Posts tagged with "French"

Orava featured inside of 360 Magazine

French Multi-Instrumentalist Orava Releases His Stunning Debut Album, ‘Behind The Wave’

Orava – the French-born, London-based multi-instrumentalist, singer-songwriter and producer – has just released a stunning debut album, ‘Behind The Wave.’ A graduate of the Musician Institute of London, Orava draws inspiration from French touch, classic electronic, DnB, and traditional rock, blending analog with digital, homemade recordings with elaborate production, and vintage instruments with synthetic textures.

We last heard from Orava upon the release of his captivating music video for “Going Backwards,” which was shot on a beach in southwest France. Opening with an ambient grand-piano and melancholic vocal melody, “Going Backwards” deals with the impact of time on people’s personal growth and “the wish to go back in time to make better choices,” Orava explains. The reverse sequence music video features a mysterious figure emerging from the ocean and slowly walking backwards to the top of a dune, and the powerful connection between the video and the song offers viewers a shortcut in understanding the deeper meaning behind Orava’s lyrics.

Born Axel Gerard and crafting his music between England and his native France since 2018, Orava is named after a stream in north-western Slovakia that roughly translates as “roaring river.” Inspired by artists like Daft Punk, Phoenix, and Depeche Mode, Orava’s compositions tackle the common hopes, doubts and fears of his generation, drawing mostly from his own experiences. Written, composed and produced entirely by the artist, “Going Backwards” follows the release of his previous singles “Behind The Wave,” “The Rest is Noise,” and “Now I Know.” 

Check out ‘Behind The Wave’ wherever you get your music, and be sure to keep an eye on this promising new artist. We’re sure we’ll be hearing a lot more from Orava over the next few years.
 
Website
Facebook
Instagram

Netflix article about Idris Elba illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE.

Netflix – The Take

By Cassandra Yany

Netflix has fixed a technical issue that left many viewers confused while watching one of the streaming service’s latest releases. 

The 2016 film The Take starring Idris Elba was added to Netflix’s library Wednesday. The partly-French film had a bug with the subtitles where only the English lines were captioned and the French lines remained untranslated.

Subscribers quickly took to Twitter to alert Netflix of the issue. One user wrote, “Okay just finished The Take on Netflix and I’m very confused as to why the English subtitles were not included. Half the movie was in French.” Another said, “You can’t watch The Take on @Netflix unless you are past Level 5 French on Rosetta Stone.”

Despite this issue, the film currently holds the no. 3 spot in the Netflix ‘Top 10,’ sitting higher than the streaming service’s most recent original film The Devil All The Time. Netflix resolved the problem as of Monday afternoon and the movie now includes translations of the scenes in French.

The film— known internationally as Bastille Day, according to Essence— stars Idris Elba and “Game of Thrones’” Richard Madden. Forbes reports that the film was set to be released in Europe in early 2016, but was pushed back later in the year due to the 2015 Paris terrorist attacks. It was pulled out of theaters days after its July release due to the truck attack in Nice.

The film was not popular in the U.S., as it was only shown in 100 theaters nationwide. It earned just over $50,000 from its release in the states. 

According to television and film news outlet Looper, the action film is about a pickpocket (Richard Madden) who steals a woman’s bag that contains a bomb, intended to go off in an empty building. He disposes of it and the explosion kills four people. He is then taken into custody by a CIA agent (Idris Elba), who quickly realizes that Madden’s character did not mean to take part in the attack. They learn that it was part of a plan by a group of corrupt police officers to rob the French National Bank. The two team up to clear the pickpocket’s name and stop the officers.

Despite the criticism over incorrect subtitling, it seems that the movie is finally getting the attention that it missed during its original release in 2016.

Netflix – Cuties

By Cassandra Yany

One of Netflix’s newest films, Cuties, has garnered much attention and backlash since its Sep. 9 release on the streaming platform. The coming-of-age film depicts a young girl as she tries to navigate her life as a pre-teen growing up in a Muslim family living in Paris.

Many critics have spoken out against the film, which currently holds the no. 7 spot in Netflix’s ‘Top 10,’ for its depiction of 11-year-old girls dancing and behaving in an indecent manner. According to the New York Times, the movie was first deemed controversial in the U.S. in August when Netflix released the promotional artwork. The original marketing for the film displayed an image of four young girls in skimpy dance costumes posing provocatively.

