Posts tagged with "Maryland"

Challenger: The Final Flight

By Cassandra Yany

On Wednesday, Netflix released “Challenger: The Final Flight,” a four-episode docuseries about the tragic explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger.

The doc was directed by Daniel Junge and Steven Leckart, and executive produced by JJ Abrams and Glenn Zipper. It provides a complete look at the events leading up to the takeoff and includes interviews with family members of the seven astronauts who died in the explosion.

According to CNN, the series uses archival footage and home videos, along with interviews from officials and crew members to shed light on the poor decision-making and systemic failures that led up to the disaster, as well as the aftermath that followed.

Challenger took off from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral on January 28, 1986. Just 73 seconds after it launched, the shuttle began breaking apart, due to malfunctioning O-rings in the rocket boosters, which hardened as the temperature decreased. NASA had reportedly known about this damaged hardware for months prior, according to Vanity Fair.

The purpose of mission STS-51-L was to deploy a satellite to study the approaching Halley’s Comet, but it had been delayed multiple times because of technical difficulties.

The crew was one of NASA’s most diverse to date, as reported by the New York Post. One of the astronauts was a teacher, so school children across the country watched in class as the shuttle went down, engulfed by a huge, ominous cloud of smoke. The explosion devastated the nation, especially all of the young children who had watched it live.

Nearly thirty-five years later, we remember the passengers who lost their lives on that dreadful day:

Christa McAuliffe

Christa McAuliffe was a teacher at Concord High School in New Hampshire who learned of the Teacher in Space Project— NASA’s plan to fly an educator into space. NASA had hoped that this would help increase public interest in the space shuttle program. 

Along with 11,000 others, McAuliffe applied in 1984 to be the first teacher to communicate with students from space. She was chosen as one of two finalists from New Hampshire, then was selected to be part of the STS-51-L crew by a Review Panel in Washington, D.C.

McAuliffe took a year off from teaching to train for the space shuttle mission. While in orbit, she was planning to conduct experiments in chromatography, hydroponics, magnetism and Newton’s laws. She also would have taught two 15-minute classes— one providing a tour of the spacecraft, the other about the benefits of space travel— which would have been broadcasted to students on closed-circuit TV. 

The nationwide excitement of having McAuliffe in space was a significant reason why the explosion had such a lasting impact on the country, and was especially upsetting for young students who watched the takeoff or extensive coverage in class. 

Gregory Jarvis

Gregory Jarvis was an engineer for Hughes Aircraft who served as Payload Specialist 2 on Challenger. In 1984, he was one of two employees from the company that were selected for the Space Shuttle program. 

Jarvis was originally supposed to make his shuttle flight in April 1985, but was rescheduled to early January 1986, then rescheduled again, landing him a spot on the STS-51-L crew. From space, he planned to conduct experiments on the effects of weightlessness on fluids. 

Dick Scobee

Dick Scobee earned his pilot wings in 1966 and served as a combat aviator in the Vietnam War, for which he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal.

After the war, Scobee graduated from the USAF Aerospace Research Pilot School and became an Air Force test pilot. He was the commander on Challenger and died a lieutenant colonel.

Judith Resnik

After graduating from Carnegie Mellon, Judith Resnik worked as a design engineer in missile and radar projects at RCA (Radio Corporation of America). There, she performed circuit design for the missile and surface radar division. She later developed electronics and software for NASA’s sounding rocket and telemetry systems programs. 

Resnik qualified as a professional aircraft pilot in 1977 and was recruited into the NASA Astronaut Corps in 1978. She was one of six women selected for the program out of 8,000 applicants. At NASA, and piloted the Northrop T-38 Talon, trained intensely, conducted research, and developed different systems and software. 

Resnik served as a mission specialist on the maiden voyage of Discovery in 1984 for her first space flight from August to September. During this flight, she operated a shuttle’s robotic arm (which she created), and deployed and conducted experiments on a solar array wing to determine if there was a way to generate additional electric power during missions. She was the second American woman in space and the first Jewish woman in space. 

