Posts tagged with "museums"

Art by Kaelen for use by 360 Magazine

Wonderworks New Exhibit Good Vibrations

Good Vibrations – WonderWorks Orlando New Exhibit on Earthquakes Named by Teachers during Teacher Appreciation Month

WonderWorks Orlando has an array of exhibits that help educate people about science. And it’s latest exhibit on earthquakes called Good Vibrations, opens May 28th. Good Vibrations will spotlight Tuckaleechee Caverns, and how they document seismic activity around the world. The new exhibit was a topic request from educators, so it seemed appropriate that they also name the exhibit.  Teachers are invited to see this exhibit for free during WonderWorks Teacher Appreciation Month celebration.

This is a fascinating new exhibit about earthquakes and all types of tectonic movement around the globe, says Brian Wayne, general manager of WonderWorks Orlando. It’s a great time for teachers to stop in and check it out and enjoy some time exploring all we have to offer.

The Tuckaleechee Caverns are located deep under the Smoky Mountains, in Townsend, Tenn. People can visit the caverns, but they also play an important role in the safety of our country. They have the most sensitive seismic station on Earth, accurately and precisely tracking tectonic movement all around the planet. The information collected includes activity from earthquakes and even when nuclear weapons are being tested. 

Once the information is collected, it is quickly transmitted directly to the Department of Defense; Geneva, Switzerland; and Vienna, Austria. The information is obtained and shared so quickly that it’s passed on within 300ths of a millisecond. Visitors will learn about the important natural wonder that gathers so much information around the world. 

Good Vibrations meets educational standards for learning about earthquakes and seismic activity. As a way to celebrate teachers and support staff during Teacher Appreciation Month, both teachers and support staff will receive free admission during May 2021 by showing a valid school ID. Additionally, up to four of their accompanying guests will receive 50% off admission.

“We are excited to invite teachers, support staff, and their families this month, as well as others, to check out the new Earthquake exhibit,” added Wayne. “This exhibit will surprise you and make you want to plan a trip to the Tuckaleechee Caverns.”

Additional on-site and community programs include the WonderWorks WonderKids event, virtual learning labs, FLO-Art Florida Youth Art Gallery, science fair partnerships, online science information and worksheets and a homeschool program. WonderWorks Orlando also offers various STEM activities, including virtual learning labs, on-site exhibits, activities and more. To learn more about the programs offered at WonderWorks Orlando, visit their website.

To get additional information about Teacher Appreciation Month, visit the site here.

Due to the continued county-wide mask restriction in Orlando, guests will need to bring one with them or buy one upon arrival. WonderWorks has COVID-19 safety protocols, including reduced capacity and hours, enhanced cleaning efforts, social distancing measures, hand sanitizer stations, employee health screenings and employee personal protective equipment (PPE). Guests are encouraged to review all safety rules before their visit on the web page devoted to COVID-19 here

About WonderWorks

WonderWorks, the upside-down adventure, is a science-focused indoor amusement park for the mind that holds something unique and exciting for visitors of all ages. Guests enter through an upside-down lobby with the ceiling at their feet and the ground above their head and must pass through an inversion tunnel to turn right side up. There are three floors of nonstop edu-tainment, with over 100 hands-on and interactive exhibits that serve a STEM educational purpose to challenge the mind and spark the imagination. WonderWorks Orlando is also home to The Outta Control Magic Comedy Dinner Show. WonderWorks is located in Orlando, Pigeon Forge, Myrtle Beach, Panama City Beach, Syracuse and Branson. For more information, visit their website.

Art by Heather Skovlund for use by 360 Magazine

Microsoft Partners with UHHM

MICROSOFT EXPANDS PARTNERSHIP WITH THE UNIVERSAL HIP HOP MUSEUM THROUGH A $5 MILLION GIFT AS PART OF ITS AI FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE PROGRAM

MICROSOFT WILL CELEBRATE THE PARTNERSHIP AT THE OFFICIAL GROUNDBREAKING CEREMONY FOR THE UHHM ON MAY 20th

Today, the Universal Hip Hop Museum (UHHM) is excited to announce their expanded partnership with Microsoft, as the leading global technology company gifts the museum $5,000,000 on behalf of their AI for Cultural Heritage program. Microsoft’s AI for Cultural Heritage program leverages the power of artificial intelligence (AI) to empower people and organizations dedicated to the preservation and enrichment of cultural heritage. Through this partnership, Microsoft will become the Official Technology Partner of the UHHM to help empower the museum’s mission of celebrating and preserving the history of local and global Hip Hop music and culture to inspire, empower, and promote understanding.

