Posts tagged with "beauty"

Makeup Illustration for use by 360 Magazine

Beautyque NYC Releases Beauty Routine Survey Results

Beautyque NYC, a virtual shopping, beauty and wellness experience, unveiled its consumer survey results assessing “Beauty Consumer Trends: Has the Pandemic Changed Beauty Routines?” One of the largest results stemming from the survey is that nearly 75% of respondents indicated they have changed their beauty routines since the pandemic started.

Beautyque NYC Founder & Owner Sonia Khemiri explains why these trends have occurred: “For most of us, many aspects of our lives have changed since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic as of March 2020. As a result, we’ve had to adapt our routines, habits, and lifestyles to fit the ‘new normal.’” She continues “Interested in seeing how consumers’ beauty habits have changed nowadays, Beautyque NYC developed a survey for consumers. We wanted to know, are they wearing more or less makeup than before? Do they purchase skincare more or less often? What are they looking for in the brands they support?”

Before the Pandemic

Before the pandemic, respondents said they bought their beauty products in retailers such as, Sephora/Ulta and Drug Stores (71.3%), from Amazon (43.9%), or directly from the brand’s website (45.2%).  Among the various Beauty categories, skincare, body care, hair care, and makeup were all used daily. Nail care and fragrances were often used. Lastly, tools & devices were reported to be sometimes used. They often purchased skincare, haircare, body care, and makeup, and sometimes bought fragrance, tools & devices, and nail care products.

During the Pandemic

Nearly 40 percent of the respondents indicated that their beauty routines have definitely changed as a result of the pandemic, while 36.8% answered that their routine has only somewhat changed, and 17.3% answered that their beauty routine has not changed.

Their place of preference for making the purchase is Amazon, Sephora/Ulta, and directly on the brand’s website.  Skincare and body care products are used daily, hair care is used often, and nail care, fragrance, tools and devices are all used sometimes.  Most of the products are purchased sometimes; however, none of them are purchased daily.

On average, 59% of respondents claimed to use makeup less often since the pandemic, and 30% uses makeup the same amount as before the pandemic.  In relation to skincare, nearly 50% of survey respondents use the same amount of time as before and just over 40% use skincare more often now. Fragrance and nail care items are used less often than before. Hair care, body care, tools and devices are all used for the same amount of time as before the pandemic.

About Makeup

Makeup consumers tend to buy products for a variety of aesthetic reasons.  The most used makeup products used on a daily basis as reported by survey respondents include mascara, eyeshadow, lip gloss, foundation, and concealer. Beautyque found that the largest percentage of survey responders, 72%, answered they wear it since it gives them a confidence boost. The second largest percentage of repsonders, 65.3%, said makeup makes them feel more beautiful. Finally, 55% of responders reported that they wear makeup to hide imperfections.“The vast majority of consumers use makeup as a means of improving their overall self-esteem and perception,” Sonia adds.

About Skincare

The most used makeup products used on a daily basis were reported to be cleanser/face wash, moisturizer, eye cream and serum. “These products are the foundation to a consistent skincare routine,” Sonia says.

About Purchase Criteria

Beautyque’s survey also assessed important factors when deciding whether or not to purchase a beauty product. Respondents reported the criteria most important in making the decision to purchase included the product having clean ingredients,  good reviews, and a reasonable price point.

“In terms of the brands our survey respondents support and purchase from: the price has to be reasonable, the product has to be cruelty-free, consist of high-performance formulas, made from clean and natural ingredients, and offer an inclusive shade range,” Sonia says. “Social media platforms, friends and family, and influencers are the top resources the respondents use to gain information on beauty trends along with researching beauty products online before making a purchase.”

Factors that affect their level of trust in a brand are knowing the brand’s founders’ story, hearing influencers mention it, and a well-known brand, Sonia adds. “Trust is derived from the brand’s reputation as a direct reflection of the products.”

These are definitely times of change for the beauty industry. “It is pertinent to keep an open eye on consumers’ behaviors and preferences,” Sonia advises. “Beautyque NYC strives to help indie brands reach their maximum potential and to deliver the best products to consumers.”

Beautyque NYC is a retail marketing platform conceived by French born, US-based female entrepreneur and indie brand founder Sonia Khemiri. In addition to the first ever beauty 3D storefront, Beautyque NYC provides an in-depth and interactive marketing platform for its more than 25 brands and 10,000 consumers.

In addition to taking its own polls with its beauty enthusiasts, Beautyque NCY also spearheads Brand Evaluation Programs for its brand members to provide them direct product feedback from a focus group testing process.

Survey respondents include 231 consumers* ages 18 and older provided insight to how and if their beauty routine has changed during the pandemic.

Sonia Khemiri QxA

Here at 360 Magazine, we spoke with Beautyque NYC Founder & Owner Sonia Khemiri about how Beautyque’s survey was conducted, future beauty industry trend predictions, and her best product recommendations for day and night skin routines:

How did you conduct your consumer survey?

