Posts tagged with "science"

Lauren Hurley/ Lauren Hurley Creative x Sator/ Project Chimps for use by 360 Magazine

Sator × Project Chimps

Sator has just announced its partnership with one of the most recent chimpanzee sanctuaries, Project Chimps. The collaboration includes the launch of a sequence of Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs) on the Sator app. Each chimp at Project Chimps will receive their own specially minted NFTs, and all proceeds will be returned back to the sanctuary.

The Project Chimps sanctuary is located in the Blue Ridge Mountains of north Georgia, where former research chimps are given lifelong refuge and rehabilitation. Home to 82 chimps today, Project Chimps aims to grow these numbers and provide more chimps with accessible care. To learn more about the chimps, visit ProjectChimps.org.

With the announcement of the collaboration, this supports the sanctuaries’ goal to assist more chimps in the future. The proceeds accumulated through the purchase of the NFTs go directly back to the sanctuary, providing more resources for better care of the chimps and to house more chimps in the future.

The NFTs will be released in a sequence of groups. The first collection drop is “The 5 Alphas.” “The 5 Alphas” include the heads of the 5 separate family units at the Project Chimps sanctuary: Binah, Bo, Kareem, Kirk and Patrick. “The 5 Alphas” NFTs can be accessible now through the Sator app. There are around 5,000 NFTs for each individual Alpha offered.  NFTs can be bought through Sator’s native token (SAO) for roughly $5 each.

Sator’s President Chris Martin speaks on the significance of the collaboration between the two teams. Martin states, “We are honored that Project Chimps chose Sator to launch their first-ever NFT campaign in support of the sanctuary’s efforts to provide care to the retired research chimpanzees. We see it as a creative way to bring awareness to their mission and we’re very excited to be a part of it.”

A feature apart of the Sator app allows users to diverge into various realms to earn crypto tokens through playing games and connecting with content. These crypto tokens can be substituted for NFTs in the app. The app also allows users the opportunity to conversate with other users around the world.

To download the Sator dApp:

iPhone: visit HERE

Android: visit HERE

science tech illustration by Gabrielle Archuletta for use by 360 Magazine

Swedish University Sings for Science

On December 10, the anniversary of Alfred Nobel’s death, the Nobel prizes are officially awarded in Sweden each year. Though there will not be quite the usual celebrations this year, the recipients will still be honoured in different ways worldwide. So in the spirit of celebrating the contribution of science and research to society, Chalmers University of Technology, one of the leading scientific universities in Sweden, aims to shine a light on the years of hard work that lie behind crucial scientific breakthroughs, through a rather unusual way – by singing for science.

The way to scientific understanding is paved with many important and cumulative steps and contributions. Every year, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology publish over 4000 scientific articles outlining new, peer-reviewed findings in a wide array of areas – everything from sustainable energy technology, food science, medicines, climate modelling and new materials, to foundational research laying the groundwork for future applications.

“Research at Chalmers and other universities helps new knowledge get out into society and industry for the benefit of everyone, to help with better decision-making. With the help of new research, we can better understand our world, and guide the way forward to more sustainable ways of living,” says Stefan Bengtsson, President and CEO of Chalmers University of Technology.

Singing for science is perhaps not the most standard way for a university to communicate. But there is a long musical tradition in Swedish academia, and last year the Chalmers Choir celebrated its 150th birthday. The pandemic unfortunately put a halt to rehearsals and concerts for a time, but now, they can sing together again, and are proud to present a new song in four voices, to the tune of the 18th century Swedish musician Carl Michael Bellman’s popular song ‘Så lunkar vi så småningom’ (‘So we gradually amble’). 

The lyrics are in Swedish, but an approximate English translation is provided in the video. Watch here.

“We are very happy to contribute and celebrate science in this way. We hope our message of faith in science can spread far and wide with the help of the song,” says Maria Cervin-Ellqvist, Vice-President of the Chalmers Choir and a doctoral student at the Department of Communication and Learning in Science where she researches, appropriately enough, research communication.

If you want to share Chalmers University’s celebration of the contribution of research to society via YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin or Instagram, please use the hashtag #singforscience.

ABOUT CHALMERS UNIVERSITY

Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, conducts research and education in technology and natural sciences at a high international level. The university has 3100 employees and 10,000 students, and offers education in engineering, science, shipping and architecture.

