Posts tagged with "Vanity Fair"

Lil Baby illustrated by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Lil Baby Performing at Grammy’s

PERFORMING ON THE 63rd ANNUAL GRAMMY’S

AIRING SUNDAY, MARCH 14, 8 PM ET / 5 PM PT ON CBS

NOMINATED FOR TWO GRAMMY AWARDS:

BEST RAP SONG AND BEST RAP PERFORMANCE FOR THE BIGGER

The Recording Academy announced that Lil Baby will perform at the 63rd Annual Grammy Awards. The Awards will air on Sunday, March 14th, at 8 p.m. ET / 5 p.m. PT on CBS Television Network from the Los Angeles Convention Center in downtown LA.

Lil Baby has been one of the most dominant and critically acclaimed names in rap since his first release in 2017. In February 2020, he released My Turn, which entered The Billboard 200 at #1, hovered in the Top 5 for 14 weeks, and then returned to the #1 selling album of any genre in 2020.

Lil Baby is as authentic as they come. At just 26 years old, he is unapologetically himself, speaking his truth in his lyrics and that connects him to listeners like no other. Last June as the nation protested, Lil Baby dropped a powerful record “The Bigger Picture”; articulating frustration, confusion, and a call to stand up for something much bigger than himself.

My Turn held 14 records simultaneously on The Billboard Hot 100 and Lil Baby has recently surpassed musical titans Prince and Paul McCartney among others in Billboard Hot 100 hits in his young 3-year career. To date, Baby’s catalog reached 22 billion global streams, scored 8 #1 songs at Urban Radio, won the BET Award for Best New Artist, named Vevo’s Top Performing Hip-Hop Artist of 2020, named MVP on Rap Caviar, and won the top award of Global Artist of the Year at the Apple Music Awards. The Bigger Picture was nominated for two Grammy’s (Best Rap Performance and Best Rap Song). He has seen widespread critical acclaim from the likes of GQ and Vanity Fair and has graced the covers of Rolling Stone and NME. With such a rapid rise and a relentless stream of critical and commercial hits, it’s clear that Lil Baby is one of the greatest modern success stories in hip-hop.

Illustration of a Booker by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Turf Shifts Modeling World

By Dana Feeney

The modeling industry has two very different faces. One side are supermodels, like Gigi and Bella Hadid, glamorously modeling, making millions of dollars, and traveling the world. The other are the unknown models working job to job, facing exploitation and manipulation by their agencies and clients, and trying to make their name in the industry. The mistreatment of models is as old as the industry itself. Skinny, cis, and white models experience this brutal reality. Working as a model is only worse for people of color [POC], LGBTQA+, and immigrants because of the lack of transparency or regulation and rampant misconduct.

New Players

The current push for diversity and inclusion has caused a much higher demand for POC, and LGBTQA+ models with different body types. In recent months, a few new players in the game are building their reputations on accountability and proper treatment of the models and creatives they represent. Three small agencies and one superpower are disrupting the model representation world: New Pandemics, Zandwagon, Community New York, and film and television power player Creative Artists Agency (CAA).
The way modeling deals traditionally work is that a model signs to an agency, such as Next Models, Ford Models, IMG Models, or Wilhelmina Models. The agency provides its models with certain services such as housing, transportation, portfolio shoots, and more. In most cases, anything an agency provides for a model they have to pay back to the agency, often at a high-interest rate. The interest rate means the longer they take to pay it back, the more they owe to the agency.

Although models sign contracts to agencies, they are not considered employees of those agencies and instead are independent contractors who the agency aids in booking jobs. The agencies do not keep models on their payroll. They do control the money that the models earn on a job and how their money models earn is distributed. Bad payment practices reach far beyond the agencies. The agencies are responsible for billing the client right after the model completes their job. Payment for jobs by agencies to their models is notoriously sketchy because clients are not required to pay upfront before shoots and can legally take up to 90 days to settle up. Most agencies take at least a 20% fee out of any money their models make and charge clients a “booking fee,” so for a $1000 job, they would charge $1200 but only pay the model $800. Worst of all, if a client does not pay the agency for work a model did, the agency does not owe the model the money they earned. The common practice in the industry is that the model only gets paid if the agency gets paid.

The film and television management world contrasts the modeling world in many ways. The modeling industry as a whole is riddled with misconduct, manipulation, and poor treatment of models by their agencies and brands. Many modeling agencies use contracts that include fees and costs they can pull out of the model paychecks and use debt, housing, and visas to keep their models dependent.