The survey was conducted virtually through a detailed online form that we distributed to our subscriber base of beauty enthusiasts and consumers. We asked them questions regarding beauty trends at various times to see what has changed over the course of the pandemic.

How large of a study did you conduct? How many people were surveyed overall?

The study consisted of 231 responses*.

*From a total of 231 responses, 98.3% of 229 were females. The breakdown of age groups goes as follows: 35 to 44 years old (26.1%), 45 to 54 years old (23%), and 24 to 34 years old (20.8%).  The annual income of the groups starts with 47.3% of respondents having an income of $50,000 or less, 34.1% with an income of $50,000 to $99,000, and 15.9% with an income of $100,000 to $249,000.  The respondents were primarily from New York, California, Florida, Texas, and Pennsylvania.

What do you predict is the largest factor in beauty routine changes during the pandemic?

Based on the survey conducted, the largest factor that changed during the pandemic was how [many] more consumers developed a greater sense of awareness toward beauty and wellness products. Areas that consumers expressed their concern were on clean ingredients, sustainability, ease of application, and effectiveness. Additionally, their preference on where they buy their beauty routine products has changed significantly from retailers to online shopping.

As the pandemic begins to less across the US, do you predict these changes to be long-term or temporary?

We believe that some habits will definitely stick around even after the pandemic, such as at-home routines and buying online. The pandemic forced individuals to color their own hair, do their own nails, and perform their own facials. This change is predicted to be long-term due to convenience and cost-effectiveness. Online shopping allows consumers to perform more research on their products and grant them a greater access to new products that fit their needs, especially with all the digital development explosion during the pandemic such as VR, AR and AI. Even though brick-and-mortar stores are reopening across the U.S, we believe the shopping experience and the beauty routines built during the pandemic will be mixed in a way or another with offline experience and shopping.

What brands would you recommend to someone looking to start a beauty routine with high quality, cruelty-free products?

All the brands we have all carry high-quality products, but we will further elaborate on the cruelty-free brands.

For a night routine: we would always recommend to double cleanse with an oil-based cleanser and a water-based cleanser to remove all unwanted residue. For oil cleansers, the Musaclean Organic Pure Melt Cleansing Oil Gel from Kadalys will get rid of all oil-soluble impurities in the first wash. The second cleanser I would recommend is the Detox Cleanser +3 from Liftlab­­–this medical grade cleanser will clean and prep your skin for maximum skincare absorption. Next, I would use a Limited 2020 Edition Lotion by Yon-Ka Paris to treat the skin after double cleansing. For serums, the Australian Botanicals Pro-Aging Treatment Concentrate Serum from Founder’s Formula will help restore the skin’s collagen production. To finish off any good routine, moisturizer is must-have! Starting off with a Youthful Eye Concentrate from Alban Muller Cosmetics to target the eye area and the DNA Intense Recovery Creme from Priori Adaptive Skincare. Another bonus to really take your skincare routine to the next level are facial oils. Skincare products are supposed to be applied from thin consistencies to thicker consistencies, so some oils may be applied before serums while others are applied after. Our favorite facial oils are either the Sabrah Prickly Pear Seed Oil by Sunia K, the Luminous Brightening Elixir from Si Skin, or the Nourishing Facial Oils by Founder’s Formula.

For a day routine: I recommend starting with some ice around the eyes to really depuff the area and give you an awakened appearance. To top off the eye areas, Priori’s Tightening Eye Serum will give you a youthful glow along with Fresh Chemistry’s Glowing Serum. For [an] everyday routine, sun protection is very important to help decrease the appearance of aging and fine lines. The Kakadu Plum Vitamin C serum  from Founder’s Formula will help protect your skin from UV rays throughout the day along with the Vitamin Sunscreen form Olecea Beaute for the ultimate SPF Protection. For those who want a little more coverage, the Tinted Moisturizer by Elevate CBD Cosmetics is light enough to benefit your skin but has enough coverage to smooth over any imperfections.

To learn more, visit Beautyque’s website.

Nicole Kidman illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Nicole Kidman × Collision 2021

Nicole Kidman, Sera Labs Strategic Business Partner/Global Brand Ambassador and Nancy Duitch, Sera Labs Founder/CEO Headline Collision 2021

Kidman and Duitch to discuss how cutting-edge delivery system technology will revolutionize the beauty industry

Sera Labs, a subsidiary of CURE Pharmaceutical Holding Corp. (OTC: CURR) announced today that Academy Award, Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning actor/producer/ entrepreneur Nicole Kidman and Sera Labs CEO/CURE Pharmaceutical Chief Strategic Officer, Nancy Duitch will headline Collision 2021. Collision is North America’s fastest-growing tech conference and brings together the world’s most sought-after founders, tech companies, and game-changing entrepreneurs of our time.