Resnik was a mission specialist on Challenger. After the explosion, further examination of the cockpit shows that her Personal Egress Air Pack was activated, indicating that she may have been alive after the cockpit separated from the vehicle to activate it. Her body was the first to be recovered from the crash by Navy divers. 

Ellison Onizuka

Ellison Onizuka served as a flight test engineer and test pilot for the U.S. Air Force in the early 1970s. After attending the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School from 1974 to 1975, he became a squadron flight test engineer there and worked as a manager for engineering support in the training resources division. 

In 1978, Onizuka was selected for the astronaut program and later worked in the experimentation team, orbiter test team, and launch support screw for the STS-1 and STS-2. At NASA he also worked on the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory test and revision software team. 

Onizzuka’s first space mission was one year before the Challenger explosion, on the mission STS-51-C on the shuttle Discovery. This was the first space shuttle mission for the Department of Defense, and he became the first Asian American to reach space. 

Onizuka was a mission specialist aboard Challenger. Similar to Resnik, it is speculated that he could have been alive when the cockpit separated from the vehicle because his Personal Egress Air Pack was also activated. When he died, he held the position of lieutenant colonel, but was later promoted to the rank of colonel. 

Ronald McNair

Ronald McNair received his Ph.D. in Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1976 and became nationally recognized for his work in laser physics. After graduation, he worked as a staff physicist at the Hugh Research Lab in Malibu, CA. 

McNair was one of the ten thousand applicants to be selected in 1978 for the NASA astronaut program. He became the second African American astronaut in 1984 when he flew as a mission specialist for STS-41-B on Challenger from Feb. 3-11. 

McNair later served as a mission specialist for STS-51-L. During this flight, he had planned to record the saxophone solo for a song he had worked on with composer Jean-Michel Jarre for his upcoming album Rendez-Vous. This would have been the first original piece of music to be recorded in space. 

McNair was also supposed to participate in Jarre’s Rendez-Vous Houston concert through a live feed from Challenger. To honor McNair, Jarre dedicated the last song on the album to him and subtitled it “Ron’s Piece.”

Michael J. Smith

Michael J. Smith served in the Vietnam War, then attended U.S. naval Test Pilot School. After graduation, he was assigned to the Strike Aircraft Test Directorate at NAS Patuxent River in Maryland, where he worked on the A-6E TRAM and Cruise missile guidance systems. In 1976, later returned to NTPS for 18 months as an instructor. 

Smith was selected for the astronaut program in May 1980, in which he served as a commander in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory, the Deputy Chief of Aircraft Operations, the Technical Assistant to the Director, and the Flights Operations Directorate. 

Smith was the pilot for Challenger, and was set to pilot another mission the following fall. His voice was the last heard on the flight deck tape recorder with his final words being “Uh oh.”

All seven passengers were awarded with the Congressional Space Medal of Honor in 2004.

Racial justice illustration by Mina Tocalini

Racial Justice

The Magnanimity of The Moment

Learning from Our Past in Today’s Fight for Racial Justice

By Jason Green

The murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and far too many other black bodies have answered Langston Hughes’ prophetic question: “What happens to a dream deferred?” As justified anger and frustration have exploded across communities large and small, I have quietly questioned whether there is room for community building. I thought for a moment that our collective hurt and fatigue might be so great that there simply might not be space for hope and reconciliation. The idea of searching for fellowship felt naïve and insignificant.

Seven years ago, as I sat at the bedside of my then 95-year-old grandmother, she told me how, in 1968, her all-black church merged with two all-white congregations (themselves split generations earlier over the issue of slavery) in the wake of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Given the tumultuous backdrop, I was surprised by their decision to join, but I will be forever moved by the intentional community building that has kept their congregation together for more than 50 years. The hardest decision wasn’t the one to come together, it was the decision to stay together.

Last week, on our weekly call, my Grandmother Green reawakened my spirit. “We have to keep working and praying and not give up,” she extolled. “Even if things are not going our way we have to have that faith, and do the work. It was important that they see my face in the choir in 1968. Well, it’s just as important today.” She helped me realize in times like these, we need to be reminded of what is possible and to be vigilant about the hard work required to achieve it.

