Politics

JOSEPH LOWERY, BARACK OBAMA, MEDAL OF FREEDOM, VAUGHN LOWERY, 360 MAGAZINE

REMEMBERING JOSEPH LOWERY

“When black will not be asked to get in back; when brown can stick around; when yellow will be mellow; when the red man can get ahead, man; and when white will embrace what is right.” – Joseph Lowery

Former Co-Founder/President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), Rev. Dr. Joseph Echols Lowery, transitioned on Friday, March 27, 2020 at 10pm at the age of 98. He was one of the last remaining leaders of the Civil Rights Movement.

Dr. Lowery has assumed and executed a broad and diverse series of roles over the span of his eight decades: leader, pastor/preacher, servant, father, husband, freedom fighter and advocate. FOX 5 Atlanta pays tribute to Lowery HERE.

In 1997,he was dubbed the ‘Dean of the Civil Rights Movement’ upon receipt of the NAACP’s Lifetime Achievement Award. On January 20, 2009, in his inimitable style; Dr. Lowery delivered the Benediction on the occasion of President Obama’s inauguration as the 44th President of the United States. On August 12, 2009 when President Barack Obama awarded him the nation’s highest civilian honor: The Presidential Medal of Freedom, in recognition of his lifelong commitment to the nonviolent struggle for the causes of justice, human rights, economic equality, voting rights, peace and human dignity.

Born in Huntsville, Alabama, on October 6th, 1921, Rev. Dr. Lowery’s legacy of service and struggle is long and rich. His genesis as a Civil Rights advocate dates to the early 1950s where, in Mobile, Alabama he headed the Alabama Civic Affairs Association; the organization which led the movement to desegregate buses and public accommodations. In 1957, with friend and colleague, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. he was a Co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), where served in an array of leadership positions, including: Vice President (1957-67); Chairman of the Board (1967-77); and as President and Chief Executive Officer from (1977-1998).

In 1961, he was one of four Alabama pastors whose property was seized by the Alabama Courts in an historic, precedent setting libel suit, Sullivan v. NY Times, Abernathy, Lowery, Shuttlesworth, & Seay, because of their civil rights work.The United States Supreme Court vindicated the ministers in a landmark ruling which remains an important element in the protections afforded the free speech rights of the press, and of citizens advocating and protesting for justice and societal change.

In March of 1965, he was chosen by Dr. King to chair the Delegation delivering the demands of the Selma-to-Montgomery March George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama.  As the world witnessed, Wallace ordered the marchers beaten in the incident that came to be known as “Bloody Sunday”, which ultimately led to enactment of the Voting Rights Act.

Throughout his career, Rev. Dr. Lowery’s commitment to human rights and social justice exists on a global scale. His work resulted in the desegregation of Nashville, Tennessee schools, presenting Nelson Mandela with the Martin Luther King Jr. Human Rights Award following his release from prison in 1990, leading a peace delegation to Lebanon and nations in Central America to seek justice by nonviolent means, and securing millions of dollars in contracts for minority businesses in the Southern region of the United States.

His efforts also emphasize the need to uplift and empower historically disenfranchised communities. Ranging from supporting the families affected by the Atlanta “Missing and Murdered Children Crisis” through setting up funds with Citizen Trust Bank, demanding election reform and economic justice as Convener of the Georgia Coalition for the People’s Agenda (GCPA), to advocating for the rights of Black farmers discriminated against by the Department of Agriculture – Rev. Dr. Joseph Lowery remains committed to cultivating the Beloved Community and reminds us to “turn TO each other not ON each other!” Ebony Magazine, in recognizing Rev. Dr. Lowery as one of the nation’s “15 Greatest Black Preachers,” described him as the “consummate voice of biblical social relevancy, a focused prophetic voice, speaking truth to power,” and his strong dedication to faith and inclusion is evident in all of his work.

Joseph Lowery had 5 children from 2 separate marriages.

•Most notable speech can be watched HERE.

Remarks at Coretta Scott King’s funeral.

•His legacy continues with the Lowery Institute.

•According to CNN Lowery was a founder of the SCLC.

BBC remembers Lowery.

Mentioned in The Guardian.