Sera Labs and CURE Pharmaceutical have the technology and are poised to set the new standard that will change how the world utilizes beauty, health and wellness products. Kidman and Duitch will discuss how cutting-edge delivery system technology, over a decade’s worth of research and development, seventeen published patents, and extensive expertise in proprietary encapsulation and polymer methodologies, which are fused into Sera Labs’ anti-aging beauty, health and wellness products, will demand attention and accomplish this beauty revolution.

“Speaking with Nicole at Collision is a milestone moment for the brand. Science and technology have always been cornerstones for our company success. The world watches what happens at Collison. We are excited to be there and share more about our cutting-edge anti-aging beauty technology,” said Duitch, Sera Labs CEO/Founder and CURE Pharmaceutical Chief Strategic Officer.

Collision will take place virtually on its proprietary software from April 20-22, 2021 and is expected to attract over 40,000 attendees from over 100 countries. To learn more about the Collision Conference, visit the website. Kidman and Duitch will be headlining day two of the conference.

For more information on Seratopical by Sera Labs, please visit their website and follow them on Instagram.

BeBe Shopp illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Miss America Partners with Rowan University

Miss America Partners with Rowan University for 100th Anniversary Archival Project

With an eye on history and ideals of beauty, students digitize Miss America archives

“There she is…”

One hundred years of artifacts from the Miss America Competition—from jeweled crowns and velvet capes to programs, photographs, judges’ books, oil paintings, films, and business records—tell more than the story of the competition.

They also provide a rich look at both American and New Jersey history and help illustrate how ideas surrounding beauty and women’s roles in society have changed over a century. 

Now, through a unique partnership with the Miss America Organization, Rowan University students are sifting through the organization’s expansive archives and digitizing the artifacts. Their work, currently underway in the Digital Scholarship Center at Campbell Library, will be the cornerstone of the new Rowan Digital Collections.

Scholars worldwide eventually will have access to the artifacts through the archive, hosted by Rowan Libraries.

Currently, the massive Miss America collection is tucked away in storage in South Jersey. The storage contains a treasure trove of floor-to-ceiling artifacts from the competition.

The Miss America Organization will continue to retain the physical artifacts. But the digitization, which began with program books and some oil paintings of former winners, will ensure the artifacts are categorized and documented–and available widely to future scholars.

The preservation partnership was orchestrated by University administrators, who were approached by the Miss America Organization.

‘An enduring feature of American culture’

“We’re excited Rowan is doing this, and we’re thrilled the University sees value in this project,” says Shantel Krebs, chair of the board and interim president and CEO of the Miss America Organization.

“This is New Jersey history. The digitization project will help others learn more about the quintessential competition and its evolution from a ‘bather’s revue’ into a nationally recognized non-profit that offers scholarship assistance and helps thousands of young women from America to improve their communities through service.”

The project will be a crucial resource to scholars and students, notes College of Humanities & Social Sciences Dean Nawal Ammar.  

“The Miss America competition has been an enduring feature of American culture, producing idealized images of female beauty and achievement,” says Ammar.

“However, the pageant also has been a space to challenge those images, both inside and outside the competition hall. This collection will be an invaluable source for the study of American history, culture, women’s history, business history, media studies, and many other topics.”

Project manager Katie Turner, a professor of history and American Studies, says Rowan students working on digitization are gaining first-hand experience of the archival process. 

“This is a great opportunity for our students to get their hands on history and to really see what goes into making a collection,” adds Turner. “Everything today is digitized for students. They often don’t get to see and touch historical documents. When you sift through paper and do research in an archive, there’s a real commitment to the work.”

Founded as a bather’s revue by businessmen in 1921 as a gimmick to lengthen the summer tourist season in Atlantic City by capitalizing on popular American ideals of female beauty, the competition in its early years was often a steppingstone for women who wanted to pursue show business careers. More than 100,000 people swarmed onto the Atlantic City Boardwalk the first year to watch 16-year-old Margaret Gorman be crowned.

Candidates in the 1920s were rated by judges on everything from the construction of their heads to their “grace of bearing” to their eyes, hair, torso, and hands. Every measurement—from ankles to biceps to head—was recorded by judges and assessed on a points system.

By the 1950s, the competition, under the leadership of Lenora Slaughter, the program’s director for more than 25 years, had been transformed into a source of scholarships for contestants. In 1958, more than $200,000 in scholarships were awarded.

A crown jewel for Atlantic City.

But the competition, a crown jewel for Atlantic City, has not been devoid of controversy. In 1968, it was the site of the first major women’s liberation protest in the United States, when the New York Radical Women, some 400 strong, protested on the Atlantic City Boardwalk. They maintained that the competition objectified women and upheld female stereotypes.

Protestors through the years also objected to the program’s exclusion of women of color. The first Black Miss America, Vanessa Williams, was crowned in 1983—more than 60 years after the competition’s founding.

That isn’t lost on Rowan senior English and writing arts major Destiny Hall, who is working on digitization. She started with the 1984 Miss America magazine, where Williams is featured prominently. Hall, a women’s and gender studies minor, says work on the project has been eye-opening as she explores her own views of feminism.