I’ve spent years chronicling how those three congregations came together in 1968 and how they have persisted, purposefully integrated, for more than 50 years. Below are three lessons I’ve learned from that experience that can inform how we collectively move forward today:

•Establish A Clear Goal

As they stumbled through the early days of the church merger, leadership of each congregation gathered to agree to the goal of coming together. A specific shared outcome gave them something to hold tight to when the path got difficult. As individual groups began working toward their own agenda, it armed the broader coalition with a mission to pull them back to. In this moment, people have begun working in different directions to speak out against and organize in support of racial justice. There is not one way to do the work — in fact, there must be a multitude of strategies, activities, and actors. To be successful, we must define the objective to hold others accountable to if their efforts achieve progress toward that shared goal, not question if their strategies happen to be similar or different to our own.

•Trust Must Be Built

When the churches merged, each harbored fear, skepticism, and animosity. There wasn’t the hugging and hand-holding you’d expect in church. To overcome, they had to be intentional; this started with acknowledging the pain of their history and being deliberate about difficult conversations. No meeting would end if someone still had something to say. Leadership demanded people share their concerns and complaints, though sometimes harsh, and those concerns were addressed. The work that faces us now is deep and structural and must push beyond performance. It will require addressing a history of hurt and creating alliances, with both traditional and non-traditional allies, to meet the magnanimity of the moment. At times, it will require taking the first step, even when you took the first step last time, and recognizing that sometimes, alliances will fray. Work to build trust anyway.

•Be Prepared To Go Alone

For those in the movement, this moment feels like a turning point, and there’s a desire to draw a line in the sand: “If you aren’t with us now, then you are against us.” But the reality is there will be folks who, even in this moment, will not be prepared to take action. Because we know that for something to be truly gained, something must be given up, there will be those who aren’t prepared for what change will mean for them. In 1968, my grandfather disagreed with the proposed church merger. My grandmother, my father, and his brother, decided to merge, despite Grandpa’s objection. We must be prepared to do the work, knowing that it is rooted in righteousness, and that there will be some who are not ready for change, even amongst those whom we love and respect. Move forward anyway, but resist the temptation to draw those terminal lines in the sand. Continue to build bridges for others to come on the journey. My grandfather joined the merged congregation years later. Before he died, he was one of its trustees.

Like the church merger, our democracy is one big social experiment that requires engagement and vigilance if it will ever reach its promise. Elections have consequences, and policy has impact. To see change, we must be active at the federal, state, and local levels to enable leadership that aligns with our values and implements policies that reflect the communities we represent.

But elections cannot eradicate racism, and policy cannot force neighbors to see each other with dignity, value and respect. This moment does not call for an “either or” approach; this must be a “yes and” strategy. And, if we want to eradicate the poison that killed George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Michael Brown, Elijah McClain, Ahmaud Arbery, Tamir Rice, and every other individual lost due to racist acts, then in addition to external activation, we must look inward to understand what each of us is prepared to do, give, and change in this moment.

Last week, my grandmother turned 102, and as we discussed plans for her socially distanced drive-by birthday parade, we also talked about the current state of the world. As I expressed frustration regarding the lack of national leadership and exhaustion that this is where we find ourselves, in true Grandma Green fashion, she said, “I hear all that, but what are you gonna do? What are you prepared to do for those who look like you and those who don’t? For those who don’t pray like you? For those who don’t love like you? What are you gonna do to inspire fellowship and build the community that we all want to see?”

I guess I know what to give for her birthday this year. Join me in making change. Across the country. Within our communities. And in ourselves.

Jason Green is a Maryland-based attorney, entrepreneur and filmmaker. Green recently directed Finding Fellowship, a documentary inspired by conversations with his grandmother which focuses on the unlikely merger of three racially segregated churches in 1968. Green is the co-founder of SkillSmart, Inc., a workforce development company that creates transparent paths to economic prosperity. A current Commissioner for the Montgomery County Commission on Remembrance and Reconciliation, Green also previously served as Associate White House Counsel to President Barack Obama.

