Posts tagged with "Vanity Fair"

SHARP STICK – LENA DUNHAM

Sharp Stick, written and directed by Lena Dunham opens on Friday July 29th in New York and Los Angeles, and keeps expanding to theaters nationwide on Friday August 5th. It will also be available on Digital platforms August 16th. The movie stars Kristine Froseth, Jon Bernthal, Scott Speedman, Luka Sabbat, Lena Dunham, Ebon Moss-Bachrach, Taylour Paige and Jennifer Jason Leigh. Watch The Trailer

Lena Dunham‘s provocative tale of sexual awakening tackles thorny material with compassion.” Elena Lazic,The Playlist

“Supremely funny. As heartfelt as it is provocative.” – Cassie Da Costa, Vanity Fair

“Surprisingly sweet and searching. It’s refreshing to see sex scenes directed with both warmth and a sense of carnality.” Stephanie ZacharekTIME

Synopsisscriptwriter

Sarah Jo (Kristine Froseth) is a sensitive and naive 26-year-old living on the fringes of Hollywood with her disillusioned mother (Jennifer Jason Leigh) and influencer sister (Taylour Paige). Working as a caregiver and just longing to be seen, she begins an exploratory affair with her older, married employer (Jon Bernthal), and is thrust into a startling education on sexuality, loss and power.

Molto Italiano new Dolce&Gabbana podcast via 360 magazine

MOLTO ITALIANO

A podcast series that chronicles the most iconic and inescapably Italian elements of Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana‘s universe. Their connection to their Country, to the world of cinema, art and culture.

Available for free starting July 7 on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Spreaker, Google Podcasts and at choramedia.com

MOLTO ITALIANO is the first podcast series produced by CHORA MEDIA – the Italian podcast company founded in 2020 by Guido Maria Brera, Mario Gianani, Roberto Zanco and Mario Calabresi who directs it – for Dolce&Gabbana. Designed for an international audience and produced in English, it is available for free starting July 7 on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Spreaker, Google Podcasts and all other major audio platforms, as well as on choramedia.com.

MOLTO ITALIANO is a journey into the creative imagination of Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana and those elements of style that, through their vision, have contributed to making Italy’s culture and traditions known throughout the world.

Each episode is dedicated to one of the “signs” that are part of Dolce&Gabbana‘s history and DNA and that, together, make the brand so inescapably Italian: from corsetry to the color black, via the tank top and the Sicilian cart.

Leading the narrative, written by author and journalist Silvia Nucini, is Isabella Rossellini, an international icon film and fashion icon, who voices her memories while alternating with historians, academics and artists who share their perspectives on the elements at the center of each episode.

Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana reveal passions and inspirations behind their vision: each episode is a chorus of voices celebrating fashion, tradition, craftsmanship, art and culture.

THE EPISODES

Ep.1 The brassiere

Almost austere, black, and inspired by the great icons of Italy’s neorealist cinema: this is the brassiere which Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana have been dressing women with for years. Guided by the voice of Isabella Rossellini, we discover the birth of this garment – which manages to be at the same time both temperate and erotic, a symbol of motherhood and sensuality.

French fashion historian Florence Müller tells of the brassiere’s first century of life, while the Sicilian writer Nadia Terranova shares her own memories of this object, from rites of passage to moments of family life.

Ep.2 Black

The color black has many meanings, often at odds with one another. It’s the color which Sicilian women used to wear for years in sign of mourning, but it’s also synonymous with elegance. It’s a symbol of power and modesty. You should always have something black hanging in your wardrobe, and it’s also worn by the fashion makers themselves.

In this episode Isabella Rossellini guides us on our way to discover one of the iconic colors of Dolce&Gabbana, weaving together ancient stories and traditions. With contributions from the Academy Award winning director Giuseppe Tornatore, from the English journalist Suzy Menkes, and the American historian Carmela Spinelli.

Ep.3 The tank top

The tank top is a simple garment, an everyday one, and it is also “molto italiano.” This popular object has been reworked and transformed by the world of film. Guido Bonsaver, professor at the University of Oxford, and Rebecca Bauman, associate professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology, tell Isabella Rossellini of the first tank tops in film from the forties and fifties. As well as the significance of this garment (as soon as the most beloved actors of the time put it on), and of its evolution towards the world of action movie heroines.

Director Giuseppe Tornatore shares with us the images that the tank top elicits in him, while journalist Suzy Menkes talks about the purely Italian style of Dolce&Gabbana.

Ep.4 The Sicilian cart

It’s reductive to consider Sicilian carts as mere vehicles. These carts are so rich in color and decorations that, according to Marianna Gatto of the Italian American Museum in Los Angeles, they’re best described as “walking books.” For the painter from Palermo, Gianfranco Fiore (who decorates these carts), they represent the most popular, creative and imaginative soul of the Sicilian people. Isabella Rossellini speaks with Gatto and Fiore of history, traditions and memories. She also talks with the German photographer Juergen Teller.