Civil Rights Icon Dies at 98 – NBC News.

•As seen on NPR.

Essence Magazine Instagram Post.

The Shade Room Instagram Post.

Tyler Perry Remembers.

Jamie Foxx Commemorates.

Barack Obama Pays Respect.

OWN Network Tribute

Lowery was laid to rest on Saturday, April 4th which is the same day MLK was assassinated.

Joe Biden Acknowledges.

Official Statement from The Family of Reverend Doctor Joseph E. Lowery

Our entire family is humbled and blessed by the overwhelming outpouring of love and support that has come from around the globe. We thank you for loving our father, Dr. Joseph E. Lowery, and for your continuous prayers during this time.

In lieu of flowers, cards or food, donations may be made to The Joseph & Evelyn Lowery Institute for Justice & Human Rights. Dr. Lowery’s life was driven by a sense of obligation to our global community and desire to champion love over hate; inclusion over exclusion. The Lowery Institute was founded in 2002 to further Dr. Lowery’s legacy of promoting non-violent advocacy among future generations.

Donations can be sent to The Joseph & Evelyn Lowery Institute, P.O. Box 92801, Atlanta, GA 30314, or made on-line by clicking here.

Aligning with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidelines on COVID-19 prevention and social distancing, plans are underway for a private family service. A public memorial will be held in late summer or early fall.

Thank you,

The Lowery Family

Rvssian – Only The Team

PLATINUM CERTIFIED PRODUCER RVSSIAN RELEASES NEW SINGLE “ONLY THE TEAM”

WATCH NOW!

Platinum-certified producer and artist, Rvssian has today released a new song “Only One Team” featuring young hitmakers Lil Tjay and Lil Mosey. The single has all the makings of a hit single with its synth laced beats and Rvssian’s pension for addictive melodies. “Only One Team” is a departure from Rvssian’s usual dancehall and Latin trap sounds but an evolution of the work he’s done following past collaborations with French Montana, Cardi B, 21 Savage and more. The song follows previously released single “IDKW” featuring Shenseea, Swae Lee and Young Thug and appears on his label Rich Immigrants, a joint venture with Interscope Records. Speaking more on the making of the song, Rvssian had this to share:

“This song is a new sound, coming from Lil TJay’s past music with added rock influence in the guitar production and his unique flow and melodies. Bringing in Lil Mosey and his signature cadence make the whole thing certified.” Lil Mosey added “Rvssian and I have been talkin’ about getting a song together for a min. Me and Tjay both young and getting money so it’s a dope moment for our generation.”

Stream/Save “Only The Team” HERE

About Rvssian

Tarik “Rvssian” Johnston, a young Uptown kid from Kingston, Jamaica started his music career at just 16 years old. He established his independent label Head Concussion Records and began producing. An ear for platinum hit-making sounds, Rvssian’s success knows no border or genre lines. His catalog has surpassed over four billion streams across platforms with multiple of those becoming certified platinum hits. He has successfully pioneered the dancehall and Latin music spaces and is now looking to take over the mainstream worlds of pop, hip hop and rap. Now at home at his new label, Rich Immigrants (a joint venture with Interscope Records) Rvssian puts on his executive hat to help break artists who live in the Caribbean diaspora towards mainstream popularity. Shenseea, Jamaica’s reigning princess of Dancehall, is the first artist signed to the label and she is joined by Kosa and Big Bvng (childhood friends from Belize). Rvssian also continues to experiment with his own music releasing one-off singles that continue to place him in the cultural zeitgeist of music and on the charts.

sara sandman, 360 MAGAZINE, business, tech, illustration

NAACP × STIMULUS PACKAGE

Derrick Johnson, president and CEO, made the following statement about Congressional passage of the $2 trillion stimulus package in response to the coronavirus. 

“This legislation is a critical step toward addressing the needs of the American people who are most at risk. After much negotiation, the final version resulted in an improved, if incomplete, response to the litany of harms caused by this crisis.  

But Congress has much more work to do. The NAACP will continue to advocate for a fair and equitable recovery plan for marginalized and under-resourced communities. In providing future relief, Congress must prioritize people first, not corporations.  

