Posts tagged with "science"

Tech created by Ho Szemui at 360 Magazine use by 360 Magazine

IP PARIS PRESENTS A WORKSHOP

Institut Polytechnique de Paris (IP Paris), a major player in French innovation, will present 21 high technological value start-ups at the 6th edition of VivaTech, taking place from June 15 to 18, 2022. On Friday, June 17th from 10:30 to 11:45 am (French time), IP Paris will present a workshop “Tech the challenge for society,” highlighting the latest game-changing research projects conducted within its existing interdisciplinary centres (E4C on Energy and Climate, and Hi! PARIS on AI and Data Analysis) and upcoming ones (in Arts, Science and Society and Bioengineering). The programme of this workshop can be found HERE.

With 3 incubators, 82 start-ups incubated in 2021, including 44 new ones, 1,400 million raised by start-ups founded by IP Paris alumni in 2021, 35% of Next40 start-ups and nearly 25% of French Tech 120 start-ups founded/managed by alumni or from its incubators, 30 laboratories and a community of nearly 1,000 researchers, 50 patents and software applications filed this year, Institut Polytechnique de Paris is asserting its position as a key player in technological innovation in France and internationally.

For this sixth edition of VivaTech, 21 start-ups from IP Paris’ ecosystem will take turns to present their innovations to professionals and the general public within the framework of the six major themes established by VivaTech: innovations related to the fight against global warming and the energy transition, tomorrow’s mobility, future of work, diversity, decoding Web3 and the promotion of the European tech ecosystem.

How can we meet the needs of maritime players, reduce production errors in industry with microchips, contribute to the rehabilitation of children with specific learning disabilities, benefit from an evolving work environment, help merchants to grasp the entry into the world of Blockchain and Web3, or reduce the vulnerability of companies via cybersecurity?

For four days, they will be taking turns on booth C48 to present their products and/or services. As a must-attend event, VivaTech will represent a significant opportunity for them, accelerating their contact and business prospects and it will allow IP Paris to present both its start-ups acceleration and incubation programmes.

Representatives of the Drahi-X Novation Center and the Télécom Paris Novation Center will also be present on the booth to introduce their incubators, accelerators, prototyping spaces, investors’ clubs and VCs, as well as their international support.

On Friday, June 17 from 10:30 to 11:45 am (French time), IP Paris will present a unique workshop in English, “Tech the challenge for society”, also live on Linkedin, highlighting the innovative research projects carried out by Institut Polytechnique de Paris, within its interdisciplinary centres, on Satellites for Solar Energy ConsumptionNext Generation of Machine Learning for BioMedical ImagingPreserving the World Heritage in the Metaverse and Creative AI: Combining Knowledge, Learning and Control.

Azulito, the Little Blue Penguin via Jordann Tomasek for use by 360 Magazine

Azulito the Penguin

Birch Aquarium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego officially named one of their Little Blue Penguins. After receiving nearly 2,500 votes, this charismatic penguin will be named Azulito, which translates to “little blue” in Spanish. The name reveal took place Friday morning in the aquarium’s Giant Kelp Forest. Divers unfurled a banner underwater with the winning name surrounded by Leopard Sharks, Moray Eels and swaying kelp fronds while some of the Little Blues looked on. 

“This is the first time we have invited the public to help name one of our animals. So, it was a special moment for aquarium fans as well as our staff. We hope this is the beginning of a long tradition of naming our penguins,” said Kayla Strate, lead penguin aquarist. “We want to thank everyone who submitted a name online. Azulito is the perfect fit for this tiny penguin and we love that it’s a nod to our binational region.”

Voters were asked to choose between five names — each option with unique ties to San Diego, Scripps Oceanography and UC San Diego — during a naming campaign that launched on World Penguin Day (April 25). Azulito won by a landslide with 924 votes. Diego trailed behind with 588 votes and Flip came in third with 438, followed by Triton and Torrey with 234 and 281 votes, respectively. 

Later this month, Azulito — along with Magic, Nero, Persimmon, Reka, Cornelius and Katie — will move into their new home. Guests can meet Azulito and the rest of the colony starting July 12 when Beyster Family Little Blue Penguins opens. 

The 2,900 square foot exhibit follows the world’s smallest penguins on their journey from hatchlings to adults, highlighting the challenges they face in a changing climate while celebrating the features that make Little Blues so unique (and adorable). 

Penguin lovers will now be able to spend more time with the aquarium’s newest residents when the aquarium’s summer hours kick off on July 1. The aquarium will stay open until 7 p.m. daily, from July 1 to September 5, 2022.

Beyster Family Little Blue Penguins is included in the cost of general admission to Birch Aquarium which is $24.95 for adults and $19.95 for children ages 3-17. Tickets for July are now available online. Advanced reservations are required for all guests, including members. Visit HERE for more information or to make a reservation.