“Preserving the history of Hip Hop, celebrating the cultural contributions of the pioneers who paved the way for today’s Hip Hop generation to thrive and flourish, and promoting the positive economic and social aspects of Hip Hop have been the sole focus of the UHHM for the past decade,” said Universal Hip Hop Museum Executive Director, Rocky Bucano.

With the use of advanced technology, such as AI, Microsoft will work together with the UHHM to ensure the museum has the resources and platforms it needs to become the state-of-the-art institution they have envisioned. This partnership will allow the UHHM to design immersive experiences which will engage global audiences both today and well into the future.

“Since its birth in the Bronx almost fifty years ago, innovators have harnessed creativity and technology to evolve and grow Hip Hop into one of today’s most celebrated musical, artistic, and cultural influences,” said Brad Smith, President of Microsoft. “As a proud supporter and official technology partner of the Universal Hip Hop Museum, we’re incredibly excited about the role that Microsoft technology will play to help document, preserve, and tell this uniquely American story to the world.” 

This donation builds on a long-standing relationship between Microsoft and the UHHM who initially partnered together in 2016 to co-host envisioning sessions that helped shape the museum’s future vision. In 2019, Microsoft and the UHHM collaborated with MIT Professor Dr. Fox Harrell, to bring to life “Breakbeat Narratives” – an experience using artificial intelligence to explore the rich history of Hip Hop music – which is currently on display at the [R]Evolution of Hip Hop, an exhibition designed to give Hip Hop lovers a sneak peek of the Universal Hip Hop Museum. 

The Microsoft partnership will be celebrated on Thursday, May 20, 2021, during the official groundbreaking ceremony at Bronx Point, the future home of the Universal Hip Hop Museum. 

About the Universal Hip Hop Museum

Anchored in the birthplace of Hip Hop culture, the Universal Hip Hop Museum will break ground in the Bronx in 2021. Built as a space for audiences, artists, and technology to converge and create unparalleled educational and entertainment experiences, the museum is slated to open in Bronx Point in 2024. The UHHM will celebrate and preserve the history of local and global Hip Hop music and culture past, present, and future. 

About Microsoft AI Cultural Heritage

Microsoft’s AI for Cultural Heritage program leverages the power of AI to empower people and organizations dedicated to the preservation and enrichment of cultural heritage. Microsoft has committed $10 million over five years to expand access to Microsoft Azure and AI resources, focused on celebrating the people who have made a significant impact throughout history, using digital tools to preserve important monuments and sites for future generations to explore, engaging with communities around the world for language preservation, and creating ways for collections and archives to be more easily accessed and enjoyed. By harnessing the latest tools in ways that support an environment rich in diversity, perspectives, and learnings from the past, and sharing that knowledge and experience to be shared with the rest of the world, every society benefits.

Spiro illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Spiro Exhibition

Ancient Mysteries Revealed: Groundbreaking Spiro Exhibition to Debut at The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum

The Spiro site contained one of the greatest collections of prehistoric American Indian artifacts ever discovered in the United States.

The Spiro Mounds are one of the United States’ most important ancient Native American sites, as well as an archaeological find unmatched in modern times. Yet, despite creating a sophisticated ancient culture, the Spiro people are nearly forgotten in the pages of history books. How did these incredible works of art and other treasures from all over North America end up hidden for hundreds of years, and why? Opening February 12, 2021 at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, “Spiro and the Art of the Mississippian World” will seek to answer these questions and more in the first major presentation on the Spiro Mounds ever undertaken by a museum, representing the first, and possibly last, time these artifacts will be reunited from various collections across the country.

“We are incredibly pleased to announce this unparalleled exhibition, which will give proper honor and representation to the culture and historical impact of the Spiro people,” said Natalie Shirley, The Cowboy president and CEO. “Our staff has worked for years to create a world-class, exciting and collaborative presentation of a people who have been overlooked for too long.”

This exhibition will share the art, history and culture of the Spiro people through approx. 175 objects, as well as an accompanying publication, website, public symposium and panel discussion. It was created in collaboration with representatives from the Caddo and Wichita Nations, the descendants of the Spiroan people, and with contributions by 17 humanities scholars from nearly a dozen universities and museums from across the United States.