In this episode we discover how the Dolce&Gabbana brand managed to inject new life in the cart and to bring it over to the fields of fashion, design and furnishing, where it has become a symbol of high quality Italian artisanship.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Silvia Nucini is a journalist, writer and author. After 20 years as Senior writer and Features editor of Vanity Fair Italy, she now collaborates with several publications. She holds a weekly podcast in which she interviews writers.

Molto Italiano is a Chora Media series for Dolce&Gabbana. It was narrated by Isabella Rossellini who shared and put into words some of her memories. It was written by Silvia Nucini and adapted by John Vincent. Story editing by Sara Poma; our Senior Account Producer is Anna Nenna and our research and production assistant is Francesca Bottenghi. Our New York based producer is Guglielmo Mattioli. Voice actors: Vincenzo Tripodo, Fabrizio Matteini, Michael Loos, Rosita Martini, Andrea Galatà. It was recorded by Charles De Montebello at CDM Studios in New York. Tape sync recordings by: Pierluigi Papaiz, Michele Boreggi, Azzurra Stirpe, Hugo Hannoun. Original music, post production and sound design by Andrea Girelli; post production assistant Guido Bertolotti. Music supervision by Luca Micheli. Additional music by Machiavelli Music and Universal Music Publishing Recording.

Sabrina Carpenter spotted at Vanity Fair featured in 360 magazine

VANITY FAIR × BACARDI

Vanity Fair and BACARDÍ Rum toasted young Hollywood at a party that took place at Musso & Frank’s in Hollywood. The event was co-hosted by Alana Haim, Ariana DeBose, and Giveon–all of whom have been spotlighted in VF’s Vanities column. VF’s Campaign Hollywood, which has become synonymous with Oscar week, honors the year’s standout performances, and the artists and storytellers paving the way to Hollywood’s future.

About Vanity Fair

Muscular long-form journalism, stunning photography, insightful essays, and superb design make each issue of Vanity Fair a must-read. Every month, the magazine commissions the best writers and photographers to explain the pressing issues of the day and take the pulse of the culture. Vanity Fair consistently delivers crucial reporting on business and finance, domestic politics and world affairs, even as it covers the very best in arts and entertainment.

About BACARDÍ® Rum- The World’s Most Awarded Rum

In 1862, in the city of Santiago de Cuba, founder Don Facundo Bacardí Massó revolutionized the spirits industry when he created a light-bodied rum with a particularly smooth taste – BACARDÍ. The unique taste of BACARDÍ rum inspired cocktail pioneers to invent some of the world’s most famous recipes including the BACARDÍ Mojito, the BACARDÍ Daiquiri, the BACARDÍ Cuba Libre, the BACARDÍ Piña Colada and the BACARDÍ El Presidente. BACARDÍ rum is the world’s most awarded rum, with more than 1,000 awards for quality, taste and innovation. Today, BACARDÍ rum is made mainly in Puerto Rico where it is crafted to ensure the taste remains the same today as it did when it was first blended in 1862. www.BACARDÍ.com

The BACARDÍ brand is part of the portfolio of Bacardi Limited, headquartered in Hamilton, Bermuda. Bacardi Limited refers to the Bacardi group of companies, including Bacardi International Limited.

GIVEON via Epic Records for use by 360 Magazine

GIVEON RIAA Certifications

Continuing to shine as brightly as ever, multiplatinum GRAMMY® Nominated R&B star GIVĒON has garnered three new certifications from the RIAA. “For Tonight” and “The Beach” both picked up Gold certifications, while “Like I Want You” has gone double-platinum. This brings his total tally of certified releases to 11, cementing him as 21st century R&B’s leading man.

Check out the Vevo Live Performance of “For Tonight” HERE.

Next up, he is notably nominated in six categories at the 2022 GRAMMY® Awards. He earned a nod in the category of “Album of the Year” as a featured artist and songwriter on Justin Bieber’s blockbuster Justice, and he’s up for “Record of the Year,” “Song of the Year,” “Best R&B Performance,” and “Best Music Video” for “Peaches” with Justin Bieber and Daniel Caesar. Meanwhile, his triple-platinum single “Heartbreak Anniversary” is vying for “Best R&B Song.”

He continues to make headlines. He just appeared on The TODAY Show where he discussed his musical journey thus far, while Harpers Bazaar selected him as February 2022 Music Director. Perhaps Vanity Fair summed it up best in a recent feature, “Everyone’s swooning for GIVĒON.” Next up, he graces the stage of Coachella on Saturday April 16 and Saturday April 23. Check out the Harper’s Bazaar interview about his Coachella fashion sense HERE.

He’s also said to release a new song, “Lie Again,” which will be released this Friday. Pre-save HERE.

