Posts tagged with "Ralph Steadman"

Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey & Flying Dog Brewery Release “The Osopher” Exclusive Limited Edition Set and Commemorative NFT Bundle via Dhiti Kapadia by 360 Magazine

“The Osopher”

Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey & Flying Dog Brewery Release “The Osopher” Exclusive Limited Edition Set and Commemorative NFT Bundle

After selling out their last limited edition product collaboration in a matter of days, Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey and Flying Dog Brewery have partnered once again to create an exclusive ultra-premium collection set, “The Osopher NFT Bundle.” This limited edition set marks the first time Stranahan’s and Flying Dog will sell their respective “The Osopher” limited edition products as a collection to a national audience. On Thursday, November 10, 2022, whiskey and beer fans alike can purchase the collection exclusively on SpiritsNetwork.com. Ten percent of the proceeds will be donated to the First Responders
Foundation.

Twenty-three collection sets will be available for $230 and include the following:

● One bottle of The Osopher from Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey
● One bottle of The Osopher from Flying Dog Brewery
● One tote bag with artwork by Ralph Steadman
● A digital NFT artwork by The Osopher’s collaboration bottle designer, internationally renowned artist, and friend of George Stranahan, Ralph Steadman

One additional “The Osopher NFT Bundle” collection set includes:

● A priceless signed limited edition print version of the NFT artwork from Ralph Steadman
● Both The Osopher expressions
● Ralph Steadman tote bag
● Ralph Steadman digital NFT artwork

In August 2022, Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey and Flying Dog Brewery launched their first joint limited edition product release collaboration, “The Osopher Project,” to celebrate their shared history and commemorate their founder George Stranahan. The limited-edition whiskey sold out in 72 hours, with people lining up outside of the Stranahan’s distillery in Denver, Colorado, beginning at midnight on launch day. The limited-edition Flying Dog beer also immediately sold out at specific Maryland retailers. Both Stranahan’s and Flying Dog are excited to bring their partnership to the next level on a national scale – an expansion truly dedicated to their dedicated fans.

About “The Osopher Project”

Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey and Flying Dog Brewery have a shared connection, history, and founder; however, The Osopher Project, launched in the summer of 2022, marked the first joint product release for the two companies. This collaboration celebrates the intersection of George Stranahan’s accomplishments as a distiller and brewer. The resulting beer and whiskey is a true testament to the art, science, and creativity on which George built both companies. The Osopher speaks to the idea that you can pursue anything if you’re just crazy enough to try it.

The Osopher Single Malt Whiskey

Stranahan’s “The Osopher” is the oldest whiskey the distillery has ever bottled. It stays true to George Stranahan’s passion for creativity and Stranahan’s commitment to innovating American Single Malt Whiskey. It starts its journey of aging for 11 years at the distillery before being matured for another four months in barrels used to age Flying Dog’s Road Dog Porter. The flavor profile consists of the following:
● Nose: Coffee cake. Roasty malt mingles with toffee and barrel char
● Palate: Dark chocolate caramels, sherried-soaked plums, and a dash of aged hops
● Finish: Bread pudding and barley wine temper to a dry finish

The Osopher Imperial Road Dog Porter

The limited-edition Flying Dog beer created for The Osopher Project is an imperial version of Road Dog Porter, an early creation by the brewery. Road Dog was one of the first beers to be wrapped in original artwork by internationally renowned artist Ralph Steadman; a version of this label was used to create The Osophers for both brands as well as the NFT. Flying Dog’s imperial Road Dog Porter was aged in 10- year-old Stranahan’s Whiskey barrels before being bottled. The results are:

● Aroma: Dark chocolate and caramel dominate the aroma, followed by cocoa butter and maple that finishes with light notes of nutty vanilla.
● Palate: A velvety smooth explosion of chocolate, vanilla cream, toasted pecans, toffee, and maple balanced with hints of caramel, spice, and tobacco from the whiskey.

Stranahan’s The Osopher carries a 47.3% ABV and Flying Dog’s The Osopher carries a 12% ABV. This project is powered by YellowHeart, the Web3 marketplace for ticketing, music, and memberships.

About Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey

Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey is a pioneering and award-winning American single malt whiskey comprised of 100% malted barley and Rocky Mountain water, aged in new American white oak barrels. From grain to glass, Stranahan’s whiskey is distilled and bottled at its Colorado distillery, the state’s first legal distillery since Prohibition. Stranahan’s expressions include Original, Blue Peak, Sherry Cask, Diamond Peak, Mountain Angel 10-Year-Old, and the limited-edition yearly release: Snowflake. As one of the first and best-selling American single malts, Stranahan’s is committed to building recognition and
admiration for the category globally.