This, along with the trailer, prompted opposers to start petitions online and call for the removal of the film from Netflix’s catalog. Netflix apologized and changed the artwork for the film to a more innocent photo of the same four characters walking down the street with shopping bags, donning bras and underwear over their clothes.

Last week’s release of the film has sparked conversation once again amongst parents, politicians and others, causing #CancelNetflix to trend on Twitter. Lina Nealon, the Director of Corporate and Strategic Initiatives at the National Center on Sexual Exploitation has spoken out against the film saying “While we commend Director Maïmouna Doucouré for exposing the very real threats to young girls having unfettered access to social media and the internet, we cannot condone the hypersexualization and exploitation of the young actresses themselves in order to make her point.” She called for Netflix to cut the “sexually-exploitive” scenes from the film, or remove the film from the platform altogether.

On Friday, Hawaii Rep. Tulse Gabbard tweeted, “@Netflix child porn ‘Cuties’ will certainly whet the appetite of pedophiles & help fuel the child sex trafficking trade. 1 in 4 victims of trafficking are children… Netflix you are now complicit.”

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz penned a letter to Attorney General William P. Barr Friday calling for the Department of Justice to start an investigation into the production and distribution of the film to “determine whether Netflix, any of its executives, or anyone involved in the making of ‘Cuties’ violated any federal laws against the production and distribution of child pornography.”

Cruz wrote that “the film routinely fetishizes and sexualizes these pre-adolescent girls as they perform dances simulating sexual conduct in revealing clothing, including at least one scene with partial nudity” falsely claiming that there’s a scene exposing a “minor’s bare breast.” The Associated Press reported that one of Cruz’s representatives, Lauren Aronson, said that the senator has not seen the film.

According to the Washington Times, some critics are even calling on the Obama’s— who have a production deal with Netflix— to take action against the film. Deadline stated that “The reality appears to have been lost in the storm, and the truth is very few of the people reacting so strongly will have actually seen the film.”

Netflix told USA TODAY “‘Cuties’ is a social commentary against the sexualization of young children. It’s an award winning film and a powerful story about the pressure young girls face on social media and from society more generally growing up— and we’d encourage anyone who cares about these important issues to watch the movie.”

Director Maïmouna Doucouré defends the film, saying that it works to shed light on these issues so they can be fixed. Cuties first premiered at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival on Jan. 23, where it won the Directing Jury Award for the dramatic film category. According to the New York Times, the movie did not stir up much conversation in France after its theatrical release (as Mignnonnes in French) in August.

Deadline reports that Doucouré did not see the promotional material prior to when it was circulated on the internet. She said that she received death threats as the outrage grew over these images. She told the news site that the film is not apologetic about the hypersexualization of children, but instead is her “…personal story as well as the story of many children who have to navigate between a liberal western culture and a conservative culture at home.”

Cuties was Doucouré’s feature directorial debut. Similar to the film’s main character, Amy, Doucouré is of Senegalese descent and grew up in a Muslim culture in Paris. In an interview at Sundance, she said she first had the idea for the movie after attending a neighborhood gathering in Paris where she saw a group of 11-year-old girls doing a stage performance of a “sensual” dance. She was shocked to see girls that age dance like that in short clothing. “We can’t continue to close our eyes about that,” she told the interviewer.

Doucouré researched for a year and a half, meeting with hundreds of pre-teens who told her their stories. She learned about their ideas of femininity, and how their self image is affected by the emphasis of social media in today’s society. According to IndieWire, the young actresses’ parents were on board with the project to spread awareness of the issue, and there was a psychologist working with the girls throughout filming who is still helping them throughout the release process.

The film is centered around Amy, an 11-year-old girl who has recently moved to a housing development in a poor suburb of Paris with her Senegalese, observant Muslim family. She looks out for her brothers, takes care of responsibilities around the house, and is in the process of being taught how to ‘be a woman’ by  her aunt.

One day after prayer, Amy walks by the laundry room and sees a girl her age dancing to music playing from her phone. In a subsequent scene, Amy is seen trying to straighten her hair with a clothing iron, burning part of it off as a result. 