With scientific excellence as a basis, Chalmers promotes knowledge and technical solutions for a sustainable world. Through global commitment and entrepreneurship, we foster an innovative spirit, in close collaboration with wider society.The EU’s biggest research initiative – the Graphene Flagship – is coordinated by Chalmers. We are also leading the development of a Swedish quantum computer.

Chalmers was founded in 1829 and has the same motto today as it did then: Avancez – forward.

Heather Skovlund for use by 360 Magazine

Liming and Phosphorous Increase Cassava Yields

Cassava is a woody, edible starchy root that provides an immense number of calories, carbohydrates, vitamins B and C and essential minerals. The plant is significant particularly in developing countries in the tropical and subtropical regions of Africa, Asia and the Americas due to its capability to withstand challenging growing conditions. Although Cassava is essential to specific regions of the globe, it has been used as a crucial source of calories for around a billion people everywhere.

In a new research study published in Agronomy Journal, researchers in Brazil explored hypothesized options for increasing cassava yields. Researchers found that adding both calcium and phosphorous to the soils of these plants would in return increase cassava yields. These found higher yields came with no correlation to increases in cooking times.

One of the main challenges that comes with growing cassava particularly in the tropics stems from the naturally acidic soils that are accompanied by low phosphorous convenience in those regions. Phosphorous is a heavily needed nutrient in plant growth. Through a process of liming, which is essentially adding calcium carbonate to the soils, nutrients like phosphorus organically becomes more available to plants. Liming also makes the plants affected less acidic, which is vital in the growth and production of edible cassava crops.

Though much was known about the process of liming, there was still a lot to uncover about the effects of the process on cassava crops. Adalton Fernandes, co-author of the new research study, states that “It was generally believed that adding calcium to the soil could increase cassava root cooking times… we showed that liming caused minimal changes to cassava cooking times.”

Liming was found, though, to increase cassava yields in the study when in blend with phosphorous fertilizers. Without liming and phosphorus fertilizers, cassava roots weighed about 270 grams – 9.5 ounces – on average. Assessments found that at top levels of liming and phosphorous fertilization, on average the roots weighed over 350 grams – more than 12 ounces. That adds up to over a 26% increase with the accumulation of liming and phosphorus.

The study lasted over the course of two years and was conducted on an experimental farm in Botucatu, Brazil. Experimental subjects were exposed to differing rates before the cassava planting. Half of the subjects received no phosphorous fertilizers. Researchers added about 70 kilograms – converted to 155 lbs – of phosphorous fertilizer to the other subjects.

Differing features of the cassava plants were assessed based on growth with or without liming and phosphorous. These characteristics that were measured included number of roots per plant, root length, root weight and cooking times.

It was found that the addition of phosphorous increased the number of roots per plant by around 8%. Root lengths did not change substantially with liming nor phosphorous fertilization. Cassava root yields were increased by 22% with phosphorous application and 28% with liming. Cooking times increased by only 6% – less than 2 minutes – with liming. The slight increase in cooking time balances out by the large increase in yields. Fernandes states, “This small increase in cooking time is no reason for cassava farmers to not apply lime.”

An untested hypothesis that phosphorous fertilizers could lower cooking time in cassava roots was ultimately disapproved by Fernandes. Fernandes states, “we observed that phosphorus-fertilized cassava roots did not cook faster. So, phosphorus fertilization is not a recommended or viable way to reduce cooking times for cassava roots.”

Fernandes and his team are still looking to further research with differing varieties of cassava. “Will the amounts of lime and phosphorus fertilizer needed be the same for other varieties of cassava?” asks Fernandes. This poses an imperative question because varying types of cassava may have different reactions to the processes of liming and fertilization.

Image of Telescope via Gabrielle Archulleta for Use by 360 Magazine

Noisy Toys List Released

The American Academy of Audiology is warning parents about the dangers of noisy toys as the Sight & Hearing Association releases its annual Noisy Toys List for 2021. The American Academy of Audiology is a national association representing audiologists across the U.S. The Sight & Hearing Association is based in St. Paul, Minnesota with a goal to work towards the prevention of vision and hearing loss. Both organizations are urging parents to be cautious this holiday season when selecting toys. Recognizing that tiny ears are particularly susceptible to hearing damage, it is important to check noise levels before purchase.