Stay tuned for more from GIVĒON soon.  It’s about to be a massive year for him.

GRETA VAN FLEET POSTER IMAGE by Republic Records for use by 360 Magazine

DREAMS IN GOLD TOUR – GRETA VAN FLEET

GRETA VAN FLEET ANNOUNCE DREAMS IN GOLD TOUR 2022

TICKETS ON SALE THIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12 AT 10 A.M. LOCAL TIME

CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED SOPHOMORE ALBUM THE BATTLE AT GARDEN’S GATE OUT NOW

Following this year’s sold-out headline events and a #1 Billboard Rock Album, Grammy-winning rock band Greta Van Fleet are confirmed for their forthcoming Dreams in Gold tour, which kicks off March 10 with the band making a triumphant return to their original stomping grounds in Michigan for a string of arena shows followed by Midwest dates and international shows in Mexico, Europe and the UK. Grammy-nominated group Rival Sons and critically acclaimed rising artist The Velveteers will support the North American shows. Tickets are on sale this Friday, November 12 at 10am local time at LiveNation.com. There will be a Fan Presale on November 10, and a Local Venue Presale on November 11. Strange Horizons, the band’s specialty events in 2021, saw sold-out shows in Nashville, Bridgeport, Chicago and Los Angeles. The group’s critically acclaimed album The Battle at Garden’s Gate was released earlier this year to extensive chart success and fanfare, debuting at #1 Billboard Rock Album, #1 Billboard Hard Rock Album, #1 Billboard Vinyl Album, #2 Billboard Top Album Sales and in the Top 10 on the Billboard 200.

“An hour of rock music that touches on their familiar themes of war, grief, and spirituality…it contains plenty of the intellectual flights that inspired an active subreddit of superfans who devote serious brainpower to textual interpretation of their lyrics. But mercifully, it’s genuinely enjoyable outside of those contexts too.” – Vanity Fair

“There’s something winning about the members’ earnest intentions, as well as their unwavering commitment to them. Their sincere love for the history of rock shows in the depth of their knowledge about it.” – The Guardian

“aim to bust down old walls.” – Rolling Stone

“one of the best straight-up rock albums to come down the pike in many moons” – Variety

The Battle at Garden’s Gate explores the boundaries of the group’s artistry and reflects heavily on the individual members’ personal and spiritual growth during their rapid rise. “There was a lot of self-evolution happening during the writing of this album that was prompted by experiences I had, experiences we all had,” explains vocalist Josh Kiszka. “It’s reflecting a lot of the world that we’ve seen, and I think that it’s reflecting a lot of personal truth,” says guitarist Jake Kiszka.

Forming in Frankenmuth, Michigan back in 2012, Greta Van Fleet consists of three brothers, vocalist Josh Kiszka, guitarist Jake Kiszka, bassist/keyboardist Sam Kiszka, as well as drummer Danny Wagner. Together they have performed across multiple continents, sold over two million albums worldwide, performed on late night television shows, topped the Billboard U.S. Mainstream Rock and Active Rock charts and won the Grammy Award for Best Rock Album in 2019.