Agencies in other media such as film, only make money if their clients make money. In film, the percentage is around 10% because of unions. Although, none of these industries are flawless especially considering scandals in the film and tv world with predators like Harvey Weinstein and Matt Lauer.
Creative Artists Agency (CAA) has a long history of representing talents across film, tv, music, and more. In August of 2020, CAA announced their partnership with KCD Worldwide, a fashion services agency, which signaled CAA’s entrance into fashion model management for the first time in the agency’s history. CAA has a strong legacy of representing high-profile individuals and building their careers. They have also stated that they only take a 10% fee out of their models’ earnings, half of the general standard of 20%. Despite their claims for better treatment of models, CAA is not blemish-free when it comes to allegations of abuse and sexual misconduct. Multiple former CAA agents have faced lawsuits.

Additionally, CAA has previously represented multiple people accused of misconduct, including Shia LaBeouf, Chris D’Elia, and Marilyn Mason; all of whom are no longer represented by CAA.
On the opposite end of the spectrum are the smaller boutique agencies mentioned earlier, New Pandemics, Zandwagon, and Community New York. New Pandemics is “a casting and management agency dedicated to increasing LBGTQ+ visibility.”

Zandwagon is “a talent management company that could guide everyday life individuals who are breaking beauty standards daily” according to their website. Community New York is run by Butterfly Cayley, Moe Lamstein, and Richie Keoall, three first-generation immigrants from Laos, and “is founded on inclusivity and progressive values by changing not only the style but the very structure of management.” Cayley, Lamstein, and Keoall have impressive experience at agencies including DNA and Elite Model Management. Community New York now represents stars such as Hunter Schafer, who is well known for her work on the hit HBO show “Euphoria” and is now a brand ambassador for Shiseido.

With small diversity forward agencies up and coming, the existing modeling industry is under attack from all sides. All three of these agencies emphasize how much they value representation and inclusivity in this industry that has avoided breaking societal beauty standards for so long. They also claim they will be different from other agencies and provide better treatment for their clients. These agencies are sending the message that you’re either with them or against them, and they’re willing to think outside of the box to get proper treatment and equity for models from all walks of life.

Same Old Problems

Many of the biggest fashion houses in the world are still reckoning with the #MeToo movement. The fashion industry is known as a highly predatory business. Many of even the largest names in modeling have had to survive people abusing their power on sets and behind the scenes to become who they are. Household names, such as Kate Upton, Coco Rocha, and Cameron Russel, have all spoken out about their experiences with the abuse they’ve experienced while working as models.

Kate Upton spoke out against Paul Marciano in 2018, which led to a total of $500,000 in settlement agreements involving five individuals. He has remained an active participant at GUESS as a board member and chief creative officer, despite resigning from his position as an executive. At the beginning of February, the news broke that Marciano is once again being sued over sexual assault allegations by a woman who has chosen to remain anonymous. The allegations against Marciano are not an isolated incident. Similarly, allegations were brought against Alexander Wang in December of 2020 but began as early as 2017, yet some still chose his side despite the overwhelming corroboration of multiple individuals. If the word of a woman as successful as Kate Upton is not enough to oust a predator from power, it’s unclear what realistically can protect vulnerable individuals with less acclaim from the same experiences or worse.

The silver lining of these allegations coming to light is the industry supporting the individuals coming forward more than ever before. In the past, many models lost their careers before they had even begun due to the actions of predators and the mechanisms powerful people use to silence their victims. Accounts such as @shitmodelmgmt and @dietprada have been using their online platforms to expose predators and condemn their actions openly across Instagram and Twitter. Additionally, the Model Alliance, an organization dedicated to giving models a voice in their work, has also spoken out against Wang on their Instagram saying, “We stand with David Casavant, Owen Mooney, Gia Garison, and all the accusers of @alexanderwangny in their pursuit towards justice.”

The upheaval that began in 2006 with survivor and activist Tarana Burke’s creation of the #MeToo movement has continued into 2021. Slowly but surely survivors are taking their power back and pushing to create real change in media industries that have exploited them for far too long.

Illustration of models by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine

The Ford Foundation’s Darren Walker in Conversation with Andre Leon Talley

The Ford Foundation’s Darren Walker will be interviewed by André Leon Talley on a zoom call Thursday, February 11th at 7:00 pm EST hosted by the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD).

The Ford Foundation’s president Darren Walker and fashion icon André Leon Talley join MAD Interim Director Terry Skoda for a Black History Month special edition of MAD Moments, exploring Walker’s path to the Ford Foundation, his vision for the future of philanthropy, and the role of museums in reimaging who has a seat at the table and a voice in the room.