The Spiro Mounds were the location of one of the largest and longest episodes of looting at any American archaeological site in history—comparable to that of Mesa Verde in Colorado and, sadly, several others across the country. Both looting and New Deal/Works Progress Administration (WPA) archaeological excavations came together in a near-perfect storm at Spiro. In 1935, the public’s imagination was peaked when the Kansas City Star called the site’s discovery a “King Tut’s Tomb in the Arkansas Valley,” and identified it as the greatest source of Mississippian iconographic material ever found. Embossed copper plates, wooden sculptures, thousands of pearls and beads, large human effigy pipes and engraved shell gorgets and cups are just some of the items found at Spiro. In fact, nearly 90% of all known engraved shell created during the Mississippian period (900 – 1650 AD) was discovered at this one site. This exhibition will include the reunification of a range of items looted and archaeologically excavated at Spiro that have not been together since the early 1930s and 1940s.

“The quality and quantity of material found at Spiro is unprecedented,” said Eric Singleton, Ph.D., Museum Curator of Ethnology. “We are grateful to have the support of the Spiroan descendants, the Caddo Nation and the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes, as we prepare this exhibition. Without them, this exhibition would not be possible.”

The Spiroan people, along with other Mississippian groups across the eastern half of North America, created a world equal to that of the Aztec, Maya or Inca, consisting of trade networks and highly developed social, political and religious centers. The exhibition will explore the archaeology and history of Spiro and its relationship to other contemporaneous Indigenous communities in North and Central America, highlighting community development, religious and ceremonial activities, farming and hunting practices and daily life. It will also illustrate how ecological factors, specifically the occurrence of the “Little Ice Age” beginning in 1350 AD and lasting until 1650 AD may have led to the site’s decline and ultimate abandonment. The exhibition also showcases contemporary Indigenous art pieces that explore the ideas of origin and connect the art and artistry of the Spiro people to their modern descendants.

Following the exhibition, the online component and educational materials will be available on the Museum’s website and in our permanent Native American gallery. In addition, the Museum will give both the Caddo and Wichita Nations all interpretative materials to use at their discretion in their respective tribal museums.

The exhibition will debut at National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum February 12 – May 9, 2021, before traveling to the Birmingham Museum of Art (October 5, 2021 – March 11, 2022) in Birmingham Alabama, and the Dallas Museum of Art (April 15, 2022 – August 5, 2022), in Dallas Texas.

Visit Spiro Mounds for more information, including photos, maps and a calendar of associated programming.

The Spiro and the Art of the Mississippian World has been made possible in part by major grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Henry Luce Foundation, as well as support from the Kirkpatrick Foundation.

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this press release do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

About the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum

The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City is America’s premier institution of Western history, art and culture. Founded in 1955, the Museum collects, preserves and exhibits an internationally renowned collection of Western art and artifacts while sponsoring dynamic educational programs to stimulate interest in the enduring legacy of the American West. For more information, visit the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum.

travel illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Japan’s Most Unique Museums

With an incredibly rich history, it’s no wonder that Japan has more than 5,700 museums across its 47 prefectures; and with so many to choose from, travelers are bound to find some unexpected surprises among them. Below are some of Japan’s most interesting museums that travelers can visit, once travel restrictions are lifted.

Cup Noodles Museum – Kanagawa Prefecture
A fun destination for kids and adults, the Cup Noodles Museum in Kanagawa Prefecture is full of exciting activities. Along with interesting exhibitions, such as a replica of the shed where instant noodles were invented and a small collection of modern art pieces made from Cup Noodles, visitors can make their own personalized cup noodle at the My Cup Noodles Factory. At the My Chicken Ramen workshop, guests can make their own instant ramen noodles from scratch. The Noodles Bazaar also gives visitors a chance to try out nine different noodle dishes.

Towel Museum of Art – Ehime Prefecture
An incredibly unique institution, the Towel Museum of Art in Ehime Prefecture is the world’s first towel museum dedicated to the art of towel manufacturing. Inside, visitors can find galleries and displays showcasing intricate traditional towels, art made from towels and an exhibition on the towel-making process. The museum gift shop features a wide array of original goods and local products available for purchase.