Impacted communities will undoubtedly need to receive repeat direct cash payments to help them weather this crisis. From workers who have lost their jobs to small businesses that will be forced to close to students drowning in student loan debt, we must ensure the safety of our communities and economy through cash injections and other forms of support, without stipulation, for those that are suffering. Additionally, our hospitals and health providers throughout this crisis need continued support to ensure all communities receive testing and treatment. We must expand paid family and medical leave for more workers. We must meet the food and nutrition needs of our most vulnerable families through this treacherous time.  

Above all, while this bill provides a downpayment to securing our democracy in this time of crisis, we recognize more robust action is required and quickly. The proposal allocates $400 million to protect elections when in reality states need $4 billion — ten times that amount — to ensure secure voting. We should not be forced to choose between our health and our vote. Congress must significantly increase funding to states so they may adopt a variety of measures to administer elections in a safe and accessible manner. Failing to protect our democracy is not an option in this critical election year. 

The NAACP urges Congress to begin work on another COVID-19 response package quickly. For the duration of this crisis, we will continue to fight for measures to protect the health, safety and well-being of underserved and overlooked communities.”

Founded in 1909, the NAACP is the nation’s oldest and largest nonpartisan civil rights organization. Its members throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for civil rights in their communities. You can read more about the NAACP’s work and our five “Game Changer” issue areas here.

GASHI, 360 MAGAZINE

GASHI – Cabin Fever

“The whole world is stuck inside right now or doing what they can to keep others healthy and safe.  I just wanted to share some of my art to help everybody get through this very surreal time period. Stay inside if you can, be safe and I can’t wait to see you all once we get through this.” – GASHI

Cabin Fever Track List

1. Greatness

2. Never Forget

About GASHI

Born in Libya, GASHI spent much of his young life as a refugee, moving from country to country.  His family eventually settled in Brooklyn, NY, where he was introduced to music at a very young age.  GASHI absorbed a melting pot of musical influences throughout his youth, resulting in the formation of his own unique sonic palette that blends together different genres of music.  His dynamic sound has allowed GASHI to collaborate with a wide range of talents ranging from Chris Brown to Travis Scott.  He released his self-titled debut album last fall which has over 420 million streams combined worldwide.  GASHI is currently putting the finishing touches on his sophomore album set to come later this year.

William Anthony Allen – Harlem’s Renaissance

by Abigail Baldwin × Vaughn Lowery

Earlier this month, 360 had the opportunity to sit down with the award-winning community activist William Anthony Allen. After many years of serving Harlem as a community leader and on the District Council, Allen is exploring the possibility of running for City Council serving the 9th District.

Harlem has long been a beacon of Black culture, community, and heritage since the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. Growing up in the 70s and 80s, the Harlem that William Anthony Allen knew was one of unity, familiarity, and freedom. According to Allen, “Crack cocaine came and killed all that. It stopped people from going to the community. It created mistrust. It changed how people participated politically and how they saw themselves. A great number of the working class and middle class of Harlem began to look at other options.” Allen describes his childhood in Harlem as poor but centered in the community, “people were so loving like they were aunts and uncles, but they really were not a blood relationship. The way they treated you, felt like family.” He watched as crack cocaine and the crisis to follow attacked the infrastructure of Harlem and divided the community, giving way to gentrification. “Black people don’t own the businesses in their own neighborhood anymore and young people say that can’t afford to come back to Harlem,” he says. Allen has completed housing and community development efforts in New York, as well as health care and social services proposals on a local, state and federal level. His efforts have always been lead by a desire to uplift the community and uphold the “great legacy” of Harlem, “particularly for African Americans.”

But what are his plans? How does Allen intend to use his experience in the community to serve them at a City Council level? He told 360 he would begin by “sitting down with parent leaders, senior citizen leaders, youth leaders, and really talk about mapping it out in terms of how do they see the future of this community, what do they want from it, and make that the blueprint.” He calls for the people of Harlem to define their own community and make their own decisions, with himself as a representative of their interests. “I’m going to be fighting very hard to address the housing inequities and disparities, helping to lower the cost of housing,” he told 360, “making sure that folks that really want to make a contribution to the life of this city can afford to be here.”