GRETA VAN FLEET DREAMS IN GOLD TOUR DATES

March 10—Kalamazoo, MI @ Wings Event Center

March 12—Grand Rapids, MI @ The DeltaPlex Arena

March 13—Saginaw, MI @ Dow Event Center

March 16—Flint, MI @ Dort Financial Center

March 17—Ypsilanti, MI @ EMU Convocation Center

March 19—Huntington, WV @ Mountain Health Arena

March 22—Madison, WI @ Kohl Center

March 23—Green Bay, WI @ Resch Center

March 25—Omaha, NE @ CHI Health Center Omaha

March 26—Peoria, IL @ Peoria Civic Center

March 29—Cincinnati, OH @ Heritage Bank Center

March 30—Hershey, PA @ GIANT Center

April 1—Atlantic City, NJ @ Hard Rock Live at Etess Arena

April 2—Atlantic City, NJ @ Hard Rock Live at Etess Arena

May 3—Rio de Janeiro, Brazil @ Qualistage 

May 16—Mexico City, Mexico @ Pepsi Center

June 5—Stockholm, Sweden @ Grona Lund

June 11—Vienne, France @ Theatre Antique de Vienne

June 14—Cologne, Germany @ Tanzbrunnen

June 15—Frankfurt, Germany @ Jarhunderthalle

June 23—Dublin, Ireland @ Fairview

June 25—London, UK @ Alexandra Palace

June 28—Manchester, UK @ O2 Apollo

June 29—Manchester, UK @ O2 Apollo

ABOUT REPUBLIC RECORDS

A division of Universal Music Group, the world’s leading music company, Republic Records is home to an all-star roster of multi-platinum, award-winning legends and superstar artists such as Ariana Grande, Black Thought, Drake, Florence + the Machine, Greta Van Fleet, Hailee Steinfeld, Jack Johnson, James Blake, James Bay, Jessie J, John Mellencamp, Jonas Brothers, Julia Michaels, Kid Cudi, Lil Wayne, Lorde, Metro Boomin, NAV, Nicki Minaj, Of Monsters and Men, Pearl Jam, Post Malone, Seth MacFarlane, Stevie Wonder, Taylor Swift, The Weeknd and more. Founded by brothers and chief executives Monte and Avery Lipman, it is also comprised of innovative business ventures, including American Recordings, Boominati Worldwide, Brushfire, Casablanca Records, Cash Money, Lava Records, XO, Young Money, among others. Republic also maintains a long-standing strategic alliance with Universal Music Latin Entertainment (J Balvin and Karol G).  In addition, Republic has expanded to release high-profile soundtracks for Universal Pictures (Fifty Shades of Grey), Sony Pictures (Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse) and NBC TV (The Voice), as well as other notable film and television franchises. Extending further into the worlds of film, television, and content, Republic launched Federal Films in order to produce movies and series powered by the label’s catalog and artists. Its first production was the Jonas Brothers documentary Chasing Happiness for Amazon Prime Video.

music Ivory Rowen illustration for 360 Magazine.

JON BATISTE NEW MUSIC VIDEO – FREEDOM

Today, Academy Award, BAFTA, Golden Globe winning musician Jon Batiste releases a vibrant new music video for his single “FREEDOM,” a celebration of Black joy, independence and New Orleans culture and energy. Watch here.

There is no better time for Jon Batiste’s song of the summer “FREEDOM,” a funk-driven 70s-pop banger that Entertainment Weekly called an “exhilarating, horn-heavy celebration of independence.”

In this electrifying love letter to his hometown of New Orleans, Batiste leads the ultimate second line through the streets, linking with the legendary St. Augustine High School Marching 100 (Batiste’s alma mater), the Joyful Choir of New Orleans, Queen Tahj of the Golden Eagles Mardi Grass Indian Tribe, dancers, musicians, and residents alike.

Jon Batiste has had a good year. The Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA winning musician’s hit song “I NEED YOU” reached #1 on the AAA Radio Charts, his album WE ARE debuted in the Billboard Top R&B Charts, Top Album Charts, and Top 200, his “I NEED YOU” music video surpassed 10MM views, he’s appeared on American Idol,  Live with Kelly and RyanThe Today ShowThe Late Late Show with James CordenCBS This Morning as guest and co-host, and of course the Late Show with Stephen Colbert.

“We Are represents a vivid turn from straight jazz to joyful, danceable pop and neo-soul… a bold declaration of conscience…” –Vanity Fair

On WE ARE, Batiste presents a captivating musical experience to the world rooted in catharsis, joy, freedom, contemplation and sensuality. It’s a love letter to his southern roots and the heritage of Black Music with guest appearances by Mavis StaplesQuincy JonesZadie SmithPJ MortonTrombone Shorty, St. Augustine Marching 100, his father Michael Batiste, grandfather David Gauthier and many more. It is a meditation steeped in the sounds of the times with collaborators including POMO (Anderson.Paak), Ricky Reed (Lizzo), Jahaan Sweet (Drake, Eminem) and others.

“I’m publicly known for some things already,” says Batiste. “But there’s so much more to know about me. It’s always been there. Now is the time to show the world my full artistry.”

Batiste continues, “WE ARE is a message of love for humanity, of humble reverence for our past, and of a hopeful future, in which we are the ones who can save us. The art reveals its motive to you. You just have to wait for the Spirit to tell you what it wants.”

A special thanks to Coach for dressing members of the cast of the “FREEDOM” video.

About Jon Batiste
One of the best-known musicians of his generation, virtuoso pianist, singer, bandleader, educator and television personality Jon Batiste has spent his career bringing that music back to where it started — that is, with the people. From his days at Juilliard, where he established his Stay Human band by playing around New York City’s subways and in street performances he called “love riots,” to his work since 2015 as the bandleader and musical director of The Late Show With Stephen Colbert, the Kenner, Louisiana native has consistently channeled his superb technical skill and deep knowledge of jazz tradition towards a specific, intentional purpose: making people’s lives better and brighter, one harmonaboard (that’s harmonica and keyboard, combined) solo at a time.

Born into Louisiana’s legendarily musical Batiste family, Jon has performed and recorded widely since his teens. His flexibility as an artist, his fluency in jazz as well as popular music of all stripes, has allowed him to collaborate with legends from Wynton Marsalis, a mentor since his Juilliard days, to Prince — as well as many of the widely-varied artists who appear on the Late Show.

Batiste’s marquee performances have ranged from the Grammy’s, to the Kennedy Center Honors, to the US Open and the NBA All-Star Game — in 2015, Batiste and the Stay Human Band became the first group to play the main stage at both the Newport Jazz and Folk festivals.

