Posts tagged with "Jewels"

Ballet illustration by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine

SF Ballet Performs GEORGE BALANCHINE’S JEWELS 

GEORGE BALANCHINE’S JEWELS SPARKLES ON SCREEN AT SAN FRANCISCO BALLET, APRIL 1–21 

The 2021 Digital Season’s Jewels stream is dedicated
to the memory of Elyse Borne

Newly filmed Emeralds, captured at the War Memorial Opera House in San Francisco in January 2021, tops Balanchine’s dazzling, abstract triptych

San Francisco Ballet (SF Ballet) streams George Balanchine’s Jewels on Program 04, April 1–21 of the 2021 Digital Season, featuring a newly-captured Emeralds to accompany archival recordings of Rubies and Diamonds. Filmed on stage at the War Memorial Opera House in January of 2021, Emeralds was captured under strict safety protocols in compliance with the San Francisco Department of Public Health guidelines which protect artists, production crews, and the greater public. Tickets to the digital stream of Jewels begin at $29. Casting is available at this link.

SF Ballet Artistic Director and Principal Choreographer Helgi Tomasson dedicates the 2021 Digital Season’s Jewels stream to the memory of Elyse Borne, a leading Balanchine répétiteur who staged dozens of ballets for the Company, beginning in 1996 with Balanchine’s Concerto Barocco. Borne passed away in December of 2019, shortly after rehearsing Jewels with SF Ballet to prepare for live performance in the 2020 Season. “While recording Emeralds on stage this year we all thought fondly of Elyse,” says Tomasson. “She and I met while dancing for New York City Ballet in the 1970s and 80s. We were both aware of how fortunate we were to be a part of that last generation of dancers who worked directly with Balanchine. She joined us as ballet master in 1997 after working with companies all over the world, and over the following six years, she guided and supported the dancers here with expertise, grace, and humor. She will always be a long-remembered colleague and dear friend.” Alongside Borne and the George Balanchine Trust, Tomasson has remained committed to documenting and preserving the choreographer’s work for future generations, programming at least one Balanchine ballet each year of his leadership of SF Ballet.

Called “a perfect introduction to ballet” (The New York Times) and inspired by the designs of jeweler Van Cleef & Arpels, Jewels was last seen in full at SF Ballet in 2009. Jewels premiered in full in 1967 at New York City Ballet and consists of three one-act ballets that span the musical and balletic traditions of France (Emeralds), the United States (Rubies), and Russia (Diamonds), with costumes designed by Barbara Karinska to fit each act. Emeralds alludes to the 19th-century dances of French romantics and is set to excerpts from Gabriel Faure’s Pelléas et Mélisande (1898) and Shylock (1889). Rubies is a feat of athleticism, set to the irregular, modernist, jazz-inspired Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra by Igor Stravinsky. Diamonds invokes memories of Imperial Russia in a grand and formal display of classical ballet and is set to Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 3 in D major. SF Ballet Orchestra performs in each ballet, with newly recorded music for Emeralds captured using approved safety protocols at Skywalker Studios and the SF Conservatory of Music, produced and engineered by Leslie Ann Jones.

Tickets to Jewels are available now as single stream tickets for $29, or within the Premium Plus Digital Package, which offers unlimited viewing of the remaining programs in the 2021 Digital Season, in addition to exclusive bonus content, for $289. Tickets and packages may be purchased online. For more information, call Ticket Services at 415-865-2000, Monday through Friday from 10 am to 4 pm. Click here to view digital viewing tips.

Celebrating Jewels

SF Ballet hosts Celebrating Jewels on April 20 from 1 to 2:30 p.m., online via Zoom. The event unites former New York City Ballet principal dancers Kay Mazzo, Mimi Paul, and Edward Villella, alongside Helgi Tomasson, to discuss their memories and insight into Balanchine’s iconic ballet. General admission tickets to Celebrating Jewels are $20, donors and subscribers receive access to the program for a reduced rate or for free.