“Part of being a feminist is allowing women to be whatever they want to be. I have a complicated history with Miss America. In the beginning, I saw it as sexist. Now, I see it as a celebration of womanhood. Many of these women compete to further their careers,” says Hall, 22, who will attend graduate school at Columbia University in the fall as she pursues a career writing fiction for women.

“Through this project, I feel like I’m preserving history and I really appreciate that. It’s important to have this information and to have access to it.”

Freshman English major Grace Fox, who is pursuing the Thomas N. Bantivoglio Honors Concentration in the Honors College, is digitizing program books.

“I’m hoping I’ll find one nugget…something nobody knows about,” says Fox. “I’m definitely looking at the advertisements, the kinds of products they marketed, the images of fashion. There’s so much value in this work. It’s so applicable to things we talk about in class, including how societal views on women’s bodies are enmeshed in the culture we see.”

Robert Hilliker, interim associate provost and director of research engagement and scholarship at Rowan Libraries, and Michael Benson, digital scholarship specialist, are overseeing the digitization work. Additionally, Center for the Advancement of Women in Communication Director Julie Haynes, whose research focuses on depictions of gender in popular culture, is involved in the project.

About the collection

While programs, photos, and other ephemera are being scanned, other artifacts, such as crowns, trophies, and a Waterford scepter carried by winners, will be photographed. Scores of oil paintings and sketches of winners, including some sketches by renowned portrait artist Everett Kintsler, whose work includes official White House portraits of Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan, will be digitized under the guidance of Rowan art historians.

Rowan’s Department of Radio/Television/Film may assist in digitizing hundreds of films and slides, some of which were donated by shore-area residents who religiously attended the annual Miss America parade on the Boardwalk.

“Prioritization of the digitization will be quite a project,” Hilliker notes. “The collection is so special from an archivist’s standpoint because it contains varied materials. That will make for some interesting research projects, but it also presents a lot of technical challenges. For our students, this project certainly will be an excellent apprenticeship in digital preservation.”

The collection is an eclectic mix.

The same storage that currently houses the unwieldy Golden Mermaid trophy, presented in the early 1920s to the winner, also includes the crown of 1955 winner Lee Meriwether, who went on to a successful television career. Then Miss California, Meriwether was the first Miss America to be crowned on television, an event that drew 27 million viewers.

Stars flocked to the competition over the years. Grace Kelly was a judge. Marilyn Monroe was the grand marshal of the parade in 1952. Eddie Fischer was a host before Bert Parks, famed singer of the “There She Is” Miss America theme, emceed for 24 years.

The collection also includes Slaughter’s personal scrapbooks. Some of her other papers are housed at the Smithsonian Institution.

Some of the artifacts, such as the film of Meriwether being crowned, were lost during an Atlantic City Nor’easter some years ago. That makes the digitization project particularly valuable, Krebs notes.

BeBe Shopp, Miss America 1948, says she’s delighted Rowan students are preserving Miss America’s legacy.

“This will make it easier for anyone to view our history and learn how Miss America has grown and become even more vital to young women today,” says Shopp, who represented Minnesota in the competition. “This is important. What an experience the students must be having combing through hundreds of thousands of documents and learning about our past. At my age, I’m thrilled that they are going to preserve me for ages to come.”

Supporting the archival work

The Miss America Organization has established a campaign to help fund the digitization project and preserve the thousands of artifacts in the organization’s 100-year history. Visit the organization’s funding site to learn more about supporting the work.

Lawsuit illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Lawsuit Against L’Oreal USA, Inc.

The Dugger Law Firm, PLLC Has Filed a Sexual Orientation, Atheism, and Disability-Based Harassment Case Against L’Oreal USA, Inc. on Behalf of Rafael Sanchez

On April 13, 2021, Rafael Sanchez filed a federal complaint in the Southern District of New York, alleging New York City Human Rights Law (“NYCHRL”) sexual orientation, Atheism, and disability-based harassment and hostile work environment claims, as well as aiding and abetting of discrimination claims, against L’Oreal USA, Inc. (“L’Oreal”). Rafael Sanchez is being represented by The Dugger Law Firm PLLC.

L’Oreal hired Plaintiff as a makeup artist and skincare consultant during approximately December 2017, through staffing company Randstad Professionals US, LLC.

Mr. Sanchez alleges that L’Oreal, through its long-time Business Manager Viviana Nunez (“Nunez”), engaged in discriminatory harassment and created a hostile work environment based on Mr. Sanchez’s status as a gay male, non-religious Atheist, and/or disabled person.

Mr. Sanchez’s complaint seeks compensatory damages, punitive damages, declaratory relief, injunctive relief, attorney’s fees, expert fees, costs, and interest.

The case is Sanchez v. L’Oreal USA, Inc., No. 1:21-cv-03229, in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York.