Closed captioning provided.

ABOUT THE PANELISTS

André Leon Talley was the indomitable creative director at Vogue during the magazine’s rising dominance as the world’s fashion bible. Over the past five decades his byline has appeared in Vanity Fair, HG, and The New York Times. He began his career as an assistant to Diana Vreeland at The Metropolitan Costume Institute, later working at Interview magazine, and as Paris Bureau Chief for Women’s Wear Daily. He is the author of books including two autobiographies, The Chiffon Trenches and ALT, as well as Little Black Dress, A.L.T.:365+, MegaStar, and Oscar de la Renta: His Legendary World of Style. He is also the subject of the documentary The Gospel According to André. Mr. Talley received his MA in French Studies from Brown University and served on the board of trustees for the Savannah College of Art and Design for twenty years.

Darren Walker is president of the Ford Foundation, a $13 billion international social justice philanthropy. He is co-founder and chair of the Presidents’ Council on Disability Inclusion in Philanthropy. Before joining Ford, Darren was vice president at Rockefeller Foundation, overseeing global and domestic programs. In the 1990s, he was COO of the Abyssinian Development Corporation, Harlem’s largest community development organization. Darren co-chairs New York City’s Mayoral Advisory Commission on City Art, Monuments, and Markers, the New York City Census Task Force, and the Governor’s Commission and serves on The Independent Commission on New York City Criminal Justice and Incarceration Reform and UN International Labour Organization Global Commission on the Future of Work. He serves on many boards, including Carnegie Hall, the High Line, VOW to End Child Marriage, the Committee to Protect Journalists, the National Gallery of Art, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is the recipient of 16 honorary degrees and university awards, including Harvard University’s W.E.B. Du Bois Medal. Educated exclusively in public schools, Darren was a member of the first Head Start class in 1965 and graduated from The University of Texas at Austin. He has been included on Time’s annual 100 Most Influential People in the World, Rolling Stone’s 25 People Shaping the Future, Fast Company’s Most Creative People in Business, and OUT Magazine’s Power 50.

Challenger: The Final Flight

By Cassandra Yany

On Wednesday, Netflix released “Challenger: The Final Flight,” a four-episode docuseries about the tragic explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger.

The doc was directed by Daniel Junge and Steven Leckart, and executive produced by JJ Abrams and Glenn Zipper. It provides a complete look at the events leading up to the takeoff and includes interviews with family members of the seven astronauts who died in the explosion.

According to CNN, the series uses archival footage and home videos, along with interviews from officials and crew members to shed light on the poor decision-making and systemic failures that led up to the disaster, as well as the aftermath that followed.

Challenger took off from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral on January 28, 1986. Just 73 seconds after it launched, the shuttle began breaking apart, due to malfunctioning O-rings in the rocket boosters, which hardened as the temperature decreased. NASA had reportedly known about this damaged hardware for months prior, according to Vanity Fair.

The purpose of mission STS-51-L was to deploy a satellite to study the approaching Halley’s Comet, but it had been delayed multiple times because of technical difficulties.

The crew was one of NASA’s most diverse to date, as reported by the New York Post. One of the astronauts was a teacher, so school children across the country watched in class as the shuttle went down, engulfed by a huge, ominous cloud of smoke. The explosion devastated the nation, especially all of the young children who had watched it live.

Nearly thirty-five years later, we remember the passengers who lost their lives on that dreadful day:

Christa McAuliffe

Christa McAuliffe was a teacher at Concord High School in New Hampshire who learned of the Teacher in Space Project— NASA’s plan to fly an educator into space. NASA had hoped that this would help increase public interest in the space shuttle program. 

Along with 11,000 others, McAuliffe applied in 1984 to be the first teacher to communicate with students from space. She was chosen as one of two finalists from New Hampshire, then was selected to be part of the STS-51-L crew by a Review Panel in Washington, D.C.

McAuliffe took a year off from teaching to train for the space shuttle mission. While in orbit, she was planning to conduct experiments in chromatography, hydroponics, magnetism and Newton’s laws. She also would have taught two 15-minute classes— one providing a tour of the spacecraft, the other about the benefits of space travel— which would have been broadcasted to students on closed-circuit TV. 

The nationwide excitement of having McAuliffe in space was a significant reason why the explosion had such a lasting impact on the country, and was especially upsetting for young students who watched the takeoff or extensive coverage in class. 