San Francisco Ballet Pop-Up Shop

San Francisco Ballet hosts a pop-up shop open to the public on April 2 and 3 from 10 to 3 p.m., observing COVID-19 regulations as suggested by the City of San Francisco. In celebration of Jewels, the pop-up is offering a 25% discount on all jewelry. The pop-up shop is held at 2400 Cesar Chavez, San Francisco, 94124. Parking is free. Donors and subscribers can access the sale early on Thursday, April 1 from 10 to 3 p.m. Contact their website with questions.

PRODUCTION CREDITS

Jewels
A Ballet in Three Parts  

Composers: Gabriel Fauré, Igor Stravinsky, Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Choreographer: George Balanchine
Staged by: Elyse Borne, Judith Fugate, Sandra Jennings
Additional Coaching by: Helgi Tomasson

World Premiere: April 13, 1967—New York City Ballet, New York State Theater; New York, New York

San Francisco Ballet Premiere: March 12, 2002—War Memorial Opera House, San Francisco, California

© The George Balanchine Trust

Emeralds
Captured on January 28, 2021 

Composer: Gabriel Fauré
Choreographer: George Balanchine
Staged by: Elyse Borne and Sandra Jennings
Additional Décor for Emeralds: Susan Touhy
Costume Design: Karinska, Recreated by Haydee Morales
Rehearsal Assistants: Ricardo Bustamante, Tina LeBlanc

Rubies
Captured on February 2, 2016  

Composer: Igor Stravinsky
Choreographer: George Balanchine
Staged by: Elyse Borne
Costume Design: Karinska
Original “Rubies” Lighting Design: Ronald Bates
Rehearsal Assistant: Tina LeBlanc

San Francisco Ballet Premiere: January 30, 1987—War Memorial Opera House, San Francisco, California

Diamonds
Captured on March 12, 2017  

Composer: Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Choreographer: George Balanchine
Staged by: Judith Fugate
Costume Design: Karinska
Rehearsal Assistants: Felipe Diaz, Betsy Erickson

ABOUT SAN FRANCISCO BALLET
San Francisco Ballet, long recognized for pushing boundaries in dance, has enjoyed a long and rich tradition of artistic “firsts” since its founding in 1933, including performing the first American productions of Swan Lake and Nutcracker, as well as the first 20th-century American Coppélia. SF Ballet is one of the three largest ballet companies in the United States and currently presents more than 100 performances annually, both locally and internationally. The mission of SF Ballet is to share its joy of dance with the widest possible audience—in its community and worldwide—and to provide the highest caliber of dance training in its School. Under the direction of Helgi Tomasson, the Company has achieved an international reputation as one of the preeminent ballet companies in the world.

MELANIE GRIFFITH’S TIFFANY & CO. DIAMOND AND PEARL BRACELETS PHOTO

Kruse GWS Auctions’ World Record

The world-record-breaking auction house, Kruse GWS Auctions, specializing in entertainment memorabilia, fine jewelry, iconic fashion accessories, Royal artifacts, antiques and collectibles, has announced another world record. On Saturday, December 5, 2020, the Oscar-nominated actress Melanie Griffith’s 48.00ctw Diamond, 8.5mm Pearl and Solid Platinum Pair of Antique Bracelets from her mother, Tippi Hedren, sold for $156,250 during the “Billionaire’s Estate & Royal Auction” event. The final bid marks the highest price paid for Tiffany & Co. jewelry at auction.

The pair of solid platinum, diamond and pearl antique bracelets personally owned by film star Melanie Griffith come with quintessential Hollywood provenance of having been gifted to her by her mother, iconic Hollywood actress Tippi Hedren, who famously won a Golden Globe Award for her iconic role in Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Birds.” The bracelets are collectively embellished with approximately 48ctw round and old European cut fiery white diamonds and are lined with eight 8.5mm pearls each. The bracelets were sold with a personal letter from Griffith’s famous mother and are housed in a fitted box. The bracelets measure 7” in length and 2.15” wide and are marked Tiffany & Co.