Mena Garcia illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Mena Garcia

By: Katherine Fleischman

Argentine-born “it” girl, stunner, and globe trotter Mena Garcia is in the process of launching her sustainable, vegan, and cruelty free fashion and beauty brands, as she searches to keep mother nature at the top of her priority list. Gone are the days of harmful damage to our beautiful earth as we move towards ensuring a green future and Mena wants to play her part in proving that fashion doesn’t have to be harmful to the planet. “In the past technology and the science of materials was limited to just niche sectors such as medical clothing, technical clothing, and sportswear. I’m here to put my spin on things and bring the fantastic technology we have to the forefront and prove that we can all wear sustainable clothing,” said Mena.

As scientists, researchers and designers join forces to try to reduce the carbon footprint that the fashion industry currently stamps, independent designers like Mena will be crucial to leading the way and showing fashion giants that if she can do it, so can they. “I believe we can really make a difference by using our voice on social media platforms and by setting online trends to really catch the attention of the largest fashion brands around the world. Independent brands like mine can truly make the difference here.” Mena, who has been modeling since her teens, has almost three-quarters of a million Instagram followers and this platform will undoubtedly help her cause. 

She talks passionately about using “waste from oranges to make silk,” or “pineapple leaf for a leather alternative” and spectacularly “agricultural waste bacteria.” As Mena continues to learn more, she’s using her education to find out interesting new ways to create sustainable fashion in a term she coins as “trash fashion” – using literal waste to create something new. “One person’s trash is another person’s treasure certainly comes to mind!”

“I’ve been studying with expert Mila at Estudio MG in a special collaboration with Closet Sustenable in Argentina. I’ve learned so much, including some incredible things. One of the main focuses is creating materials inspired in nature where cells and proteins are being used to create different types of real leather but in a totally sustainable, vegan and cruelty-free way.”

However, it’s not all smooth-sailing or simple. To be true to the cause, it is essential to be sustainable throughout the whole process. Everything from material sourcing, grading, dyes, and packaging needs to be clean and green. Mena said “I want to also make sure that workers during the production process are treated fairly, with respect, are safe, and paid fairly. To be truly sustainable, the entire process needs to be true to the terms “sustainable, cruelty-free, and vegan.”

Mena is certainly one to watch in 2021 and 2022. She says “it will take some time because piecing it all together perfectly is crucial, but I’m ready for the challenge and encourage everyone to join the cause! You can follow Mena on Instagram or her website for more about her modeling, image-consulting, and her upcoming brands.

Mena Garcia image courtesy of  Do-Tell Publicity
Cannabis illustration by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine

Holistic CBD Beauty Therapy

When OLIVEDA founder, Thomas Lommel, discovered the active ingredient cannabidiol/CBD, he researched the great synergy effects that arise in connection with the legendary cell elixir from the olive leaf and developed a new beauty line for inside and outside:

LA DOPE is a holistic, highly active cosmetic based on the power of the two oldest cultivated plants in the world. It combines the legendary active ingredient cannabidiol from the hemp plant with the highly active antioxidants oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol from the olive leaf to create powerful beauty grenades.

LA DOPE­ provides protection and care with 100 percent pure effectiveness because all products contain the precious cell elixir from the olive leaf, instead of water. Due to the globally unique composition of the emulsions, LA DOPE works with the intelligence of nature, which intuitively recognizes the individual texture of the skin and its current needs. LA DOPE actively regenerates and balances skin’s texture on this basis.

True to the OLIVEDA tradition, LA DOPE is also holistically oriented, starting with products for internal use, and then devoting itself to the skin with various serums, oils and creams.

The synergy effect from the transforming energy of cannabidiol with the extraordinarily protective and regenerative effects of the cell elixir from the olive leaf makes LA DOPE the perfect CBD, holistic beauty therapy. For beauty that comes from within and radiates outwards. Dope your wrinkles from within with Oliveda and LA DOPE.

 

Mini Tocalini illustration for hair salon and Barbershop marketing for 360 MAGAZINE

SNAP AND SHARE

Black Salon and Barbershop Owners as Social Influencers

Wil Shelton, CEO and Founder of Wil Power Integrated Marketing 

All marketers understand the importance of sharing images and messages with their online communities. But what if your online community doesn’t reflect enough diversity for African Americans to engage? African American salon and barbershop marketing can breathe life into a campaign and enable brands to piggyback on the connection Black barbers and hairstylists already have within their communities—including those that are online. 

These cultural catalysts are considered to be taste-makers within the African American community because they are always the first to know about new trends, products, and sports or news information that matters to their customers. When they share an in-store promotion, their customers take it as a recommendation from a trusted source. And that’s when the word-of-mouth marketing really starts to take effect.

African American customers who happen to be in the shops are thrilled to be a part of this seemingly spontaneous, infused in-store experience, which turns another day at the salon into a behind-the-scenes sneak peek at the next big craze that’s about to blow up. In-store marketing means that not only do these customers get to be in the know before everyone else, they score some dope merch to prove it. 