About Birch Aquarium at Scripps

Birch Aquarium at Scripps is the public exploration center for Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. Perched on a bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean, Birch Aquarium features the groundbreaking work of Scripps Oceanography and UC San Diego scientists as well as conservation breeding programs, and interactive exhibits. Birch Aquarium’s mission is to connect understanding to protecting our ocean planet, which the aquarium achieves by engaging, hands-on learning opportunities for nearly 500,000 guests as well as more than 50,000 pre-K-12 students each year. Visit HERE for more information. 

Male Feritlity via Brittney Houser for Pitch Publicity NYC for use by 360 Magazine

Baby And Beyond: Why You Need Healthy Sperm

By: Ayla Barmmer

Although still commonly referred to as a “woman’s issue,” nearly half of all fertility problems are attributed to men. Statistics show that the rate of infertility is increasing and men and women are in this together. Nearly 9% of men and 10% of women under the age of 44 report infertility problems in America (CDC, 2013 and Office on Women’s Health, 2019). However, fixing the fertility problems tend to fall primarily on women while men are often sidelined. This is not a good situation for anyone, as not being part of the fertility journey can cause feelings of anxiety, helplessness, shame and guilt that can ultimately cause problems in relationships, performance at work and overall mental wellbeing. 

Men Have A Biological Clock Too

Traditionally, we focus on the woman’s age as being a major factor in fertility success. Often referred to as a woman’s biological clock, which is a metaphor used to describe the sense of pressure many women feel to get pregnant while they are at the peak of their reproductive years, a man’s age makes a difference too. And just because a man marries a younger woman, it does not necessarily solve the fertility hurdles. A retrospective cohort study found that increased paternal age had negative effects on offspring and their mothers. Specifically, offspring born to fathers aged 45 years or older had higher odds of premature birth and seizures compared to fathers aged 25 to 34, and mothers had an increased risk of premature birth and gestational diabetes.

While it is true that fertility begins to decline for most people in their mid-30s, it is still possible to become pregnant later in life when you are ready to have a family, with targeted diet and lifestyle strategies being hugely supportive at this point. Being aware of the challenges going into the fertility journey and knowing all your options is the first step to having positive outcomes that do not put unnecessary stress on the relationship.

Skipped Steps = Stress

Most couples turn to medical interventions if they do not conceive within the first 3-6 months of trying to have a baby. While this may seem like a logical next step from a medical perspective, the process of using medical interventions can cause an enormous amount of stress and financial strain on the relationship. The average couple will often attempt two in vitro fertilization cycles, bringing the total cost of IVF, including procedures and medications, somewhere between $40,000 and $60,000 (SingleCare, 2020). Add to that an estimated 85% of IVF costs are often paid out of pocket (Fertility and Sterility, 2011). While IVF is costly and stressful, the alternative does not seem any better considering that infertility is one of the primary reasons for divorce among couples (International Journal of Reproductive Biomedicine, 2020).

Couples who choose this path are often unaware that they are skipping over a cost-effective and less-stressful option. Like many aspects of our health, male and female fertility can be supported by improving lifestyle choices, such as exercise, sleep, targeted nutritional support and minimizing environmental exposures.

Don’t Underestimate Nutrition

An extensive amount of research shows that if men make positive changes with their nutrition and engage in good lifestyle choices, there is a clear connection to improved male fertility, ultimately resulting in healthier babies. Some immediate lifestyle choices men can make to help improve sperm health include exercising regularly and getting at least 7-8 hours of sleep daily.

While sleep and exercise may be easier to implement, the nutrition component of fertility may be new to men since it is not often talked about. Flooding the body with the right nutrients could really up your fertility game. 

To start, a Mediterranean diet is often recommended as it focuses on foods that are high in antioxidants (such as selenium and vitamins E and C) and omega-3 fatty acids, which can be helpful in managing chronic inflammation. Mediterranean diets often include lots of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, seafood, nuts, legumes and olive oil; and lesser amounts of poultry, eggs, cheese and dairy. A man’s diet has a major influence on the health of the baby. Recent findings from an animal model study found that when male mice ate low-protein diets, ATF7 (a protein responsible for fat metabolism and cholesterol production) turned on, and led to metabolic reprogramming in offspring. Another key study showed that sperm and semen from male mice that were fed a poor-quality diet resulted in their offspring becoming overweight with symptoms of Type 2 diabetes and reduced expression of genes that regulate fat metabolism.