Batiste played himself on the HBO series Treme and appeared in director Spike Lee’s Red Hook Summer — most recently, his music was featured in the 2020 Disney/Pixar film Soul. Batiste won a Golden Globe and Critic’s Choice Award for his participation in the soundtrack alongside Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, and the trio are currently nominated for an Oscar and BAFTA for Best Soundtrack.

He’s been awarded the American Jazz Museum Lifetime Achievement Award, the Harry Chapin ASCAP Humanitarian Award and appeared on Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list; Batiste also currently serves as the Music Director of The Atlantic and the Co-Artistic Director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem.

Jon Batiste is devoted to the education and mentorship of young musicians. He has led his own Social Music Residency and Mentoring Program sponsored by Chase, as well as master classes throughout the world. He has also led several cultural exchanges, beginning in 2006, while still a teen, with the Netherlands Trust, which brought students from the USA and Holland to perform with him at the Royal Concertgebouw and Carnegie Hall.

Batiste balances a demanding performance schedule with public speaking engagements, masterclasses, brand partnerships, community activism and acting roles. His composing and songwriting will be featured in his large-scale, genre-melding symphonic work “American Symphony,” set to premiere at Carnegie Hall in 2021 and he has been developing a Broadway musical about the life of famed painter Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Lil Baby illustrated by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Lil Baby Performing at Grammy’s

PERFORMING ON THE 63rd ANNUAL GRAMMY’S

AIRING SUNDAY, MARCH 14, 8 PM ET / 5 PM PT ON CBS

NOMINATED FOR TWO GRAMMY AWARDS:

BEST RAP SONG AND BEST RAP PERFORMANCE FOR THE BIGGER

The Recording Academy announced that Lil Baby will perform at the 63rd Annual Grammy Awards. The Awards will air on Sunday, March 14th, at 8 p.m. ET / 5 p.m. PT on CBS Television Network from the Los Angeles Convention Center in downtown LA.

Lil Baby has been one of the most dominant and critically acclaimed names in rap since his first release in 2017. In February 2020, he released My Turn, which entered The Billboard 200 at #1, hovered in the Top 5 for 14 weeks, and then returned to the #1 selling album of any genre in 2020.

Lil Baby is as authentic as they come. At just 26 years old, he is unapologetically himself, speaking his truth in his lyrics and that connects him to listeners like no other. Last June as the nation protested, Lil Baby dropped a powerful record “The Bigger Picture”; articulating frustration, confusion, and a call to stand up for something much bigger than himself.

My Turn held 14 records simultaneously on The Billboard Hot 100 and Lil Baby has recently surpassed musical titans Prince and Paul McCartney among others in Billboard Hot 100 hits in his young 3-year career. To date, Baby’s catalog reached 22 billion global streams, scored 8 #1 songs at Urban Radio, won the BET Award for Best New Artist, named Vevo’s Top Performing Hip-Hop Artist of 2020, named MVP on Rap Caviar, and won the top award of Global Artist of the Year at the Apple Music Awards. The Bigger Picture was nominated for two Grammy’s (Best Rap Performance and Best Rap Song). He has seen widespread critical acclaim from the likes of GQ and Vanity Fair and has graced the covers of Rolling Stone and NME. With such a rapid rise and a relentless stream of critical and commercial hits, it’s clear that Lil Baby is one of the greatest modern success stories in hip-hop.

Illustration of a Booker by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

New World Model

By Dana Feeney × Vaughn Lowery

The modeling industry has two very different faces. One side are supermodels, like Gigi and Bella Hadid, glamorously modeling, making millions of dollars, and traveling the world. The other are the unknown models working job to job, facing exploitation and manipulation by their agencies and clients, and trying to make their name in the industry. The mistreatment of models is as old as the industry itself. Skinny, cis, and white models experience this brutal reality. Working as a model is only worse for people of color [POC], LGBTQA+, and immigrants because of the lack of transparency or regulation and rampant misconduct.

New Players

The current push for diversity and inclusion has caused a much higher demand for POC, and LGBTQA+ models with different body types. In recent months, a few new players in the game are building their reputations on accountability and proper treatment of the models and creatives they represent. Several small agencies and one superpower are disrupting the model representation world: New Pandemics, Zandwagon, Community New York, We Speak Models, and film and television power player Creative Artists Agency (CAA).
The way modeling deals traditionally work is that a model signs to an agency, such as Next Models, Ford Models, IMG Models, or Wilhelmina Models. The agency provides its models with certain services such as housing, transportation, portfolio shoots, and more. In most cases, anything an agency provides for a model they have to pay back to the agency, often at a high-interest rate. The interest rate means the longer they take to pay it back, the more they owe to the agency.