“Many parents don’t realize the permanent damage a simple toy can inflict on a child’s hearing,” said Sarah Sydlowski, Au.D., Ph.D., MBA, president of the American Academy of Audiology; and associate chief improvement officer and audiology director of the Hearing Implant Program at Cleveland Clinic. “When we fail to protect a child’s hearing, the result can be irreversible hearing loss.” The inner ear contains delicate hair cells which do not regrow. Once these are damaged by noise, the result can be permanent hearing loss.

The Sight & Hearing Association has produced an annual list of noisy toys prior to the holidays for the past 24 years. Since 1939, SHA has been identifying and preventing vision and hearing loss, in partnership with other professional and community organizations, by providing screenings, education and research. “During the holiday season, we look for the most popular sound-producing toys on the market and, with a sound level meter, we measure the decibel level to raise awareness regarding how dangerously loud and potentially damaging toys can be to children. Toys are tested based on how a child would play with them, first at arm’s length (10 inches) and then next to the ear, which is how a child often listens to a noisy toy,” explained Kathy Webb, executive director of SHA.

“It’s very important that parents pay attention to this list as well as any toy they purchase. Hearing damage can be from a one-time exposure or multiple exposures over time,” explained Sydlowski. “The louder a sound is, the shorter the amount of time you can safely be around it. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommends sounds at 85 dB can be safe for up to eight hours. But for every 3 dB louder the sound is, the safe listening time reduces by half. Anyone buying toys for children needs to be aware of loud noises, particularly toys that have loud bursts—cap guns, popping balloons, air horns, etc. which are loud enough to damage hearing permanently with one short exposure.” 

A study released in January 2017 by researchers with the University of Alberta in Canada, determined the noise levels of popping balloons. They studied popping them with a pin, blowing them up until they ruptured and crushing them until they burst. The ruptured balloons clocked in at 168 decibels, four decibels louder than a 12-gauge shotgun.

Sydlowski advises parents to use phone apps to test the sound levels of toys before buying them. “Toys that make noise at or above 85 dBA can contribute to noise-induced hearing loss. If they come in at 85 decibels or higher when holding your phone microphone near them, like your child would hold the toy near their own ear, don’t buy them. It isn’t worth the risk. Remember, the louder the sound, the faster the damage and damage continues with exposure.”

While hearing loss numbers are rising in adults in the U.S., the total number of children with some type of hearing loss is unknown and many cases go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed.

“A child with just minimal hearing loss can be missing 50 percent of classroom discussion,” Sydlowski explained. These children will need to use extra effort in order to hear what is being said and they often become distracted and exhausted by the end of the day. These characteristics can be mistaken for learning disabilities when what the child needs is management of the hearing loss, typically in the form of hearing aids and other assistive listening devices. 

Reduced hearing can lead to behavioral issues, lack of focus, even depression in children. Children with hearing loss often don’t recognize that they can’t hear and parents don’t always know the signs.

Sydlowski cautioned, “Loud toys aren’t just annoying to parents, they can be a danger to children. Parents should exercise caution when buying toys with sound, including video games. With toys and games where you can turn the sound down, set the sound at an acceptable, non-harmful level and teach children to keep them at that level. Also, be vigilant about any signs that may indicate your child is having difficulty with their hearing. If you have any concerns about your child’s hearing, have a comprehensive hearing test with an audiologist.”

The American Academy of Audiology provides a list of licensed audiologists on its website. Click on “Find an Audiologist.”

health via 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

New Latinx Community Studies

 Leading Latino digital media company mitú, in partnership with premier multicultural marketing and communications agency The MRKT, released the first of a series of studies titled The mitú InTell Series. The studies aim to gain and socialize insights on the current state of the U.S. Hispanic community while digging deeper into their motivations and behaviors behind topics ranging from health and wellness to finance, sports, food, commerce, and travel.

“As a digital media brand that has stood for Latinx representation for 10 years, mitú has conversations with millions of Latinos daily. This interaction and our editorial process allows us to gather signals and real-world concerns from our audience to develop insights not only on what our community is thinking, but also why, and to do so while the topics are still actionable and timely,” said President of mitú, Stephen Brooks. “Ultimately we feel a responsibility to not only share these insights, but to give a voice to our audience.”

Both mitú and The MRKT are inherently able to provide insights into the state of the U.S. Hispanic population both from a macro, public perspective and at an interpersonal scale, allowing them to uncover nuances and evaluate the community from a unique point of view not seen before. 