What you cannot consistently get enough of through the diet, you should get through dietary supplements. To support male fertility, supplements that are helpful to include daily are choline, zinc, vitamin D, vitamin B12, magnesium, selenium and folate. Knowing the precise amounts to take of each nutrient can be overwhelming. This is one of the reasons why I started FullWell, a fertility wellness and education brand, to take the guesswork out of knowing which fertility supplements and what amounts were most effective. For men, FullWell’s Vitality + Virility supplement contains familiar antioxidants like vitamin E, C and selenium plus a unique antioxidant blend to offer more support than the typical men’s multivitamin. Beyond antioxidants, the nutrients included in this formula help support the very nutrient-intensive liver detoxification process, which in turn can encourage the healthy formation of sperm and the DNA contained within it.

The role of fertile, healthy sperm goes far beyond conception. Sperm quality, motility (movement) and morphology (shape and size) all contribute to an overall healthy pregnancy and the health of the baby for the long term. Some factors with sperm health are certainly out of a man’s control, but nutrition is not. If men focus on flooding their body with the right levels of these nutrients, through diet and supplementation, they can play a major role in conception, pregnancy health and the baby’s long-term health.

Inventory Your Environment

While women are often told to avoid smoking, alcohol and reduce exposure to chemicals during pregnancy and preconception, men can also make an impact here as well. Consider the evidence:

  • Findings from a longitudinal study revealed that paternal smoking and welding exposure prior to conception was independently associated with non-allergic asthma in offspring, even if smoking stopped five years prior to conception
  • Another study looking at sex-specific changes found that parental smoking at an early age also increased the risk of obesity in male adolescent offspring
  • A meta-analysis looking at paternal occupational exposure to herbicides, such as pentachlorophenol (PCP) used in wood-related industries, demonstrated that exposure increased the risk of lymphoma and leukemia in the father and their offspring

However, obvious environmental factors like smoking and pollution are not the only culprits for conception. Other more common environmental situations men could be exposing themselves to occur right in the home and car. Consider your exposure to unnecessary chemicals that can be found in scented candles, air fresheners, colognes and even heavy metals that could be present in the supplements you are taking. Be sure to check the label of dietary supplements for seals that indicate the company uses third-party independent testing. FullWell uses third-party independent testing to ensure no harmful contaminants, including heavy metals, are present in its fertility supplements for both men and women.

Beyond Baby: Do It For Your Health

Beyond fertility, male reproductive factors like low sperm count have been associated with increased risk of metabolic syndrome for men. In the largest study to date evaluating semen quality, reproductive function, and metabolic risk, researchers discovered that men with low sperm counts had a higher risk of greater body fat, higher blood pressure, insulin resistance and abnormally elevated cholesterol. This and other recent studies have provided more insight into how fertility status can act as a biomarker for future health whether you are planning to have a baby or not. 

Biography

Ayla Barmmer, MS, RDN, LDN, is a registered dietitian nutritionist, functional medicine practitioner and the founder/CEO, of FullWell, a fertility wellness and education brand. Her entire career focus has been to advance the health and empowerment of practitioners, patients and families through nutritional science, functional medicine and evidence-based holistic solutions. Barmmer launched FullWell to provide all families access to the same evidence-based, effective, high-quality prenatal and fertility supplements that she successfully uses with her own patients. Barmmer earned her undergraduate degree in dietetics and completed her dietetic internship at the University of Connecticut; a Master of Science in Health Communications from Boston University and has additional training in clinical nutrition, functional medicine, women’s health, herbal medicine and holistic and integrative therapies.

Labratory Picture via Kennedy Reed for Pitch Perfect NYC for use by 360 Magazine

Don’t Freak Out During Tick Season

By: Sandra Lee, CEO, NJ Labs

Ticks are a year-long issue, but the season for ticks peaks from April to October. Are you ready for tick season? Do not ignore it. Do not freak out.

What was once a regional issue has now become a national problem because of the migration of these bugs and the increasing frequency in which people travel and spend time outdoors. When it comes to ticks, most people are concerned about being infected with Lyme disease, a bacterial infection caused by the bacterium Borrelia Burgdorferi that is transmitted to humans through the bite of blacklegged or deer ticks. Lyme Disease is an inflammatory disease that if left untreated can lead to possible arthritis and neurological and cardiac disorders. The CDC estimates that there are about 300,000 cases of Lyme Disease per year, with more than 96% concentrated in the Northeast and upper Midwestern United States. However, there are many other tick species across the United States that also spread disease and cause virus-like symptoms including headaches, fever, fatigue, chills and muscle aches. This makes tick testing crucial, so you know the tick that bit you. Tick testing is a proactive measure to take that can help a doctor or veterinarian determine the best course of action to treat a tick-borne pathogen.