TOTO Museum – Fukuoka Prefecture
Japan’s famous TOTO brand is best known for its bathware and in celebration of its 100th anniversary, the TOTO Museum was opened in 2017. The elegant two-story building leads visitors through the history of TOTO, especially focusing on the evolution of its toilets. From the first ceramic flush toilet seat that was developed in 1914, to modern toilets with bidets and heated seats, guests can learn about the company’s evolution, spanning more than a decade. While the museum’s signage is in Japanese, visitors can download the museum’s app for an English audio guide or to translate the signs.

Omiya Bonsai Art Museum – Saitama Prefecture
Located in the heart of the Omiya Bonsai Village, the Omiya Bonsai Art Museum is home to more than 120 bonsai masterpieces and bonsai-related artifacts, such as woodblock prints, books, bonsai pots and more. Art pieces are selected in accordance with the season and around 50 pots of bonsai are always on display in the garden and gallery. After visiting the museum, travelers can wander around the village and check out local artisans and stores. The village was originally founded in 1925 when the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 forced bonsai nurseries and garden industry workers in central Tokyo to relocate.

Yokote Masuda Manga Museum – Akita Prefecture
The first manga-themed museum in Japan, the Yokote Masuda Manga Museum showcases the artwork from manga artists across Japan and the world. The museum houses around 400,000 original illustrations from around 100 artists in the permanent exhibitions. The museum also pays honor to the works of Takao Yaguchi, whose work helped highlight Akita Prefecture and attracted visitors. Guests can enjoy a large library of manga and read to their heart’s content for free.

For updates on travel restrictions to Japan, please visit this website.

ABOUT JAPAN NATIONAL TOURISM ORGANIZATION (JNTO)

As the official tourism board of Japan, JNTO is involved in a wide range of promotional activities to encourage international travelers to visit Japan. Through a variety of campaigns and initiatives, JNTO is inspiring more American travelers to visit Tokyo, Kyoto and beyond.

For more information about travel to Japan, visit JNTO on its WebsiteFacebookInstagram and Twitter.

The Ford Foundation’s Darren Walker in Conversation with Andre Leon Talley

The Ford Foundation’s Darren Walker will be interviewed by André Leon Talley on a zoom call Thursday, February 11th at 7:00 pm EST hosted by the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD).

The Ford Foundation’s president Darren Walker and fashion icon André Leon Talley join MAD Interim Director Terry Skoda for a Black History Month special edition of MAD Moments, exploring Walker’s path to the Ford Foundation, his vision for the future of philanthropy, and the role of museums in reimaging who has a seat at the table and a voice in the room.

Closed captioning provided.

ABOUT THE PANELISTS

André Leon Talley was the indomitable creative director at Vogue during the magazine’s rising dominance as the world’s fashion bible. Over the past five decades his byline has appeared in Vanity Fair, HG, and The New York Times. He began his career as an assistant to Diana Vreeland at The Metropolitan Costume Institute, later working at Interview magazine, and as Paris Bureau Chief for Women’s Wear Daily. He is the author of books including two autobiographies, The Chiffon Trenches and ALT, as well as Little Black Dress, A.L.T.:365+, MegaStar, and Oscar de la Renta: His Legendary World of Style. He is also the subject of the documentary The Gospel According to André. Mr. Talley received his MA in French Studies from Brown University and served on the board of trustees for the Savannah College of Art and Design for twenty years.

Darren Walker is president of the Ford Foundation, a $13 billion international social justice philanthropy. He is co-founder and chair of the Presidents’ Council on Disability Inclusion in Philanthropy. Before joining Ford, Darren was vice president at Rockefeller Foundation, overseeing global and domestic programs. In the 1990s, he was COO of the Abyssinian Development Corporation, Harlem’s largest community development organization. Darren co-chairs New York City’s Mayoral Advisory Commission on City Art, Monuments, and Markers, the New York City Census Task Force, and the Governor’s Commission and serves on The Independent Commission on New York City Criminal Justice and Incarceration Reform and UN International Labour Organization Global Commission on the Future of Work. He serves on many boards, including Carnegie Hall, the High Line, VOW to End Child Marriage, the Committee to Protect Journalists, the National Gallery of Art, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is the recipient of 16 honorary degrees and university awards, including Harvard University’s W.E.B. Du Bois Medal. Educated exclusively in public schools, Darren was a member of the first Head Start class in 1965 and graduated from The University of Texas at Austin. He has been included on Time’s annual 100 Most Influential People in the World, Rolling Stone’s 25 People Shaping the Future, Fast Company’s Most Creative People in Business, and OUT Magazine’s Power 50.