“As a leading multicultural marketing and communications agency, our team lives and breathes the experiences that permeate the cultural zeitgeist within our community, making the issues that affect the U.S. Hispanic community incredibly evident to us. It is with that real-world and professional experience that we help create these studies which we hope enable other entities and organizations to identify the most current needs of the U.S. Latino population and bring us closer to a future where our community is fully seen and heard.” said President of The MRKT, Marcos Barron.

This first online quantitative study – conducted by a third party, HyperFocus ROI, with a sample size of 1,000 U.S. Hispanics–consisted of evaluating participants for their various attitudes, perceptions and behaviors across a number of demographic segments relative to the broader topic of health & wellness. Four key areas under this topic–medical, mental health, fitness, and nutrition–were evaluated across key audience segments broken out by age, income, gender, and country of origin.

While specific insights relative to each of these four areas were uncovered across the various audience segments, mental health emerged as the most common denominator, garnering the highest overall importance ratings when compared with the other three subcategories, with 65% of all respondents rating mental health as very important. Notably, mental health has declined across all segments of the U.S. Latino population vs. two years ago.

 Additional key findings include:

  • U.S. born Latinos are reporting health issues that affect multiple generations at nearly twice the rate as non U.S. born Latinos.
  • 37% of the Latinos surveyed report that the #1 reason they don’t have a primary care physician is their financial situation, with non U.S. born Latinos expressing this as a barrier with even more frequency at a rate of 46%. 
  • Latinos in the lowest income bracket (earning under $49K) are rating all of the health subcategories (medical, mental health, fitness, nutrition) as being somewhat/not at all important to them. However, there are some key barriers and reasons that surfaced on why they may not be placing importance on their health when compared to the other groups.
  • Out of the four subcategories, Latinos aren’t placing as much importance on fitness even though their reported habits are demonstrating that they are exercising at higher rates when compared to two years ago, with 45% stating that they are exercising more often.

For more key insights and to read the full study, click HERE

About mitú

Mitú is the leading digital media company representing the Latino point of view among consumers 18-44. Through our multiple touch points in video, editorial, social media and commerce, we connect brands, content buyers, and creators to the massive community of Latino consumers in America. Our audience is the 200%, 100% American and 100% Latino, who inspire us to create authentic, culturally relevant stories. We reach a massive, cross-cultural audience across a variety of social and O&O platforms. Mitú is a GoDigital Media Group company headquartered in Los Angeles, CA with operations in New York, Miami, Chicago, Mexico, Colombia, Belarus, Sri Lanka and South Korea. 

About The MRKT

The MRKT is the full-service multicultural marketing and communications division of Terry Hines & Associates (THA), a leading entertainment-marketing firm for over 40 years. The MRKT offers a comprehensive approach to creating narratives and experiences that connect clients to diverse, multicultural demographics via culture and lifestyle, over stereotypes and assumptions. The MRKT specializes in reaching Latinx, African American, and AAPI consumers and executes campaigns with both a national and local footprint, all infused with cultural resonance, across several disciplines including: PR, social media, influencer marketing, experiential, grassroots, and creative (print, digital, AV) on behalf of some of the largest entertainment and consumer brands in the world.

health via 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

New Act May Worsen Staffing Crisis

The American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL), representing more than 14,000 nursing homes and long term care facilities across the country that provide care to approximately five million people each year, said that two provisions in the Build Back Better Act (H.R. 5376) will have a devastating impact on nursing homes and could force thousands more facilities to further limit admissions or possibly close their doors.

The provisions, one that would require nursing homes to have a registered nurse (RN) on-staff 24 hours a day and another that would require the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to conduct a study on minimum staffing ratios and implement the regulations within one year, are unfunded mandates that conservatively, would cost the nursing homes industry billions of dollars a year and require hiring more than 150,000 new caregivers. 

“We strongly support having a RN on staff in nursing homes 24 hours a day, as we originally proposed in our reform agenda earlier this year. However, current data shows that the nursing homes are facing the worst job loss among all health care providers. We’ve lost 221,000 jobs since the beginning of the pandemic, and recovery is a long way away. Nursing home providers are doing all they can to attract and retain new workers, but the applicants simply aren’t there. The provisions in this bill do nothing to help us strengthen our workforce and will only force thousands of nursing homes to further limit the number of residents they can serve,” said AHCA/NCAL President and CEO Mark Parkinson. 

AHCA/NCAL estimates that if the HHS study found that nursing homes need to increase clinical and direct care staff by 25 percent, it would require hiring more than 150,000 RNs, licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and certified nursing assistants (CNAs), costing $10.7 billion per year. 