You can be sure they leave that salon or barbershop ready to get everyone they know excited, too. But in-store marketing activations don’t end there. Because African-American-owned salons and barbershops tend to have huge online followings on social media sites such as Instagram.

In fact, almost all Black salon and barbershop owners are savvy social media influencers and often have hundreds of thousands of social media followers. You can see why smart brands are competing for their recommendation. Even better, most African American barbers and salon owners are more sophisticated in non-traditional marketing than a lot of senior media planners and buyers. But this hasn’t happened by chance! They are entrepreneurs who have had to teach themselves how to promote their stores and being seen as on-trend is part of the allure.

Shop owners have a history of doing more with less. In short, out of a lack of resources, urban barbershop owners have had to be nimble and develop the skills to become their own Black marketing creatives, media planners, and strategists.  

Barbers and stylists are engagement experts, and what they have accomplished can’t be devalued, because they have the power to monetize the culture and narratives in their shops and elevate the marketing strategies of the brands with which they choose to work. Even after COVID-19 hit, they have found ways to pivot and thrive. 

African American men and women gather weekly to spend money on self-improvement and discuss what’s new. This culture predisposes them to the idea of receiving brand messaging from the chair. Even as social media has expanded the realm of influencers, barbers and hairstylists have maintained and, in most cases, built on their role as taste-makers to become the micro-influencer stars. 

They’ve done it by leveraging their strong social-media engagement skills to develop an ever-widening circle of influence. This phenomenon is nothing new, but, interestingly, COVID-19 has put salon and barbershop owners in the spotlight, as people realize the critical role they play in their lives. This makes it more relevant than ever to leverage their influence to reach African American consumers.

About the Author 

Wil Shelton is the CEO & Founder of Wil Power Integrated Marketing, a full-service agency offering traditional and digital marketing services to reach multicultural audiences in the beauty and grooming industries.  

Drew Barrymore illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE

FLOWER Beauty Hair Tools Collection by Drew Barrymore

Drew Barrymore is truly a jack of all trades from producing, directing, and acting on tv and in film, to hosting a talk show, and now producing a line of hair tools exclusively available at Walmart.

Introducing Flower Hair Tools, a collection of essentials curated by Drew Barrymore that are not only high-quality, but also bold and beautiful. These six must-have hair tools are multi-functional and versatile, ensuring users have many options when styling their hair. Each tool is carefully designed to make styling hair easier, offering solutions for all hair types and using innovative engineering techniques to give consumers the ultimate quality at an affordable price.

The Collection

Ionic Volumizing Styler

With two heat settings up to 400˚ F, this styler is perfect for adding limitless body to your hair while also helping you style luscious waves and/or curls. ($39.88)

Ceramic Styling Iron

With its beveled edges and rounded shape, this styling iron will help you create smooth, straight hairstyles without any snagging or creasing. ($69.88)

Ceramic Straightening Brush

This straightening brush will give you smooth, straight hair in less time with its 4 heat settings that provide consistent, even temperature. Instant heat recovery also provides better results with fewer passes and faster styling.($59.88)

Titanium Rotating Styling Iron

The rounded design of the revolving barrel straightens better than any flat iron. The ionic bristles and tourmaline ceramic plate polish hair to reduce frizz and deliver unbelievable shine. This glorious, rotating iron can add bombshell curls or beachy waves with a flick of the wrist. ($69.88)

Ionic Pro Dryer

This ultra-lightweight, advanced hair dryer will have your hair drying in half the usual time. The Ionic boost feature will dry the water from the surface but not remove the moisture within your hair. ($79.88)

Ionic Travel Dryer

This compact and lightweight, powerful hair dryer with dual voltage capabilities make it the perfect addition to your carry-on, gym bag, or hotel or dorm room. ($29.88)

Ionic Pro Diffuser

This finger diffuser enhances your natural curl texture to control and create soft, shiny movement. Get your curl’s best bounce, body and volume possible. ($14.99)

This colorful collection has a product to fit any hair routine at an affordable price point. You can find more about the FLOWER Beauty brand here.

Drew Barrymore FLOWER Beauty Hair Tools

Halsey Illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

HALSEY × ABOUT-FACE

Created by multimedia, award-winning artist and bestselling author Halsey, about-face is a multidimensional color beauty brand rooted in innovation, self-expression and high-performance with customer experience as its highest priority. Set to launch direct-to-consumer via www.aboutface.com on January 25, 2021, about-face celebrates the many facets and forms of expression that live in each person.

about-face provides the tools to create looks that highlight authenticity and uniqueness in every form, recognizing that there is no one version of us. Delivering a powerful promise to perform, the highly-pigmented, long-wear formulas meet bold individualism, elevating all faces and empowering everyone to share their voice and vision through makeup. Inspired by music, fashion and art, about-face honors inclusivity, acceptance, experimentation and the democratization of beauty for our multiple identities.