Gregory Jarvis

Gregory Jarvis was an engineer for Hughes Aircraft who served as Payload Specialist 2 on Challenger. In 1984, he was one of two employees from the company that were selected for the Space Shuttle program. 

Jarvis was originally supposed to make his shuttle flight in April 1985, but was rescheduled to early January 1986, then rescheduled again, landing him a spot on the STS-51-L crew. From space, he planned to conduct experiments on the effects of weightlessness on fluids. 

Dick Scobee

Dick Scobee earned his pilot wings in 1966 and served as a combat aviator in the Vietnam War, for which he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal.

After the war, Scobee graduated from the USAF Aerospace Research Pilot School and became an Air Force test pilot. He was the commander on Challenger and died a lieutenant colonel.

Judith Resnik

After graduating from Carnegie Mellon, Judith Resnik worked as a design engineer in missile and radar projects at RCA (Radio Corporation of America). There, she performed circuit design for the missile and surface radar division. She later developed electronics and software for NASA’s sounding rocket and telemetry systems programs. 

Resnik qualified as a professional aircraft pilot in 1977 and was recruited into the NASA Astronaut Corps in 1978. She was one of six women selected for the program out of 8,000 applicants. At NASA, and piloted the Northrop T-38 Talon, trained intensely, conducted research, and developed different systems and software. 

Resnik served as a mission specialist on the maiden voyage of Discovery in 1984 for her first space flight from August to September. During this flight, she operated a shuttle’s robotic arm (which she created), and deployed and conducted experiments on a solar array wing to determine if there was a way to generate additional electric power during missions. She was the second American woman in space and the first Jewish woman in space. 

Resnik was a mission specialist on Challenger. After the explosion, further examination of the cockpit shows that her Personal Egress Air Pack was activated, indicating that she may have been alive after the cockpit separated from the vehicle to activate it. Her body was the first to be recovered from the crash by Navy divers. 

Ellison Onizuka

Ellison Onizuka served as a flight test engineer and test pilot for the U.S. Air Force in the early 1970s. After attending the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School from 1974 to 1975, he became a squadron flight test engineer there and worked as a manager for engineering support in the training resources division. 

In 1978, Onizuka was selected for the astronaut program and later worked in the experimentation team, orbiter test team, and launch support screw for the STS-1 and STS-2. At NASA he also worked on the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory test and revision software team. 

Onizzuka’s first space mission was one year before the Challenger explosion, on the mission STS-51-C on the shuttle Discovery. This was the first space shuttle mission for the Department of Defense, and he became the first Asian American to reach space. 

Onizuka was a mission specialist aboard Challenger. Similar to Resnik, it is speculated that he could have been alive when the cockpit separated from the vehicle because his Personal Egress Air Pack was also activated. When he died, he held the position of lieutenant colonel, but was later promoted to the rank of colonel. 

Ronald McNair

Ronald McNair received his Ph.D. in Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1976 and became nationally recognized for his work in laser physics. After graduation, he worked as a staff physicist at the Hugh Research Lab in Malibu, CA. 

McNair was one of the ten thousand applicants to be selected in 1978 for the NASA astronaut program. He became the second African American astronaut in 1984 when he flew as a mission specialist for STS-41-B on Challenger from Feb. 3-11. 

McNair later served as a mission specialist for STS-51-L. During this flight, he had planned to record the saxophone solo for a song he had worked on with composer Jean-Michel Jarre for his upcoming album Rendez-Vous. This would have been the first original piece of music to be recorded in space. 

McNair was also supposed to participate in Jarre’s Rendez-Vous Houston concert through a live feed from Challenger. To honor McNair, Jarre dedicated the last song on the album to him and subtitled it “Ron’s Piece.”

Michael J. Smith

Michael J. Smith served in the Vietnam War, then attended U.S. naval Test Pilot School. After graduation, he was assigned to the Strike Aircraft Test Directorate at NAS Patuxent River in Maryland, where he worked on the A-6E TRAM and Cruise missile guidance systems. In 1976, later returned to NTPS for 18 months as an instructor. 

Smith was selected for the astronaut program in May 1980, in which he served as a commander in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory, the Deputy Chief of Aircraft Operations, the Technical Assistant to the Director, and the Flights Operations Directorate. 

Smith was the pilot for Challenger, and was set to pilot another mission the following fall. His voice was the last heard on the flight deck tape recorder with his final words being “Uh oh.”

All seven passengers were awarded with the Congressional Space Medal of Honor in 2004.