About Flying Dog Brewery

As the 35th largest craft brewery in the U.S., Flying Dog has a reputation for brewing premium beer that pushes the confines of traditional styles out of our home base in Frederick, MD. From hop-heavy favorites like The Truth Imperial IPA and Double Dog Double IPA to left-of-the-dial best sellers like Kujo Cold Brew Coffee Porter and Dead Rise Old Bay Summer Ale – we take pride in challenging the status quo. Our brand is built on the gospel of Gonzo, drawing inspiration from Hunter S. Thompson’s relentless truth seeking and Ralph Steadman’s provocative drawings. In the true gonzo spirit, when authoritarians have tried to censor our creativity, we’ve gone to Federal court defending our right to free speech and
expression and won. At Flying Dog, we challenge conformity, embrace the weird, and encourage you to Cut The Leash and reclaim your independence. For more information visit flyingdog.com.

About Ralph Steadman
When George Stranahan first founded the Flying Dog Brewery just outside of Aspen, Hunter S Thompson immediately suggested Ralph Steadman produce the labels for their first beer, Road Dog. Flying Dog still uses Ralph’s work on their beer bottles today so it was a natural fit to use that first artwork on the Osopher Whiskey. Steadman is best known for his collaborations with Hunter S Thompson including Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and The Curse of Lono. He has illustrated literary classics such as Alice in Wonderland and Treasure Island, and written his own books including I Leonardo, Freud and The Big I Am. Other collaborations include Pyschogeography with Will Self and the Gonzovation Trilogy about endangered animals with Ceri Levy. Ever the trailblazer, Ralph has recently begun minting his art as NFTs on objkt.com at steadmanart.tez and is enjoying exploring the new opportunities that Web 3 offer.

About First Responders Foundation

Rooted in 9/11 remembrance and how first responders often are taken for granted until tragedy strikes, the First Responders Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to serving and honoring our first responders, veterans and their families, building appreciation and respect for their work, and enhancing public safety. The First Responders Foundation supports all first responders from Law enforcement, Firefighters, Dispatchers, EMTs, Medical Personnel, and Veterans. For over 14 years, the First Responders Foundation has been supporting the overall well-being of first responders, veterans and their families through key areas such as behavioral and mental health programs, physical health services, service dog programs (JALVELAN), and community events.

About YellowHeart

Founded in 2017, YellowHeart is the leading Web3 marketplace for ticketing, music and memberships, which accepts both crypto and credit card payments. Powered by distributed ledger technology, YellowHeart’s platform was designed to help the larger industry graduate to the next phase of ticketing, giving control back to artists and fans. YellowHeart is one of the earliest adopters of blockchain ticketing and music, having released the first-ever NFT tickets and NFT album with Kings of Leon in 2021. Tao Group Hospitality, MGM Resorts, Maroon 5, Julian Lennon, and ZHU are just a few of the globally recognized artists and brands YellowHeart works with.

The Gnarled Branch illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Q×A with The Gnarled Branch

Q&A with David Irvine from The Gnarled Branch

David Irvine is the multi-talented artist behind the Gnarled Branch. He is known for his imaginative ‘Re-Directed Paintings’, whimsical furniture, original paintings, painted burnt out light bulb ornaments, salvaged record paintings, and so much more. You can visit his Etsy shop here! You can see throughout his work that there is an interest with popular characters which brings life to the rural paintings he often re-directs. Irvine will match the original artist’s style within the painting or counter it intentionally, but he always leaves the original signature clear to see. There’s a story behind each of his works, including the painting “The Last Trick or Treater” which is one of Irvine’s favorites. Read on to learn more about David’s work, inspiration, and so much more.

What is your background – in addition, did your upbringing prompt a specific reference point within your work? Is your work informed by certain concepts or themes from your childhood, background, socioeconomic status, where you lived or were raised?

DI: I was fortunate to be raised by parents who appreciated all the arts. Going to see theatre shows, music performances, and gallery exhibits were always exciting. I was encouraged to develop with the visual arts and musically as well with regular music lessons and art lessons. They were at first concerned when I decided to pursue a career in the visual arts, as they knew it can be a real struggle – but were fully supportive and excited that I was accepted into art college to study illustration.

How does this impact how you see the world and create art?

DI: It’s no secret the art world can be very snooty, takes itself far too seriously and that is a real shame. In a lot of the genres that I do- I am always considering humor and fun as elements in a piece. Especially during these difficult pandemic times, art needs to uplift and provide smiles and not be staunch, same old -same old themes that have been done over and over.

