confronting the Fabric of Fiber Art” investigates the narratives of contemporary fiber artists. The exhibition brings together a diverse group of artists who each address through their own personal vision, materials, and methods, works that are deeply rooted in the history of feminism, in the intersection of art and craft, addressing our living experiences and personal languages. We live in a world of extremes – on one hand, the pandemic has brought forth an intensity on digital and online programming peaking with the emergence of NFT art, and on the opposite end of the spectrum we are seeing a return to the comforts of the home and along with it a renaissance of organic and handmade artworks that embody that spirit. The laborious and repetitive methods required to create one work of fiber art can take hundreds of hours, yet equally the creation process is often referred to as a mediative act of healing, allowing for an expressive personal and cultural interrogation.

Fibers have been an integral part of human civilization for thousands of years. Textile art is one of the oldest art forms, dating back to prehistoric times. Despite early works of textiles such as embroideries and tapestries having been made by both men and women, the tradition of textiles and needlework evolved into that of “women’s work” and was not only dismissed as not “important” but was literally banned from the high art world by the Royal Academy in the 18th century (circa 1769). With the rise of the women’s movement as well as technological advances, women reclaimed the medium, subverted its history as a lesser art form, and transformed it into a tool of expression, of protest, of personality. From early suffrage movement embroidered banners to the groundbreaking exhibitions and works of female pioneers such as Bauhaus weaver Anni Alber’s momentous solo show at the Museum of Modern Art in 1949, Lenore Tawney’s exhibition at the Staten Island Museum in 1961 to Judy Chicago’s groundbreaking 1979 work “The Dinner Party”, we have seen the medium evolve and inspire new generations of fiber artists.

“UNRAVELED: Confronting the Fabric of Fiber Art” explores this new wave of female-identifying artists who are using materials ranging from thread and yarn to human hair, fabrics, and discarded clothing, among a range of other components to unravel the “language of thread” with works that provoke and interrogate. Whether drawn from a deeply personal narrative, or rooted in political motivation, each artist weaves, spins, sews, and hooks the viewer with their detailed and intricate textures that communicate and empower. The exhibition presents two and three-dimensional pieces that explore with gravity and humor our contemporary culture, its beauty, flaws, and idiosyncrasies through murals, assemblages, fragile and gestural threads, meditative, and metaphorical fibers. “UNRAVELED: Confronting the Fabric of Fiber Art” pushes the boundaries, investigates ancient as well as new materials and techniques, and presents a contemporary universe of the language of women and their interwoven, progressive vocabulary.”– Curator Indira Cesarine

“To know the history of embroidery is to know the history of women.” – Rozsika Parker author of “The Subversive Stitch” (1984)

“I am a multimedia artist who uses sculpture and performance to bear witness to the experiences of black women even as American society aims to render us and our lives as invisible and meaningless. Despite the prevalent “urban black” narrative, my experience is tied to the natural world, and I use materials that reference my desert environment and my lived experience as a black woman with Indigenous roots.” – Artist Amber Doe

“I mix subversion with flirtation, humor with power, and intimacy with frivolity. My subject matter is frank and provocative, dealing with issues of fertility, sexuality, self-image, isolation, vulnerability, indulgence, and beauty in the mundane, which are designed to challenge social stereotypes embedded within childhood fairytales. My work explores the many flavors of feminism.” – Artist Orly Cogan

“I pull from my autobiography to illustrate stories of trauma, sexuality, intimacy, and growth. Detailed beading and cyclical patterning emphasize the consistent labor in the repetitive motion of handsewing, that which mirrors the emotional and psychic labor expended in order to manage the suffering a body can accumulate over time. My sculptures translate the life experience of a survivor of complex trauma through the lens of glittering beadwork in order to recount deeply traumatic stories for the same cultural collective that due to repression, denial, censorship and deliberate silencing…” –Artist Caroline Wayne

“This body of work scrutinizes the amalgamation of victim shaming tropes that men and women are taught throughout their lives, both passively and actively, through social norms, pop culture, our educational and legal systems, religious establishments, and familial influences and upbringing.” – Artist Christy O’Connor

“My work focuses on my personal experience living within the confines of a female body, exploring sexuality, religion, and body image. The shared narratives of childbirth, menstruation, dysmorphia, sexual violation, and societal scrutiny all come into play and find connections with the viewers in their shared commonality.” – Artist Dominique Vitali

