Posts tagged with "Foundation"

Les Paul illustration by Mina Tocalini at 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

Les Paul – New Website

The all-new Les-Paul.com website has officially launched and is the most comprehensive and interactive source for information and entertainment relating to the legendary Les Paul. The acclaimed inventor and musician are known for numerous inventions and innovations that changed the way musicians play music, engineers record music, and the way fans hear music. Les was a pioneer and is arguably the most important individual in the history of the modern music industry. The exciting new website is divided into five sections: The Inventor, The Musician, The Foundation, Education, and Music. Visitors will enjoy hours of amazing videos and other content in which to explore the life and career of the man who is revered by musicians worldwide in every genre of music. The site’s new homepage opens with a slide show edited to Les’ own music and features highlights of his extraordinary life. 

The INVENTOR section features additional Les Paul videos and includes “The Solid Body Electric Guitar is Born,” “Broomstick with Pick Ups On It,” a CNN segment, “The Les Pulverizer” featuring Les Paul and Jose Feliciano on Dick Clark’s live show, “The Log” educational video and other outstanding segments about Sound on Sound, The First Tape Machine, The Lathe and the 8-Track Recorder, The Les Paul Studio Tour, “The Thomas Edison of Recording,” and original videos of Les Paul accepting The Inventors Hall of Fame award and many more.  Never before has such an extensive collection of such rare or rarely-seen videos, rare or rarely-viewed been available on one dedicated website. 

Fans can hear legends including Peter Frampton, Sting, Stevie Wonder, producer Don Was, Steve Vai, and Sir Paul McCartney and Slash all pay homage to Les Paul.

The MUSICIAN section celebrates Les’ impact on countless artists from Sir Paul McCartney to Slash. It speaks to his status as a music legend whose virtuosic playing extended across all genres including jazz, country, R&B, and Rock. His early relationships with such icons as Bing Crosby, Chet Akins, and Tony Bennett can be seen in extraordinary photos and performance videos. This section also includes a chronicle of his life with Mary Ford and hits such as “How High the Moon” and “Vaya Con Dios” – to name just a few. 

The FOUNDATION section provides information about the Les Paul Foundation which Les created. The Foundation inspires innovative and creative thinking by sharing the legacy of Les Paul through the support of music education, recording, innovation, and medical research related to hearing. A full list of grantees and a section detailing the process for applying for a grant from the Foundation is available in this section. Les Paul exhibits at museums across the United States are highlighted providing details on where one can visit to learn more and see actual Les Paul artifacts. This section serves as a virtual travelogue of sorts for Les Paul exclusive exhibits at some of the country’s most popular museums. 

The EDUCATION section offers diverse resources for classroom or individual use and is divided into Elementary, Secondary and Collegiate sections. Study units developed through the collaboration of the Les Paul Foundation, the Wisconsin School Music Association, and the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction are included. Everyone can download free posters in this section.

The MUSIC section is an extensive area devoted to a Les Paul Discography, which is, in fact, the most inclusive ever presented online. We all know that Les Paul was a musician and nowhere else online can one explore such a robust listing of Les Paul’s music. His musical output included over 33 Top 20 recordings spanning multiple genres from country and pop to jazz and R&B. Fans can download his music directly and experience the greatness of his and Mary Ford’s ingenuity all in one place. One can spend hours listening to songs such as “Hawaiian Paradise” (1949), “Bye Bye Blues” (1952), “The Hit Makers (1953), “The Les Paul Trio” (1978), “Hits of Les and Mary” (1960), “Vaya Con Dios” (1953) and many more. Visitors can also see original album covers and listen to some of his hits by clicking next to the album image. It’s a one-stop, curated look at Les’ music dedicated to the sounds of Les Paul and his musical legacy. This section makes it easy to download any of the available songs or to stream on visitor’s favorite streaming platforms and with many updates being added in the following months. 360 Magazine is pleased to promote such legends personal website to the world to reach many hearts that admired Les Paul. 

“Les Paul was one of the most important individuals of our time and gave the music industry the inventions to innovate and create music in new ways. No one can dispute his influence on modern music.  We wanted to make sure that the new les-paul.com site not only celebrates his life and career but provides a wealth of information and interactivity for website guests. The content on the new site is not only exclusive and in some cases rare but is a collection of the most extensive resources available in one place. We will continue to add exciting new content and hope that as visitors explore all of the areas under each section, they enjoy and learn about Les Paul.  Click on les-paul.com and have some fun. We hope you find a surprising amount of reasons to return again and again. We are pretty sure you will. – Michael Braunstein, Executive Director, Les Paul Foundation

Lebron Illustration created by Rumnik Ghuma from 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

Lebron James × Youtube Originals – I PROMISE

Youtube Originals Announces new documentary “I Promise” from Ledbron James’ The Springhill Company chronicling year one at his groundbreaking, public I Promise school, both a film and an educational resource, “I Promise” provides an inside look at a new model for urban, public education, the film debuts September 28 onlu on Youtube, and watch the official trailer HERE  

YouTube Originals today announced “I Promise,” a feature documentary film from award-winning director, Marc Levin, that tells the story of LeBron James’ efforts to close the achievement gap in his hometown of Akron, Ohio through the eyes of the inspiring students who are resetting expectations of their futures. The film premieres Thursday, September 28 at 12 pm ET / 9 am PT on the YouTube Originals channel. 

The documentary, which premiered at the 2021 Tribeca Festival, features an in-depth look at the first academic year inside the groundbreaking I Promise School, which opened in 2018. Viewers will get to explore the day-to-day trials, triumphs, and life-changing impact of the school staff, students, and families working together in a unique, family-first educational environment that embraces the trauma and challenges many faces in Akron. The film offers an intimate look at the school’s blueprint for a new model for urban, public education – a holistic, STEM-focused approach led by love and Social-Emotional Learning infused with the LeBron James Family Foundation’s “We Are Family” philosophy. In opening the doors to the I PROMISE School’s early challenges and learnings, the film exists to provide insights and tools that students and educators in every community across the country can implement in their classrooms and beyond.  