BANKS shares “Contaminated” video

BANKS shares the lyric video for the haunting track “Contaminated.” View it HERE.

The track is featured on BANKS’ third album, III, which debuted to widespread critical acclaim last month. Zane Lowe first debuted the song as a World First on Apple Music’s Beats 1. BANKS recorded “Contaminated” in Los Angeles, collaborating with producer BJ Burton (Bon Iver, Francis and the Lights). Rolling Stone called the track “infectious” while Billboard noted “‘Contaminated,’…a heavy synth-based melody juxtaposed by the songstress’ signature airy vocals to detail the draining and heartbreaking process of being with someone not healthy for you.”

“‘Contaminated’ is about being addicted to a toxic relationship. The more you give, the less of yourself you become,” says BANKS. BANKS further discusses III in feature articles running in TIME Magazine, Harper’s BAZAAR, Vanity Fair, V Magazine and elsewhere. III is her highest-charting album to date on Billboard’s Top Album Sales tally, debuting at No. 3. It came in at No. 1 on the Internet Albums tally, No. 2 on the Current Alternative Albums and Current Pop Albums charts and No. 9 on the Digital Albums chart. Songs from III have accumulated over 50 million streams alone. She’ll support the album with an extensive headline tour, which kicks off on September 3 at REBEL in Toronto.

The III Tour will include two sold-out shows at Brooklyn Steel (with a third night on sale now) and an October 1 concert at the Hollywood Palladium in Los Angeles. Tickets and VIP packages are on sale now. BANKS will also perform at such festivals as Music Midtown in Atlanta, Life is Beautiful in Las Vegas and Austin City Limits. See below for full list of North American/UK/EU dates.

   BANKS – THE III TOUR Dates here.

New York Reality Shows

New York is an exceptional city and its essence has been immortalized in Michael Montgomery’s iconic song New York, New York. Its unmistakable skyline is recognizable in countless movies and TV shows and has become home to record-setting, rating-grabbling reality TV shows. Just like the hugely successful Million Dollar Listing Los Angeles featured previously on 360 Magazine, the following rank as the top three and most popular of their respective franchises under reality TV shows based in New York.

Say Yes to The Dress

TLC’s famous reality show, which debuted in 2007, revolves around New York’s swanky bridal salon, Kleinfeld, owned by Mara Urshel and Ronald Rothstein. The show follows soon-to-be brides in choosing their dream wedding dress. While accompanied by friends and family, they are waited on by the store’s consultants and fitters. To be featured on the show, future brides must provide countless personal details, including the fiancée’s occupation and information about the upcoming wedding for dramatic purposes.

Due to the success of the show, Kleinfeld has become a tourist hotspot with fans flocking from all over to check out the store and try on dresses despite upcoming marriage plans. In-person, the store appears quite different than on the show, with the small salon packed with 20 or so brides crowding for dresses. With only 90 minutes to choose the perfect dress, brides who aren’t even in front of the camera feel the pressure.

Million Dollar Listing New York

In its seventh season, Bravo’s popular New York real-estate reality TV program features what it truly means to sell high-priced New York City properties. Hosted by New York brokers Fredrik Eklund, Ryan Serhant and Steve Gold, the series has become a massive hit with viewers who live vicariously through the show and dream of owning a high-end New York apartment. With the wide exposure, the show has seen the hosts’ careers fast-tracked immensely. As for Ryan Serhant and Steve Gold, it has brought both fame and fortune.

Serhant was ranked 15th on The Real Deal’s top agents when the show debuted in 2012, and is now listed as number 1 for Manhattan closed deals. With Manhattan apartments getting more expensive each year, broker commissions have also soared. Yoreevo reports that New York commissions have gone up 50% in the last decade despite the increased information transparency. It’s no wonder that the show’s exposure has exponentially benefitted the trio – Steve Gold landing a job with coveted brokerage firm, Corcoran Group.

The Real Housewives of New York

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In what has been described as 10 seasons of catfights, wine swigging, and backstabbing, the Bravo show’s popularity stems from its intentional and unintentional humor. The Real Housewives of New York (RHONY) features 7 female socialites while focusing on their personal and professional lives. Originally a spin-off of The Real Housewives of Orange County, the 13th season premiered July 16. Executive producer, Andy Cohen told Vanity Fair that the show “…is stuff no one could script. It’d be considered too absurd.” This is exactly what the series feels like, absurd, with storylines that often defy belief. Although, it was RHONY’s mercurial cast and over-the-top drama which has propelled the franchise to the grand following it has today.