Amy learns that her father, who is still in Senegal, has taken a second wife and will be coming to Paris soon to have the wedding. Her mother, Mariam, tries to hide her reaction to the news, but Amy sees her grow upset and take her frustrations out on herself. This is where Amy’s behavior begins to shift; she starts to reject her culture and identity, and instead tries to conform to fit in with the other girls at school. 

At school, Amy is teased for her clothes and lack of fashion sense, so she begins to wear her younger brother’s t-shirt to match the crop tops that her classmates wear. After seeing a group of girls her age dancing after school, Amy steals her cousin’s iPhone to learn how to dance, herself. She comes across their social media accounts and begins taking selfies, imitating what she sees on their profiles. 

Amy finds herself a spot in the girls’ friend group and dance troupe, and as a result, begins to neglect her responsibilities at home. Amy starts to show more self expression, wearing her hair natural rather than pulling it back. She also begins to explore the internet more, finding videos of almost-naked women dancing rather suggestively and moving their bodies in ways that an 11-year-old probably shouldn’t be watching. 

Taking what she found online, Amy practices dancing with her friends and teaches them how to twerk. This is where the movie begins to make viewers slightly uneasy. It was jarring to see these young, innocent girls tainted by this inappropriate content and doing dance moves that they didn’t understand the implications of. It appears that this was the intention of director Doucouré, as she stated in an interview with Netflix that the film is “…a mirror of today’s society; a mirror sometimes difficult to look into and accept but still so true.”

Some of the scenes, frankly, are very disturbing to watch. These include the girls dancing provocatively for two older male workers at a laser tag facility so that they wouldn’t get in trouble for sneaking in, as well as Amy beginning to undress for her cousin once he found she had stolen his iPhone in an attempt to smooth over the situation. Perhaps the most disturbing scene is when Amy takes a picture of her genitals to post on her social media profile so that people at school would think she’s mature. While there was no nudity shown in this scene, the implied action was horrifying to watch. 

At the end of the film, Amy performs with her dance troupe at a local competition. Dressed in revealing outfits, they dance immodestly in front of a crowd of people who quickly seem unsettled. (This is the scene from which the original promotional photos were taken.) Toward the end of the song, Amy freezes as she begins to think about her mom, then runs off the stage crying. She goes home where she asks her mom not to attend her father’s wedding. Her mom continues to get ready for the event, but tells Amy that she doesn’t have to go.

Instead of going to the wedding, Amy steps outside and begins jumping rope. This scene depicts a mixture of her two identities: she is wearing jeans and a crop top with her hair down, but is surrounded by people of her culture dressed in traditional garments. After suppressing her family’s background for a majority of the movie, Amy is finally able to find the balance where her multiple cultures intersect in order to be her honest self. 

After watching Cuties, it is evident that it is not meant to promote this behavior among young girls, but instead provide commentary on what is happening today and warn the adults who see the movie. The harsh reality is that more pre-adolescents are exposed to this type of content than we think. Any child who has access to a smart device and social platforms have the potential to see a video not meant for them. Take TikTok for example: racy dances to Cardi B and Meg Thee Stallion’s “WAP,” as well as a recent trend where women make “thirst traps” to Beyoncé’s “Rocket” are some of the most popular videos on the app right now. Young TikTok users can easily see creators on their For You Page enjoying themselves while engaging in these trends, causing the young viewer to want to do the same.

When speaking to Deadline, Doucouré said, “What happens is young girls see images of women being objectified, and the more the woman becomes an object, the more followers and like she has— they see that as a role model and try to imitate these women, but they’re not old enough to know what they’re doing.” In a separate interview, she posed the question, “Isn’t the objectification of a woman’s body that we often see in our Western culture not another kind of oppression?”

Overall, Cuties shows the dangers of uncensored media for young children and displays how impressionable they can be. It also shows the journey of Amy’s self-discovery and learning how to blend her multiple cultures in order to shape her identity. Unfortunately, the risqué nature of the film overshadows the storyline and the message is lost for a number of audience members.

In various articles, Doucouré is quoted discussing the meaning of the film in the broad context of femininity and what it means for young girls to enter womanhood in this digital age. During her aforementioned interview with Netflix, she stated “The real question of Cuties is can we, as women, truly choose who we want to be, beyond the role models that are imposed upon us by society?”