Be Aware of the Tick Types

Before learning more about tick testing, it is important to know the kinds of tick you or your pet may come across. The known species of ticks in the United States that bite and transmit diseases include:

Tick Prevention

You may encounter a tick during everyday activities. Tick populations tend to be in elevated, wooded and grassy areas where creatures they feed on live. However, they can also be found in populated urban areas and coastal locations. Ticks enjoy moist and humid environments, like wood piles, leaf piles and litter, bird feeders, or fallen and low-hanging branches. Some ticks are also found in homes, such as the Brown Dog Tick and Soft ticks. To prevent the at-home ticks from entering your home be sure to keep lawn grasses low, eliminate leaf litter and distribute gravel to create a zone that prevents ticks from coming in. Additionally, here are some tips to prevent tick bites:

  • Avoid direct contact with ticks by avoiding wooded and grassy areas; and if hiking, stay near the center of trails.
  • Dress appropriately with long pants and long sleeves, and ensure the clothing has been pretreated with permethrin, or spray 0.5% permethrin on clothing.
  • Immediately take a shower after coming home from outdoors, and check for ticks on body, gear and pets.
  • Tumble dry clothes on high heat for 10 minutes to kill any ticks.
  • Use monthly flea and tick medications for pets as recommended by your veterinarian.

Tick Testing Peace of Mind

There are specific steps to take if you or your pet get bit by a tick. When removing the tick, you must be cautious because the way the tick is removed can affect whether or not a pathogen-positive tick’s disease will be transmitted to you or your pet’s bloodstream. To safely remove a tick, use plastic tweezers to grasp the tick, pull the tick upward with steady pressure, and thoroughly clean and disinfect the bite area. Do not use metal cosmetic tweezers that could damage the tick or the skin.  After the tick is removed, do not burn, freeze or squeeze the tick. Make sure to monitor the affected area for signs of infection. Immediately send the tick into a lab that uses a DNA-based method to test for common tick-borne pathogens, including Lyme disease.

Having a tick test and sample collection kit can make this process easier, especially if you are on vacation or outdoors. For peace of mind, and to be sure about the tick that bit you, I recommend including a Tick SURE kit to your first-aid kit. The Tick SURE kit includes simple directions on how to remove a tick along with plastic tweezers and safe packaging for the tick to be sent in a pre-paid, first-class envelope that is delivered to the FDA and DEA inspection lab for full identification and testing. Once the tick arrives at the lab, the tick’s DNA is extracted to identify the species, then tested for the different pathogens it may carry. Having a tick test and sample collection kit on hand will alleviate unnecessary stress if you come in contact with a tick because you will know what to do with it. At the same time, you send the tick in for testing, make an appointment with your doctor or veterinarian if you or your pet are not experiencing any symptoms. Sometimes symptoms do not show up until later, but the sooner you can get checked out the quicker you can be treated. Having the lab results of the tick in hand will help the doctor determine the best course of action.

What Does A Positive Test Mean?

If the tick test results from the lab come back positive, don’t panic. A positive tick test does not mean that you or your pet have the disease; a positive tick test just means the pathogen in the tick has been detected. If you are diagnosed with Lyme disease early, doctors can use antibiotics to get rid of the disease within the first 14 days after transmission. However, if left untreated, Lyme disease may stay with you for the rest of your life. Another reason why testing is so important.

Don’t Freak Out

Being aware of tick season and taking preventive measures are the first steps toward protecting you and your pet’s health. A tick test and sample collection kit is an important addition to your first aid kit so you can enjoy your time outdoors. You can view videos and pictures HERE so you can be sure about the types of ticks you encounter and be prepared with the next steps. Most importantly, do not freak out when you encounter a tick. Mistakes can be made with tick removal if you are in a panic. We cannot avoid the outdoors, but we can be aware of the critters that live there, and the hitchhikers that come along with them, so we know what to do if a tick bites you.  

Biography

Sandra Lee is the CEO of NJ Labs, a nationally recognized provider and advocate for quality in chemistry and microbiology testing that serves the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, dietary supplement, cosmetic and cannabis/CBD industries. As a scientist and one of the few female CEOs in the analytical testing industry, she has a passion for chemistry and how it influences multiple aspects of our daily lives. At NJ Labs she leads the privately-owned FDA and DEA inspected facility that has been a mainstay in the testing industry for 85 years with a certified full-service contract analytical testing laboratory that follows strict Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP) regulations and holds ISO/IEC 17025:2017 accreditation. She also hosts the “Going Beyond Testing” podcast series to help companies and consumers get an insider’s look at testing practices and what should be tested to keep products safe and effective. Lee is a graduate of the University of Michigan where she holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry.

Courtesy of Dreweatts

Space Exploration Photography × Ephemera

A private collection of space photographs and memorabilia from the late space correspondent, writer and space aficionado Tim Furniss, who witnessed pioneering space moments first-hand, is among a vast selection of unique photographs of man’s very first moments in space. This exciting auction of Space Exploration Photography & Ephemera will take place at Dreweatts on February 22, 2022.