“My textile works are hand-sewn, fabric based sculptural pieces made from recycled materials that have multiple uses as ritual talismans, wearables, ecstatic birth blankets, dreamcatchers and traveling altars”. – Artist Katie Cercone

“Discarded clothing is my paint. I give second chances to the worn, the damaged, the mistreated, the abandoned, the unwanted, and to myself. My emotional narrative portraits and figurative artworks examine the human condition through my own lived experience. The violence of cutting and deconstruction make way for the reconstruction and refashioning of a broken past.” – Artist Linda Friedman Schmidt

“We are drawn to the grand gesture, the loud assured voice, the bold move, the aggressive brush stroke. I celebrate the opposite: the small moments in our lives – the unremarkable… as Covid-19 took over, some of the things I was celebrating became even more pertinent; toilet paper, soap, hand sanitizer. These objects became signs of hope, of safety, of comfort.” – Artist Melanie Fischer

ABOUT THE UNTITLED SPACE

The Untitled Space is an art gallery located in Tribeca, New York in a landmark building on Lispenard Street. Founded in 2015 by artist Indira Cesarine, the gallery features an ongoing curation of exhibits of emerging and established contemporary artists exploring conceptual framework and boundary-pushing ideology through mediums of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, video and performance art. The gallery is committing to exploring new ideas vis-à-vis traditional and new mediums and highlights a program of women in art. Since launching The Untitled Space gallery, Cesarine has curated over 40 exhibitions and has exhibited artwork by more than 450 artists. Her curatorial for The Untitled Space includes solo shows for artists Sarah Maple, Rebecca Leveille, Alison Jackson, Fahren Feingold, Jessica Lichtenstein, Tom Smith, Loren Erdrich, Kat Toronto aka Miss Meatface, Katie Commodore, and Jeanette Hayes among many others. Notable group shows include “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Happiness” public art exhibition and group show presented in collaboration with Save Art Space, “IRL: Investigating Reality,” “BODY BEAUTIFUL,” “SHE INSPIRES,” Special Projects “EDEN” and “(HOTEL) XX” at SPRING/BREAK Art Show, and internationally celebrated group shows “UPRISE/ANGRY WOMEN,” and “ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE” responding to the political climate in America, as well as numerous other critically-acclaimed exhibitions. Recent press on Indira Cesarine & The Untitled Space includes Vogue (US), Vogue Italia, CNN, Forbes, Newsweek, W Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, Teen Vogue, New York Magazine, i-D Magazine, Dazed and Confused, and The New York Times among many others.

*Featured image artwork by Victoria Selbach for UNRAVELED: Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art. 

artwork by  Elise Drake, UNRAVELED Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art. For use by 360 Magazine

Artwork by Elise Drake, UNRAVELED Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art.

artwork by Indira Cesarine, for UNRAVELED Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art. For use by 360 Magazine

Artwork by Mary Tooley Parker, UNRAVELED Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art.

Katie Commodore x The Untitled Space

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “Katie Commodore: Between Friends and Lovers” solo exhibition opening on November 21st, and on view through December 12, 2020.  Curated by Indira Cesarine, “Katie Commodore: Between Friends and Lovers” debuts a series of large scale erotically charged figurative tapestries, created with detailed adornments and unique embroideries, along with a number of her signature portraits in gouache, miniature watercolor paintings on ivory, as well as works on paper including intaglio etchings, metallic foil cutouts, and photogravure prints. Katie Commodore is an interdisciplinary artist who concentrates on creating intimate portraits of her friends. In 2000 Commodore received her BFA in illustration from Maryland Institute College of Art. In 2004 she obtained her MFA in printmaking from Rhode Island School of Design where she is currently an adjunct professor.

“Katie Commodore: Between Friends and Lovers”

A Solo Exhibition
Presented by The Untitled Space

THE UNTITLED SPACE
45 Lispenard Street, NYC 10013

*RSVP*
Due to COVID, there will be limited capacity inside the gallery, and guests are required to wear masks. RSVP Required via Registration Link. All RSVPs will be confirmed. Thank you in advance.
RSVP REGISTRATION LINK 