Although models sign contracts to agencies, they are not considered employees of those agencies and instead are independent contractors who the agency aids in booking jobs. The agencies do not keep models on their payroll. They do control the money that the models earn on a job and how their money models earn is distributed. Bad payment practices reach far beyond the agencies. The agencies are responsible for billing the client right after the model completes their job. Payment for jobs by agencies to their models is notoriously sketchy because clients are not required to pay upfront before shoots and can legally take up to 90 days to settle up. Most agencies take at least a 20% fee out of any money their models make and charge clients a “booking fee,” so for a $1000 job, they would charge $1200 but only pay the model $800. Worst of all, if a client does not pay the agency for work a model did, the agency does not owe the model the money they earned. The common practice in the industry is that the model only gets paid if the agency gets paid.

The film and television management world contrasts the modeling world in many ways. The modeling industry as a whole is riddled with misconduct, manipulation, and poor treatment of models by their agencies and brands. Many modeling agencies use contracts that include fees and costs they can pull out of the model paychecks and use debt, housing, and visas to keep their models dependent.

Agencies in other media such as film, only make money if their clients make money. In film, the percentage is around 10% because of unions. Although, none of these industries are flawless especially considering scandals in the film and tv world with predators like Harvey Weinstein and Matt Lauer.
Creative Artists Agency (CAA) has a long history of representing talents across film, tv, music, and more. In August of 2020, CAA announced their partnership with KCD Worldwide, a fashion services agency, which signaled CAA’s entrance into fashion model management for the first time in the agency’s history. CAA has a strong legacy of representing high-profile individuals and building their careers. They have also stated that they only take a 10% fee out of their models’ earnings, half of the general standard of 20%. Despite their claims for better treatment of models, CAA is not blemish-free when it comes to allegations of abuse and sexual misconduct. Multiple former CAA agents have faced lawsuits.

Additionally, CAA has previously represented multiple people accused of misconduct, including Shia LaBeouf, Chris D’Elia, and Marilyn Mason; all of whom are no longer represented by CAA.
On the opposite end of the spectrum are the smaller boutique agencies mentioned earlier, New Pandemics, Zandwagon, and Community New York. New Pandemics is “a casting and management agency dedicated to increasing LBGTQ+ visibility.”

Zandwagon is “a talent management company that could guide everyday life individuals who are breaking beauty standards daily” according to their website. Community New York is run by Butterfly Cayley, Moe Lamstein, and Richie Keoall, three first-generation immigrants from Laos, and “is founded on inclusivity and progressive values by changing not only the style but the very structure of management.” Cayley, Lamstein, and Keoall have impressive experience at agencies including DNA and Elite Model Management. Community New York now represents stars such as Hunter Schafer, who is well known for her work on the hit HBO show “Euphoria” and is now a brand ambassador for Shiseido.

With small diversity forward agencies up and coming, the existing modeling industry is under attack from all sides. All three of these agencies emphasize how much they value representation and inclusivity in this industry that has avoided breaking societal beauty standards for so long. They also claim they will be different from other agencies and provide better treatment for their clients. These agencies are sending the message that you’re either with them or against them, and they’re willing to think outside of the box to get proper treatment and equity for models from all walks of life.

Same Old Problems

Many of the biggest fashion houses in the world are still reckoning with the #MeToo movement. The fashion industry is known as a highly predatory business. Many of even the largest names in modeling have had to survive people abusing their power on sets and behind the scenes to become who they are. Household names, such as Kate Upton, Coco Rocha, and Cameron Russel, have all spoken out about their experiences with the abuse they’ve experienced while working as models.

Kate Upton spoke out against Paul Marciano in 2018, which led to a total of $500,000 in settlement agreements involving five individuals. He has remained an active participant at GUESS as a board member and chief creative officer, despite resigning from his position as an executive. At the beginning of February, the news broke that Marciano is once again being sued over sexual assault allegations by a woman who has chosen to remain anonymous. The allegations against Marciano are not an isolated incident. Similarly, allegations were brought against Alexander Wang in December of 2020 but began as early as 2017, yet some still chose his side despite the overwhelming corroboration of multiple individuals. If the word of a woman as successful as Kate Upton is not enough to oust a predator from power, it’s unclear what realistically can protect vulnerable individuals with less acclaim from the same experiences or worse.

The silver lining of these allegations coming to light is the industry supporting the individuals coming forward more than ever before. In the past, many models lost their careers before they had even begun due to the actions of predators and the mechanisms powerful people use to silence their victims. Accounts such as @shitmodelmgmt and @dietprada have been using their online platforms to expose predators and condemn their actions openly across Instagram and Twitter. Additionally, the Model Alliance, an organization dedicated to giving models a voice in their work, has also spoken out against Wang on their Instagram saying, “We stand with David Casavant, Owen Mooney, Gia Garison, and all the accusers of @alexanderwangny in their pursuit towards justice.”