Do you have an educational background or experiences that have contributed to your evolution as an artist?

DI: I studied illustration at Sheridan College, and throughout my childhood would occasionally take art lessons. The rest was experimenting and being self-taught with various mediums and medium combinations. I taught visual art to a wide range of ages through community night school and was an art tutor to a terrific student with special needs. Those were very memorable years.

What does your work aim to say?

DI: I do so many different genres of art, I think there’s a spectrum of what I want to communicate…. from making people laugh and feel good — to the darker, macabre work to scare and bring the viewer into a world that they may not feel comfortable being in… I guess I make art to get a reaction… not just creating something for its sole purpose is to look pretty and match the sofa.

Is there a particular artist that inspired you to pursue art?

DI: My grandfather was an accomplished amateur painter and I’d watch him work and see the pieces he did… maybe that was the first seed…Other than that I would always sign out art books from the library and soak in everything from master painters to illustrators and cartoonists who worked presently.

Whose techniques do you study or admire?

DI: There are so many — but in high school, I always enjoyed Ralph Steadman ink illustrations, Van Gogh for his boldness, Rene Magritte for the unique and surreal visuals … Currently I’ll search through websites like Tumblr or magazines like Juxtapoz and discover artists both old and new who mix unusual mediums or have their own unique style.

How do you cultivate a collector base?

DI: When I first started as a fine artist, I didn’t have a computer- the internet wasn’t a thing yet, so I was reliant on physically going to galleries and public places to show my work. From little gift or record shops to restaurants and cafes. Now with technology, it’s just a matter of updating and refreshing social media, submitting articles to websites, or being lucky and being featured by a blog, website, or podcast…it all helps and a lot more convenient to be able to post an instructional video from home, or post new work in progress photos to a website, than to lug workaround or mail promo packages out to land a show. Once a collector is on board, having top-notch customer service skills and excellent communication is key…

What inspires you to paint?

DI: I’ll have a lot of eureka moments as I’m sketching or planning out new works or series….and I have to then see that eureka image come to fruition. It would drive me bananas having a good idea sitting there on a page and going nowhere. As well it is my chosen job- so those bills must get paid.

How do you look for new ways to challenge yourself?

DI: I get bored very easily… so challenges are always put in place to not get bored. Every artist has a spectrum of color they usually gravitate to when creating a piece…I like to switch things up and use the colors I don’t normally use or come up with different color combinations/ mixing. I’ll even wear tinted sunglasses so the colors I think I’m using wind up making happy accidents when I look at the piece without the sunglasses. Using oil pastels with acrylic paint… various types of inks and papers …are many variables that can be used to break away from regular tendencies when approaching a piece.

Do you have a favorite painting that you have completed? If so, can you tell us the story behind it?

DI: I did a solo show a few years ago with Halloween as the main theme. A few favorite paintings came out of that show including one called the Last Trick or Treater. It showed a bird’s eye view looking down onto an old tyme small hamlet, and one child in a ghost costume running down a street with a lantern. I think I captured the quiet of the night, and the bit of panic the boy was having as he was quickly trying to get home.

What inspired Re-Directed painting for you?

DI: When I first started as a fine artist, I had very little money and art supplies and framing was expensive. I would frequent yard sales and thrift shops to purchase old frames, lithographs on board, and existing canvas prints to paint over and frame. Around 2009 I started to paint weird imagery in an existing piece and then later one piece my Mom was getting rid of was a seascape -where I had the immediate vision of two reapers playing with a beachball. I painted them in, shared them on social media and things snowballed rather quickly from there. I came up with the term re-directed as I used that as a tag and hoped people would begin to associate it with me…and it worked! Other people now use that term – which is fine… I prefer that to ‘Improved Painting’…as I never meant to demean the original artist. All these redirected pieces were salvaged and unwanted and quite likely wind up as landfill. I hate waste and seeing potential thrown away. This was just another method to upcycle. I’ll spend considerable time touching up the piece from scratches, buffs or sun/ water damage then I’ll add in my own visions. ..never covering the signature of the original artist. Research is always done prior to any painting to insure it’s not of significant value. I rarely work on originals, always lithographs, canvas prints, or anonymous paint by numbers.

Is there anything that you would like to add?

DI: Even though most know my work through my ongoing Re-Directed thrift art series, I look forward to continuing my upcycling work (hand-painted ornaments using salvaged burnt-out light bulbs, pop art paintings on discarded, damaged vinyl records, beer cap pins, and redoing/painting discarded wooden furniture…) and preventing landfill.

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Photo Credit: David Irvine
Photo Credit: David Irvine
Photo Credit: David Irvine
Photo Credit: David Irvine