MARKUS KLINKO × “2000s”

Markus Klinko

Award-Winning Fashion and Celebrity Photographer,

Presents a Decade of World-Renowned Work in “2000s The Exhibition”

Mouche Gallery, Beverly Hills

Beyonce “Dangerously in Love” Album Cover (2003) by Markus Klinko All Rights Reserved 2018

Exhibition Presents June 15 through June 30, 2018

Award-winning fashion, celebrity photographer and director Markus Klinko is pleased to present “2000s”, an exclusive exhibition featuring the decade’s most iconic photographic images. The gallery has partnered with FujiFilm and will host several in-gallery artist appearances: Saturday, June 16th from 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm, Saturday June 23rd from 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm and Saturday June 30th, 2018 from 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm at Mouche Gallery 340 N Beverly Dr., Beverly Hills, CA 90210.

For me, this collection goes beyond celebrity photography and more so defines a greater cultural connection. The early 2000’s was a very influential time of fashion, music, and entertainment that we are seeing resurface today. Being able to capture it photographically gives us a window into our past and it how it has helped form our future.” – Markus Klinko

Klinko and his subjects

Throughout the years, Markus Klinko has become one of the most recognizable celebrity photographers across the globe. For his upcoming exhibition, “2000s”, Mouche Gallery has assembled a collection of famous images from his archives. The collection depicts a variety of pop culture milestones that have truly defined the decade of the early 2000’s. Highlighted works include: Beyonce’s Dangerously in Love album cover; a series of Mary J. Blige album covers documenting her meteoric rise to superstardom; and images from Klinko’s wildly successful David Bowie Unseen international exhibition. With these works and more to see, Klinko can be credited for capturing some of the most legendary moments in each of his subject’s careers.

David Bowie “Heathen” Album Cover (2002) by Markus Klinko Ó All Rights Reserved 2018

Klinko’s works were recently displayed in a New York Subway station with a large-scale photographic installation and interactive displays celebrating the late, great David Bowie. The installation was unveiled earlier this month and runs until May 13. It coincides with the opening of Bowie Is – an exhibition celebrating the musician’s contribution to popular culture – at the Brooklyn Museum.

The centerpiece of the takeover was an installation that stretched across 30 metal ‘L beams’ and was seen at either end of the station from steps leading down to the platform. It features black-and-white photographs of Bowie as the Thin White Duke – a persona he adopted in the mid- 1970s and taken by Masayoshi Sukita and Markus Klinko.

INSTALLATION NYC SUBWAY 2018

As David Bowie’s and Iman’s photographer for over 15 years, Klinko’s client list reads as a who’s who of Hollywood royalty. Other notable pop culture icons that will be featured in the exhibit include: Jennifer Lopez, Christina Aguilera, Britney Spears, Kim Kardashian, Naomi Campbell, Kelis, Pharrell Williams, Kanye West and more.

“Mouche Gallery in Beverly Hills is honored to present this exhibition in collaboration with FUJIFILM North America Corporation, and is thrilled to add Markus Klinko to its prestigious roster of internationally acclaimed photographers. We look forward to continuing the tradition of featuring museum quality art and photographs at the forefront of culture.” – Keiko Noah, Gallerist & Principal: Mouche Gallery

Made possible by FUJIFILM North America Corporation, “2000s” will feature a rare retrospective collection of select cameras and lenses used by Klinko to photograph these images and will be installed at Mouche Gallery. As one of the earliest adopters of digital post-production, Klinko pioneered a style that widely influenced trends in current fashion and celebrity photography. Klinko credits his usage of the FUJIFILM GX680III, a 6x8cm medium format system, in conjunction with FUJICHROME PROVIA 100F for the vibrant palette and exceptionally high resolution of his work. In 2001, Klinko also started shooting with the FUJIFILM FinePix S1 Pro, the early predecessor of the current line of the FUJIFILM X Series and GFX system. A previously unseen series of new images, taken in 2018 with the FUJIFILM GFX medium format mirrorless system, will be unveiled on June 14th, featuring re-emerging signature ’00s staples, connecting his works from past and present. All of Klinko’s works to be featured in “2000’s” were created with FUJIFILM cameras and/or film products.

Given the exhibition’s fashion and celebrity culture focus, thirteen of Klinko’s most celebrated images will be sold via Paddle8 (http://www.paddle8.com/auction/cfda) to benefit the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) Foundation to help support its programs dedicated to fashion education and professional development. To learn more about the CFDA, please visit the organization’s website at www.CFDA.com

For more information on photographer Markus Klinko, please visit his website at www.markusklinkostudio.com or follow him @MarkusAndKoala on Instagram.