“Melanie Griffith is a true American fashion and film icon. These bracelets are so exquisite, our auction house recognized immediately they are fine art in the form of fine jewelry and we were proud to set a world record with their sale,” said Dame Brigitte Kruse. “They represent the highest level of Americana; being made at the peak of craftsmanship by iconic American jewelry company Tiffany & Co. and being gifted from iconic American actress Tippi Hendren to her daughter, fellow iconic American actress Melanie Griffith. Kruse GWS Auctions was thrilled to be trusted with such a remarkable opportunity. The sale of the beautiful Diamond and Platinum bracelet secured a new world record as well as a placement in a museum.”

ABOUT KRUSE GWS AUCTIONS, INC.

Kruse GWS Auctions is the world-record breaking auction house specializing in Hollywood Memorabilia, Fine Jewelry, Master Timepieces, Royal Artifacts, Luxury Vehicles, Antiques and Collectibles.  Founder Dame Brigitte Kruse is the first auctioneer to be knighted by a Royal Family, the first female auctioneer to be recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records and is a member of the Forbes Los Angeles Business Council.

Fifth-generation auctioneer Kruse recently co-founded iSynergy Network, a group of innovative industry leaders providing a platform and solutions for entrepreneurs within a network of professionals across interconnected industries “for the betterment of all.” The global auction house has been featured around the world for sales of such notable items as Elvis Presley’s personal jet, Marilyn Monroe’s famous black wool dress, Marlon Brando’s historic watch, Italian Renaissance philosopher Machiavelli’s estate in Florence, and the 14th century celadon bowl owned by the last Empress of Vietnam.  www.gwsauctions.com

Katie Commodore x The Untitled Space

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “Katie Commodore: Between Friends and Lovers” solo exhibition opening on November 21st, and on view through December 12, 2020.  Curated by Indira Cesarine, “Katie Commodore: Between Friends and Lovers” debuts a series of large scale erotically charged figurative tapestries, created with detailed adornments and unique embroideries, along with a number of her signature portraits in gouache, miniature watercolor paintings on ivory, as well as works on paper including intaglio etchings, metallic foil cutouts, and photogravure prints. Katie Commodore is an interdisciplinary artist who concentrates on creating intimate portraits of her friends. In 2000 Commodore received her BFA in illustration from Maryland Institute College of Art. In 2004 she obtained her MFA in printmaking from Rhode Island School of Design where she is currently an adjunct professor.

“Katie Commodore: Between Friends and Lovers”

A Solo Exhibition
Presented by The Untitled Space

THE UNTITLED SPACE
45 Lispenard Street, NYC 10013

*RSVP*
Due to COVID, there will be limited capacity inside the gallery, and guests are required to wear masks. RSVP Required via Registration Link. All RSVPs will be confirmed. Thank you in advance.
RSVP REGISTRATION LINK 

EXHIBITION ON VIEW
November 21– December 12, 2020

“Everyone is my friend and they are allowing me to be a witness to their love, which in turn is then celebrated by everyone that sees it.” Over the past few years, Katie Commodore’s artwork has concentrated on depicting real people’s sexuality, although not necessarily their sexual preferences, but rather sexuality in the broader sense. Her intimate portraits address what is it that makes them feel sexy, how they express that physically, and how it evolves over the years for them as individuals. “We change our clothes every season; our physical appearance through body modification, losing weight, gaining weight, tattoos, etc; we change our kinks and sexual preferences partner to partner, year to year.  Our sexuality, and how we feel about it, is in constant flux; the same way that we redecorate our homes, change the wallpaper and curtains, change the sheets.” States the artist on her portraits. Commodore likens this subtle change in how her friends express themselves to the way society also expresses its collective self through decorative patterns. “In a roundabout way, it can be looked at as a meter of a population’s ‘sexuality’ – the public expression of the private. Bright colors, vibrant patterns, clean lines, and minimal decoration all provide a window into the personalities that chose or created them. Historians and anthropologists often use the decorative remnants (pots, jewelry, frescos, etc.) of past cultures to gain valuable insight into the lives of the people that created them, the same sort of cultural portrait can be drawn from our design choices today.”