EXHIBITION ON VIEW
November 21– December 12, 2020

“Everyone is my friend and they are allowing me to be a witness to their love, which in turn is then celebrated by everyone that sees it.” Over the past few years, Katie Commodore’s artwork has concentrated on depicting real people’s sexuality, although not necessarily their sexual preferences, but rather sexuality in the broader sense. Her intimate portraits address what is it that makes them feel sexy, how they express that physically, and how it evolves over the years for them as individuals. “We change our clothes every season; our physical appearance through body modification, losing weight, gaining weight, tattoos, etc; we change our kinks and sexual preferences partner to partner, year to year.  Our sexuality, and how we feel about it, is in constant flux; the same way that we redecorate our homes, change the wallpaper and curtains, change the sheets.” States the artist on her portraits. Commodore likens this subtle change in how her friends express themselves to the way society also expresses its collective self through decorative patterns. “In a roundabout way, it can be looked at as a meter of a population’s ‘sexuality’ – the public expression of the private. Bright colors, vibrant patterns, clean lines, and minimal decoration all provide a window into the personalities that chose or created them. Historians and anthropologists often use the decorative remnants (pots, jewelry, frescos, etc.) of past cultures to gain valuable insight into the lives of the people that created them, the same sort of cultural portrait can be drawn from our design choices today.”

Throughout the years, she has focused on various mediums including drawing, painting, printmaking, textiles, and scrimshaw. She has often emphasized materials that are not considered “fine art” but were rather thought of as women’s “hobbies” and in so doing highlights their traditional merit. A majority of her artwork is portraits of her friends during their most erotic moments, acting as a celebration of personal power, beauty, and sexuality.  It is a subtle, but often rich moment that shows the kink, sexual fulfillment, and the sexual interests of those closest to her. “Any activity that helps someone express their sexuality is beautiful, to be supported, and worthy of being immortalized in art.” She states of her sexually charged portraits which depict real people in the moment, captured through private photo sessions with the artist which are used as references for her paintings or prints.

Commodore was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 2007, which forced her to adjust her artistic practice. Her diagnosis motivated her to explore ways of maintaining the vibrant patterns and detail that she’s known for while not having to rely completely on her super fine motor skills. “Right before I was diagnosed with MS my artwork got much more detailed and pattern-based, and I think that was an unconscious reaction to the fact that I was losing my super-fine motor skills. Since then, I’ve adapted my studio practice to accommodate what I can and cannot do. I don’t draw with a pencil or pen as much anymore, paint brushes are more forgiving when it comes to small hand tremors. I do much more planning and sketching in the computer. Embroidery has been a real change that allows me to maintain the compulsive marking and patterns while there’s no need for perfect hand-eye coordination.”

Her latest series of large-scale figurative tapestries are ripe with intricate details. In a continuation of her signature style she presents bold figures against dramatically complex patterns, pushing the visuals into the realm of surreal erotic fantasies. The sheer scale of the works heightens the drama in a cinematic manner with the life-sized figures taking center stage. “Tandem to creating miniatures and paintings with vivid patterns, I’ve always been interested in creating life-sized portraiture. In grad school I did a series of life-sized relief prints and over the years I’ve done several life-sized drawings that I then spent months filling in with patterns. There was always something about portraying my models in a completely relatable scale that took the image from something precious to something actually more personal, the viewer can feel their gaze and the energy in their pose, feel their weight and almost come away feeling like they know the model in real life. Several years ago, I wanted to have custom tapestries made to reference the historical value of tapestries while giving tribute to the fact that often women were the actual makers of the tapestries which were usually designed by men. My digitally woven textiles start out as drawings in my computer. Like my works on paper, the patterns are historical wallpaper and fabric designs that range from the medieval to contemporary examples. I embroider on them, adding appliques (chine collé, if you will), bejeweling and beading away for hours, turning them into monoprints. I’m creating something new that combines the immediate gratification of print on demand fabricated works with the meditative, time consuming craft of embroidery and fiber arts. I juxtapose mass-produced elements with the uniqueness of each piece, elevating each patch and plastic bead to something more substantial.” She also introduces a number of text works in fiber that complement the series with their adventurously powerful statements.

Katie Commodore has exhibited throughout the United States and Europe, including England, Italy, Germany, and Greece. She has had solo exhibitions at Baby Grand, NYC, and SHAG, Brooklyn. Her work has been previously featured in a number of group shows presented by The Untitled Space including “(Hotel) XX” at Spring/Break Art Show, “IRL: Investigating Reality” and “Secret Garden”. Other notable exhibitions include “FEMME” presented by Spoke Art and Juxtapoz Magazine, SCOPE Art Fair, “StitchFetish 6” at The Hive Gallery, and “Facing the Walls” at The VETs Gallery. Residencies include ChaNorth, Pine Plains, New York; Red Light Design, Amsterdam, Holland; and One Night Residency, London, England. She is currently the Administrative Director of Crux, LCA, a cooperative of Black XR Creatives and Producers that focuses on Black storytelling and creating a foothold in the burgeoning vocabulary of new media of VR and creating Black wealth. Commodore has been featured in a number of publications including The New York Times and Dazed Digital, among others. She currently lives and works in Providence, Rhode Island.