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Landon Cube

Landon Cube – Eighties

Maryland bred singer-songwriter Landon Cube releases his new track “Eighties” feat. 24KGoldn today. On the track, new-wave synths blare beneath vocals from Landon Cube, while 24KGoldn pops off with an undeniable verse of his own.

“Eighties” follows the releases of “Groceries” and “Drugs” as well as a string of releases in 2019 including “Pretty” feat. 24kGoldn. The track received over 5 million streams in the first couple of months of release and was included on Spotify’s Most Necessary and Clout Culture playlist. His EP Orange has garnered over 70 million streams worldwide since its release and features previously released tracks “20,” “17,” “Nuisance” and “Makeup,” which received over 1 million streams in the first month of its release.

Both tracks came after his previously released tracks “Round n Round” feat. Sprite Lee (15+ million streams), “Drive My Car” (14+ million streams) and “19” (9+ million streams). He also appeared on Lil Skies’ “Nowadays” and “Red Roses,” which both garnered over 250 million streams individually. The singer wrapped up his first headlining tour last fall and went on a national tour with Iann Dior.

There’s a poignant yet feel-good vibe that makes 22-year-old recording artist Landon Cube’s sound infectious. The Southern Maryland native has a diverse history within music, punctuated by his versatile catalog. At 16, he made the firm decision that music was his chosen trajectory and once he graduated high school, he dropped his introductory cut “Euphoria.” His participation with local viral video crew Cufboys added fuel to the fire, as Landon began galvanizing a fan base through his laid-back authenticity and knack for melding sounds. 

Through Cufboys he met burgeoning star Lil Skies, as the two joined forces on cuts like “Red Roses” and “Nowadays.” It wasn’t long before Landon was Los Angeles bound and continued his upward mobility as an artist, ultimately joining the Republic Records roster. Landon Cube, who already has nearly 4 million monthly listeners on Spotify, has already secured a solid following based upon his honest and heartfelt music, and the next phase in his career will bring more of that to the forefront.

Follow Landon Cube: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Youtube

landon cube, 360 magazine

Landon Cube – “Groceries”

22-year-old singer-songwriter Landon Cube releases his new track “Groceries” feat. Lil Keed today.

On the track, Landon Cube weaves together his signature nimble rhymes over glassy synths and a steady beat. He carries an echoing hook that proves impossible to shake as Young Thug’s YSL Records’ phenomenon Lil Keed pops up with a slick cameo of his own to deliver another banger.

There’s a poignant yet feel-good vibe that makes 22-year-old recording artist Landon Cube’s sound infectious. The Southern Maryland native has a diverse history within music, punctuated by his versatile catalog. At 16, he made the firm decision that music was his chosen trajectory and once he graduated high school, he dropped his introductory cut “Euphoria.” His participation with local viral video crew Cufboys added fuel to the fire, as Landon began galvanizing a fan base through his laid-back authenticity and knack for melding sounds. Through Cufboys he met burgeoning star Lil Skies, as the two joined forces on cuts like “Red Roses” and “Nowadays.” It wasn’t long before Landon was Los Angeles bound and continued his upward mobility as an artist, ultimately joining the Republic Records roster. Landon Cube, who already has nearly 4 million monthly listeners on Spotify, has already secured a solid following based upon his honest and heartfelt music, and the next phase in his career will bring more of that to the forefront.

Shy Glizzy, The Purple Agency, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine

Shy Glizzy Continues to Make Headlines

NEW INTERVIEWS WITH FLAUNT, REVOLT, & MORE 

CHECK OUT “LONELY VIBES” VIDEO BY SHY GLIZZY TODAY! 

GRAMMY® Award-nominated multiplatinum Washington, DC rapper Shy Glizzy continues to make waves and headlines throughout the culture.  In the past week alone, he has popped up everywhere.  In case you missed it, Flaunt spoke to him in a detailed interview, and BLEU described him as “leading the scene” in another feature. He also sat down with REVOLT TV for an interview, while Def Pen and AllHipHop both covered his generous donation of $10,000 to Martha’s Table in his hometown of Washington, D.C. Right now, he’s putting the finishing touches on his highly anticipated new project Young Jefe 3—coming very soon. Stay tuned for more music!

