Posts tagged with "Prince Philip"

illustration by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

Beau-Rivage Palace Celebrates 160th Anniversary

The Beau-Rivage Palace Hotel marks its 160th anniversary with a gender revolution.

When Lausanne’s iconic Beau-Rivage Palace Hotel opened its doors on the shores of Lake Geneva in 1861, it was financed by men, managed by men, promoted by men, and staffed almost entirely by men. Women were engaged to make beds and wash dishes. 

What a difference 160 years make. In 2021, the Beau-Rivage Palace’s general manager, its resident celebrity chef, and its chief concierge are all women. And today, it is largely men who clean the hotel’s guest rooms, schlepp the luggage and park the cars.

MAKING HISTORY

The site of many milestone moments in history, it was the Beau-Rivage Palace’s Jacques Tschumi who, in 1893, opened the Lausanne Hotel School in order to train his hotel staff. Now, 128 years later, the École Hôtelière de Lausanne continues to be regarded as the best hospitality school in the world, and many of its students still undergo on-the-job training at the Beau-Rivage Palace. The hotel’s Cinq Mondes spa was totally refurbished in 2020, ready to underscore the hotel’s growing devotion to wellness.

Host to celebrities from Charlie Chaplin and Coco Chanel to Matt Dillon and Christopher Walken, not to mention Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, and U.S. presidents, the hotel was and is host to world-changing events as well. Highlights of its history include:

  • 1912 – Signing of the First Treaty of Lausanne (or Treaty of Ouchy) at the Beau-Rivage Palace, ending the Italian-Turkish War
  • 1923 – Hosting of the conference of the Treaty of Lausanne that draws the borders of present-day Turkey
  • 1945 – Coco Chanel lived at the Beau-Rivage Palace from 1945 to 1954 and is buried in Lausanne
  • 1968 – Albert Cohen publishes his novel Belle du Seigneur, inspired by the romantic atmosphere of the Beau-Rivage Palace
  • 2009 – Anne-Sophie Pic, the world’s most celebrated female chef, opens her eponymous restaurant at the Beau-Rivage Palace. In October, Michelin awards the restaurant two coveted stars 
  • 2015 – Nathalie Seiler-Hayez appointed general manager of the Beau-Rivage Palace
  • 2015 – The months’-long negotiations at the Beau-Rivage Palace conclude with the Iran Nuclear Treaty. 

IT’S ALL ABOUT 2021

The celebratory year will feature an array of special events and offerings focusing on wellness and healthy living, including:

On August 27, the now traditional Anne-Sophie Pic Market will offer the opportunity to discover local delights produced by the chef’s partners. A special highlight will be the signing of Michael Berthoud’s book on wild harvesting – Anne-Sophie Pic wrote the preface in homage to their friendship. An “eat and be fit” section will also be presented in collaboration with Jérémy Peltier to respond to the growing demand for health preservation through food, a subject dear to Anne-Sophie Pic’s heart. 

From September 1, the Absolute Infusion Menu will be featured at the Beau-Rivage Palace’s Anne-Sophie Pic restaurant. An exclusive alcohol-free food and drink pairing offers an unprecedented new culinary experience.  

Finally, on November 24th, Anne-Sophie Pic and team will present “1861,” an extraordinary three-course gala menu reinterpreting the dishes served at the Beau-Rivage Palace’s very first dinner, 160 years ago.

ABOUT THE BEAU-RIVAGE PALACE

The Beau-Rivage Palace is situated on ten acres of private gardens, adjacent to Lake Geneva with spectacular views of the Swiss Alps. The property’s two Michelin starred restaurant, Anne-Sophie Pic at the Beau-Rivage Palace, features France’s only female chef with three Michelin stars. Other amenities include two bars and terraces, two tennis courts and a special program for children.

Kate Middleton illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Kate Middleton × Future Queen

Jezebel: The Forging of Kate Middleton Into a Future Queen

On the eve of her 10th wedding anniversary, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, appeared on the steps of St. George’s Chapel in Windsor for a very different sort of formal royal occasion: the funeral of the 99-year-old Prince Philip. She was appropriately somber in a black coat dress and matching hat, with a veil over her eyes lending her appearance a slight frisson of Dynasty-style mature glamour. The look was leavened only by a four-strand pearl choker borrowed from Queen Elizabeth II. After the service family members opted to walk back to Windsor Castle in the pleasant spring weather, and so came the most hotly anticipated moment of the day: Will and Harry together again, walking along at first with Kate—until she discreetly melted a couple of steps behind the brothers and let them walk ahead together.

The Duchess of Cambridge received effusive praise for her appearance at the funeral and perceived role as peacemaker between the warring brothers: “Kate Middleton’s new role as the glue holding troubled House of Windsor together,” the Mirror declared breathlessly in the wake of the funeral, praising the duchess for “tenderly” kissing her father-in-law on the cheek. The Telegraph announced, “The Duchess of Cambridge’s destiny is set, but it was at Prince Philip’s funeral that she showed just how ready she is for the role of future queen,” while the Sun pronounced: “Kate Middleton looked every inch the graceful and stoic royal at Prince Philip’s funeral.”

It was a media anointment in the UK—a coronation, even. Those same papers once tittered about how some people found Kate’s mother a bit vulgar and bandied about the nicknames “Waity Katy” or the “Duchess of Dolittle,” suggesting Kate was shamelessly content to wait around for Will and none too keen on work. Over the last decade, the commoner from Berkshire has successfully fashioned herself into a perfect, smiling, briskly competent but never flashy vision of modern, polished, up-market motherhood—posting her own photographs of the kids on Instagram, chatting kindly through her charity efforts with new mothers struggling to adjust. The Duchess of Cambridge is now the wholesome heart of the Windsors, the maternal figure with an expansive understanding of family ties ready to extend a hand to the prodigal brother, the future queen with the traditional womanly virtues required to bind together an ancient institution as its biggest generational transition in a century loom. This modern queen is the creation of a very old-fashioned playbook—handed down straight from Victoria and Albert.

Born in 1982 to Carole and Michael Middleton, who met working as a flight attendant and a dispatcher at British Airways, Kate’s childhood was prosperous but conventionally happy. Michael is distantly descended from Tudor gentry but more recently from Yorkshiremen who’d struck it rich in wool during the 19th century, resulting in a series of trusts that could be drawn upon for things like fancy private education. Carole is technically a very distant relative of the Queen Mother, but her family tree was full of laborers—including a coal-miner great-grandfather—and she had been born in a council flat. Around the time she had her third child, Carole launched Party Pieces, her party supply company; Robert Lacey puts somewhat dryly in his book Battle of Brothers that her “haggling skills are legendary in the direct mail business.” A source told him: “Butter wouldn’t melt in her mouth most of the time, but she was a ferocious negotiator—and if the haggling wasn’t going her way, the decibel level rose.”

To continue reading this Jezebel article, click here