The Untitled Space Launches Online Art Boutique – Make An Offer

The Untitled Space is pleased to announce the launch of “Make An Offer” on our online Art Boutique, allowing collectors to name their own price, which is then presented to each artist for consideration. Make an Offer is now available on a wide selection of artworks available via the gallery. Discover and collect paintings, sculptures, photography, printmaking, drawings, and mixed media, as well as limited-edition prints by our artists. We are pleased to offer gallery pick-up as well as delivery to locations in the US and abroad.

Visit us online for more info and to view collections by artists including Fahren Feingold, Sarah Maple, Indira Cesarine, Grace Graupe-Pillard, Rebecca Leveille, Miss Meatface, Tina Maria Elena Bak, Trina Merry, Meg Lionel Murphy, Lynn Bianchi, Robin Tewes, Christina Massey, Meegan Barnes, Ashley Chew, Katie Commodore, Dolly Faibyshev, Robyn Gibson, Logan White, Lauren Edrich, Tom Smith, Anne Barlinckhoff, and Katya Zvereva among many others.

VISIT THE BOUTIQUE

*All offers on artwork will be considered although the gallery and artists have a right to negotiate or refuse any offers on a case by case basis. 

FEATURED ARTISTS

TINA MARIA ELENA BAKE 

A Solo Exhibition
Presented by The Untitled Space
In Collaboration with Fleur Du Mal
175 Mott Street, NYC
August 11 – December 31, 2020

THE PEEP SHOW

The Untitled Space is pleased to announce the solo show of works by artist Tina Maria Elena Bak presented in collaboration with luxury New York-based ready-to-wear and lingerie brand Fleur du Mal has been extended to December 31, 2020. Tina Maria Elena Bak’s works on paper are currently on display at “The Peep Show,” Fleur du Mal’s gallery space located within their boutique at 175 Mott Street in Soho, Manhattan. “The Peep Show” premiered a number of new works on paper, as well as a large selection of original paintings by the artist that have never been exhibited before. A limited edition t-shirt collection has additionally been created in celebration of the exhibition, with 15% proceeds supporting FREE ARTS.

Tina Maria Elena Bak watercolors premiered in the US at The Untitled Space’s “EDEN” installation and exhibition at SPRING/BREAK Art Show at The UN Plaza in 2019. She has since been featured in several other group shows presented by The Untitled Space including “BODY BEAUTIFUL,” “The Female Gaze on Love, Lust and Longing” at Superfine Art Fair, as well as the Art4Equality benefit group show and auction in 2020. Her paintings have additionally been featured in a number of international publications including Glamour Magazine, The Washington Post, Metal Magazine, and The Huffington Post, among many others.

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Artwork by Artist Tina Maria Elena Bak, Featured in “The Peep Show” presented by Fleur Du Mal and The Untitled Space.

INDIRA CESARINE

Artist In Residence Solo Exhibition
Presented by The Parlor NYC
In Collaboration with The Untitled Space
October 29, 2020 – August 31, 2021

The Parlor NYC
160 Madison Avenue, NYC 10013
(Entrance on 33rd Street)

THE PARLOR NYC

The Parlor NYC is pleased to present a solo exhibition of works by artist in residence Indira Cesarine on view by appointment through August 31, 2021. The exhibition, which is presented in collaboration with The Untitled Space gallery, is the inauguration of their resident artist series presented annually at the newly opened 13,000 sq ft luxury wellness space located in the heart of the NoMad Design District at 33rd Street and Madison Avenue.

The Parlor NYC’s artist residency uniquely fuses the luxury wellness community with contemporary art. The exhibition presents a collection of over 70 works in a variety of mediums including photography, printmaking, and mixed media neon artwork created by the artist between 1993-2020. Many early works on paper, including a number of intaglio etchings created in the 1990s are being exhibited for the first time. Known for her empowering feminist themes, Indira Cesarine’s artwork engages a narrative of social discourse and art activism. Cesarine’s artwork has been featured internationally at many galleries, museums, and festivals, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Mattatuck Museum, Hudson Valley MOCA, The Watermill Center, Paul Mellon Art Center, CICA Museum, San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, French Embassy Cultural Center, Art Basel Miami, Cannes Film Festival, and SPRING/BREAK Art Show to name a few.