Throughout the years, she has focused on various mediums including drawing, painting, printmaking, textiles, and scrimshaw. She has often emphasized materials that are not considered “fine art” but were rather thought of as women’s “hobbies” and in so doing highlights their traditional merit. A majority of her artwork is portraits of her friends during their most erotic moments, acting as a celebration of personal power, beauty, and sexuality.  It is a subtle, but often rich moment that shows the kink, sexual fulfillment, and the sexual interests of those closest to her. “Any activity that helps someone express their sexuality is beautiful, to be supported, and worthy of being immortalized in art.” She states of her sexually charged portraits which depict real people in the moment, captured through private photo sessions with the artist which are used as references for her paintings or prints.

Commodore was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 2007, which forced her to adjust her artistic practice. Her diagnosis motivated her to explore ways of maintaining the vibrant patterns and detail that she’s known for while not having to rely completely on her super fine motor skills. “Right before I was diagnosed with MS my artwork got much more detailed and pattern-based, and I think that was an unconscious reaction to the fact that I was losing my super-fine motor skills. Since then, I’ve adapted my studio practice to accommodate what I can and cannot do. I don’t draw with a pencil or pen as much anymore, paint brushes are more forgiving when it comes to small hand tremors. I do much more planning and sketching in the computer. Embroidery has been a real change that allows me to maintain the compulsive marking and patterns while there’s no need for perfect hand-eye coordination.”

Her latest series of large-scale figurative tapestries are ripe with intricate details. In a continuation of her signature style she presents bold figures against dramatically complex patterns, pushing the visuals into the realm of surreal erotic fantasies. The sheer scale of the works heightens the drama in a cinematic manner with the life-sized figures taking center stage. “Tandem to creating miniatures and paintings with vivid patterns, I’ve always been interested in creating life-sized portraiture. In grad school I did a series of life-sized relief prints and over the years I’ve done several life-sized drawings that I then spent months filling in with patterns. There was always something about portraying my models in a completely relatable scale that took the image from something precious to something actually more personal, the viewer can feel their gaze and the energy in their pose, feel their weight and almost come away feeling like they know the model in real life. Several years ago, I wanted to have custom tapestries made to reference the historical value of tapestries while giving tribute to the fact that often women were the actual makers of the tapestries which were usually designed by men. My digitally woven textiles start out as drawings in my computer. Like my works on paper, the patterns are historical wallpaper and fabric designs that range from the medieval to contemporary examples. I embroider on them, adding appliques (chine collé, if you will), bejeweling and beading away for hours, turning them into monoprints. I’m creating something new that combines the immediate gratification of print on demand fabricated works with the meditative, time consuming craft of embroidery and fiber arts. I juxtapose mass-produced elements with the uniqueness of each piece, elevating each patch and plastic bead to something more substantial.” She also introduces a number of text works in fiber that complement the series with their adventurously powerful statements.

Katie Commodore has exhibited throughout the United States and Europe, including England, Italy, Germany, and Greece. She has had solo exhibitions at Baby Grand, NYC, and SHAG, Brooklyn. Her work has been previously featured in a number of group shows presented by The Untitled Space including “(Hotel) XX” at Spring/Break Art Show, “IRL: Investigating Reality” and “Secret Garden”. Other notable exhibitions include “FEMME” presented by Spoke Art and Juxtapoz Magazine, SCOPE Art Fair, “StitchFetish 6” at The Hive Gallery, and “Facing the Walls” at The VETs Gallery. Residencies include ChaNorth, Pine Plains, New York; Red Light Design, Amsterdam, Holland; and One Night Residency, London, England. She is currently the Administrative Director of Crux, LCA, a cooperative of Black XR Creatives and Producers that focuses on Black storytelling and creating a foothold in the burgeoning vocabulary of new media of VR and creating Black wealth. Commodore has been featured in a number of publications including The New York Times and Dazed Digital, among others. She currently lives and works in Providence, Rhode Island.