Current requirements mandate that nursing homes have a RN on staff eight hours a day. Under the proposed mandate in the legislation, AHCA/NCAL estimates it would require hiring 21,000 more nurses, costing $2.5 billion a year.

Phil Fogg, President and CEO of Marquis Companies, who operates more than 20 long term care facilities in California, Nevada and Oregon, said if Congress enacts these provisions without the necessary resources and recruitment programs, it could have a devastating impact on nursing homes and the residents they serve across the country.

“The workforce and economic crisis long term care providers are already experiencing is unprecedented. Lack of qualified workers is forcing providers to limit their admissions and, in some cases, close their doors permanently. Providers simply cannot attract more caregivers to our profession and meet the requirements of these mandates without financial support from Congress,” said Fogg, who is also the chair of the AHCA Board of Governors.

“We all share a common goal and that is to strengthen our workforce and provide the best possible care for our residents. But these unfunded mandates could further exacerbate the challenges we face and ultimately limit access to care for millions. We are eager to work hand-in-hand with lawmakers to find meaningful solutions that will ensure seniors continue to receive the highest quality care and caregivers have access to good-paying, rewarding jobs,” said Len Russ, operator and administrator of Bayberry Care Center in New Rochelle, NY.

Breaking News illustration via Nicole Salazar for use by 360 Magazine

EHT Says Don’t Buy Children Phones

“Choose safe toys for your children, not wi-fi connected toys or smartphones,” is the message the Environmental Health Trust is sharing after recently winning a victory in the U.S. Court of Appeals of the District of Columbia Circuit. The court ordered the Federal Communications Commission to explain why it ignored scientific evidence showing harm from wireless radiation. Included in the evidence that the FCC ignored are studies on the impact of wireless exposure to children.

Because children’s skulls are thinner and their brains and bodies contain more fluid, they potentially absorb more cell phone microwave radiation. The American Academy of Pediatrics has made recommendations that parents should limit cell phone use by children, keep the phone away from the head and instead of streaming wirelessly, pre-download games and videos so children can use the technology more safely in airplane mode.

Studies at the National Institutes of Health National Toxicology Program found cell phone radiation led to cancers in the hearts and brains of male rats. DNA damage was also found. In 2021, a study by the Environmental Working Group published in Environmental Health, analyzed the NIH NTP study and concluded that U.S. safety limits needed to be 200 to 400 times stronger to protect children. A Yale Medicine study found that mice prenatally exposed to cell phone radiation had increased hyperactivity and impaired memory.

“Cell phones were never pre-market tested for long-term safety,” said Devra Davis, Ph.D., president of the Environmental Health Trust, a scientific think tank that promotes a healthier environment through research, education and policy. “Safety limits for radiation were set 25 years ago, based on 35-year-old science and using a model of a large, adult male. Over a dozen countries inform parents to limit their children’s exposure because they are more vulnerable and will have a lifetime of exposure,” Davis explained. “Parents assume they’re buying devices and toys that have been deemed safe but no U.S. health agency has ever completed a systematic evaluation of the health risks of wireless radiation.”

While all cell phones have fine print warnings about keeping a distance between the phone and the body, the instructions are easy to miss. For instance, the Apple iPhone 13 should not be closer than 5 mm. The Amazon Echo has a distance of 20 cm, or about 8 inches. Laptops and many wi-fi toys advise keeping an “8-inch distance” from the body. When cellphones and wi-fi devices are held close to the body, the wireless radiation absorption can exceed U.S. safety limits that were set for adults more than two decades ago.

Because smartphones, smart toys and other smart home devices have become ubiquitous in our daily lives, we rarely think about how this technology works. But it’s not holiday magic—it’s wireless microwave radiation. All wireless devices from smartphones to wi-fi and connected dolls and stuffed animals are two-way microwave radios that send and receive a type of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation called radio frequency (RF radiation or microwaves).

Many physicians are cautioning about how this daily exposure will affect children’s health in the long term. Before buying your child a cell phone this holiday, be sure to learn the facts. EHT has resources for parents on how to reduce exposure at home.

Mars illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Water Infrastructure Funding Act

The California Legislative Analysts Office has just produced a report to estimate the financial impact of the “Water Infrastructure Funding Act of 2022,” a proposed ballot initiative that aims to increase the annual supply of water to Californians by five million acre feet. The contents of this report are good news for every Californian. More water. Lower water bills.