The upheaval that began in 2006 with survivor and activist Tarana Burke’s creation of the #MeToo movement has continued into 2021. Slowly but surely survivors are taking their power back and pushing to create real change in media industries that have exploited them for far too long.

Illustration of models by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine

The Ford Foundation’s Darren Walker in Conversation with Andre Leon Talley

The Ford Foundation’s Darren Walker will be interviewed by André Leon Talley on a zoom call Thursday, February 11th at 7:00 pm EST hosted by the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD).

The Ford Foundation’s president Darren Walker and fashion icon André Leon Talley join MAD Interim Director Terry Skoda for a Black History Month special edition of MAD Moments, exploring Walker’s path to the Ford Foundation, his vision for the future of philanthropy, and the role of museums in reimaging who has a seat at the table and a voice in the room.

Closed captioning provided.

ABOUT THE PANELISTS

André Leon Talley was the indomitable creative director at Vogue during the magazine’s rising dominance as the world’s fashion bible. Over the past five decades his byline has appeared in Vanity Fair, HG, and The New York Times. He began his career as an assistant to Diana Vreeland at The Metropolitan Costume Institute, later working at Interview magazine, and as Paris Bureau Chief for Women’s Wear Daily. He is the author of books including two autobiographies, The Chiffon Trenches and ALT, as well as Little Black Dress, A.L.T.:365+, MegaStar, and Oscar de la Renta: His Legendary World of Style. He is also the subject of the documentary The Gospel According to André. Mr. Talley received his MA in French Studies from Brown University and served on the board of trustees for the Savannah College of Art and Design for twenty years.

Darren Walker is president of the Ford Foundation, a $13 billion international social justice philanthropy. He is co-founder and chair of the Presidents’ Council on Disability Inclusion in Philanthropy. Before joining Ford, Darren was vice president at Rockefeller Foundation, overseeing global and domestic programs. In the 1990s, he was COO of the Abyssinian Development Corporation, Harlem’s largest community development organization. Darren co-chairs New York City’s Mayoral Advisory Commission on City Art, Monuments, and Markers, the New York City Census Task Force, and the Governor’s Commission and serves on The Independent Commission on New York City Criminal Justice and Incarceration Reform and UN International Labour Organization Global Commission on the Future of Work. He serves on many boards, including Carnegie Hall, the High Line, VOW to End Child Marriage, the Committee to Protect Journalists, the National Gallery of Art, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is the recipient of 16 honorary degrees and university awards, including Harvard University’s W.E.B. Du Bois Medal. Educated exclusively in public schools, Darren was a member of the first Head Start class in 1965 and graduated from The University of Texas at Austin. He has been included on Time’s annual 100 Most Influential People in the World, Rolling Stone’s 25 People Shaping the Future, Fast Company’s Most Creative People in Business, and OUT Magazine’s Power 50.

Challenger: The Final Flight

By Cassandra Yany

On Wednesday, Netflix released “Challenger: The Final Flight,” a four-episode docuseries about the tragic explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger.

The doc was directed by Daniel Junge and Steven Leckart, and executive produced by JJ Abrams and Glenn Zipper. It provides a complete look at the events leading up to the takeoff and includes interviews with family members of the seven astronauts who died in the explosion.

According to CNN, the series uses archival footage and home videos, along with interviews from officials and crew members to shed light on the poor decision-making and systemic failures that led up to the disaster, as well as the aftermath that followed.

Challenger took off from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral on January 28, 1986. Just 73 seconds after it launched, the shuttle began breaking apart, due to malfunctioning O-rings in the rocket boosters, which hardened as the temperature decreased. NASA had reportedly known about this damaged hardware for months prior, according to Vanity Fair.

The purpose of mission STS-51-L was to deploy a satellite to study the approaching Halley’s Comet, but it had been delayed multiple times because of technical difficulties.

The crew was one of NASA’s most diverse to date, as reported by the New York Post. One of the astronauts was a teacher, so school children across the country watched in class as the shuttle went down, engulfed by a huge, ominous cloud of smoke. The explosion devastated the nation, especially all of the young children who had watched it live.

Nearly thirty-five years later, we remember the passengers who lost their lives on that dreadful day:

Christa McAuliffe

Christa McAuliffe was a teacher at Concord High School in New Hampshire who learned of the Teacher in Space Project— NASA’s plan to fly an educator into space. NASA had hoped that this would help increase public interest in the space shuttle program. 

Along with 11,000 others, McAuliffe applied in 1984 to be the first teacher to communicate with students from space. She was chosen as one of two finalists from New Hampshire, then was selected to be part of the STS-51-L crew by a Review Panel in Washington, D.C.