For more information and the latest on Shy Glizzy, visit:
Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

ABOUT SHY GLIZZY:

The past decade of DMV rap belonged to Shy Glizzy. Over the course of a slew of singles, mixtapes, and the critically praised full-length Fully Loaded, he has posted up 100 million-plus total streams and even notched a co-sign from Beyoncé, who bopped to “Awwsome” in 2015 at Global Citizen Festival. He also garnered a GRAMMY® Award nod for appearing on Goldlink’s triple-platinum “Crew.” His bold and bruising lyricism continues to incite tastemaker applause. Of his 2019 project Covered N’ Blood,  Pitchfork commented, “As with all of his best work, the D.C. rapper’s latest finds him grappling with trauma, haunted by the specter of death at every turn.” Meanwhile, The Washington Post has applauded his “artfully pressurized style of mouth-music that keeps you listening close, with every syllable prompting a balancing act in your brain.” The FADER has even called his hooks “silky smooth.” All signs point to the next decade of the DMV belonging to him as well.

 

Shy Glizzy, The Purple Agency, Washington DC, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine,

TyFontaine – Huh?!

Maryland rapper TyFontaine has released a new song and video “Huh?!”, produced by Nick Mira and Taz Taylor, out now on 10K Projects/ Internet Money. Along Fetish, produced by Jetsonmade and released last week, “Huh?!” is set to feature on TyFontaine’s forthcoming 1800 mixtape, out on April 24. 

WATCH THE VIDEO FOR “HUH?!” HERE.   

“Huh?!” and “Fetish” are the follow up singles to TyFontaine’s March released ‘Virtual World’ EP. The EP features the standout track “tragic”, in which Pitchfork notes “Fontaine displays his newfound dynamism with a next-level performance”. Made with producers like Jetsonmade (DaBaby, Roddy Ricch), 1800 offers everything from the ’80s-inspired groove, to massively catchy melodies and mosh-pit energy.  

The first time he ever cut a record, 20-year-old rapper TyFontaine came up with a track that landed in rotation on a major local radio station. Originally from the D.C. area, Ty had stepped into the studio mostly as an experiment, then ended up kicking off the rapid rise of his music career. “The sneaker store I was working at had a studio in the back, and a lot of rappers would come through there,” says Ty, who was a senior in high school at the time. “I got a free session because my friend was the head engineer, and I wrote this song called ‘Precision’ that won a contest and got played on the radio for two weeks. After that it was just about changing things up and progressing to the highest point I could get to.” 

Dropping out after his first year at St. John’s, Ty returned home and kept making music, soon connecting with Internet Money producer SidePCE (Juice WRLD, Young Thug) through an Instagram livestream. After SidePCE sent him a pack of beats, Ty made a song called “Imagine” and posted an excerpt to Instagram, quickly catching the attention of Internet Money founder Taz Taylor and inking his record deal by start of 2020. 

Already at work on his next mixtape, Ty continues to push for total honesty in his lyrics. “I feel like the best music comes from being vulnerable and tapping into things from your past that you’re maybe not proud of, because that’s what people can learn from,” says Ty. “The feeling of making a good song is better than anything, and I want to make songs that people can hear and relate to or vibe to, something that people really cherish so that it becomes a part of their life forever.” 

LISTEN TO “HUH?!”

Landon Cube, music, 360 MAGAZINE, Republic Records

Landon Cube – Drugs

Maryland bred singer-songwriter LandonCube releases his new track “Drugs” today.

Listen to Drugs”HERE

The track follows a string of releases from Landon Cube in 2019 including his song “Pretty” feat. 24kGoldn, which received over 5 million streams in the first couple of months of release and was included on Spotify’s Most Necessary and Clout Culture playlists, as well as his EP Orangewhich has garnered over 46 million streams worldwide since its release. The EP features previously released tracks “20,” “17,” “Nuisance” and “Makeup,” which received over 1 million streams in the first month of its release. Both tracks came after his previously released tracks “Round n Round” feat. Sprite Lee (15+ million streams), “DriveMy Car” (14+ million streams) and “19” (9+ million streams). He also appeared on Lil Skies’ “Nowadays” and “RedRoses,” which both garnered over 250 million streams individually. The singer wrapped up his first headlining tour last fall and is currently embarking on a national tour with Iann Dior.