Illustration for 360 Magazine art story

How Technology Makes Learning Art More Accessible To Aspiring Artists

The art world is constantly evolving and moving forward towards adapting to the use of the latest technology. Throughout history, the development of the latest technology has been eyed with suspicion by members of the mainstream arts sector before the new eventually becomes normal. The arts are an area that has always adapted to the use of new technologies, whether it was the introduction of photography in the late-19th-century or computer-aided design in the last three decades.

What we have seen on educational sites, such as Learning Cloud New Zealand, was an uptick in the number of art students in the role social media is playing in the modern art sector. Museums and public galleries are taking their collections online to give every person the chance to enjoy artworks by famous artists and those they may not have heard of. Galleries and museums are looking to switch their collections to the online sector to allow more people to explore and learn about art. For students and academics looking to take part in the academic study of art history and specific artists, the ability to turn to Instagram or the online collections of galleries and museums makes it easier to view as many artworks as possible from the comfort of their home, office, or desk.

Looking back at the history of art is just one way the development of technology has shifted towards the delivery of information online. There are many ways technology can change the artistic world, including the ability to allow artists from around the world to find new ways of working. In the past, those affected by disabilities were unable to take part in the practical study of the arts because of the restraints placed on their movements. However, the evolution of technology has allowed the majority of people to feel they can now enjoy the chance to build a career using the latest in technology.

The challenge for many people with some form of disability when they are exploring art through the use of technology is to develop a better way of understanding art. Those who are visually-impaired are among the individuals who are being given the chance to learn about art through the use of technology. Visually-impaired individuals are given the chance to enjoy art through descriptive words designed to create an image in the mind.

Digital art is taking the canvas onto the screens of mobile devices and laptop screens to give those in far-flung areas of the world the chance to perfect their artistic talent. Teachers can be located almost anywhere in the world to provide advice and support as the artist works from their home location. Even in schools, the development of technology is taking out of the use of traditional media and into the digital realm. Adding the arts to STEM courses has been positive for millions of students and led to the development of STEAM classes that focus on technology. For most students, the use of digital technology is an accompaniment to the traditional media used for classes at all levels.

Immersive Van Gogh

Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago, a brand new venue in Chicago’s Germania Club will open Feb. of 2021.

The recently renovated building will open to the U.S. premiere of Immersive Van Gogh. The building’s Victorian Era, 35-foot-tall walls will show off art exhibitions that completely encapsulate an audience, blurring the lines between entertainment and culture, art and blockbuster creation.

Immersive Van Gogh received rave reviews from critics and a wide array of audiences in Toronto, as it allowed them to step inside the iconic, emotional, imaginative artist Vincent Van Gogh.

The Toronto Sun called Immersive Van Gogh “intense and emotional, cathartic and liberating” while Debra Yeo of the Toronto Star said,  “I wondered: could projections of paintings on walls and floors be thrilling? The answer is yes.”

More than 180,000 guests were able to see the exhibition in July 2020, and it passed worldwide ticket sales for any of Ticketmaster’s live cultural events.

Tickets will be available beginning Nov. 23 at 11 a.m. CST. You can find them by clicking right here, or you can call (844) 307-4644. Admission begins at $39.99, or $24.99 for children 16 years old or younger.

The tickets will be for viewings from Feb. 11 to May 2, and parking is available at the James House parking garage, conveniently located nearby.

Given the world’s current state of affairs, the experience also makes health and safety a priority, as admissions will align with Chicago’s capacity guidelines.

Tickets will also be taken contact-free, temperatures will be taken upon arrival and hand sanitizer stations will be open. Markers throughout the exhibit will also remind guests to socially distant as they get sucked into the world of Van Gogh. Face masks will be required.

The same Italian creative team that pioneered Atelier des Lumières will create a design custom to the exhibition’s home in Chicago.

The exhibition was designed by Massimiliano Siccardi, an Italian film producer, with help from composer Luca Longobardi, who delivers a score that combines electronic music with piano, blending modern and classic tones to evoke the perfect tone for the experience. Vittorio Guidotti is the art director.

Siccardi and Longobardi created the Van Gogh, Starry Night exhibition together, setting them up for Immersive Van Gogh, which features more than 50 projectors that cover more than 14,000 square-feet.

Siccardi said Van Gogh has created a lasting emotional impact despite going relatively unknown while he was alive.