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Indira Cesarine “The Labyrinth” Exhibit artwork, The Untitled Space, New York March – April 2020

LOREN ERDRICH

An Online Solo Exhibition
Presented by The Untitled Space
September 3 – December 3, 2020

The Untitled Space is pleased to present an online solo show of works by artist Loren Erdrich curated by Indira Cesarine. The online exclusive premiered on September 3, 2020 and is on view through December 3, 2020. New York based artist Loren Erdrich explores through mediums of painting, sculpture, and her latest “Isolation” drawings a personal universe which is soft, subtle, and venerable, while equally emphasizing the strength and fluidity of her favored element, water. Her mysteriously romantic portraits of humans, animals, and environments let the imagination flow, as she vividly points out with a favorite quote, “Let the body think of the Spirit as streaming, pouring, rushing, and shining into it from all sides” – Plontius

Loren Erdrich received an MFA from the Burren College of Art at the National University of Ireland, a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and a BA from the University of Pennsylvania. She has been awarded residencies at the Jentel Foundation, Burren College of Art, Santa Fe Art Institute, thrice at Art Farm Nebraska, Sculpture Space and the Vermont Studio Center. Notable accomplishments include publication in ARTMAZE Mag’s Autumn Issue 14, and exhibitions with Proto Gomez and Field Projects in New York, Wasserman Projects in Detroit and The Delaware Contemporary in Wilmington. Erdrich frequently collaborates with the poet Sierra Nelson, coauthoring the award winning “I Take Back the Sponge Cake” (published by Rose Metal Press) and “Isolation” (forthcoming in 2020). Erdrich lives and works in New York, NY.

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Artwork by Loren Erdrich , The Untitled Space Gallery, New York

Art4Equality x Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Happiness

A Group Show & Public Art Series
Presented by The Untitled Space in Collaboration with SaveArtSpace and Art4Equality

EXHIBITION ON VIEW ONLINE

September 26 – December 18, 2020

The Untitled Space group exhibition and public art series “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Happiness” presented in collaboration with SaveArtSpace and Art4Equality is now available to view online through December 18, 2020. The two-part exhibition featured an empowering public art series of 10 billboards each by different artists which launched week of September 21, 2020 in a variety of locations throughout New York City, to coincide with the gallery exhibition which was on view from September 26 – November 3, 2020 at The Untitled Space featuring the work of over 50 contemporary artists. Revolving around the theme of “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Happiness” the public art series and group exhibition curated by Indira Cesarine features works in a variety of mediums including painting, drawing, photography, and sculpture inspired by the words “Equality,” “Life,” “Liberty,” and “The Pursuit of Happiness”.

EXHIBITING ARTISTS: Alexandra Rubinstein, Alison Stinley, Alysia Davis, Ann Lewis, Anne Barlinckhoff, Annika Connor, April Fitzpatrick, Ashley Chew, Buket Savci, Cabell Molina, Coco Dolle, D’nae Harrison, Dan Alvarado, Daniel Aros-Aguilar, Danielle Siegelbaum, Daryl Daniels, David Siever, Dessie Jackson, Devynity Wray, Diana Zipeto, Dolly Faibyshev, Donna Bassin, Egypt H., Fahren Feingold, Faustine Badrichani, Geoffrey Stein, Hana Zhang, Indira Cesarine, Jamia Weir, Jared Freschman, Jodie Herrera, Joel Tretin, Jose Baez, Karen Bystedt, Katya Zvereva, Kim McCarty, Leah Schrager, Linda Friedman Schmidt, Lola Jiblazee, Lynn Bianchi, Meg Lionel Murphy, Michele Pred, Osaze Stigler, Panteha Abareshi, Paolo Morales, Q’shaundra James, Rachel Van Der Nacht, Rebecca Bird, Robin Tewes, Robyn Gibson, Rosemary Meza-DesPlas, Sarupa Sidaarth, Travis Rueckert, Tslil Tsemet, Valerie Carmet, and Vaughan Larsen.