The initiative calls for two percent of the state general fund to be set aside to develop new water supplies. Projects eligible for this funding would include the development or expansion of facilities for:

  • Groundwater cleanup and storage.
  • Stormwater capture, treatment, and storage.
  • Water recycling.
  • Surface reservoirs.
  • Desalination of seawater or brackish water.
  • Water conveyance, such as canals or pipes.

Also eligible for funding are water conservation programs to achieve up to 1 million acre-feet of the total objective of 5 million acre-feet of water.

Among the fiscal effects predicted by the Legislative Analyst include increased state spending on water supply projects, and potentially less funding available for other state activities. Notwithstanding the multi-billion budget surplus California’s legislature currently enjoys, this redirecting of spending for water projects is what the initiative proponents intend. The State of California has neglected its water infrastructure for decades. With climate change promising dryer winters and a reduced Sierra snowpack, this is the perfect moment for California to prioritize spending on a resilient water infrastructure.

Assemblyman Devon Mathis (R, Tulare), a supporter of the initiative who has gathered endorsements from a growing bipartisan list of state legislators, had this to say in response to the LAO report: “This is a first of its kind ballot initiative. We set the goal based on our state’s current and future water needs, set ongoing funding for a diverse set of eligible project categories, and placed a sunset for when the goal is reached.” Mathis added, “This is a vote for people to lower their water bills, and for cities and school districts to upgrade their water systems without breaking their local budgets.”

Mathis is correct. As the LAO report notes, “it could result in water customers paying lower water bills than they otherwise would in the absence of the measure.”

One of the proponents, Lisa Ohlund, the retired general manager of the East Orange County Water District, explained the long-term benefits of this initiative, saying “climate change projections have many water districts concerned about their ability to reliably deliver safe water in quantities that will protect people, trees and the economy. This initiative focuses tax dollars on this enormously important problem at a pivotal time. We must take action to prepare for the increasingly harsh storms that will dump large amounts of rain on California, and the extended dry periods where we must look to water recycling and desalination to help fill in the shortfalls. California lead the world in water in the last century; we need to do the same in this one.”

To learn more about the progress of this game changing initiative, visit their website HERE.

WonderWorks Unveils Fall Programs

WonderWorks Panama City Beach Unveils Fall Programs, Includes Art Contest and National STEM Day

WonderWorks Panama City Beach offers over 100 interactive exhibits for guests to explore and enjoy all year long. This fall, the attraction is focused on bringing their guests even more science-based learning opportunities. WonderWorks will be offering fun, educational programs for students and families this fall, such as the annual art contest, National STEM Day festivities, and a Saturdays in Space virtual “Ask An Astronaut” program.

“Fall is always an exciting time of year for us because we get to host incredible programs for our community such as our FLO-ART art contest and our National STEM Day program,” said Michael Walsingham, general manager of WonderWorks Panama City Beach. “Students love getting to see their work on display at the upside-down house, and we’re excited to welcome a new class of artists to the gallery.”

Students and families have a variety of ways to engage at WonderWorks this fall, including with these new programs and exhibits:

FLO-ART: This fall, WonderWorks will be opening applications for its North Florida Youth Art Gallery. This year’s theme is “Imagination.” Submissions are currently being accepted online only. The deadline to apply is Wednesday, December 15, 2021. Local artists will have their work displayed in the gallery for a full year, and winners will receive free tickets to WonderWorks to see their work on display. To enter the contest or read the submission guidelines, visit the site: Here.

Saturdays in Space – Every Saturday during October, guests and followers will get the chance to learn more about life in space and the career of an astronaut through the Ask an Astronaut Q&A series. Dr. Don Thomas, a former NASA astronaut, will be answering questions that were submitted by teachers and students in the community. His video responses will be posted each week for viewers to tune in on the WonderWorks’ YouTube Channel: Here.

National STEM Day – WonderWorks will be honoring this special day for the second year in a row. To highlight the importance of STEM, there will be fun science labs and experiments throughout the building all day on Monday, November 8, 2021. The labs will give people a chance to learn more about pressure, temperature, density, origami, and more.

“Fall is also a great time for our local schools to book a field trip to give their students a hands-on way to make a connection with science,” added Walsingham. “We look forward to providing the community with a fun and interactive fall.”