There’s a poignant yet feel-good vibe that makes 21-year-old recording artist Landon Cube’s sound infectious. The Southern Maryland native has a diverse history within music, punctuated by his versatile catalog. With Landon’s new single “Makeup,” the young star on the rise is geared to level up to the next chapter in his career. At 16, he made the firm decision that music was his chosen trajectory and once he graduated high school, he dropped his introductory cut “Euphoria.” His participation with local viral video crew Cufboys added fuel to the fire, as Landon began galvanizing a fan base through his laid-back authenticity and knack for melding sounds. Through Cufboys he met burgeoning star Lil Skies, as the two joined forces on cuts like “Red Roses” and “Nowadays,” the former impressively hitting one million streams in less than a month. It wasn’t long before Landon was Los Angeles bound and continued his upward mobility as an artist, ultimately joining the Republic Records roster. Landon Cube, who already has over 4 million monthly listeners on Spotify, has already secured a solid following based upon his honest and heartfelt music, and the next phase in his career will bring more of that to the forefront.

nikko lamere, landon cube, 360 MAGAZINE

Landon Cube

Maryland bred singer-songwriter Landon Cube releases his new video and track “Pretty” feat. 24KGoldn today.

Watch “Pretty” feat. 24KGoldn: HERE
Listen to “Pretty” feat. 24KGoldn: HERE
 
The Nicholas-Jandora directed video is a nostalgic visual that plays on the “pretty” title of the song, as Landon Cube and 24KGoldn spend a day getting pampered, creating a new look for themselves.

The track follows the release of Landon’s EP Orange, which has garnered over 9 million streams since its release. The EP features previously released tracks “20,” “17,” “Nuisance” and “Makeup,” which received over 1 million streams in the first month of its release. Both tracks came after his previously released tracks “Round n Round” feat. Sprite Lee (15+ million streams), “Drive My Car” (14+ million streams) and “19” (9+ million streams). He also appeared on Lil Skies’ “Nowadays” and “Red Roses,” which both garnered over 250 million streams individually.

There’s a poignant yet feel-good vibe that makes 21-year-old recording artist Landon Cube’s sound infectious. The Southern Maryland native has a diverse history within music, punctuated by his versatile catalog. With Landon’s new single “Makeup,” the young star on the rise is geared to level up to the next chapter in his career. At 16, he made the firm decision that music was his chosen trajectory and once he graduated high school, he dropped his introductory cut “Euphoria.” His participation with local viral video crew Cufboys added fuel to the fire, as Landon began galvanizing a fan base through his laid-back authenticity and knack for melding sounds. Through Cufboys he met burgeoning star Lil Skies, as the two joined forces on cuts like “Red Roses” and “Nowadays,” the former impressively hitting one million streams in less than a month. It wasn’t long before Landon was Los Angeles bound and continued his upward mobility as an artist, ultimately joining the Republic Records roster. Landon Cube, who already has over 4 million monthly listeners on Spotify, has already secured a solid following based upon his honest and heartfelt music, and the next phase in his career will bring more of that to the forefront.
 

*Photo by Nikko LaMere

Adé

Adé (formally Phil Ade) recently released his brand new EP Always Something.

In case you are unfamiliar, Adé is a Nigerian/Grenadian-American artist known for effortless lyrics and ability to smoothly transition between rapping and singing. He has previously worked with artists such as Logic and Mac Miller, and his new six-track EP features collaborations with Lil Baby, Rich The Kidand Wale. Adé has previously caught the attention of publications such as Billboard, Complex, XXL, HypeBeast, Hot New Hip Hop and more. Beginning a new chapter in his career with a new name and unique sound, Adé is on his way to rap stardom and a chance for his reinvention to inspire on a massive scale. He recently freestyled over Jay-Z’s “Threat” on L.A. Leakers which can be seen HERE.