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ABOUT THE UNTITLED SPACE

The Untitled Space is an art gallery located in Tribeca, New York in a landmark building on Lispenard Street. Founded in 2015, the gallery features an ongoing curation of exhibits of emerging and established contemporary artists exploring conceptual framework and boundary-pushing ideology through mediums of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, video and performance art. The gallery is committed to exploring new ideas vis-à-vis traditional and new mediums and highlights a program of women in art as well as special events aligned with our creative vision. Website

THE UNTITLED SPACE: SECRET GARDEN

On Thursday July 20th, join The Untitled Space NY for a Reception and Artist Talk on The Female Gaze on Erotica, Sex Positive Art & Censorship hosted by artist and curator Indira Cesarine along with SECRET GARDEN exhibiting artists Myla DalBesio, Leah Schrager, Julia Fox, Katie Commodore, Annika Connor, Dominique Vitali, Kristin Prim, Katya Zvereva, Taira Rice and Rowan Renee.

Drinks will be served from 6-7pm, with the talk from 7pm – 8:30 and conversation and drinks served afterwards. Space is limited as this is a seated event, please RSVP. 

The Untitled Space gallery is pleased to present “SECRET GARDEN” a group exhibition of female identifying artists exploring figurative works of nudes and erotic art. Curated by Indira Cesarine, the exhibit will be on view from June 27 – July 30 and will include works of painting, drawing, photography, printmaking, pottery, sculpture, collage, mixed media and video. The exhibit title is inspired by the book, “My Secret Garden”, published in 1973 by sex positive feminist author Nancy Friday who was instrumental in addressing taboos revolving around female sexuality in the early 70s and an important figure of the feminist sexual liberation movement. 

Through historical works of pioneering feminist artists such as Betty Tompkins and Joan Semmel, to that of emerging contemporary female artists such as Andrea Mary Marshall, India Munuez, Myla Dalbesio, Katie Commodore, and Leah Schrager, Alexandra Rubinstein, Andrea Mary Marshall, Annika Connor, Betty Tompkins, Brittany Maldonado, Brittany Markert, Cabell Molina, Danielle Sigler, Dara Vandor, Dominique Vitali, Elisa Garcia de la Huerta, Ellen Jong, Fahren Feingold, Hiba Schahbaz, India Menuez, Indira Cesarine, Jacqueline Secor, Janine Gordon, Jeanette Hayes, Jessica Litchtenstein, Joan Semmel, Julia Fox, Kat Toronto, Katie Commodore, Katya Zvereva, Kelsey Bennett, Kristin O’Connor, Kristin Prim, Lauren Rinaldi, Leah Schrager, Maia Radanovic, Mairi-Luise Tabbakh, Maisie Willoughby, Marne Lucas, Mary Theinert, Meredith Ostrom, Miza Coplin, Myla Dalbesio, Natasha Wright, Rebecca Leveille, Renee Dykeman, Rowan Renee, Signe Pierce, Suzanne Wright, Taira Rice, Tafv Sampson; SECRET GARDEN presents works by taboo shattering artists who fearlessly address sexual themes in their art and celebrate freedom of expression. 

Since the inception of the sexual liberation movement women have been faced with polarizing views on sexuality, including pornography and erotica, and it’s place within feminism. Through the highly documented feminist sex wars, which many historians believe attributed to the decline of second wave feminism, came the rise of the sex positive movement, which embraced women’s sexual freedom as central to women’s liberation. While the women’s liberation movement is often been equated with sexual liberation, the fight continues against the double standards that inhibit women from enjoying their sexuality freely and without judgment. 

Despite decades of “liberation” contemporary feminist artists today continue to address these themes, to explore the dichotomies of contemporary society and challenge the double standards that linger. The battle with censorship may have shifted from film to the internet, yet artists continue to grapple with to the constraints of conservative positions on depictions of nudity and sexually explicit works. Through their own visual narrative, the artists of SECRET GARDEN explore works that challenge stereotypes, celebrate femininity and reclaim sexual independence. The female perspective on the theme is at once visible through the subtle details as these artists define in their own terms the language of “erotic” through a female lens. They engage a dialogue of sexual self-empowerment that pushes social and political boundaries with artworks that exemplify a new wave of women’s sexual liberation in art. 

“I feel it is an important time to present an exhibition of female artists who are resisting oppressive structures and climates by championing sex positive feminism. With the new political right, we have ushered in a conservative era, which attempts to challenge many liberties we have grown accustomed to including women’s reproductive rights and the legality of birth control. The importance of censorship-free, sexually liberated art has regained significance as women today continue to battle for equality and freedom of expression. We were saddened that we were forced to censor many of the artworks featured in the exhibit in our promotions due to regulations of social media platforms and online services such as Mailchimp. We are looking forward to a society that accepts artworks of all kinds, including those depicting nudity as “safe” content for everyone.” – Curator Indira Cesarine