WonderWorks Panama City Beach offers many STEM-related exhibits and activities all year long. There are also demonstrations, activities, virtual learning labs, science fair partnerships, homeschool days, and more. In addition to offering families hands-on learning opportunities, they also provide educational field trips for schools and student groups. To get more information about WonderWorks’ STEM programs, visit their website: Here.

Jurrasic Quest Dino Trainers via Jurrasic Quest for use by 360 Magazine

Jurassic Quest Celebrates National Fossil Day

Jurassic Quest®, the nation’s largest and most realistic dinosaur experience, invites fans of the prehistoric era to join Jurassic Quest’s dinosaur trainers and loveable baby dinosaurs for a day of virtual family fun on National Fossil Day, October 13, 2021.  

Families can save 25% off tickets to Jurassic Quest’s upcoming showings (full schedule below) on October 13th with promo code FOSSIL DAY. Use promo code FOSSIL DAY to purchase tickets at their website. This is a one day promotional offer and restrictions may apply. And, special merchandise discounts will be offered on October 13th during our zoom playdates- stay tuned for additional details!

National Fossil Day Fun with Jurassic Quest!

Join Jurassic Quest baby dinosaurs and trainers for live virtual play sessions throughout the dino holiday, on October 13. To join, fans will need to register for each session they’d like to attend HERE.

Each daytime session will include about 30 minutes of live family-friendly fun, such as dino storytime, show and tell, adorable dino baby appearances and more, led by the Jurassic Quest dinosaur trainer team: Safari Sarah, Dino Dustin, Captain Caleb, Prehistoric Nick and Park Ranger Marty. In the evening, kids can snuggle in for virtual baby dino bedtime stories at 8 p.m. ET. 

Other Activities

Jurassic Quest has free activities for families to celebrate at home including coloring and activity sheet, participants will get opportunities for discounts and exclusive merchandise commemorating the occasion in the Jurassic Quest Shop. And watch out for more fun via promotional partner Macaroni Kids.

Fossil fans can “rock” out to the Jurassic Quest song all year long and see highlights from the national event tour HERE. And that’s not all… catch the Jurassic Quest herd of 100+ dinosaurs in person!

Fall and Winter Tour

Loved by millions, Jurassic Quest is kicking off its fall tour by launching a THIRD touring show for the first time ever–meaning more families than ever before can visit the age of the dinosaurs! Watch for upcoming cities and show dates HERE.

Jurassic Quest is touring with its most beloved and unique experiences for the whole family including more than 100 life-like dinosaurs, dinosaur themed rides, live dinosaur shows, interactive science and art activities, a “Triceratops” soft play area for our littlest explorers, bounce houses and inflatable attractions, photo opportunities, and more. 

Visitors walk through the Cretaceous, Jurassic and Triassic periods to see the dinos that ruled on land, and “deep dive” into the “Ancient Oceans” exhibit to come face to face with the largest apex predator that ever existed–a moving, life-size, 50-foot-long megalodon! Meet the babies, hatched only at Jurassic Quest: Cammie the Camarasaurus, Tyson the T-Rex and Trixie the Triceratops–and, you may even catch one of our star dino trainers: Safari Sarah, Dino Dustin, Captain Caleb, Prehistoric Nick or Park Ranger Marty! 

The Jurassic Quest herd of animatronic dinos–from the largest predators to playful baby dinos–are displayed in realistic scenes with movement and sound, allowing guests to experience them as they were when they roamed the earth billions of years ago. Jurassic Quest works in collaboration with leading paleontologists to ensure each dinosaur is painstakingly replicated in every detail, from coloration to teeth size, to textured skin, fur or feathers, drawing on the latest research about how we understand dinosaurs and ancient giants of the sea looked and moved. 

About Jurassic Quest

Since 2013, Jurassic Quest has been touring epic dinosaur experiences treating millions of people across North America to an as-close-as-you-can-get look at the giants that ruled the Earth and sea millions of years ago. Jurassic Quest is the largest and most realistic dinosaur exhibition in North America. Developed with leading paleontologists, each dinosaur has been painstakingly replicated in every detail including the most realistic likenesses, movement and sound. Whether their prehistoric counterpart had skin that was scaly, feathers or fur, Jurassic Quest has spared no expense in bringing the dinosaurs to life. Jurassic Quest produced 96 multi-day events in 34 states and Canada and sold over one million tickets in 2019, and has hosted over 2.5 million fans at its Jurassic Quest Drive Thru® touring throughout the country since June 2020. For more information and tickets, click HERE.