Bastille Day Cocktail illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

D’USSE Bastille Basil

As you may know, the bold, yet remarkably smooth character of D’USSE Cognac was conceived at the prestigious Château de Cognac – a 200-year-old venue and one of the oldest Cognac houses in France. Thus, making it an opportune time to explore an exclusive cocktail from the brand to celebrate Bastille Day! 

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 Parts D’USSE
  • 1 1/2 Parts French Rosé Wine
  • 3/4 Part Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1 Part Simple Syrup
  • 1 1/2 Part Sparkling Water

Garnish

  • ​4 Basil Leaves
  • 1 Lemon Wheel

Method

Add D’USSE, Rosé, lemon, simple syrup and basil leaves into a shaker with ice. Shake and strain into an ice filled glass. Top with sparkling water. Garnish with a lemon wheel and a sprig of fresh basil.

Follow D’USSE: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

wine, 360 MAGAZINE

Bastille Day Gourmet Tasting Kit

With Bastille Day just around the corner, Francophiles are getting ready to celebrate Le Quatorze Juillet in true Parisienne style. To help you join in on France’s most festive fête from the comfort of your home, beloved French liqueur brand St-Germain and NYC-based Gastronome Catering have teamed up to design an exclusive gourmet tasting kit, Menu du Quatorze Juillet, scheduled to launch on July 14 (details below).

While New Yorkers have started slowly venturing out since the Phase 2 reopening last month, the vast majority have realized the truth of the matter – apartment dining will not be going away any time soon. But preparing a meal for two doesn’t have to be a laborious chore. In fact, quite the opposite. The deluxe Bastille Day tasting kit – created by St-Germain and Gastronome whose high-profile clientele includes Fendi, Alice & Olivia, One King’s Lane, Tribeca Film Festival and Mark Cross to name a few – offers a 4-star tasting experience in the comfort of our homes.

Available for purchase through August 14, the kit will be equipped with everything you need to enjoy an elevated evening – including a Drizly code for the ingredients to make a St-Germain Spritz cocktail, paired with a Parisian-inspired tasting menu from award-winning chef Alex Ureña (bio below). This collaboration is an extension of the St-Germain Moment du Jour social initiative that aims to inspire creativity, elevate daily rituals and design special moments in people’s daily lives at this time.

ABOUT ST-GERMAIN MOMENT DU JOUR

In collaboration with a collective of lifestyle experts and local bartenders from around the country, The St-Germain Moment Du Jour platform offers a series of lifestyle tips — spanning culture, gastronomy, style, and home décor — and cocktail pairings to help inspire creativity and design special moments in our daily lives. The program brings together local artisans and bartenders, who have been impacted in these challenging times, to share weekly tips on the St-Germain Instagram.

Ivory Rowen, 360 MAGAZINE, ILLUSTRATIONS, DRINKS, SPIRITS, COCKTAILS

Martell Vs. Single Distillery

About Martell VS Single Distillery

Martell VS Single Distillery combines spirits from a single distillation source in France’s Cognac region for a richer and more intense expression of the Martell distillation style. Martell is the only great cognac house to double distill exclusively clear wines, from which all sediments have been removed, in order to preserve the authentic fruity aromas of the grapes and reveal their incredible subtlety. These are hallmarks of the Martell style.

The Color: Rich, clear gold.
The Aroma: Intense aromas of plum, apricot, and candied lemon.
The Taste: The luscious fruity notes associated with Martell are taken to new heights with this supremely smooth blend.
MSRP: $26.99

Martell Cordon Bleu

About: The legendary cognac Martell Cordon Bleu in an international emblem of excellence. Ideal for special occasions, the taste of this French cognac is an explosion of spicy fruit notes and elegant richness.
The Color: Deep, golden copper.
The Aroma: Vibrant, rich and complex, with orchard fruit – candied plum and apple – harmonizing with roasted notes of mocha coffee, toasted almonds and vetiver.
The Taste: An exceptionally rounded, mellow sensation further enhanced by Borderies eaux-de-vie, which lend elegance and complexity. An impressively long finish characterized by notes of fruit and spices. Best enjoyed neat or with a splash of water.
MSRP: $129.99

One Hour Translation: Google Wins the Battle of Real Time Voice Translators

OHT used expert in-house linguists to compare the performance of Skype Translator, Google Assistant and Apple’s Siri in translating business and tourism expressions from English into Japanese, French, German and Spanish and vice versa

On average across languages, Google scored the highest – 4.54 out of 6, Skype second (4.32) and Siri third (4.09). Google was the best in Japanese (4.01), German (4.5) and Spanish (4.8), while Siri led in French (4.87) 

Google Assistant is the top performing real time voice translator, according to a benchmark conducted by One Hour Translation (OHT), an online platform which provides translations in more than 100 languages and 3,000 language pairs.