Allen lamented that a particular program that had been around for nearly fifty years, the Addicts Rehabilitation Center (ARC), has closed, “without those services, gentrification moves us all out.” Allen is fighting to get these programs reestablished, but he specifies that black and brown people should be running these programs for the community, “I want to make sure that the people that are running the program are culturally correct.”

In his youth, William Anthony Allen attended Fordham University in the Bronx where he was the first non-white person to serve as Vice President of the Student Council. Later, he transferred to CUNY where he was the Editor-in-Chief of the school newspaper. Now, he is the founding member of a local charter elementary school. He recognizes that education is of the utmost importance. In City Council, Allen plans to create a network through Historically Black Colleges. “We need to make learning and knowledge sexy,” he says, so everyone, regardless of there circumstance can step up and participate in the betterment of their community.” Of his current efforts, he says, “I’m organizing a network of black influencers to address crisis issues that affect black people across the country.” These crisis issues include police relations, employment discrimination, gentrification, and inadequate schools.

For himself, Allen’s goal is, in his own words, “to be known as the guy who brings everybody together to have dialogue and then create action.” He says to not only the Black community but to the youth of Harlem and the LGBTQ+ community, “Tell me how I can support you to have a strong voice.”

“Harlem represents a great legacy, particularly for African Americans. And our entry, not only here into the city but what we have done for the nation,” says Allen, “We need to leverage that.”

SUSAN E. FOSTER × CHARMING IMPOSSIBLES

For the many women (and men) stuck at home with abusers, children to care for, and the current stress of survival overall, domestic violence survivor, Susan E Foster, author of the new book Charming Impossibles: How Ordinary Angels Help Free the Hopelessly Stuck (Clovercroft Publishing) provides tips, advice, strategies, and resources to help them escape the invisible strings of abusers.

Foster calls them “‘Charming Impossibles’ – ‘charm’ is their deceptive invisible mask and convincing lure. ‘Impossible to satisfy’ is their secret weapon.”

But, how do you escape the abusers in your life? Why is leaving them behind while moving forward so difficult?

In this very revealing book, Foster shares her personal journey of surviving years of emotional abuse and isolation in plain sight…and the lessons learned. She also shares powerful and moving stories of others, unraveling the mysterious web of confusion surrounding abuse and overcoming difficult relationships.

In her article “Why Do We Self-Sabotage? You may be self-sabotaging without even realizing it,,” Dr. Ellen Hendriksen, a psychologist, states: “Self-sabotage can interfere with the best-laid plans and goals. Why do we do it? Turns out, there are many reasons why instead of shooting for the moon, we end up aiming right for our foot. Self-sabotage is any action that gets in the way of your intent…'”

She further adds, “There are countless ways we sabotage ourselves. So why do we do it? It comes down to four big reasons: Self-Worth, Control, Perceived Fraudulence, and Familiarity of that which we know is preferable to the unknown. To summarize: it all comes down to three words: fear of failure.”

Charming Impossibles is a story that describes a path to freedom for the apparently “hopelessly stuck.” The result is a credible, engaging, informative, supportive, and hopeful story.

To learn more, visit: susanefoster.com 
Books are available online

About the Author 

Susan E Foster is a mother, author, speaker, coach and advocate hoping to equip women and men to recognize the abusive Charming Impossibles in their lives. She hopes you will discover the Ordinary Angels in your life just as she has in hers. She resides in Fort Worth, Texas.

Regaining Control in Uncertain Times: Advice from a Doctor/Cancer Survivor

As a doctor and entrepreneur, I spent most of my life seeking control – obsessively studying, planning, and working to guarantee my success. That’s why I wanted to be an entrepreneur in the first place – I wanted to be my own boss, in charge of my own fate. Despite my success, in 2013, I would lose every semblance of control in my life. In 2013, I was diagnosed with cancer.

My cancer diagnosis came with many emotions: anger, anxiety, uncertainty, depression. I felt alone and hopeless, like everything I had worked so hard for suddenly didn’t matter. I just had to “wait and see” if the chemotherapy worked; how sick I would be; if I could have a family one day; if I would ever have my regular life back.