“I Promise” is directed by Marc Levin with executive producers LeBron James, Maverick Carter, Jamal Henderson, Philip Byron, Nicholas Lopez, Marc Levin, Dan Levin, Catherine Cyr, and Josh Gold. LeBron James and Maverick Carter will serve as executive producers on the documentary with their empowerment-led media conglomerate The SpringHill Company. “I Promise” director Marc Levin will also executive produce alongside Jamal Henderson, Philip Byron, Nicholas Lopez, Daniel B. Levin, Catherine Cyr, and Josh Gold. The film is a Blowback Pictures Production in association with RYOT Lab and LeBron James Family Foundation. Susanne Daniels is Global Head of Original Content for YouTube. Nadine Zylstra serves as Head of Family, Learning, and Impact for YouTube Originals, with Zoe Di Stefano also overseeing “I Promise” for YouTube Originals. 360 Magazine is amazed to see such good work being done for the community. Many people are giving back to the community especially because of the time period we are in. 

“I Promise” joins a growing slate of learning and impact projects including the upcoming new slate of sustainability-focused programming: “Seat at the Table,” with David Attenborough and creator Jack Harries, “Stay Wild” (working title) from Brave Wilderness in partnership with Appian Way and Madica Productions, “Shut It Off ASAP” (working title) from AsapSCIENCE and B17 Entertainment; in addition to launched projects from the #YouTubeBlack Voices Fund aimed to invest with intention with programming like “Bear Witness, Take Action 2,” which continued the movement on racial justice to evoke change and protect Black lives; “Resist,” a documentary series from Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors; and “Barbershop Medicine” aiming to put the “public” back in Public Health and explore the impact race and socioeconomic status have on healthcare and longevity. Additional learning YouTube Originals include Emmy Award-winning mini-series “Create Together,” a Joseph Gordon-Levitt hosted series featuring the creations of everyday people collaborating to make art; Daytime Emmy Award-winning special “Creators for Change on Girls’ Education with Michelle Obama” where YouTube creators, such as Liza Koshy, sit down with Former First Lady Michelle Obama and the Obama Foundation to discuss the state of girls’ education around the world; Emmy-nominated “Glad You Asked” that explores topics driven by our curiosity about the world around us; and “Retro Tech” the Emmy-nominated series that explores the technological promises of the past.

Sean and Myra Anderson illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Big Sean Hosts 3rd D.O.N. Weekend

Big Sean & Sean Anderson Foundation to Unveil Music Production Studio Inside Boys & Girls Clubs of SE Michigan During 3rd Annual D.O.N. Weekend

President Pro-Tem Mary Sheffield will add Occupy the Corner-Detroit to D.O.N. Weekend activities, will offer vaccines, expungement of records services, unemployment support and more.

Celebrity Kickball game of Team Big Sean vs. Team Sheffield to take place for youth, will feature Michigan’s Lieutenant Gov. Garlin Gilchrist, WJLB’s Dr Darrius, and surprise celebrity guests.

Sunday’s activities will focus on mental health and include Yoga on the Beach and Industry Club Fashion Show.

Multi-platinum artist, philanthropist and BGCSM Alumni Big Sean is excited to return to Detroit for his 3rd Annual Detroit’s On Now (D.O.N.) Weekend Saturday, August 28 – Sunday, August 29. The weekend is presented by the Sean Anderson Foundation (SAF) and hosted by the Boys & Girls Clubs of Southeastern Michigan (BGCSM) and City Council President Pro-Tem Mary Sheffield and will offer free activities for all ages. COVID-19 protocols will be enforced, and attendance is limited. 

This past year and a half has been challenging for everyone. I’m glad we can bring D.O.N. Weekend back and celebrate the people who make this city great, said Big Sean. With all the hurdles Detroit has faced during the pandemic, it’s so important to bring the city together in a positive way.

The new Reimagined Club is another strategic step to ensure Detroit youth have the tools and skills to become career, start-up and homeowner ready before leaving the Clubs at 18. The facility includes not only the new fully functional SAF content and production studio, but updated buildouts of the Ponyride co-working space for area entrepreneurs, computer lab, art gallery, 3D and laser printers, and a retail pop-up shop, similar to BGCSM’s Dauch Club on Tireman, which unveiled its Reimagined space with Big Sean in 2019. 

Boys & Girls Clubs of Southeastern Michigan is proud to be the anchor partner bringing DON Weekend to Detroit neighborhoods, said Shawn H. Wilson, president & CEO BGCSM. On behalf of the youth and families of Detroit, we want to thank Myra and Sean for their continued support and love for the city.

The special weekend celebrates the Detroit artists, creatives, entrepreneurs, families and long-standing institutions that are the backbone of the city. Along with the special unveiling of the SAF Studio, there will be a community block party and Occupy the Corner led by President Pro-Tem Mary Sheffield. Activities include live DJ, free food, live performances, COVID-19 vaccines, free haircuts and braiding, workforce one jobs, felony expungement, apprenticeship opportunities, carnival rides, gaming stations and a celebrity kickball game.

During these difficult times it’s more important than ever to stay consistent in our service to others. Combining forces with the Sean Anderson Foundation and the Boys and Girls Club of Southeastern for the D.O.N. Weekend and Occupy the Corner – Detroit collaboration is a perfect way to show the community, especially those in need, that there are people who care and resources available, exclaimed Detroit City Council President Pro Tempore Mary Sheffield. Additionally with the new reality resulting from the Covid-19 pandemic, it’s nice to help the community we serve and love to get a little slice of normalcy, interaction, and fun.