Tim Furniss’ interest in space started at age 12, when, during an outing with his grandmother in 1961, they passed a television shop and saw Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, on the news. This instigated a lifelong fascination with space, which would later lead him into the role of ‘spaceflight correspondent’ for Flight International magazine from 1984-2006, reporting on the very subject that he loved. Tim was also a broadcaster, lecturer and author of over 35 published books on space history. His role and lifelong enthusiasm for space, combined with sheer tenacity, gained him access to some astounding historical moments in space history and the opportunity to build a rapport with some of the most celebrated astronauts of our time. 

Offering the collection is Tim Furniss’ son, Thomas Furniss, who has been tasked, alongside his sister, with curating his father’s lifetime project of scrapbooks, photographs and space ephemera gathered over decades. On recalling one of many anecdotes about his father Thomas Furniss, he tells us, “When he travelled to the US to cover the launch of Apollo 13 at age 22, he crawled through the legs of a hoard of journalists to take a series of pictures of the crew before transferring to the launch pad. Upon leaving, my dad was given an ‘Apollo Operations Manual’ for a space suit, to help with his reporting—something he no doubt asked for—and this very item will be available at auction as Lot 166.”

He also recounts that on the same trip a few days later, brandishing his journalist credentials, he managed to talk his way into a sub-branch of NASA, where he given a tour of the building, and asked if he could try a suit on! His wish was granted and he was given the suit and gloves closest to his size, which turned out to be those of the astronauts Bill Pogue and Frank Borman.

Among the highlights of his collection is a vintage gelatin silver print titled Lift Off showing the launch of Apollo 13, on April 11, 1970, which is estimated to fetch £300-£500 (lot 289, pictured left).

Not surprisingly amongst Tim’s collection is a photographic portrait of the man that inspired him, Yuri Gagarin, dated April 12, 1961. The vintage gelatin silver print shows Yuri smiling as he attains the title of the first man to ever go to space. It has a conservative estimate of £200-£300 (lot 18).

Amongst many photographs of historic moments is the first frame from a photographic sequence documenting the first American spacewalk, depicting Ed White floating in zero gravity over Hawaii. Taken by fellow astronaut James McDivitt on June 3rd, 1965, this vintage chromogenic print is the first ever photograph taken by another human being in space, as up to this point all released images of astronauts were taken by television or monitoring cameras.

Ed White floated out of the spacecraft wearing a specially designed suit and gold-plated helmet to protect him against unfiltered rays of the sun, as well as emergency oxygen tank. A 25-foot long umbilical line and a tether line connect him to the spacecraft. He used a Hand-Held Manoeuvring Unit (HHMU) to manoeuvre around the spacecraft at more than 100 miles (160 kilometres) above the Pacific Ocean, while James McDivitt took photographs. Aside from being a milestone experiment, this was a thoroughly enjoyable experience for White and he returned to the spacecraft reluctantly commenting: ‘It’s the saddest moment in my life’. The photograph is one of the most iconic and well-recognised images and carries an estimate of £1,000-£2,000.

Elsewhere in the sale are some very important photographs from key moments in the history of space. Commenting on the sale, Ania Hanrahan, Dreweatts specialist in charge of the Sale, tells us: “In over 430 lots the sale unravels the story of human endeavours to discover what lies beyond our home planet, from early rocketry engineering by the forefathers of space exploration to complex interplanetary missions. Although today space photography and video footage appear to be a part of our daily news feeds, it was only few decades ago that we had the chance to see what our planet looks like from space for the very first time. In those days space photography was a source of awe, wonder and amazement and had the power to change the way we see Earth and our place in space.”

Among the highlights is the most celebrated image of the earth rising above the Moon’s horizon. It is the first Earthrise witnessed by humans and captured in colour on camera. Taken from Apollo 8 on December 24th, 1968, by the astronaut William Anders, this iconic picture shows earth peeking out from beyond the lunar surface as the first staffed spacecraft circumnavigated the moon with astronauts William Anders, Frank Borman, and Jim Lovell aboard. It is estimated to fetch £4,000-£6,000 (lot 145). One of the most symbolic images of the Apollo program, which featured on the cover of Life Magazine on the 11 August 1969, was taken on the Apollo 11 mission by Neil Armstrong on July 20th, 1969. It features Buzz Aldrin standing on the surface of the Moon, casting a shadow on the ground, with his gold-plated visor reflecting the Lunar Module and the photographer. This is very rare in such a large format, making it highly sought-after and it remains one of the most well-known images of space around the globe. Its’ popularity and importance are reflected in its’ estimate of £8,000-£12,000.