Halsey, a self-taught makeup artist, has always taken ownership of what makes her feel most beautiful, creating and applying her own looks for performances, editorials and music videos. A true makeup junkie, she has an encyclopedic knowledge of brands, application methods, and best-in-class products from drugstore heroes to luxury leaders. Perfecting her craft, she was often blending, cocktailing and color-correcting to achieve levels of vibrancy, pigment intensity and shine. From this extensive base knowledge of beauty, she created a brand rooted in performance-driven formulations that deliver the finish and quality in products that are hard-working over hype.

“Makeup is an art and art is about happy accidents, not any single idea of perfection,” said Halsey, Founder and Chief Creative Officer of about-face. “I always feel the freest when I am creating looks without following any rules. The beauty industry has norms, but I want to encourage people to challenge those standards and allow things to be imperfect and fun.”

The about-face launch collection embodies Halsey’s personal style and love of diverse beauty, initially with three distinct franchises – Light Lock, Matte, and Shadowstick. Light Lock, her signature face highlighter range with stratospheric shine, includes Stick, Powder, Fluid and Lip Gloss. The Matte range of velvety smooth, creaseless, high-intensity colors consists of Paint-It Matte Lip Colors, Matte Fix Lip Pencils and Matte Fluid Eye Paint, as well as a Set and Prime Spray with application sponge for the face. Shadowsticks are precise, multi-tasking cream eyeshadow crayons that feature soft pearly pastels, as well as a high-intensity matte velvet in white, teal blue and black for a range of looks for liner and lids. The launch consists of 10 product categories (inclusive of beauty tools and limited edition cosmetic bags) across a total of 40 SKUs. All about-face products are formulated to be vegan, clean, and cruelty-free. Prices range from $17.00 to $32.00.

about-face will be sold direct-to-consumer in the US, Canada, UK and Europe on www.aboutface.com, as well as via an exclusive year-long partnership with Ipsy, featured in the newly launched and limited edition Glam Bag X on www.ipsy.com. The next about-face drop will be Anti-Valentine’s Day, a limited-edition matte lip range launching in early February 2021.

ABOUT about-face

Make-u(p) without rules. Made for the many versions of you, about-face is multidimensional makeup for everyone, everywhere created by Halsey and built on the truth that no one is just one thing and humans are weird, complex and imperfectly beautiful beings. Everyone has their own messy, mad, and personal method to becoming their greatest version of themselves, so we make products that are hardworking over hype, designed to celebrate the journey to become every version of us – the ones we end up being, and all of the experimental versions along the way.

ABOUT HALSEY

GRAMMY® Award-nominated multi-platinum singer/songwriter Halsey burst onto the scene in 2015 with her first studio album, Badlands, which has been RIAA certified 2x platinum. Her second release, Hopeless Fountain Kingdom, claimed the #1 spot on the Billboard Top 200 chart upon its debut. Since then, Halsey has continued her success with her 7x Platinum “Without Me,” which made Halsey the first and only female artist to have at least three songs chart on the Billboard Hot 100 for 50 weeks each.

Halsey continues to push creative boundaries, expanding her influence and impact beyond music. In 2019, she was awarded the Hal David Starlight Award, presented by the Songwriters Hall of Fame, to honor her songwriting. In 2020, Halsey released her latest album, Manic, to rave reviews. The album has already attained RIAA Platinum status as did the single “Graveyard” from the album. Most recently, it was announced that she will executive produce and star in “The Players Table” alongside Sydney Sweeney and in November of 2020, she debuted her first original poetry book, I Would Leave Me If I Could, which made her a NY Times bestselling author.

For more information please visit www.aboutface.com
@aboutfacebeauty

Katie Commodore x The Untitled Space

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “Katie Commodore: Between Friends and Lovers” solo exhibition opening on November 21st, and on view through December 12, 2020.  Curated by Indira Cesarine, “Katie Commodore: Between Friends and Lovers” debuts a series of large scale erotically charged figurative tapestries, created with detailed adornments and unique embroideries, along with a number of her signature portraits in gouache, miniature watercolor paintings on ivory, as well as works on paper including intaglio etchings, metallic foil cutouts, and photogravure prints. Katie Commodore is an interdisciplinary artist who concentrates on creating intimate portraits of her friends. In 2000 Commodore received her BFA in illustration from Maryland Institute College of Art. In 2004 she obtained her MFA in printmaking from Rhode Island School of Design where she is currently an adjunct professor.