Jewel illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

JTV Jewelry Care

Knowing how to properly care for and clean your jewelry will help keep it sparkling for years to come, but it can be difficult to know the best way to clean them as different gemstones and metals require special care.

See below for expert tips from Kim Kanary, Certified Diamontologist and Vice President of Community Development & Engagement at JTV about important care details for many different gemstones on how to simply and safely clean your jewelry at home.

EXPERT TIPS FROM KIM KANARY:

Guidelines for Cleaning Jewelry: 

  • Generally, you can use lukewarm water, mild dish soap or jewelry cleaner, a soft cloth, or a soft bristle toothbrush.
  • In a small bowl, prepare a cleaning solution by mixing two tablespoons of mild dishwashing liquid with one quart of lukewarm water. Or, if you are using a commercial jewelry cleaner, be sure to follow all instructions, and make sure the expiration date has not passed since an expired cleaner may be ineffective or perhaps even damage your jewelry.
  • To clean: soak for 10-20 minutes, gently brush all sides, rinse with clean water, pat dry with a clean cloth. You can repeat this as much as you’d like to achieve the desire cleanliness and appearance.  

For Silver Jewelry:

  • First, try simply polishing it. To polish, use a silver or microfiber cloth and use long back-and-forth motions. Avoid rubbing in circles, as this can magnify small scratches.
  • If simple polishing doesn’t deliver the desired level of shine, following the cleaning guidelines above for a full cleaning of your jewelry.

For Gold Jewelry:

  • Follow the general cleaning guidelines above.

 For Gold-Plated Jewelry:

  • Rub gently with a soft cloth to restore shine.
  • If more cleaning is needed, follow the general cleaning guidelines above.

 For Earrings with Gemstones:

 Costume Earrings: 

  • Because glue is often used to attach stones, be extra cautious when cleaning.
  • Wipe gently with a clean, damp cloth and use as little water as possible.
  • Dry with a soft, absorbent cloth.
  • Let air dry before wearing or storing.

 How to keep your jewelry clean & sparkling: 

  • Earrings should be the last thing you put on and first thing you take off.  This will help you avoid getting hair or other products on your earrings, which can dirty or damage them.  
  • Wipe all jewelry with a soft, dry cloth when you take it off.
  • Be sure to properly store your jewelry.  If you prefer a jewelry box, place each piece in its own pouch or plastic bag.
  • Make sure jewelry is completely dry before storing.
  • Avoid wearing jewelry when bathing, swimming, or exercising

JTV is the leading retailer of jewelry and gemstones in the United States. With a proven 26-year history, JTV leverages an omni-digital strategy designed to elevate the customer experience through holistic, digitally-driven touch points, including live TV programming, 24 hours a day, seven days a week to 85 million U.S. households, an industry leading mobile optimized e-commerce platform, and a robust and engaging social media presence. As part of its commitment to customer satisfaction and the development and distribution of educational content, the company employs numerous Graduate Gemologists and Accredited Jewelry Professionals. JTV.com is one of the largest jewelry e-commerce websites in the country according to Internet Retailer’s Top 500 list for 2017.  

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16th Century Spanish Royal Jewel

A royal jewel, 30 carat pearl brooch is set for auction at Christies in Geneva Switzerland on May 14th. The Ana Maria pearl was a gift of King Charles V of Spain to a noble family and where it remained for generations. Using cutting edge radiocarbon analysis, the Swiss Gemological Institute (SSEF) confirms the age of the pearl—something unheard of previously.  The laboratory is happy to speak with you.

 

Jewels with fabulous royal provenance are currently trending at auction. Sotheby’s set a record for pearls at auction in 2018 with the $36 million dollar sale of the Marie Antoinette Pearl.

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