Courtesy of Dreweatts
Courtesy of Dreweatts
Courtesy of Dreweatts
Health clipboard graphic via Rita Azar for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Interview with Jonathan Scheiman

By: Skyler Johnson

If you’re an active person that’s ever wanted to increase your performance, you should check out Fitbiomics. They’re a small company helping athletes and health-driven people into a better lifestyle by improving gut health with a small, daily capsule. 360 was able to interview their CEO Jonathan Scheiman. Scheiman is a St. John’s and NYU graduate, who did his postdoctoral fellowship at the George Church’s lab at Harvard University. 

Can you tell me about your mission?

Our mission is to empower, educate, and elevate. We’re working to inspire and build a world where greatness is possible for everyone by driving transformation from the inside out to maximize human potential. FitBiomics is simultaneously bridging the gap between sports and science, bringing communities together, and inspiring the next generation of scientists. The new frontier of human health & wellness is Nella–a daily capsule of next-gen performance probiotics designed to help anyone pursuing a healthy and active lifestyle to a new frontier of personal best, from the inside out. Nella gives you the guts to defy your limits.

 Can you tell me about your probiotic?

With a new subscription price of $59, our daily capsule, Nella, is now easier than ever to add into a daily routine and positively impact health and wellness resolutions for 2022. The one-time purchase price remains at the current price of $75.

The product is manufactured using probiotics sourced from the microbiome of elite endurance athletes. FitBiomics supports that the source of the probiotic strains matters when it comes to athletic performance. The American-made, gluten-free, vegan probiotic is certified by Informed Sport, a service which identifies banned substances. 

The Nella probiotic supplement is trusted by elite competitors across the country, including Olympic medalists, professional athletes, and USA record holders. Additionally, FitBiomics is in partnership with and serves as the official probiotic of Fordham University Athletics and St. John’s University Athletics. 

What can we expect from your company in the next 6 months? What are your plans?

We have a lot planned as far as partnerships as well as new products in the pipeline. I can sum up the latter in one word: Veillonella. Yes, the lactic acid-eating probiotic that improves endurance and was published in Nature Medicine is in the commercial queue…so stay tuned.

What’s something about your company that people might not know about?

At our heart, we are a biotechnology company focused on continued microbiome R&D. We’re expanding our discovery platform for continued decoding of elite phenotypes to develop additional next-generation probiotics. Our mission is to improve human health and performance, holistically, across multiple functional applications.

Lauren Hurley/ Lauren Hurley Creative x Sator/ Project Chimps for use by 360 Magazine

Sator × Project Chimps

Sator has just announced its partnership with one of the most recent chimpanzee sanctuaries, Project Chimps. The collaboration includes the launch of a sequence of Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs) on the Sator app. Each chimp at Project Chimps will receive their own specially minted NFTs, and all proceeds will be returned back to the sanctuary.

The Project Chimps sanctuary is located in the Blue Ridge Mountains of north Georgia, where former research chimps are given lifelong refuge and rehabilitation. Home to 82 chimps today, Project Chimps aims to grow these numbers and provide more chimps with accessible care. To learn more about the chimps, visit ProjectChimps.org.

With the announcement of the collaboration, this supports the sanctuaries’ goal to assist more chimps in the future. The proceeds accumulated through the purchase of the NFTs go directly back to the sanctuary, providing more resources for better care of the chimps and to house more chimps in the future.

The NFTs will be released in a sequence of groups. The first collection drop is “The 5 Alphas.” “The 5 Alphas” include the heads of the 5 separate family units at the Project Chimps sanctuary: Binah, Bo, Kareem, Kirk and Patrick. “The 5 Alphas” NFTs can be accessible now through the Sator app. There are around 5,000 NFTs for each individual Alpha offered.  NFTs can be bought through Sator’s native token (SAO) for roughly $5 each.

Sator’s President Chris Martin speaks on the significance of the collaboration between the two teams. Martin states, “We are honored that Project Chimps chose Sator to launch their first-ever NFT campaign in support of the sanctuary’s efforts to provide care to the retired research chimpanzees. We see it as a creative way to bring awareness to their mission and we’re very excited to be a part of it.”

A feature apart of the Sator app allows users to diverge into various realms to earn crypto tokens through playing games and connecting with content. These crypto tokens can be substituted for NFTs in the app. The app also allows users the opportunity to conversate with other users around the world.

To download the Sator dApp:

iPhone: visit HERE

Android: visit HERE

science tech illustration by Gabrielle Archuletta for use by 360 Magazine

Swedish University Sings for Science

On December 10, the anniversary of Alfred Nobel’s death, the Nobel prizes are officially awarded in Sweden each year. Though there will not be quite the usual celebrations this year, the recipients will still be honoured in different ways worldwide. So in the spirit of celebrating the contribution of science and research to society, Chalmers University of Technology, one of the leading scientific universities in Sweden, aims to shine a light on the years of hard work that lie behind crucial scientific breakthroughs, through a rather unusual way – by singing for science.

