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7 Fashionable Styles you can Do even in Isolation

Are you looking for some fashionable hairstyles that you can easily do at home? We have some excellent ideas for you ladies. Once you go through them, you will have plenty of inspiration. Sitting in isolation doesn’t mean that your hair will look messy. You can do pretty styles all by yourself, without having to visit the hair salon. Let’s get started!

1. Elegant updo

If you like to wear your hair up, this hairstyle is a good one. And the best thing is that it is pretty easy to do. Tie your hair in a low ponytail, but pull it halfway. Wrap the hanging part of the ponytail around the band. Then, secure it using bobby pins. Now you have a hairstyle that you can wear for your video conference.

2. Space buns

If you are having a bad hair day, this is your way out. Having two buns on top of your hair looks so cute, so you should definitely try this style at least once during the lockdown. The best thing about this style is that it will hold better on second hair day, or even third. It is a perfect choice if you want to prolong the hair washes. 

If you are together with your boyfriend in isolation, you can try different hairstyles together. Get some hair products such as waxes and gels to get started. There are so many great man hairstyle ideas, but this pompadour is something that you shouldn’t miss. 

3. Side-swept textured hairstyle

It is time for some charming and loose waves. You can put up slightly damp hair in a low bun to get some casual waves. A deep part on the side will enhance your facial features. Add a few decorative bobby pins on the other side to keep the hair in place. Don’t forget that visible bobby pins are a trend, so give this one a go!

4. Casual topknot

This is a personal favorite to many, as it is very easy to DIY at home. It works for both short hair and long hair, so feel free to try it no matter your hair length and haircut. Apply some hairspray on an old toothbrush and tame those baby hairs. 

5. Voluminous blowout

Just because you are in isolation it doesn’t have to mean that you won’t get a good salon-like blowout. With a bit of practice, you will learn how to do it at home. Start with damp hair, and apply a heat protecting spray. Make sure that it is evenly distributed, so apply it strand by strand. Use a large round brush to replicate the typical salon blowout. This will bring volume to your look and style your hair neatly. This is the perfect hairstyle for women that want to look put together even during the lockdown

6. Casual waves and headband

If you appreciate the natural wavy hair, then it is time to spice it up. Use a nice headband to make your hair look more put together. Adding a simple accessory can look like you have put a lot of effort into styling your hair. 

7. Romantic ponytail with a scrunchie

Scrunchies are very popular hair accessories now. They can help you turn your stay-at-home-ponytail to a romantic hairstyle. If your hair is too flat, tease it a little bit at the crown to give it a nice lift. Then, tie it with a colorful scrunchie. You can go low or high with the ponytail, depending on your personal preference. 

SCLC Calls for Additional Stimulus Money

On the 52nd Anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr’s. Assassination, His Call for Economic Equality for All is Being Revived

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Calls for Permanent Monthly Financial Subsidy for The Poor, Billions for Black-Owned Businesses and Reparations for Descendants of Slaves.

In Commemorating the 52nd Anniversary of the Assassination of its co-founder and first leader, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), has called on the U.S. Government to set aside $250 billion for black-owned businesses.

The civil rights organization also called on Congress, which recently approved a nearly $2 trillion stimulus package to provide emergency aid to Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic, to permanently extend monthly payments to the poor and to pay reparations for descendants of slaves. The coronavirus crisis, SCLC officials say, has highlighted the need for America to right its wrongs when it comes to income inequality, which is linked to disparities in education, health care, housing and access to capital. These life essentials are key components of wealth creation.

“We will circulate a petition that will be delivered to Congress asking for $250 billion for black-owned businesses,” said Dr. Charles Steele, Jr., president, and CEO of the SCLC. “The administration is turning the stimulus money over to banks, but banks are the main reason black Americans can’t get access to wealth and why most black Americans have lost their savings. Black America lost its wealth when the housing market collapsed, and banks played a major role in that collapse.”

Dr. Steele said, “it’s time for restoration.” “The Covid-19 stimulus package can assist black-owned businesses, especially black-owned banks, and our historically black colleges and universities,” he added. “If we get our banks, businesses, and institutions healthy, our communities will recover, and we will achieve Dr. King’s dream for racial and economic equality.”

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis on April 4, 1968 while in the city advocating for fair wages for striking sanitation workers. Before Dr. King was killed at the age of 39, he had called for the U.S. government to address the injustices in the American economic system which provided government funding to the rich and the poor, but referred to the aid by different names. For the poor, it is called welfare. For the
rich, it is called subsidies. To end economic exploitation, Dr. King called for America to redistribute its wealth. He pushed for a guaranteed subsidy for the poor, saying a rich nation like the U.S. should not have citizens living in poverty.

“The U.S. Government response to the Coronavirus is a start, but the virus has made it clear that we are all tied to our nation’s survival and revival,” Dr. Steele said. “The only way for America to move forward as a stronger nation is for Congress to act on additional financial measures to ensure that poor and working-class families have the financial means to prosper. We need a permanent stimulus package, not a temporary one that is a band-aid approach to our financial problems. The $1200 check won’t cut it for poor folks. You can’t pay your bills and get out of this slump with that check.”