With demand for real time voice translation on the rise, OHT decided to test out the leading services: Skype Translator (run by Microsoft Translate), Google Assistant and Apple’s Siri, and rank them for accuracy.

With the help of expert in-house linguists OHT took 16 business and 10 tourism expressions and translated them from English into Japanese, French, German and Spanish and vice versa. The same sentences were then given to real time voice translator devices, apps and digital assistants to see just how they performed. The results were rated by the linguists on a scale of 0 to 6.

On average across languages, Google scored the highest – 4.54 out of 6, Skype second (4.32) and Siri third (4.09). Google was the best in three out of the four languages – Japanese (4.01), German (4.5) and Spanish (4.8), while Siri led in French (4.87).  Overall Japanese was the hardest language to translate with an average score of 3.7.  French was the easiest language for the instant voice translator devices to translate with an average of 4.75, followed by Spanish (4.54) and German (4.41).

“The real time voice translators were more accurate in translating tourism related experssions in comparison to business expressions” said Yaron Kaufman, chief marketing officer and co-founder of OHT. He attributed this to the use of a lot of business-related abbreviations which are not easily recognized by real time voice devices. Kaufman added that “despite the recent improvements in all of the assistants we tested, real time voice translations still cannot be relied on for business related content.”

Some examples of the sentences: “Stay on budget for this campaign, we can’t have it affecting our ROI”; “R&D are cutting too many corners, the product is undeployable”;  “Schedule a meeting between your CMO and our product manager”; “Do you have any allergies? This dish contains peanuts and avocado”; “I need to find the fastest way to the airport, my plane is leaving soon”; “My travel insurance should cover that bill.”

There are also new developments on the horizon in the field of real time voice translation. Among other advancements, Amazon is planning to release a DIY toolkit for creating translation apps and Xiaomi has released a new and advanced physical device for real time translations.

About One Hour Translation

One Hour Translation (OHT) believes that businesses should be able to reach any customer, anywhere, anytime, with no language barriers.

One Hour Translation’s AI powered cloud-based translation management platform, HALO,  helps enterprise customers reduce overhead by automating their translation process and workflow. HALO combines automated workflows, Neural Machine Translation (NMT) and professional translation services, to process all of the enterprise content quickly and easily via API/WEB. A dedicated NMT engine is automatically trained as the translations proceed and as a result the project’s cost keeps decreasing while translation speed improves. HALO is easy to implement and use, encrypted, secured and allows the enterprise to use any mix of its translators and reviewers with those of OHT, as well as any mix of NMTs for optimal quality and cost. The platform also allows OHT to manage a company’s resources and in-house budgets earmarked for translation in order to obtain the best possible results.

OHT is the leader in translations for enterprise customers, currently serving over 60 percent of the Fortune 500 companies, including Coca-Cola, Deutsche Bank, Microsoft, Amazon, IBM, HP, Xerox, Acer, Shell, Deloitte, HSBC, Procter & Gamble, IKEA, 3M, McCann, Allianz, Xiaomi and many other organizations.

One Hour Translation specializes in translation for 30 expert domains, including law, technology, marketing, website translation, applications, software and more.

Company Website

Twitter

Facebook

ONEs – OHT NMT Evaluation Score

Vérité Unveils New Single “Gone”

Singer, songwriter Vérité unveils Gone today, her first single in two years, NYLON. Co-written and produced by singer-songwriter Madi Diaz and Konrad Snyder, the song reintroduces the musician, capturing the devastating effects of something ending. Carried by haunting crescendos and is powerhouse vocals, the track sees the singer pleading for time to stand still for a little while longer before her world turns upside down.