On Sunday, to continue strong focus on mental and physical wellness, BGCSM will be hosting Yoga on the Beach with Jamel Randall, owner of the Trap Yoga and Massage Studio Detroit and an Industry Club Fashion Show.

The weekend’s events were made possible by presenting sponsors Duo, Detroit Pistons, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Mercy Primary Care Center, Foot Locker, Fratarcangeli Wealth Management, The Mullick Foundation and TKG Business Management LLC.

Event tickets are limited due to COVID precautions but free to the public. BGCSM continues to be a safe space for youth, families and the community amid the current pandemic. Strict safety measures will be actively enforced during weekend activities.

About Sean Anderson Foundation

The mission of the Sean Anderson Foundation, a non-profit 501(c)3, is to assist in the education, health, safety, and well-being of school-age youth and their families. The Foundation partners with established charitable organizations and corporate sponsors to support its signature program, Mogul Prep.

About Boys & Girls Clubs of Southeastern Michigan  

Founded in 1926, Boys & Girls Clubs of Southeastern Michigan (BGCSM) has over 95 years of experience serving youth ages 6-18 by providing a safe, fun place that inspires, while offering high quality programs that provide real-world learning from caring adult mentors. Serving nearly 21,000 youth, families and entrepreneurs annually in Clubs throughout southeastern Michigan, BGCSM works every day to provide a world-class experience, empowering youth to become change agents through economic mobility. By providing high quality youth development programs, BGCSM has reimagined the future of afterschool learning and continues to stay agile and expand to better support the needs of our changing youth, ensuring that they are career, start-up and homeowner ready. To learn more about BGCSM visit their site and follow us on social media on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter!

About Big Sean 

Big Sean consistently asserts himself as an elite rapper and a vital voice for the culture, at large, since he emerged in 2011, with his debut album Finally Famous on Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music / Def Jam imprint. The album spun off consecutive top-charted pop/R&B/rap crossover smashes with My Last featuring Chris Brown (platinum), Marvin & Chardonnay featuring Kanye West and Roscoe Dash (platinum), and Dance (A$$) featuring Nicki Minaj (4x-platinum). Sean was a major collaborator on Kanye’s groundbreaking Cruel Summer album in 2012, and shared multi-platinum success with Kanye on the Grammy-nominated Mercy (also featuring Pusha T and 2 Chainz), and Clique (with Jay-Z). Sean’s Hall Of Fame album followed in 2013, including Guap (platinum) and Beware featuring Lil Wayne and Jhené Aiko (2x-platinum). Dark Sky Paradise (2015) was Sean’s first platinum and first album to debut #1 on Soundscan. It reigned on the charts with the #1 IDFWU featuring E-40 (6x-platinum), Blessings featuring Drake and Kanye West (3x-platinum), and One Man Can Change the World featuring Kanye West and John Legend (platinum). I Decided. (released Feb 2017, platinum) debuted at #1 on the momentum of the two pre-order instant great tracks that turned into smash singles, Bounce Back (5x-platinum with over 300 million streams globally), and Moves (2x-platinum). In 2020, he logged his third consecutive #1 debut on the Billboard Top 200 and fifth straight #1 entry on the Billboard Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums Chart with the critically acclaimed Detroit 2.  

Beyond selling out worldwide tours, the Detroit native was recently appointed Creative Director of Innovation for the Detroit Pistons. Sean has also made a successful foray into film/TV – starring in the animated film Dog Gone Trouble, which hit #1 on Netflix, as well as appearing in Lena Waithe’s comedy series Twenties on BET. Attracting an audience of nearly 50 million across channels, Sean leverages his platform to give back. He runs his own 501(c)3 non-profit organization, the Sean Anderson Foundation, which assists in the education, health, safety and well-being of school aged youth in underserved communities across the country.

Follow Big Sean via Instagram, Twitter and Spotify.

"Best Driving Song" Survey Result image by Rita Azar for use by 360 Magazine

FLEETWOOD RV FACTORY TOUR VIDEOS

FLEETWOOD RV® SHARES “HOW THEY’RE MADE” SERIES OF FACTORY TOUR VIDEOS

REV Recreation Group brand Fleetwood RV has released a series of five videos showcasing how their luxury motorhomes are made at their 480,000-square foot manufacturing headquarters in Decatur, IN. The exclusive, behind-the-scenes tour delivers a peek into a few of the steps involved in manufacturing a 16,000 to 30,000 lb. Class A motorhome. The video also introduces some of the engineers, managers, welders, and technicians who design, manufacture, and assemble the various elements of a Fleetwood RV.

Fleetwood RV is one of the most-established brands in the motorhome industry and is known for its quality, innovative features, and family-friendly design options. One of Fleetwood’s most popular models, the Bounder®, is celebrating its 35 anniversary in 2021 and has the distinction of being one of the best-selling motorhomes ever.

The factory tour videos deliver a top-to-bottom look at Fleetwood RV and cover the foundation, lamination process, cabinet shop, assembly, and paint process.

Factory Tour Video Details

The foundation video shares the different types of chassis used for a gas or diesel motorhome and the steel bridging system that is custom built for each floor plan.

The lamination process video shows how the walls, floor, and ceiling are created. Light-weight aluminum framing is welded together, and the cavities are packed with bead foam insulation. The pieces undergo a lamination process that applies consistent pressure for nearly an hour, creating a permanent bond and solid structure.

The cabinet shop video looks at how the cabinetry in a Fleetwood RV is made on-site with the bases, frames, doors, and drawers fashioned from solid wood. The video also shows how the wood scraps and leftover pieces don’t go to waste, instead, they are used to heat the building during the winter months.