“Both myself and Luca Longobardi are very excited to visit Chicago and once again bring Van Gogh’s legacy to life in a way that is unique to the beautiful architecture of the Germania Club Building,” Siccardi said.

Some of the most notable pieces featured include Self Portrait with Felt Hat, The Bedroom in Arles, Irises and The Starry Night.

Corey Ross, the co-producer of Immersive Art Space, said Immersive Van Gogh is a new way to consume art from all directions.

“Both connoisseurs and new admirers of Van Gogh’s work are guaranteed a breathtaking perspective on the influential artist’s oeuvre,” Ross said. “Merging state-of-the-art technology, theatrical storytelling, animation and some of the finest works of art ever created, Immersive Van Gogh is a uniquely mesmerizing experience that seemingly transports the viewer into the artist’s mind to see these timeless works as never before.

For more information, you can click right here.

Rita Azar illustration for 360 MAGAZINE travel stories

Free Ways to Have Fun in Montreal This Summer

You don’t have to break the bank to have an amazing time in Montreal. The city is filled to the brim with stunning museums, gorgeous nature parks, and frequent cultural festivals. The best part? Most of the best things to see in Montreal are actually completely free.

Travelling on a budget may be tricky but in a city like Montreal, it’s easy to have an unforgettable trip without spending a fortune. 

#1. Explore the natural beauty of Mount Royal Park

The namesake of Montreal is also one of its main attractions, the beautiful Mount Royal. This peaked hill stands tall in the centre of the city, surrounded by a nature park designed by Frederick Law Olmstead, the renowned architect who made New York’s Central Park a reality.

Mount Royal Park is especially beautiful in the summer for picnics, relaxing by Beaver Lake, or hiking to the top for some spectacular views. You can spend a whole day here and all without spending a bit.

#2. Create your own bike tour of the city and surrounds

A great way to spend a day without breaking the bank is by seeing the city on a bicycle. Montreal is crisscrossed with bike paths that total a length of over 500km and all are open to the public for free.

Cycle along the Lachine Canal into Old Montreal, pass the Olympic Village, and enjoy the sights of Parc La Fontaine along the way. If you’re feeling especially adventurous, you can even make your way off of the island to explore the north and south shores.

#3. Get your culture fix at one of the city’s amazing museums

The Musee des Beaux Arts

For lovers of art and photography, there is no better way to spend an afternoon for free than at The Musee des Beaux-Arts. Along with a permanent exhibition, the museum features artwork from Canadian and European artists like drawings, engravings, silverware, and works of art from ancient Asia, Egypt, Greece, and South America. 

Modern art aficionados can also see Andy Warhol’s advertising on display too! Museum admission is free for all on the first Sunday of the month and every day for those 20 and under while seniors (65+) are admitted free on Thursdays.

The Redpath Museum

The Redpath Museum is named after a 19th-century sugar baron who financially supported the museum on the campus of McGill University. 

History and science geeks will get a kick out of the wide range of fossils (including dinosaurs), skeletons of rare and extinct animals, rocks and minerals, and a fine collection of Egyptian antiquities that the Redpath has to offer. And best of all, admission is free.

#4. Partake in the summer festivals

Montreal is known as a festival town and it’s no wonder with locals that love to eat, drink, and celebrate life every day of the year. 

The city is abuzz with music festivals throughout the year like the International Jazz Festival, Les Francofolies, Les Nuits D’Afrique, and the indie music festival Pop Montreal. Music lovers, rejoice! From shows and live entertainment, the summer is ablaze with music — and all of it is completely free.

#5. Enjoy the spectacle of the International Fireworks Competition

Summer visitors to Montreal will likely be familiar with the International Fireworks Competition there that takes place twice a week throughout June and July. This epic (and free) attraction draws locals and tourists alike to the waterfront of the Old Port, the Jacques Cartier Bridge, or the amusement park, La Ronde, for the best views.

#6. Stay in and relax

Whether you’re a Montreal local or on a summer holiday, some days you may just feel like staying in and snuggling up with a glass of wine and a good movie. 

For a fun and free good time, put on your comfiest outfit and try your luck at one of Canada’s great online casinos with free spins that require no obligation and are easy to activate. Who knows? Your free spins might end up paying off!

MONTREALIVE

The vibrance of the city is undeniable, as is the accessibility for all types of travellers on any budget. There are delicious cheap food choices, it’s easy to walk or cycle around, and there are plentiful free activities to do and things to see – especially in the summer when nearly every week hosts some kind of festival, street fair, parade, or cultural show.