BUY/STREAM GONE

Vérité said about the song, Gone is about the moment before an inevitable shift. It’s the feeling of sitting still, taking in your surroundings, and burying yourself in a final scene. It’s about accepting an action as simple as getting dressed can delineate an end. It’s about leaving something/someone you’ve known behind and how the massive swell of frenetic potential energy that is all encompassing in that moment becomes a tiny blip in retrospect. It’s about being done and moving on. The sentiment is simple, the reality—overwhelming.

Gone speaks to a larger theme Vérité will be focusing on with her sophomore album: capturing the nuance of being in a relationship that isn’t romanticized or idealized. The single is the first taste of a forthcoming album Vérité has coming down the pipeline.

Following the release of her 2017 LP Somewhere In Between, Vérité has become the definition of thriving in the new music industry as an independent artist. Since her project began, Vérité has garnered a 250M+ streams across all platforms with a 1.4+ monthly listeners. Her debut album has over 50M streams, while her cover of The 1975’s Somebody Else has been streamed 111M times.

FOLLOW Vérité:

Website, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube

Urban Electric Artist Aazar Releases New Single

Following a recent track with Grammy winning, dance-duo, The Chainsmokers, French DJ and producer, Aazar is just time for the summer with his debut single (via Interscope Records) – “Diva (featuring Swae Lee & Tove Lo)” – the rhythmic, hip-swaying banger is available today via all digital retailers.

An Ode to Modern Divas in all their forms: from the most badass to the most glamorous, dancers or boxers. Aazar wanted us to celebrate in a fun and uninhibited way the diversity of the “Carefree Divas” of the World. Watch  Aazar, Swae Lee, and Tove Lo dance around the streets of Los Angeles in the video directed by Original Kids HERE.

The trio teamed up after Aazar was asked about his dream collaborations. “’ Diva’ is a very special record to me. I produced this record a few years ago and I always wanted a vocal on it. Here we are now, with Swae Lee and Tove Lo…I couldn’t be happier” says Aazar of the track. After sharing his appreciation of Swae Lee, Aazar (Alexis Duvivier), coincidentally ran into him at Paris Fashion Week. Without hesitation, he told the Grammy-nominated rapper that he’s a producer, a huge fan and believed that one day they would work together. When he reached out to Swedish singer, Tove Lo, who thought the song “felt like a golden egg dropping into [her] lap,” he wasn’t confident of a response. Tove was immediately on board after finishing a writing session for her album back home in Stockholm. Calling it the “fastest and smoothest collab ever,” she sent her vocals back within forty-eight hours.

More on Aazar: Paris-based producer and member of Point Point, Aazar, has been immensely busy in the studio working on an abundance of exciting new music this year. Having produced official remixes for the likes of David Guetta (Flames) and Martin Solveig (My Love) as well as powerful collaborations with Cesqueaux, Yellow Claw & Moksi (Shanghai Nights Album), Aazar is generating an undeniable buzz around him and his music. His more recent collaboration with The Chainsmokers on groundbreaking track ‘Siren’ has been streaming non-stop worldwide. Aazar’s live career is also on the rise, continuously touring around the world and playing for new audiences in Europe, Asia, USA as well as celebrated festivals such as Tomorrowland, Encore Beach Las Vegas, Mysteryland, the momentum is clear in Aazar conquering these territories. In contrast to the globe-trotting exploits of this artist, Aazar has also been spending a lot of time in the kitchen, as his gourmet alter-ego Chef Aazar. Interesting and tasteful, exactly how Aazar approached everything in 2018 and before; and 2019 is going to build on this trend since he already has some exciting stuff cooking.

Follow Aazar on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter

A VAN GOGH

A Van Gogh, Without a Doubt

The Wadsworth Atheneum’s Vase with Poppies, c. 1886 is Authenticated

After nearly 30 years of doubt, the Wadsworth Atheneum’s painting, Vase with Poppies, by Vincent Van Gogh, has now been fully authenticated by specialists at the Van Gogh Museum. While the painting came to the Wadsworth in a bequest from the writer and French Impressionist collector Anne Parrish Titzell in 1957 along with works by Renoir, Monet, and Redon, Vase with Poppies has been difficult to confidently attribute since questions about Van Gogh’s practice remained unresolved. Experts in Amsterdam following scientific and art-historical inquiry have determined that the painting technically and stylistically concurs with Van Gogh’s documented work in 1886. This new finding means that the Wadsworth is home to two Van Gogh’s, Vase with Poppies will join Self Portrait, both painted during his Paris period 1886-1887 atop earlier paintings.