In many ways, I see similarities between the way my cancer diagnosis impacted my life and how the current Coronavirus pandemic is affecting us all. Life as you know it has suddenly stopped. You don’t know when it will return to normal, and you may feel like you have completely lost control of your life.

Even though the unknowns of cancer treatment terrified me, certain strategies gave me a “sense” of control – and often times, that was enough. I hope that you can employ these strategies in the coming days and weeks to regain control in these uncertain times.

Exercise

Although chemotherapy prevented intense workouts, simply walking regularly released feel-good endorphins in my brain, and it’s something I had control over. Similarly, a self-imposed routine may help you cope with the uncertainty of the Coronavirus pandemic. Even though gyms are closed, consider doing body-weight workouts at home, YouTube fitness tutorials, or walking/running outside.

Breathe

You can also change your breathing patterns voluntarily, resulting in various powerful effects. For example, if you feel a wave of panic approaching, try taking deeper breaths using your diaphragm, which will cause your heart rate to slow and your body to relax.

Journal

Exercise and focused breathing are two techniques that worked for me, but it’s also important to remember what activities made you feel the best. Try journaling how different activities make you feel – more/less anxious, more/less in control, etc. This way, you can continue doing things that make you feel good, even when the Coronavirus is a distant memory.

Sometimes, challenging times are the kickstart you need to pursue a better life. After my cancer diagnosis, I completely transformed my stress-filled, unhealthy lifestyle. I overcame cancer, and I owe it all to positive lifestyle changes. If you are ready to start your journey to better health, check out my book “From Doctor to Patient.”

About Dr. Diva Nagula

Dr. Diva Nagula is a board-certified osteopathic physician with extensive knowledge and training in Integrative and Functional Medicine. He was diagnosed and treated for Stage 4 non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. After several years of treatment, he remains in complete remission.
You can purchase his book here.

sara sandman, 360 MAGAZINE, business, tech, illustration

SCLC FIGHTS FOR POOR

With all Americans bearing the brunt of the Coronavirus (Covid-19) crisis, Dr. Charles Steele, Jr., president and CEO of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), today called on President Donald Trump and the U.S. Congress to make sure all Americans benefit from the nearly $1 trillion that will be spent to restore the health of citizens and the economy.
 
“I want to weigh in on behalf of regular people,” said Dr. Steele, who currently heads the civil rights organization co-founded and first led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “We have seen this socialist bailout of corporate America before. As the Trump Administration and Congress prepare to help some corporations, hand out new contracts and create new jobs to address this pandemic, we must ensure that billions ends up in the hands of the people who have been historically left behind. Poor people, black and brown people, must be recipients of these gifts of generosity that normally go to corporations.”
 
President Trump has said efforts are underway to financially assist corporations that have been hit hard by Convid-19, including the travel and cargo industries. He has announced plans to assist small businesses, but there are no specifics how those disbursements will be handled, and he has announced plans to give all families at least $2,400 to help them through the crisis.
 
“When it comes to bearing the weight, it is not fair that the corporations get the support when the rest of us starve,” Dr. Steele said.  “We saw our government bail out the banks during the housing collapse. We also bailed out the auto industry and Wall Street. Those industries recovered, but we didn’t. Most black and brown people lost their homes. We lost our wealth. Nearly 75 percent of poor people are living from check to check. Many of us have no health insurance. We can’t afford to take a day off work.”
 
Dr. Steele said the SCLC, which has focused on the plight of the poor and the voiceless since the days of Dr. King, has received calls for individuals and groups who are concerned about how individuals with no jobs and insurance will fair during this pandemic and recover after the crisis is over. 
 
“They are asking, ‘Where are our leaders,’” Dr. Steele said. “They are not seeing them standing up to make sure the real money will flow down to the people most impacted. That is why the SCLC is taking a stand. We must fight to make sure our government does not repeat what has happened in the past. We need more than $1,200 to catch up in America. We will not be left behind this time.”

ABOUT THE SCLC:

Established in 1957, the SCLC, whose first president was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is a now an international organization made up of chapters and affiliates with programs that affect the lives of all Americans: north, south, east, and west. Its sphere of influence and interests has become international in scope because the human rights movement transcends national boundaries. For additional information about the SCLC, visit www.nationalsclc.org.