To learn more about FUJIFILM North America Corporation, please visit their website at www.FUJIFILMXGFX.com or follow Fujifilm at www.twitter.com/FujifilmX_US, www.facebook.com/FujifilmXUS, and www.instagram.com/FujifilmX_US.

To learn more about Mouche Gallery and to meet the world-renowned photographer and visit this once-in-a-lifetime Collection: “2000s The Exhibition” in Beverly Hills, please visit Mouche at www.mouchegallery.com.

ALL WORKS ON EXHIBITION & AVAILABLE FOR ACQUISITION

WITH IN-GALLERY APPEARANCES BY MARKUS KLINKO ON

SATURDAY, JUNE 16th 4:00-7:00PM PST

SATURDAY, JUNE 23rd 2:00-5:00PM PST

SATURDAY, JUNE 30TH 4:00-7:00PM PST

MOUCHE GALLERY

340 N. Beverly Drive

Beverly Hills, CA 90210

All appearances are complimentary and open to the public: RSVP’s strongly suggested.

For more information, please contact Keiko Noah at:

(310) 858-8114 or

RSVP @ info@mouchegallery.com

http://mouchegallery.com

All Images Courtesy of Markus Klinko. All Rights Reserved 2018. For Editorial Usage Only. No Commercial Usage Allowed.

Image: Markus Klinko 2018 Los Angeles

ABOUT MARKUS KLINKO:

Markus Klinko is an award-winning, international fashion/celebrity photographer and director, who has worked with many of today’s most iconic stars of film, music, and fashion.

Klinko has photographed Beyonce, Lady Gaga, David Bowie, Jennifer Lopez, Britney Spears, Mary J. Blige, Mariah Carey, Kanye West, Anne Hathaway, Kate Winslet, Will Smith, Eva Mendes, Kim Kardashian, Naomi Campbell, and Iman. His editorial clients include Vogue, GQ, Vanity Fair, Harper’s Bazaar, and Interview. Brands such as Lancôme, L’Oréal Paris, Nike, Hugo Boss, Anna Sui, Pepsi, Skyy Vodka, and Remy Martin have hired Klinko to create advertising campaigns. His campaign for Keep A Child Alive raised over one million dollars for children with AIDS in just 3 days.

Born in Switzerland of French, Italian, Jewish, and Hungarian descent, Klinko spent his early years training to become a classical harp soloist. He studied at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique in Paris. Later, Klinko signed an exclusive recording contract with EMI Classics, as well as a management contract with Columbia Artists Management. He received the Grand Prix de Disque for his recording of French harp music, with members of the orchestra of the Paris Opera Bastille. Klinko performed in recitals and as a featured soloist with symphony orchestras around the world. He was also regularly featured in such publications as Vogue Italia, Vanity Fair, GQ, The New York Times, Madame Figaro, Stereo Review, and Ongaku no Tomo.

After a hand injury, Klinko decided to become a fashion photographer and retired from his international concert and recording career. During that time, he met Indrani, who later became a regular collaborator in her role as his studio’s digital post production artist and photo editor.

Isabella Blow discovered Klinko’s work while at the London Sunday Times and commissioned cover stories from the emerging photographer. Around the same time, Ingrid Sischy, at Interview magazine hired Klinko for various shoots. Iman and David Bowie followed, giving the up and coming photographer a chance to photograph them for their respective book (I am Iman) and album covers (Heathen).

From there, he went on to create some of the most iconic album covers of his time, including Beyonce’s Dangerously in Love, and Mariah Carey’s The Emancipation of Mimi.

Many of Klinko’s famous celebrity photographs can be seen in his coffee table book ICONS (Perseus). Lincoln Center in New York presented an art exhibit showcasing many prints from the book and since, art galleries and museums in Europe (Opera Gallery, Monaco) and the USA (National Portrait Gallery, Washington) have featured his work.

Amazon Echo Look at NYFW with Prabal Gurung and Bella Hadid

Fashion Week went well! Below are photos from a first of its kind partnership between Prabal Gurung and Amazon Echo Look. On Sunday, they used Echo Look to create a digital version of the look book for Prabal’s (incredible) Fall 2018 collection. Enclosed you can see the images the device took of Bella Hadid along with several other models, as well as an image of Prabal being interviewed by E! – note that these have not been retouched, enhanced or otherwise altered. This partnership is an incredible example of the growing overlap between fashion and technology.