Vase with Poppies fits stylistically with a group of works the artist made shortly after arriving to Paris in the spring of 1886. Van Gogh took advantage of the easy access to flowers as he reinvented his stylistic approach after two years of depicting peasant life in Nuenen. His embrace of a more vibrant palette and light filled renderings of humble subjects–flowers, nuts, fruit–is evident in this simple composition of cut poppies in a plain cylindrical vase. In his words in an 1886 letter to fellow artist Horace M. Livens, “And now for what regards what I myself have been doing, I have lacked money for paying models else I had entirely given myself to figure painting. But I have made a series of color studies in painting, simply flowers, red poppies, blue corn flowers and myosotys, white and rose roses, yellow chrysanthemums–seeking oppositions of blue with orange, red and green, yellow and violet seeking les tons rompus et neutres to harmonize brutal extremes.”

Concurrent to the physical examinations by the team at the Van Gogh Museum, recent investigations uncovered that the painting was exhibited at the watershed 1913 Armory Show in New York City. These new investigations were all prompted by the Wadsworth conservation lab using newly acquired imaging equipment through the generosity of the Sherman Fairchild Foundation. Digital x-ray and advanced infrared reflectograms revealed with greater clarity than ever before the presence of an earlier painting beneath the current composition. These early forensic findings made sending Vase with Poppies to the Van Gogh Museum for advanced study the logical next step. Their work–analyzing the paint, materials, linen, style–enabled a level of professional scrutiny and artist specific context to arrive at this new judgement of authenticity with great confidence.

“It was a pleasure for our museum to work together with the Wadsworth Atheneum on this particular project,” says Louis van Tilborgh Senior Researcher, Van Gogh Museum, and Professor of Art History, specializing in Van Gogh, University of Amsterdam. “When in 1970 Van Gogh’s oeuvre catalogue by De la Faille was published, it was seen by many as a progress report. It contained too many “floaters” in terms of both dating and authenticity to admit that a firm, unequivocal, authentic oeuvre had been established, to quote the eminent art historian Ronald Pickvance. Now, almost fifty years later, one can say that slowly but surely, real progress is being made in Van Gogh studies. Some of these floaters even turned out to be firmly anchored in Van Gogh’s oeuvre, and Vase with Poppies, I am happy to say, is one of them.”

“This extraordinary collaboration and harnessing of technology and professional discernment simply not available until now is a reminder of the opportunities today to both enrich discourse in the field and take stock in our collections,” says Director and CEO of the Wadsworth Thomas J. Loughman. “These studies have revealed just how much we still need to learn about Vincent and his growth as a painter, new to Paris and exploring new avenues for his art.”

The painting will return home to the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, Connecticut just in time for the opening of the 38th Annual Fine Art and Flowers on Friday, April 26, 2019. Vase with Poppies will next go on loan to Europe for The Museum Barberini in Potsdam, Germany’s exhibition Van Gogh: Still Lifes (October 26, 2019 to February 2, 2020) where it will join a number of these transitional works, allowing the public and scholars alike, access to this exciting development through side-by-side display.

About the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

Founded in 1842, the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art is the oldest continuously operating public art museum in the United States. The museum’s nearly 50,000 works of art span 5,000 years, from Greek and Roman antiquities to the first museum collection of American contemporary art. The Wadsworth Atheneum’s five connected buildings–representing architectural styles from Gothic Revival to modern International Style–are located at 600 Main Street in Hartford, Conn. Hours: Wednesday-Friday: 11am-5pm; Saturday and Sunday: 10am-5pm Admission: $5-15; discounts for members, students and seniors. Free admission for Hartford residents with Wadsworth Welcome registration. Free “happy hour” admission 4-5pm Public phone: (860) 278-2670; website: thewadsworth.org.

 

Image:Vincent Van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), Vase with Poppies, c. 1886. Oil on canvas. 21 1/2 x 17 3/4 in. Bequest of Anne Parrish Titzell. 1957.617