The assembly video brings all the individual elements together, including the slide outs. Fleetwood RV uses a proprietary process to ensure a positive slide out fit that eliminates gaps and helps prevent water infiltration. Each slide out is also slightly sloped to the outside to direct water away from the coach.

Finally, there is a video visit to the 120,000-square-foot paint facility. Fleetwood RV has 10 paint booths, and each year applies 164,000 gallons of paint to its coaches. Dependent on the motorhome, there are either three or four base colors applied. After a quality inspection, several layers of clear coat are used to deliver a deep shine and provide years of protection.

To watch the factory tour videos, visit HERE. Select the “About” tab, click on “Factory Tours,” and provide an email address.

Fleetwood RV is a brand from REV Recreation Group, a subsidiary of REV Group, Inc. (NYSE: REVG). For more information on Fleetwood RV, visit HERE.

The Bounder® model from Fleetwood RV is celebrating its 35-year anniversary in 2021, and has the distinction of being one of the best-selling motorhomes ever.

About REV Recreation Group

REV Recreation Group, Inc. (RRG) is a REV Group® subsidiary and a leading manufacturer of Class A Gas and Diesel recreational vehicle brands. This company has one of the best and longest standing distribution networks in the industry and boasts some of the industry’s most recognized and iconic brand names such as American Coach®, Fleetwood RV®, and Holiday Rambler®. REV Recreation Group is headquartered in Decatur, IN, which is also its principal manufacturing location. In addition, RRG operates two state-of-the-art service and repair centers and a genuine parts online warehouse.

About REV Group, Inc.

REV Group® companies are leading designers and manufacturers of specialty vehicles and related aftermarket parts and services. Our companies serve a diversified customer base, primarily in the United States, through three segments: Fire & Emergency, Commercial, and Recreation. They provide customized vehicle solutions for applications, including essential needs for public services (ambulances, fire apparatus, school buses, and transit buses), commercial infrastructure (terminal trucks and industrial sweepers) and consumer leisure (recreational vehicles). REV’s diverse portfolio is made up of well-established principal vehicle brands, including many of the most recognizable names within their industry. Several of our brands pioneered their specialty vehicle product categories and date back more than 50 years. REV Group trades on the NYSE under the symbol REVG.

illustration by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

What Will Happen To The Gates Foundation?

Commentary by Samy Dwek, Founder and CEO, The Family Office Doctor

and White Knight Consulting  

We’ve seen in the press today articles about the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. It was a foundation that they started with a very clear purpose and focus on helping third world countries, eradicating certain diseases, and researching diseases such as Parkinson’s, HIV, and others. It’s phenomenal in terms of what they’re trying to do.

Unfortunately, Melinda French Gates and Bill Gates have decided to separate. How does this impact the family foundation? Yes, they’ve grown apart. They’ve decided to separate their ways amicably. Clearly, their focus points and their desires of what they want to accomplish are different.

The problem is, in most family foundation trusts, people don’t plan for what happens in case of divorce. That’s not in the planning and maybe it should be. Maybe it’s something we need to think more about and discuss more openly. Not that we are preempting or provoking; we should be planning in case of such an eventuality.

The Gates Foundation currently has close to $50 billion. It’s not an insignificant amount of money, and they’re talking about adding another 15 to $20 billion. So again, these are significant amounts of money that can have a major impact on the focus points that these two individuals have.

So how do they go forward? What’s been very interesting is that Melinda French Gates has decided that she’s going to stay on for two years. Let’s see whether they can make this work or whether they fail to get along or see eye to eye on the objectives of the foundation.

Bill Gates has agreed in principle that they will set aside new money into a new foundation controlled by Melinda French so that they can then continue their missions. What does that mean for family foundations? I think they need to have those discussions. They need to put planning in place.

What would happen if this eventuality should occur in your family? How would it impact your family foundation? What mechanisms do you have in place so that you could separate those funds? It doesn’t have to be just in the case of divorce. It could be brothers or sisters decide that they want to go in different directions.

So what mechanisms have you put in place? It’s something to discuss with legal counsel, something to think about because at the end of the day, we’re human beings. We have different ideas and we grow in different ways. But if we’re creating a family foundation, if we’re trying to help benefit others and pass on the goodwill, let’s make sure anything that happens to us doesn’t negatively impact them.

Bésame Cosmetics × Lucille Ball

After creating detailed and imaginative collections for Disney and Marvel, Bésame Cosmetics is kicking off their new “Iconic Women Series” with a full collection inspired by Lucille Ball on June 25th.
Widely known as the spunky redhead from the hit sitcom I Love Lucy, Lucille Ball was a beloved comedienne that captured America’s heart and broke barriers for women in the entertainment business.
Featuring exact color matches from her favorite makeup and foundation, you can experience the timeless elegance of Lucille Ball. Highly-pigmented formulas and unparalleled staying power bring superior performance to each piece in this luxurious set.
The Lucy Collection includes:

  • Club Babalu Eyeshadow Palette
  • Love That Redhead Lipstick
  • What A Peach Lipstick
  • Lucy’s Face Powder Compact
  • Lucy’s Pencil Set

As a bonus for purchasing the complete collection, you’ll also get:

  • Lucy’s Lashes
  • I Love Lucy Mini Tote Bag

The cruelty-free lashes are based on the exact size, shape, and color that Lucille Ball wore and can’t be found anywhere else! They are only available with the complete collection. Lucille Ball brought laughter to the world. Capture that light by owning a Lucille Ball-inspired makeup set of your own.