Adé is the true voice of the DMV hip-hop scene and has fueled a new wave of D.C. rap. His global perspective can be seen on his diverse new EP featuring undeniable anthems and powerful lyrics. As an artist, he is able to deliver music with something for everyone as he combines live instrumentation, hip-hop, rapping, and singing. Ade’s songs focus on the positives in his life and showcase the newfound confidence he has achieved while introducing himself as a new leader in the DMV hip-hop movement.

More about Adé

In between, growth occurs. Silver Spring, Maryland rapper, producer, and artist Adé (born Phil Adetumbi) underwent such evolution. Under the name Phil Adé, he delivered a string of independent mixtapes, singles, and appearances in addition to collaborations with everyone from Logic and Mac Miller to Raekwon and Bootsy Collins. Starting in 2013, he dove into honing his craft, writing in the studio with a variety of artists, perfecting his own sound as well as his live performance. He ultimately developed his voice immensely. During this time, he made extensive contributions as a writer and featured act to Wale’s #1 opus The Album About Nothing [2015] and Shine [2017], in addition to working with Raheem DeVaughn, Anthony Hamilton, Chris Brown, Eric Bellinger, Mýa, Trevor Jackson, Serayah, 9th Wonder and Bink , while gracing the stage on the sold out SHIN3 Tour. In 2017, he shared the solo single “No Fear” [feat. Tate Kobang and Saba Abraha], which soundtracked WWE NXT and clocked half-a-million streams. Upon the latter’s arrival,Billboard described him as “ready to seize his opportunity at rap stardom.”

However, he changed everything for 2019. He opted to go by simply Adé, signed to Epic Records, and cooked up his first EP of the label, Always Something.

“I spent a long time recording and figuring out what I wanted my sound to be like,” he admits. “I feel like I’m there now. I was able to watch Wale and see a lot of the ‘do’s and don’ts’ of being an artist on a major label and how to behave in different situations. Everything got me to my comfort zone. I’ve found a happy medium between singing and rapping. It’s a new era in my life. That’s why I felt the need to reintroduce myself. I’m definitely more experienced. I’m more comfortable with what I’m doing. Since I wanted to start fresh, I changed my name. This is a clean slate. I’m a new artist.”

At the same time, he still kept his heritage and hometown close. Born to a Nigerian father and Grenadian mother, he grew up with a global mindset when it came to music, going from singing in church to rapping in high school. Coming up in the DMV scene, he also developed an appreciation for the live instrumentation intrinsic to the region’s “Go-go” movement before eventually galvanizing the first wave of D.C. rap.

His perspective informs the diversity of Always Something. The six-track project kicks off with the sharp and fiery flow of “Play Something.” Backed by live drums and wailing synths, he properly makes his introduction by “rapping continuously in freestyle fashion about who I am, where I’m from, and where I’m at,” as he puts it.

Immediately after, “Something New” [feat. Lil Baby] coasts along on an airy beat as he locks into a laidback and confident cadence punctuated by a magnetic turn from Lil Baby.

“I made the song one night after coming home from the club,” he goes on. “My art always needs to be fun. It’s all about seeing what’s going on around me, how people move, and staying focused. Lil Baby killed it.”

Elsewhere, “Something from Nothing” [feat. Rich The Kid] stretches from hypnotic verses into a hard-hitting hook. Another highlight, “Something Real” [feat. GoldLink & Wale], unites three DMV titans on one seismic collaboration. As all of the songs feature “Something” in their titles, the project maintains a true cohesion.

“As I was recording, I kept thinking about the phrase ‘Always Something’,” he elaborates. “I found a deeper meaning. In life, you’re met with negatives, and you’re met with positives. From my experience, I’ve always been able to have more peace and progress when I am focused on whatever good is going on in my life. When it seems like everything going on is negative, it’s easier to move forward when you are focused on the upside. There’s Always Something to remain positive about.”

In the end, Adé’s reinvention paves the way to inspire on a massive scale.

“No matter what’s happening, there’s a light at the end of the tunnel,” he leaves off. “Stay positive. I want everyone to know that.”