Montreal has been called many things throughout the years. From “The City of Steeples” to “Festival City”, “The City of Saints”, nothing captures the essence of the city as well as its most recent nickname: “Montrealive”.

Must-See Places in DC via Bike

By Lia Summers

Loop of the National Mall

The National Mall is the most popular attraction in Washington, DC for good reason. The iconic buildings, memorials, and greenery are breathtaking. Biking is one of the best ways to see the glory of the National Mall. Start at the 15th Street bike trail on the Northeast Side of the White House and follow 15th street past the Washington Monument. Stay on the sidewalk and go clockwise to view the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Capitol, the Holocaust Museum, the Jefferson Memorial, and the George Mason Memorial to Ohio Drive. Continue on Ohio Drive and view the Potomac River, the Arlington Memorial Bridge and Arlington National Cemetery in the distance. Hang a right on West Basin Drive to see the FDR Memorial, MLK Memorial and the DC World War I Memorial. Hang a left onto Independence Ave to see the Korean War Memorial, the Lincoln Memorial and the Reflecting Pool and the Vietnam Memorial. Take Constitution Ave East and view the Federal Reserve, Constitution Gardens and the Lock-keeper’s House. Hang a Right onto 17th Street to get a close up view of the WW2 Memorial, the John Paul Jones Memorial and the Tidal Basin.

If you are feeling adventurous, cross the Arlington Memorial bridge on the North side into Virginia and cross to the West side of Jefferson Davis Highway to follow the trail to the Netherlands Carillon and a recently restored Marine Corps Memorial (Iwo Jima).

Another option is to take the South side path on the Arlington Memorial Bridge and merge onto the Mount Vernon trail. Take the scenic ride along the Potomac River to the 14th Street Bridge and ride East to land back in DC at the Thomas Jefferson Memorial.

Hains Point

Hains Point is the location where the Potomac and Anacostia rivers meet and the location of East Potomac Park. Now that the SW Waterfront has been redeveloped, there are beautiful views along the road that hugs the perimeter of the park. There are trees along the route including Weeping Willows, Horse Chestnuts, Buckeyes and the oldest section of surviving Yoshino Cherry trees on the National Mall. There are also several recreational activities in East Potomac Park including swimming, tennis and mini golf.

Pennsylvania Ave Capitol/LOC/SC

Head East from South Side of the White house to the center bike lane on Pennsylvania Ave to see the historic buildings on Federal Triangle, City Hall, the Old Post Office, the National Gallery of Art and the Capitol Building. Bike up the walkway around the Capitol to the see the East side, which is the front of the Capitol and where every presidential inauguration has been held until Ronald Reagan’s in 1981. Behold the beautiful views of the Capitol visitor center, the Supreme Court and the Jefferson Library of Congress on First Street. Bike North on First past the Senate Buildings to view Union Station.

Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens – Formerly known as Shaw Gardens, Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens is a historic water lily farm started by Walter and Helen Shaw Fowler. It is set in the Anacostia River Tidal Wetlands and is easily accessible on the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail North bicycle Trail. Water lilies bloom from early May to mid-September and enjoy the lotus seed pod heads for three seasons. Enjoy the beautiful marshes, bird watch, or have a picnic!

Anacostia River Trail South and Kingman Island

Starting at RFK Stadium there is a lovely bike trail that hugs both sides of the Anacostia River. This trail passes Kingman Island, several boating clubs, fishermen, and beautiful views on the West Side of the Anacostia River. Cross the Philip Souza bridge and go North on the West side of the river for a complete loop, or continue South on the East side to the Navy Yard.

Navy Yard/Nats Stadium

The Anacostia river trail ends on 11th St SE. You can then cross the highway to the Navy Yard boardwalk and continue along the Potomac River and several historic military memorials to the boardwalk at Yards Park which hosts several restaurants and Nats Stadium.

Mt Olivet Cemetery and the National Arboretum

Mt. Olivet Cemetery is an underrated attraction that features some of the oldest graves in the city. Most importantly, they allow bikes on their main roads! This iconic cemetery is one of the oldest in Washington, DC and features rolling hills, ancient marble headstones and elaborate family vaults. It’s also the final resting place of Lincoln Conspirator, Mary Surratt and White House Architect, James Hoban.