Follow Bésame Cosmetics: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Website | Wikipedia

T.J. Martell Foundation and the NYC Marathon

T.J. Martell Foundation for Cancer Research Named an Official Charity Partner of the 2019 TCS New York City Marathon Set for Sunday, November 3, 2019

The T.J. Martell Foundation for Cancer was named an Official Charity Partner of the 2019 TCS New York City Marathon, it was announced today. The race will take place on Sunday, November 3, 2019.  

“The T.J. Martell Foundation is thrilled to be named an official charity partner of the 2019 TCS New York City Marathon,” said Laura Heatherly, CEO. “The TCS New York City Marathon provides a unique platform for thousands of dedicated runners to pursue their goals while raising awareness for causes that are close to their hearts. We are proud to support our team on their journey to the iconic finish line as they raise important for our cancer research programs.”

The T.J. Martell Foundation kicked off its Team T.J. Martell at the 2018 Hamptons Marathon and Half, where a team of 10 runners raised over $48,000 for cancer research programs at flagship hospitals across the country.

“New York Road Runners is honored to have the T.J. Martell Foundation joining us as an official charity partner for the 2019 TCS New York City Marathon,” said Christine Burke, vice president of runner products and strategic partnerships for NYRR. “Taking on the five boroughs of New York City while raising funds and awareness for important causes is truly inspiring. We are proud to support the efforts of the T.J. Martell Foundation’s team, and all of our charity runners, and wish them the best of luck as they begin their journey to the 2019 TCS New York City Marathon.”

Since its inception in 2006, the TCS New York City Marathon official charity partner program has raised $310 million, including $40 million at the 2018 TCS New York City Marathon. For more information on the official charity partner program, please visit: http://www.tcsnycmarathon.org/plan-your-race/run-for-charity

About the T.J. Martell Foundation

The T.J. Martell Foundation is the music industry’s leading foundation that funds innovative medical research focused on finding treatments and cures for cancer. The Foundation was founded in 1975 by music industry executive Tony Martell and his colleagues in loving memory of his son T.J., who died of leukemia. The Foundation has provided more than $280 million for research at flagship hospitals in the United States. For more information, please visit www.tjmartell.org.

About the TCS New York City Marathon

The TCS New York City Marathon is the largest marathon in the world and the signature event of New York Road Runners (NYRR), the world’s premier community running organization. The race is held annually on the first Sunday of November and includes over 50,000 runners, from the world’s top professional athletes to runners of all ages and abilities, including 10,000 charity runners. Participants from over 125 countries tour the diverse neighborhoods of New York City’s five boroughs—Staten Island, Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, and Manhattan. Race morning also features the Rising New York Road Runners Youth Invitational at the TCS New York City Marathon, a race within Central Park that ends at the marathon finish line. More than one million spectators and 10,000 volunteers line the city’s streets in support of the runners, while millions more watch the globally televised broadcast. The race is a founding member of the Abbott World Marathon Majors, which features the world’s top marathons—Tokyo, Boston, London, Berlin, Chicago, and New York.Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), a leading global IT services, consulting, and business solutions organization, is the premier partner of NYRR and the title sponsor of the TCS New York City Marathon. The 49th running of the TCS New York City Marathon is set for November 3, 2019. To learn more, visit www.tcsnycmarathon.org  or follow them on Instagram.

Former Vice President Joe Biden Knows America’s “Dirty Little Secret”

Former Vice President Joe Biden Knows America’s “Dirty Little Secret”

Former Vice President Joe Biden has called it a, “public health epidemic.” A “stain on the moral character of a society.” An issue that “cuts to the very core of how we measure ourselves.” Joe Biden believes, “We must change the culture.” See Joe Biden live, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, January 28, 2019.

Fort Lauderdale, FLA – Hope for Children Foundation®! ; mission stands firmly in supporting the prevention of cruelty to children, extending and offering protection to children, families and adults in the United States through free online video and movie education. Hope for Children Foundation celebrates the lives of children and families in the United States of America.

The FBI reported 97% of abused children reported to the legal system are not protected.

Read more about this and view free online videos by going to the Website: www.hopeforchildrenfoundation.org  Hope for Children Foundation’s presence is throughout the United States due to the power of the Internet. Many free movies and videos are available for your increased protection and knowledge. Be careful and make sure you are on the correct URL address. A few others wrongly use our name. We have the Trademark Registration number 5,409,810.

Joe Biden has spent more than 25 years fighting to end violence against women, children and men, in the United States. In the 1990s, as a senator, he wrote the landmark Violence Against Women Act, which drastically changed how the U.S. responded to domestic violence and sexual assault. 

This video produced by Hope for Children Foundation shows how this Act offers protection to women, children and men:

Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/embed/zZAPzGy7HZI

Donations to Hope for Children Foundation

You can donate online through Paypal or mail a check to a safe P.O. Box 191028  Dallas, TX  75219. All of our training has always been free to everyone. Therefore, we greatly appreciate your donation to further the future of Hope for Children Foundation.

Abuse of Power – Help End the Cycle of Abuse

Joe Biden was raised by a gentle, honorable man who always taught his children that the greatest sin anyone could commit is the abuse of power — and the cardinal sin is when a man raises his hand to a woman or a child or someone with less physical power, including raising a hand to a weaker man.

When he started to work on this issue, violence against women, children and men, were not taken as seriously, and survivors were not given the recourse they deserved. Too often, victims of violent crimes were blamed. Too often, perpetrators were not prosecuted.

Joe Biden, Hope for Children Foundation, and many others, are convinced America needs to change its culture. And in order to change the culture, we have to pull the mask off of this dirty little secret. A simple message for all Americans:  You should be the ultimate agents of change. It’s time for all of you to step up. 

Think about a culture that exists when a victim who’s been abused or raped is asked all the wrong questions: Why were you there? What were you wearing? What did you say? Why did you say it? What were you drinking? Those are all the wrong questions. It’s never the victim’s fault.