The way to scientific understanding is paved with many important and cumulative steps and contributions. Every year, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology publish over 4000 scientific articles outlining new, peer-reviewed findings in a wide array of areas – everything from sustainable energy technology, food science, medicines, climate modelling and new materials, to foundational research laying the groundwork for future applications.

“Research at Chalmers and other universities helps new knowledge get out into society and industry for the benefit of everyone, to help with better decision-making. With the help of new research, we can better understand our world, and guide the way forward to more sustainable ways of living,” says Stefan Bengtsson, President and CEO of Chalmers University of Technology.

Singing for science is perhaps not the most standard way for a university to communicate. But there is a long musical tradition in Swedish academia, and last year the Chalmers Choir celebrated its 150th birthday. The pandemic unfortunately put a halt to rehearsals and concerts for a time, but now, they can sing together again, and are proud to present a new song in four voices, to the tune of the 18th century Swedish musician Carl Michael Bellman’s popular song ‘Så lunkar vi så småningom’ (‘So we gradually amble’). 

The lyrics are in Swedish, but an approximate English translation is provided in the video. Watch here.

“We are very happy to contribute and celebrate science in this way. We hope our message of faith in science can spread far and wide with the help of the song,” says Maria Cervin-Ellqvist, Vice-President of the Chalmers Choir and a doctoral student at the Department of Communication and Learning in Science where she researches, appropriately enough, research communication.

If you want to share Chalmers University’s celebration of the contribution of research to society via YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin or Instagram, please use the hashtag #singforscience.

ABOUT CHALMERS UNIVERSITY

Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, conducts research and education in technology and natural sciences at a high international level. The university has 3100 employees and 10,000 students, and offers education in engineering, science, shipping and architecture.

With scientific excellence as a basis, Chalmers promotes knowledge and technical solutions for a sustainable world. Through global commitment and entrepreneurship, we foster an innovative spirit, in close collaboration with wider society.The EU’s biggest research initiative – the Graphene Flagship – is coordinated by Chalmers. We are also leading the development of a Swedish quantum computer.

Chalmers was founded in 1829 and has the same motto today as it did then: Avancez – forward.

Heather Skovlund for use by 360 Magazine

Liming and Phosphorous Increase Cassava Yields

Cassava is a woody, edible starchy root that provides an immense number of calories, carbohydrates, vitamins B and C and essential minerals. The plant is significant particularly in developing countries in the tropical and subtropical regions of Africa, Asia and the Americas due to its capability to withstand challenging growing conditions. Although Cassava is essential to specific regions of the globe, it has been used as a crucial source of calories for around a billion people everywhere.

In a new research study published in Agronomy Journal, researchers in Brazil explored hypothesized options for increasing cassava yields. Researchers found that adding both calcium and phosphorous to the soils of these plants would in return increase cassava yields. These found higher yields came with no correlation to increases in cooking times.

One of the main challenges that comes with growing cassava particularly in the tropics stems from the naturally acidic soils that are accompanied by low phosphorous convenience in those regions. Phosphorous is a heavily needed nutrient in plant growth. Through a process of liming, which is essentially adding calcium carbonate to the soils, nutrients like phosphorus organically becomes more available to plants. Liming also makes the plants affected less acidic, which is vital in the growth and production of edible cassava crops.

Though much was known about the process of liming, there was still a lot to uncover about the effects of the process on cassava crops. Adalton Fernandes, co-author of the new research study, states that “It was generally believed that adding calcium to the soil could increase cassava root cooking times… we showed that liming caused minimal changes to cassava cooking times.”

Liming was found, though, to increase cassava yields in the study when in blend with phosphorous fertilizers. Without liming and phosphorus fertilizers, cassava roots weighed about 270 grams – 9.5 ounces – on average. Assessments found that at top levels of liming and phosphorous fertilization, on average the roots weighed over 350 grams – more than 12 ounces. That adds up to over a 26% increase with the accumulation of liming and phosphorus.

The study lasted over the course of two years and was conducted on an experimental farm in Botucatu, Brazil. Experimental subjects were exposed to differing rates before the cassava planting. Half of the subjects received no phosphorous fertilizers. Researchers added about 70 kilograms – converted to 155 lbs – of phosphorous fertilizer to the other subjects.

Differing features of the cassava plants were assessed based on growth with or without liming and phosphorous. These characteristics that were measured included number of roots per plant, root length, root weight and cooking times.

It was found that the addition of phosphorous increased the number of roots per plant by around 8%. Root lengths did not change substantially with liming nor phosphorous fertilization. Cassava root yields were increased by 22% with phosphorous application and 28% with liming. Cooking times increased by only 6% – less than 2 minutes – with liming. The slight increase in cooking time balances out by the large increase in yields. Fernandes states, “This small increase in cooking time is no reason for cassava farmers to not apply lime.”