Johnny Orlando’s Debut EP

Johnny Orlando Announces Debut EP, TEENAGE FEVER, Plots Headlining North American Tour &

Drops Dreamy New Single “SLEEP”

Singer-songwriter and fan favorite Johnny Orlando shows no sign of slowing down. Set to share his first solid musical statement in the form of his debut EP, Teenage Fever, out March 15, followed by a headlining North American tour this spring, the recent JUNO-Award nominee for Breakthrough Artist of the Year also drops his dreamy new single, Sleep today.

Tickets for the Teenage Fever Tour are on sale February 18 at johnnyorlandomusic.com. To pre-order Teenage Fever, click here. See full track listing below.

Sleep”, co-written by Orlando, his sister Darian and Swedish collaborators Linnea Södahl (Zara Larsson, Anne-Marie) and Hampus Lindvall (Zara Larsson), is the second single from Johnny’s upcoming debut EP. The pop Swedish-influenced song about living in the moment and not wanting that moment to end showcases Johnny’s maturing sound and songwriting skills.

“We wrote ‘Sleep’ for anyone who’s ever experienced that feeling of never wanting to be apart from someone who you love to spend time with. I felt that it was a very real and relatable thing that people experience at some point in their adolescence,” said Johnny. “Linnea first came up with the concept for ‘Sleep’ – it’s almost like there’s a word for it in Swedish, or it’s a common feeling, that we don’t really think about in English, and that’s why I think it’s so unique.”

Out March 15, Teenage Fever marks Orlando’s biggest release since signing with Universal Music Canada and Island Records. Emanating confidence and charisma over danceable electronic grooves and a subtle hip-hop bounce, Orlando levels up his take on pop. The EP highlights his ever-evolving songwriting skills as he co-writes all six tracks with his sister, Darian Orlando, and a range of acclaimed collaborators including Mike Wise (bülow, Dvbbs, RALPH), Linnea Södahl (Zara Larsson, Anne-Marie), Nick Ruth (Ryan Tedder), Jordon Manswell (Daniel Caesar) and Matthew Burnett (Jessie Reyez, Daniel Caesar). The EP also features previously released single, “Last Summer” which sits at over 17.3 million global streams (and growing) across all platforms.

“I’m very excited and so grateful that I have this opportunity to share my debut EP,” added Johnny. “‘Teenage Fever’, represents those experiences and feelings all teenagers have while trying to navigate their high school years. It tells the story of my journey, and I hope it will give people a more personal insight into my life and experiences. We spent about a year making this project and it means so much to me. I worked with so many cool people with different backgrounds and from different places, which gives it a lot of character and makes every song unique. I’m so happy to share new music with fans and hope they love it as much as I do – I can’t wait to see the reaction live on tour!”  

Stay tuned for much more to come from Johnny Orlando at johnnyorlandomusic.com.

Teenage Fever Track Listing:

  1. Sleep
  2. Last Summer
  3. Piece of My Heart
  4. Deep Down
  5. Waste My Time
  6. Why

TEENAGE FEVER TOUR DATES:

4/29/2019     Chicago, IL  – Park West

4/30/2019     Pontiac, MI – The Crofoot

5/2/2019       Toronto, ON – Danforth Music Hall

5/3/2019       Montréal, QC –  Corona Theatre

5/5/2019       Boston, MA –  Paradise Rock Club

5/6/2019       Philadelphia, PA – The Theatre of Living Arts

5/7/2019       New York, NY – Playstation Theater

5/8/2019       Baltimore, MD – Rams Head Live

5/10/2019     Charlotte, NC – The Underground

5/11/2019     Orlando, FL Plaza Live

5/13/2019     Houston, TX House of Blues

5/14/2019     Dallas, TX – House of Blues

5/16/2019     Tucson, AZ – Rialto Theatre  

5/17/2019     Los Angeles, CA – The Belasco Theatre

5/18/2019     San Francisco, CA – August Hall

5/20/2019     Portland, OR – Holocene

5/21/2019     Seattle, WA – Neumos

5/22/2019     Vancouver, BC – Rio Theatre