The right questions are: What made that person think they had a right to touch me?  Why on Earth did no one step up when they had the chance? Or for you men:  Why didn’t I have the courage to speak up — to intervene, to act?  Men to ask yourselves: What would I have done if she was my sister?

Passing the Violence Against Women Act in 1994, has literally saved lives. Women, men and children need to know they won’t be abused again by the system, they’re reporting violen! ce at higher rates. Twenty – five years ago, there was no domestic violence hotline — now 3.4 million women and men have called the National Domestic Violence Hotline and gotten support and help.

The yearly domestic violence rates dropped 64 percent between 1993 and 2010. There were no special victims units — now, police departments across the country have specially trained personnel to treat domestic abuse as crime rather than a private matter. The culture is changing so that abusers are now treated as the criminals they are. It’s no longer acceptable for a man to abuse a woman in public or privately in the home. Sexism is no longer tolerated. We no longer remain silent when a woman is being abused in front of us. The #MeToo and #Time’sUp Movements have helped to empower victims of violent crimes. The clock has run out on sexual assault, harassment and inequality in the workplace.

We all should take a pledge and act on three things: (1) I promise to intervene instead of being a bystander. (2) I promise to recognize that any time consent is not given — or cannot be given — it’s sexual assault and it’s a crime; and (3) I promise to do everything I! can to create an environment where sexual assault is unacceptable, where survivors are supported, where perpetrators are treated with the moral and legal accountability they deserve. 

Healthy Support for the United States of America

Joe Biden by instinct and long experience has shown he has the ability to reach across the aisle and return this country to civility and compromise with integrity, respect, dignity and honor in the best interest of protecting Americans, and other people around the world. Joe Biden is interested in all Americans and supports a healing process for all to experience. Hope for Children Foundation encourages you to attend Joe Biden’s American Promise Tour. We did, and realized America is better off having a man and a women standing strong for Americans like former Vice President Joe Biden and Jill Biden.

For more information, visit the website at http://www.hopeforchildrenfoundation.org

A Voice for the Forgotten Minority

If foundations fall short on equality for people with disabilities, Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi puts them on the spot.
By Alex Daniels

A microphone in Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi’s hands is a powerful weapon. At venues across the country, Mizrahi has used her strong, clear voice to ask foundation leaders variations of one simple question: Why aren’t people with disabilities included?

As large foundations have placed more muscle behind programs that promote equity in terms of race, wealth, gender identity, and sexual orientation, Mizrahi believes people with disabilities have been overlooked.

During question-and-answer sessions at major foundation gatherings, she is the first with her hand up, ready to put foundation leaders on the spot. Why isn’t a foundation’s website accessible to the blind? she’ll ask. Or why isn’t data on disabled voters included on a conference speaker’s chart of voting patterns among residents of rural areas, African-Americans, and young people?

The reason for the neglect, she says, is that disability groups have too often come to foundations looking for charity. That strategy is rooted in the idea that donors should take pity on people who are blind, have dwarfism, or are intellectually challenged, she says, rather than treating discrimination against them as a violation of their civil rights.

“The overall messages of the disability community caused us more harm than good,” she says. “The more they were repeated, the more harm was done.”

Through RespectAbility, an organization she co-founded five years ago, and through her own philanthropy, Mizrahi has pushed to eliminate stigmatization and to reduce barriers to employment for people with disabilities.

Sometimes her approach is direct, such as when she called Darren Walker, president of the Ford Foundation, a “hypocrite” in an email for not including disabilities in the grant maker’s shift to focus entirely on equity. After that, and with the input of lots of others in addition to Mizrahi, Walker issued a mea culpa and announced that Ford would work to address inequalities based on disability throughout all of its programs. Mizrahi now calls Ford’s response the “gold standard.”

Donn Weinberg, executive vice president of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation and co-founder of RespectAbility, said Mizrahi is “fearless” in asking difficult questions of foundation honchos. When she’s able to get face-to-face with philanthropy executives at conferences, she seizes the opportunity to educate them about disability issues.

Private Consultations

Some nonprofit leaders grumble privately that Mizrahi sometimes claims credit for efforts that were already underway. And sometimes her questions come in the form of short lectures.

At a Philanthropy Roundtable conference in 2017, the group’s staff asked Weinberg, who also serves as Philanthropy Roundtable’s chairman, if he could persuade Mizrahi to tone down her rhetoric and get to the point. “She clearly wants people to hear a bit of commentary before the question,” he says. “She’s planting seeds of thought and bringing to people’s consciousness an issue they often don’t think about.”

But Mizrahi doesn’t see herself as a provocateur or a grandstander. She consults directly with nonprofit leaders to make sure their websites, grant applications, and program strategies benefit and are accessible to people with disabilities.

She’s created a set of guidelines and tools for organizations that want to gauge whether they are being inclusive. And she dispatches young professionals and students working as RespectAbility fellows to interview foundation employees about how they communicate with, employ, and benefit the disabled population.

“We try to call people aside and not call them out,” she insists, saying most of her work is done in private consultations with foundation leaders, not in the public spotlight. “I like to see myself as a partner, a facilitator, and a resource.”

Aaron Dorfman knows from experience.

Mizrahi said her annual-dues statement from Dorfman’s group, the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy, sold the organization as a social-justice champion — but something was missing.

“They were very proud to send me a 12-page, single-spaced memo on diversity, equity, and inclusion,” she says. “The word ‘disability’ wasn’t in it.”

The two met for coffee to discuss the matter. Afterward, as the committee was preparing to release a guide for foundations interested in social justice, Dorfman asked Mizrahi to analyze a draft to make sure it adequately covered disability.