An untested hypothesis that phosphorous fertilizers could lower cooking time in cassava roots was ultimately disapproved by Fernandes. Fernandes states, “we observed that phosphorus-fertilized cassava roots did not cook faster. So, phosphorus fertilization is not a recommended or viable way to reduce cooking times for cassava roots.”

Fernandes and his team are still looking to further research with differing varieties of cassava. “Will the amounts of lime and phosphorus fertilizer needed be the same for other varieties of cassava?” asks Fernandes. This poses an imperative question because varying types of cassava may have different reactions to the processes of liming and fertilization.

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Noisy Toys List Released

The American Academy of Audiology is warning parents about the dangers of noisy toys as the Sight & Hearing Association releases its annual Noisy Toys List for 2021. The American Academy of Audiology is a national association representing audiologists across the U.S. The Sight & Hearing Association is based in St. Paul, Minnesota with a goal to work towards the prevention of vision and hearing loss. Both organizations are urging parents to be cautious this holiday season when selecting toys. Recognizing that tiny ears are particularly susceptible to hearing damage, it is important to check noise levels before purchase.

“Many parents don’t realize the permanent damage a simple toy can inflict on a child’s hearing,” said Sarah Sydlowski, Au.D., Ph.D., MBA, president of the American Academy of Audiology; and associate chief improvement officer and audiology director of the Hearing Implant Program at Cleveland Clinic. “When we fail to protect a child’s hearing, the result can be irreversible hearing loss.” The inner ear contains delicate hair cells which do not regrow. Once these are damaged by noise, the result can be permanent hearing loss.

The Sight & Hearing Association has produced an annual list of noisy toys prior to the holidays for the past 24 years. Since 1939, SHA has been identifying and preventing vision and hearing loss, in partnership with other professional and community organizations, by providing screenings, education and research. “During the holiday season, we look for the most popular sound-producing toys on the market and, with a sound level meter, we measure the decibel level to raise awareness regarding how dangerously loud and potentially damaging toys can be to children. Toys are tested based on how a child would play with them, first at arm’s length (10 inches) and then next to the ear, which is how a child often listens to a noisy toy,” explained Kathy Webb, executive director of SHA.

“It’s very important that parents pay attention to this list as well as any toy they purchase. Hearing damage can be from a one-time exposure or multiple exposures over time,” explained Sydlowski. “The louder a sound is, the shorter the amount of time you can safely be around it. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommends sounds at 85 dB can be safe for up to eight hours. But for every 3 dB louder the sound is, the safe listening time reduces by half. Anyone buying toys for children needs to be aware of loud noises, particularly toys that have loud bursts—cap guns, popping balloons, air horns, etc. which are loud enough to damage hearing permanently with one short exposure.” 

A study released in January 2017 by researchers with the University of Alberta in Canada, determined the noise levels of popping balloons. They studied popping them with a pin, blowing them up until they ruptured and crushing them until they burst. The ruptured balloons clocked in at 168 decibels, four decibels louder than a 12-gauge shotgun.

Sydlowski advises parents to use phone apps to test the sound levels of toys before buying them. “Toys that make noise at or above 85 dBA can contribute to noise-induced hearing loss. If they come in at 85 decibels or higher when holding your phone microphone near them, like your child would hold the toy near their own ear, don’t buy them. It isn’t worth the risk. Remember, the louder the sound, the faster the damage and damage continues with exposure.”

While hearing loss numbers are rising in adults in the U.S., the total number of children with some type of hearing loss is unknown and many cases go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed.

“A child with just minimal hearing loss can be missing 50 percent of classroom discussion,” Sydlowski explained. These children will need to use extra effort in order to hear what is being said and they often become distracted and exhausted by the end of the day. These characteristics can be mistaken for learning disabilities when what the child needs is management of the hearing loss, typically in the form of hearing aids and other assistive listening devices. 

Reduced hearing can lead to behavioral issues, lack of focus, even depression in children. Children with hearing loss often don’t recognize that they can’t hear and parents don’t always know the signs.

Sydlowski cautioned, “Loud toys aren’t just annoying to parents, they can be a danger to children. Parents should exercise caution when buying toys with sound, including video games. With toys and games where you can turn the sound down, set the sound at an acceptable, non-harmful level and teach children to keep them at that level. Also, be vigilant about any signs that may indicate your child is having difficulty with their hearing. If you have any concerns about your child’s hearing, have a comprehensive hearing test with an audiologist.”

The American Academy of Audiology provides a list of licensed audiologists on its website. Click on “Find an Audiologist.”