This is a challenging ride with many hills, so it’s ideal for an electric bicycle. Mt. Olivet Cemetery is located in Northeast Washington, DC off of Bladensburg Road. It’s best to drive and park at the cemetery before you ride. The National Arboretum is across the street from Mt. Olivet Cemetery. Enjoy 400 acres of gardens, a world-class Bonsai collection, and a stunning display of the Old sandstone Capitol columns.

Dating While Sober

When it comes to dating, “let’s grab a drink” is often the go to first date invitation. Many opt to cure first date jitters with a libation or two to “chill out” and feel more comfortable.  What happens if you are a recovering alcoholic and you can’t opt for “liquid courage” to get you through those awkward dating moments? For approximately 30-million Americans who identify as recovering from alcohol abuse, dating while sober is often a tricky reality. With tips on how to pass on booze but not on love, is Dr. Duy Nguyen, D.O., a Board-Certified Psychiatrist in General Psychiatry practicing at Beachway Therapy Center, a drug and alcohol rehab in Boynton Beach, Florida.

1. Take the lead and suggest a dry date.

The easiest way to maintain sobriety is to avoid situations where alcohol is present. Having several alcohol-free dating options already in mind can empower you to steer the date in a dry direction more easily.  Opt for daytime dates that are more activity focused, get you outside enjoying quality time together away from any bar. “Doing activities that aren’t conducive to drinking such as museums, galleries, fairs, and festivals could be fun. People who don’t drink often are the most creative when it comes to choosing fun dates,” says Dr. Nguyen.

2. Create your new story and get honest.

In the spirit of 12-step recovery, which emphasizes the importance of self-honesty, aim for truthfulness in how you present yourself. If an on-line dating profile questionnaire asks how much you drink, don’t let fear about what others may think prevent you from checking the “Never” box. “Frame out when and how you plan to reveal what inspired your decision not to drink. Simply saying that you no longer drink alcohol is enough in the beginning. When you get to know someone better then share your story from a place of an achievement you’re proud of,” Dr. Nguyen encourages.

3. Get clear on what you want in a partner.

If someone has an issue with you not drinking, then they clearly aren’t the right person for you and that’s okay. Decide if you would prefer to date someone who understands recovery, may even have been through it themselves or is a health enthusiast who also doesn’t drink.

Dr. Nguyen says that, “While there are a lot of benefits to dating those in recovery, it can also lead to risky situations. There are often times in which one partner relapses and the other follows, although this isn’t a guarantee.”

If you decide that you want to date non-recovering people, it’s best to have some clean time under your belt and be solid in your recovery, as this can lead to tempting situations.

4. Trust your gut, nerves can be a good indicator!

Your nerves could very well be indicating that there is something there. That is, chemistry. Dr. Nguyen says, “Alcohol typically dulls our sensory and emotional experience so without it we’re open to the raucous disarray of emotions that warp us when we’re under the spell of a potential new love. Of course, that doesn’t make the experience of a new relationship any easier. Try to reframe the experience in a way that embraces these jitters.”

5. Don’t make love the new addiction.

On top of the excitement that comes with meeting a potential new partner, scientifically we produce numerous hormones that can increase that excitement. “A new relationship can very much become a replacement drug,” says Dr. Nguyen. He adds, “Many confuse infatuation with love, so it’s a good idea is to take it slowly. Again, make sure that you are at a place emotionally that can handle all of the new feelings that come with dating and be prepared if relationships don’t end the way you expected.”

6. Embrace the awkward.

“Being sober will probably increase the number of awkward pauses, says Dr. Nguyen. “We’re sharper and more present when we’re not drinking which can actually be used as an advantage to navigate conversation and ask the other person about themselves which enables a deeper connection and more trust,” he adds.

7. Keep first dates short.

The majority of first dates that extend into the wee hours of the morning are alcohol fueled and can lead to unintended promiscuity. Dr. Nguyen suggests going into the date with a self-imposed time frame in mind, two to three hours and then making another date if there’s interest. For a recovering alcoholic, especially someone in early sobriety, being “forced” to bar hop will be like white knuckling it on a scary roller coaster.

If you feel dating is hard enough and are more comfortable with dating others who practice a sober lifestyle, there are many options:

http://www.sobersinglesdate.com

http://www.12stepmatch.com

http://www.singleandsober.com

http://www.aadatingservice.com

http://www.soberdatingservice.com