Dorfman said he welcomed the challenge. By putting foundation leaders on the spot at conferences, Mizrahi is helping philanthropy see its shortcomings and grow.

“There’s a certain amount of discomfort when you get called out, even if you get called out rightfully,” he says. “This culture of politeness doesn’t serve marginalized communities well. It’s all right to make someone feel uncomfortable in pursuit of full inclusion.”

Diversity Includes Disabled People

Some foundations recognize they need help. A survey of 205 foundation chief executives conducted by the Center for Effective Philanthropy found that most leaders thought their organization was staffed by people with a diversity of backgrounds and served a diverse set of beneficiaries in terms of race, gender, and sexual orientation. But over half said they fell short when it came to people with a disability.

The reason, according to Judy Belk, president of the California Wellness Foundation, is many people think the Americans With Disabilities Act, passed in 1990, cured injustices faced by disabled people.

The existence of handicapped parking places and curb cuts on street corners, Belk says, doesn’t mean all of the challenges have been addressed. Similarly, just because philanthropies have crafted strategies designed to ameliorate inequities doesn’t mean they’ve faithfully put them into practice.

For Belk, concentrating on disabilities could be a good way to achieve progress in some of the foundation’s existing programs, including efforts to improve oral health for low-income adults, prevent HIV/AIDS among women of color, and help women of color adjust to society after being incarcerated. All of the groups that stand to benefit from that work, Belk says, include a large proportion of people with disabilities.

To start, the California Wellness Foundation had RespectAbility audit its website. Mizrahi’s staff found that the grant maker’s web presence wasn’t an inviting place for everyone. Belk ordered a redo to make sure the site complied with content-accessibility guidelines.

“Foundations have diversity, equity, and inclusion statements up the wazoo,” she says. “They can show you a statement and say they’re committed. I’d like to push ourselves and hold ourselves accountable.”

Easy Improvements

Foundations have largely failed to incorporate disability into the programs they run and the data they collect, Mizrahi says. And she thinks nonprofits in general have fallen behind businesses and government agencies in accommodating people with disabilities. Though many organizations would like to make progress, they often fear it will cost a lot.

Many fixes aren’t expensive but require presence of mind. For instance, Mizrahi says, it’s free and easy to make Twitter and Facebook feeds accessible and put captions on YouTube videos. And avoiding meetings in places like church basements that aren’t accessible for people in wheelchairs requires the presence of mind to schedule gatherings elsewhere.

Mizrahi says she’d rather educate than scold, and help people understand that people with disabilities are productive team members.

“I don’t view every organization equally,” she said. “The Americans With Disabilities Act treats organizations differently based on size and budget, and so do I. If it’s a small, fragile organization with nobody on staff, I have very few expectations they’ll all of a sudden have a personal-care assistant for someone who is a quadriplegic and on oxygen in order to participate in their program.”

Nonprofits lack clear guidelines on the steps they should take to make their organizations more accessible, according to Michael Thatcher, president of Charity Navigator. Over the past year, he has been in discussions with Mizrahi about how to encourage charities to get started.

Master Problem-Solvers

The first step, Mizrahi says, is to help organizations understand what kind of contributions people with disabilities can make.

At a Capitol Hill conference that RespectAbility held in July, Vincenzo Piscopo, the director of community and stakeholder relations for the Coca-Cola Company, told the 200 attendees that people with disabilities are often accustomed to overcoming obstacles and are master problem- solvers. It’s incumbent on people with disabilities in the work force to serve as ambassadors, to help employers understand what they bring to the table.

“When companies have people with disabilities, they’re providing value to their company,” he told the gathered crowd. “They’re not doing charity.”

Stephanie Farfan is one of those ambassadors. Farfan, a little person who calls herself a “master Googler,” was looking for internships specially geared toward disability issues and found RespectAbility online. There weren’t a lot of other opportunities like it.

RespectAbility’s fellows program, which is supported by the Stanford and Joan Alexander and Ford foundations, allows students and young professionals to work in public policy and communications roles and in the organization’s foundation practice.

Before she came to Washington to attend graduate school in international studies at American University, Farfan worked in Florida with Little People of America. A fluent Spanish speaker, her volunteer work with Little People of America often involved talking with Hispanic parents of children with dwarfism.

Coming to RespectAbility, Farfan, who wants to pursue a career at the State Department, has spent much of her time delving into state laws and regulations on disability issues.

“Coming over to the policy side has given me a new perspective,” she says. “It’s rounded out my skill set.”

‘One Toe in the Water’

Mizrahi’s behind-the-scenes work has resulted in changes in foundation practices. In addition to the National Committee on Responsive Philanthropy and the Belk Foundation, she shared — on the condition that they not be named — emails from several grant makers showing they had incorporated RespectAbility’s suggestions into their website design and broader communication strategy.

While she’d like to keep those successes private, she’s not afraid of publicly criticizing foundations she thinks are lagging behind.

She slammed the Lumina Foundation for not specifically incorporating people with disabilities in its work-force development grants. She said the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation provided little money to directly support disabilities and did not collect or disseminate data on the progress of students with disabilities in its domestic education work.

“I am deeply disturbed that Lumina and Gates aren’t doing dramatically more,” she says. “They are both sort of one toe in the water.”

In response, Lumina’s director of strategic communications, Kevin Corcoran, said that while there is “laudable” work being done to ensure people with disabilities succeed after high school, the foundation’s focus was on educational outcomes for students of color. The Gates Foundation said it has been making changes to address the issue, but it did not single out any one person who pushed for the revisions.

In October 2017, Gates “refreshed” its approach to education grant making. Since then, the foundation has said it has begun to disaggregate the data it collects so it can track students with disabilities, and it has begun to support programs to accommodate disabled charter-school students.