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PRINCESS CYD

A Film by Stephen Cone
Watch the trailer

“As kind a movie as there was [last] year. Cone quietly asserts himself as a major talent. How heartening to see big topics – like faith, like sexuality – discussed in such warm, considerate terms by two such gifted actresses.”
– Richard Lawson, VANITY FAIR

Princess Cyd is a wonderful movie to live in; it’s full of hope and empathy, as are its two leads. This is a film that believes finding joy in each other is not just what we should do, but what we are naturally inclined to do.”
– Emily Yoshida, VULTURE

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“Cone’s gift with ensembles puts him in rare company with directors like Jonathan Demme and Jean Renoir.”

Sheila O’Malley, ROGER EBERT. COM

“Anchored by complicated, smart, funny women, Princess Cyd is a rare delight.”

Jude Dry, INDIEWIRE

Synopsis:16-year-old Cyd (Jessie Pinnick) decides to take a break from her depressive single father and spend a summer in Chicago with her aunt Miranda (Rebecca Spence), a well-known novelist. Soon after her arrival, Cyd encounters Katie (Malic White), a young barista behind the counter. The two make plans to meet up after Katie’s shift and a new, charged relationship begins. The Chicago landscape expands, and we navigate intimate and fragile moments between Cyd and Katie as they explore their new attraction. Miranda functions as a counterpart to young Cyd’s new explorations of sexuality and love, and as the summer continues they develop a strong relationship founded on a shared openness and healthy criticism of particular personal moments.

Sensitive to the contradictions and confusion of the ever-changing self, Stephen Cone has created a film that reimagines that distinct summer feeling when adolescence creeps in, skin is bared, emotions emerge, and everything begins to feel more complicated.

Director: Stephen Cone
Writer: Stephen Cone
Cast: Rebecca Spence, Jessie Pinnick, Malic White, James Vincent Meredith, Tyler Ross, Matthew Quattrocki
Composer: Heather McIntosh
Director of Photography: Zoe White
TRT: 96
min.
Distributor: Wolfe Releasing

PRINCESS CYD is now available to stream on Netflix

Simonetta Lein

Simonetta Lein, “The Celebrity Wishmaker,” Author, Top 100 Influencers in the world, Named Fashion Icon, and Millennial-Activist

Founder of The Wishwall Foundation www.thewishwallfoundation.org #Ihelpwishescometrue.


Ms. Simonetta Lein boasts an enormous list of accomplishments, such as to be considered one of the top 100 influencer in the world, names social media icon by the Entrepreneur Magazine, best-selling author, television and radio personality, international fashion and lifestyle influencer and named fashion icon, brand ambassador, entrepreneur and philanthropist to name a few. But one of her most treasured accomplishments is the establishment of her charitable organization, The Wishwall Foundation.

The foundation is a space allowing people from across the world to post their deepest wish or desire on the website’s “Wishwall.” Simonetta, “The Wishmaker,” along with her global network, take those wishes and make incredible dreams come true. Through celebrity interviews, fashion shows and other special events, Simonetta brings people into a world that they would not normally have access to. Through stories that people share with Simonetta on her blog at the Hu Post, she educates, motivates and empowers people and fashion.

Simonetta is a story teller; her rst novel was inspired by the power of dreams. From a simple actress, hostess and radio speaker working for others – she poured herself into helping and encouraging women and branding herself as “The Wishmaker,” making the hopes and dreams of others attainable. Simonetta is passionate about making this world a better place and empowering women to work hard and make their own dreams a reality. She is selective in collaborating with brands that will always give her readers her message.

With a focus on educating and inspiring others and making wishes come true, Simonetta writes novels and articles, hosts events, and can be booked as a speaker as well. With more than 1.5 million followers across all digital platforms, “The Wishmaker” has been a columnist for Vanity Fair Italy and is currently a contributing fashion and lifestyle journalist for the Huffington Post and D La Repubblica, a top fashion Italian magazine. She collaborates as a fashion icon with Marie Claire Italy. She has served as a Brand Ambassador to several of Italy’s top luxury fashion, accessory and beauty brands; and she has collaborated with some of the world’s top photographers, including Giovanni Gastel and Bruno Oliviero.

Simonetta is the 9th most influential personality in Philadelphia and is truly a Millennial social media expert, empowering her generation and advocating for women. People can share their wishes on her blog and using the “pay it forward” philosophy, receive and provide help. The Wishmaker’s work is supported by many celebrities and she works in entertainment to invest in people. Her motto is: GIVE DREAMS A CHANCE!


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