McAuliffe took a year off from teaching to train for the space shuttle mission. While in orbit, she was planning to conduct experiments in chromatography, hydroponics, magnetism and Newton’s laws. She also would have taught two 15-minute classes— one providing a tour of the spacecraft, the other about the benefits of space travel— which would have been broadcasted to students on closed-circuit TV. 

The nationwide excitement of having McAuliffe in space was a significant reason why the explosion had such a lasting impact on the country, and was especially upsetting for young students who watched the takeoff or extensive coverage in class. 

Gregory Jarvis

Gregory Jarvis was an engineer for Hughes Aircraft who served as Payload Specialist 2 on Challenger. In 1984, he was one of two employees from the company that were selected for the Space Shuttle program. 

Jarvis was originally supposed to make his shuttle flight in April 1985, but was rescheduled to early January 1986, then rescheduled again, landing him a spot on the STS-51-L crew. From space, he planned to conduct experiments on the effects of weightlessness on fluids. 

Dick Scobee

Dick Scobee earned his pilot wings in 1966 and served as a combat aviator in the Vietnam War, for which he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal.

After the war, Scobee graduated from the USAF Aerospace Research Pilot School and became an Air Force test pilot. He was the commander on Challenger and died a lieutenant colonel.

Judith Resnik

After graduating from Carnegie Mellon, Judith Resnik worked as a design engineer in missile and radar projects at RCA (Radio Corporation of America). There, she performed circuit design for the missile and surface radar division. She later developed electronics and software for NASA’s sounding rocket and telemetry systems programs. 

Resnik qualified as a professional aircraft pilot in 1977 and was recruited into the NASA Astronaut Corps in 1978. She was one of six women selected for the program out of 8,000 applicants. At NASA, and piloted the Northrop T-38 Talon, trained intensely, conducted research, and developed different systems and software. 

Resnik served as a mission specialist on the maiden voyage of Discovery in 1984 for her first space flight from August to September. During this flight, she operated a shuttle’s robotic arm (which she created), and deployed and conducted experiments on a solar array wing to determine if there was a way to generate additional electric power during missions. She was the second American woman in space and the first Jewish woman in space. 

Resnik was a mission specialist on Challenger. After the explosion, further examination of the cockpit shows that her Personal Egress Air Pack was activated, indicating that she may have been alive after the cockpit separated from the vehicle to activate it. Her body was the first to be recovered from the crash by Navy divers. 

Ellison Onizuka

Ellison Onizuka served as a flight test engineer and test pilot for the U.S. Air Force in the early 1970s. After attending the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School from 1974 to 1975, he became a squadron flight test engineer there and worked as a manager for engineering support in the training resources division. 

In 1978, Onizuka was selected for the astronaut program and later worked in the experimentation team, orbiter test team, and launch support screw for the STS-1 and STS-2. At NASA he also worked on the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory test and revision software team. 

Onizzuka’s first space mission was one year before the Challenger explosion, on the mission STS-51-C on the shuttle Discovery. This was the first space shuttle mission for the Department of Defense, and he became the first Asian American to reach space. 

Onizuka was a mission specialist aboard Challenger. Similar to Resnik, it is speculated that he could have been alive when the cockpit separated from the vehicle because his Personal Egress Air Pack was also activated. When he died, he held the position of lieutenant colonel, but was later promoted to the rank of colonel. 

Ronald McNair

Ronald McNair received his Ph.D. in Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1976 and became nationally recognized for his work in laser physics. After graduation, he worked as a staff physicist at the Hugh Research Lab in Malibu, CA. 

McNair was one of the ten thousand applicants to be selected in 1978 for the NASA astronaut program. He became the second African American astronaut in 1984 when he flew as a mission specialist for STS-41-B on Challenger from Feb. 3-11. 

McNair later served as a mission specialist for STS-51-L. During this flight, he had planned to record the saxophone solo for a song he had worked on with composer Jean-Michel Jarre for his upcoming album Rendez-Vous. This would have been the first original piece of music to be recorded in space. 

McNair was also supposed to participate in Jarre’s Rendez-Vous Houston concert through a live feed from Challenger. To honor McNair, Jarre dedicated the last song on the album to him and subtitled it “Ron’s Piece.”

Michael J. Smith

Michael J. Smith served in the Vietnam War, then attended U.S. naval Test Pilot School. After graduation, he was assigned to the Strike Aircraft Test Directorate at NAS Patuxent River in Maryland, where he worked on the A-6E TRAM and Cruise missile guidance systems. In 1976, later returned to NTPS for 18 months as an instructor. 

Smith was selected for the astronaut program in May 1980, in which he served as a commander in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory, the Deputy Chief of Aircraft Operations, the Technical Assistant to the Director, and the Flights Operations Directorate. 

Smith was the pilot for Challenger, and was set to pilot another mission the following fall. His voice was the last heard on the flight deck tape recorder with his final words being “Uh oh.”

All seven passengers were awarded with the Congressional Space Medal of Honor in 2004.