“We have already begun to fund research to help us understand how the foundation could best support success, engagement, and transitions for students with disabilities, and we plan to make the results of this research publicly available, via our grantees,” the foundation said in a statement.

An Advantage From Dyslexia

Activists have pushed foundations to recognize disabilities in the broader civil-rights context for decades. In the 1980s, Donors Forum, a collective of Illinois grant makers now known as Forefront, had a board meeting to discuss a survey on diversity it was going to send out to members.

Marca Bristo, who was a board member at the time, said there were no questions about disabilities. “They just plain forgot about it,” says Bristo, who is president of Access Living, a Chicago disability and housing advocate.

More recently, Bristo has noticed a desire among large foundations to learn more. Before the MacArthur Foundation awarded $100 million to Sesame Street Workshop and the International Rescue Committee last year as part of its 100&Change challenge, Bristo sat down with the foundation’s president Julia Stasch to figure out how to incorporate inclusion of people with disabilities into the award.

With Susan Sygall, a former MacArthur fellow and CEO of Mobility International, Bristo reviewed the contest’s eight semifinalists and developed a disability checklist that the applicants could use to assess their pitches.

“Leaders from the disability-rights movement have been working on these issues for years,” she wrote in an email to the Chronicle. “The work RespectAbility has focused on is critically important but not new. No one organization can do this transformational work alone. The intransigence of stigma, prejudice, and exclusion requires a sustained and collaborative effort by all of us.”

Before the winners were named, Mizrahi was instrumental in “amplifying” the work to include people with disabilities, according to Cecilia Conrad, who leads MacArthur’s 100&Change program. Mizrahi consulted with the foundation about what constitutes full inclusion and wrote opinion pieces that highlighted the role of inclusion in the award.

For Mizrahi, becoming an effective communicator didn’t come naturally. As someone with dyslexia, she didn’t begin reading until she was 12 and didn’t achieve functional literacy until two years later. After an early growth spurt, she reached her full, above average, adult height at a very early age. She seemed all grown up, but she was having a difficult time. Adults around her expressed their disappointment in her academic progress, calling her “lazy.”

Mizrahi responded to the challenge through intensive work on reading. She expertly honed her listening and speaking skills. Now, she says, when she enters any conversation or debate, her disability has given her a huge advantage.

“Having a disability means there’s something you can’t do in your everyday living. But there’s nothing in the world that says you can’t be the best in the world at something else.”

Donna Kalajian Lagani Joins Hearst Foundations

Hearst today announced that Donna Kalajian Lagani will join the Hearst Foundations after nearly 25 years at Hearst Magazines. Kalajian Lagani had been senior vice president and group publishing director of Hearst Magazines Young Women’s Group, encompassing CosmopolitanSeventeen and Women’s Health. The announcement was made by Hearst President and CEO Steven R. Swartz. Kalajian Lagani assumes her new role February 4. Her replacement at Hearst Magazines will be named shortly.

“Donna has done an outstanding job leading our flagship magazine brand for more than two decades, and I am thrilled that she has chosen to take the next step in her career journey at the Hearst Foundations,” Swartz said.

The Hearst Foundations are national philanthropic resources for organizations working in the fields of culture, education, health and social services. The Foundations identify and fund outstanding nonprofits to ensure that people of all backgrounds in the United States have the opportunity to build healthy, productive and inspiring lives. Created by William Randolph Hearst, the Foundations are independent, private philanthropies operating separately from Hearst. Since 1945, the Foundations have made over 20,000 grants totaling more than $1.1 billion. 

“Philanthropy is an important part of my life, and this is something I’ve always wanted to do,” Kalajian Lagani said. “I’ve had the absolute best job on the planet for more than two decades, overseeing Cosmopolitan, the most powerful young women’s media brand in the world, and more recently, adding SeventeenWomen’s Health and brand licensing to my purview. Now, after a ‘fun and fearless’ career generating revenue and profits, I feel truly blessed to work with the Foundations and its directors, Paul ‘Dino’ Dinovitz and George Irish. The Foundations’ grants profoundly change people’s lives, and I’m honored to join them to uphold the legacy of William Randolph Hearst and his philanthropic efforts.”   

In a joint statement, Dinovitz and Irish said, “We have known for some time of Donna’s interest in philanthropy and impacting lives for the better, and we’re pleased that she will be joining us, bringing her philanthropic interest and executive talent to the Foundations.”

Kalajian Lagani joined Hearst Magazines in 1995 as publisher of Cosmopolitan and was named publishing director in 1999. She added oversight of Seventeen in 2014 and of Women’s Health in 2018, following Hearst’s acquisition of Rodale. During her career at Cosmopolitan, Kalajian Lagani introduced groundbreaking initiatives, most recently through mobile and artificial intelligence technology. She developed and immortalized the “fun fearless female” mantra used by Cosmopolitan editions worldwide. During her tenure, she helped launch CosmoGIRL! and Cosmo for Latinas, and was a strong force in bringing Cosmopolitan to new platforms, including Snapchat and Sirius XM Radio. 

Kalajian Lagani conceived and produced a Cosmopolitan “takeover” of Times Square on New Year’s Eve in 2015 to celebrate the brand’s 50 birthday and developed the “Fun Fearless Life” conference in New York City to empower young women. She initiated a multi-year brand partnership with the USO and received the organization’s Distinguished Service Award in 2010. Kalajian Lagani also launched the $100,000 Cosmopolitan “Practice Safe Sun” research grant and was honored as a cosmetic industry leader at the prestigious DreamBall in 2005 for her support of the “Look Good Feel Better” program and the American Cancer Society.

Kalajian Lagani sits on the Board of Directors of Circle of Generosity and the Fragrance Foundation.