“Katie Commodore: Between Friends and Lovers”

A Solo Exhibition
Presented by The Untitled Space

THE UNTITLED SPACE
45 Lispenard Street, NYC 10013

*RSVP*
Due to COVID, there will be limited capacity inside the gallery, and guests are required to wear masks. RSVP Required via Registration Link. All RSVPs will be confirmed. Thank you in advance.
RSVP REGISTRATION LINK 

EXHIBITION ON VIEW
November 21– December 12, 2020

“Everyone is my friend and they are allowing me to be a witness to their love, which in turn is then celebrated by everyone that sees it.” Over the past few years, Katie Commodore’s artwork has concentrated on depicting real people’s sexuality, although not necessarily their sexual preferences, but rather sexuality in the broader sense. Her intimate portraits address what is it that makes them feel sexy, how they express that physically, and how it evolves over the years for them as individuals. “We change our clothes every season; our physical appearance through body modification, losing weight, gaining weight, tattoos, etc; we change our kinks and sexual preferences partner to partner, year to year.  Our sexuality, and how we feel about it, is in constant flux; the same way that we redecorate our homes, change the wallpaper and curtains, change the sheets.” States the artist on her portraits. Commodore likens this subtle change in how her friends express themselves to the way society also expresses its collective self through decorative patterns. “In a roundabout way, it can be looked at as a meter of a population’s ‘sexuality’ – the public expression of the private. Bright colors, vibrant patterns, clean lines, and minimal decoration all provide a window into the personalities that chose or created them. Historians and anthropologists often use the decorative remnants (pots, jewelry, frescos, etc.) of past cultures to gain valuable insight into the lives of the people that created them, the same sort of cultural portrait can be drawn from our design choices today.”

Throughout the years, she has focused on various mediums including drawing, painting, printmaking, textiles, and scrimshaw. She has often emphasized materials that are not considered “fine art” but were rather thought of as women’s “hobbies” and in so doing highlights their traditional merit. A majority of her artwork is portraits of her friends during their most erotic moments, acting as a celebration of personal power, beauty, and sexuality.  It is a subtle, but often rich moment that shows the kink, sexual fulfillment, and the sexual interests of those closest to her. “Any activity that helps someone express their sexuality is beautiful, to be supported, and worthy of being immortalized in art.” She states of her sexually charged portraits which depict real people in the moment, captured through private photo sessions with the artist which are used as references for her paintings or prints.

Commodore was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 2007, which forced her to adjust her artistic practice. Her diagnosis motivated her to explore ways of maintaining the vibrant patterns and detail that she’s known for while not having to rely completely on her super fine motor skills. “Right before I was diagnosed with MS my artwork got much more detailed and pattern-based, and I think that was an unconscious reaction to the fact that I was losing my super-fine motor skills. Since then, I’ve adapted my studio practice to accommodate what I can and cannot do. I don’t draw with a pencil or pen as much anymore, paint brushes are more forgiving when it comes to small hand tremors. I do much more planning and sketching in the computer. Embroidery has been a real change that allows me to maintain the compulsive marking and patterns while there’s no need for perfect hand-eye coordination.”

Her latest series of large-scale figurative tapestries are ripe with intricate details. In a continuation of her signature style she presents bold figures against dramatically complex patterns, pushing the visuals into the realm of surreal erotic fantasies. The sheer scale of the works heightens the drama in a cinematic manner with the life-sized figures taking center stage. “Tandem to creating miniatures and paintings with vivid patterns, I’ve always been interested in creating life-sized portraiture. In grad school I did a series of life-sized relief prints and over the years I’ve done several life-sized drawings that I then spent months filling in with patterns. There was always something about portraying my models in a completely relatable scale that took the image from something precious to something actually more personal, the viewer can feel their gaze and the energy in their pose, feel their weight and almost come away feeling like they know the model in real life. Several years ago, I wanted to have custom tapestries made to reference the historical value of tapestries while giving tribute to the fact that often women were the actual makers of the tapestries which were usually designed by men. My digitally woven textiles start out as drawings in my computer. Like my works on paper, the patterns are historical wallpaper and fabric designs that range from the medieval to contemporary examples. I embroider on them, adding appliques (chine collé, if you will), bejeweling and beading away for hours, turning them into monoprints. I’m creating something new that combines the immediate gratification of print on demand fabricated works with the meditative, time consuming craft of embroidery and fiber arts. I juxtapose mass-produced elements with the uniqueness of each piece, elevating each patch and plastic bead to something more substantial.” She also introduces a number of text works in fiber that complement the series with their adventurously powerful statements.

Katie Commodore has exhibited throughout the United States and Europe, including England, Italy, Germany, and Greece. She has had solo exhibitions at Baby Grand, NYC, and SHAG, Brooklyn. Her work has been previously featured in a number of group shows presented by The Untitled Space including “(Hotel) XX” at Spring/Break Art Show, “IRL: Investigating Reality” and “Secret Garden”. Other notable exhibitions include “FEMME” presented by Spoke Art and Juxtapoz Magazine, SCOPE Art Fair, “StitchFetish 6” at The Hive Gallery, and “Facing the Walls” at The VETs Gallery. Residencies include ChaNorth, Pine Plains, New York; Red Light Design, Amsterdam, Holland; and One Night Residency, London, England. She is currently the Administrative Director of Crux, LCA, a cooperative of Black XR Creatives and Producers that focuses on Black storytelling and creating a foothold in the burgeoning vocabulary of new media of VR and creating Black wealth. Commodore has been featured in a number of publications including The New York Times and Dazed Digital, among others. She currently lives and works in Providence, Rhode Island.