Dr. King believed in self-help, but he also believed in the government partnering with citizens to help them get on track economically, Dr. Steele said.

“The $1200 that the current administration is talking about giving to citizens is a slap in the face,” Dr. Steele said. “That is not a salary for folks who have lost their jobs. The money the government is giving is just pocket change. Poor folks need checks until they reach the next rung of the economic ladder.”

And descendants of slaves, Dr. Steele added, need reparations, because the remnants of that era still exist today where blacks face racism in every arena in society. Reparations can address some of the past injustices, persistent disparities and redistribute some of the wealth.

“Dr. King was a visionary and global leader,” Dr. Steele said. “He called for the government to take care of the people 52 years ago. It is taking the Coronavirus for us to see how we are all connected and linked to each other’s survival. And we see this not only in America but around the world. Dr. King’s vision was not destroyed. It was delayed, but the moment to fulfill that vision is in our hands. The SCLC is going to keep the issues and his dream front and center.”

Tainy – MALOS HABITOS

TAINY REVEALS NEW VIDEO FOR “MALOS HABITOS” FEATURING PUERTORICAN NEWCOMER KRIS FLOYD

3 time Latin GRAMMY© Award-winning producer and artist  Tainy,  released the video for  “MALOS HABITOS”  alongside  Puertorican newcomer Kris Floyd. The song is part of “The Kids That Grew Up On Reggaeton- Neon Tapes”, Tainy’s debut EP released earlier this month which consists of 7 songs and features other talented artists such as Dalex, Alvaro Diaz, Sean Paul, Cazzu, Mozart La Para, Lauren Jauregui, C. Tangana, Kali Uchis, Khea, Kris Floyd, Dylan Fuentes, Lennox, Justin Quiles, and Llane.

The video was directed by Elliot Muscat and The Garden and was shot on location in Miami in the middle of the night. Muscat drew inspiration from the up close and personal feel of the 90s shooting styles and tying the camera to the back of a pickup truck giving him the chance to capture Tainy and Kris in the best way.

“This track is special,  it’s Kris Floyd’s debut as part of the NEON16 family, so this is another exciting time for us. It was produced by the very talented Jota Rosa who is also under the NEON incubator. In this song he put his touch and gave the EP the variety it was missing. Kris’ delivery on this track is truly amazing”, comments Tainy.

WATCH HERE

INSTAGRAM / TWITTER / FACEBOOK

Tainy

Beethoven’s Effect on Test Results

Students Who Listened to Beethoven During Lecture — and Heard the Same Music in Dreamland — Did Better on Test Next Day

But scores on the material nine months later dropped to ‘floor level,’ Baylor University study finds

College students who listened to classical music by Beethoven and Chopin during a computer-interactive lecture on microeconomics — and heard the music again that night — did better on a test the next day than did peers who were in the same lecture, but instead slept that evening with white noise in the background.

Over the long haul — when students took a similar test nine months later — the boost did not last. Scores dropped to floor levels, with everyone failing and performance averaging less than 25% percent for both groups. However, targeting memory reactivation (TMR) may aid during deep sleep, when memories are theorized to be reactivated and moved from temporary storage in one part of the brain to more permanent storage in other parts, researchers said.

The study, supported by the National Science Foundation and conducted by Baylor’s Sleep Neuroscience and Cognition Laboratory (SNAC), is published in the journal Neurobiology of Learning and Memory.

“All educators want to teach students how to integrate concepts, not just memorize details, but that’s notoriously difficult to do,” said Michael K. Scullin, Ph.D., director of Baylor’s sleep lab and assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience. “What we found was that by experimentally priming these concepts during sleep, we increased performance on integration questions by 18% on the test the next day. What student wouldn’t want a boost or two to their letter grade? The effects were particularly enhanced in participants who showed heightened frontal lobe activity in the brain during slow wave sleep, which is deep sleep.”

He noted that the effects emerged when using gold standard procedures: neither participants nor experimenters knew who received a particular treatment, sleep was measured using EEG in a laboratory setting, and the learning materials matched those that would actually be used in a college classroom, in this case an undergraduate microeconomics lecture.

Poor sleep is widespread in college students, with 60 percent habitually sleeping fewer than the recommended seven hours on 50 to 65 percent of nights. While students may be more concerned about immediate test results — and TMR may help them cram for an exam — learning by rote (item memory) does not normally benefit grasping and retaining a concept.

For the study, researchers recruited 50 college students ages 18 to 33 for a learning task with a self-paced, computer-interactive lecture; and for two overnight polysomnography sessions, with the first night an adaptation to the lab and screening for sleep disorders, and the second done the evening of the lecture.

During the lecture, soft background selections were played from a computer: the first movement of Beethoven’s “Moonlight” Piano Sonata, the first movement of Vivaldi’s “Spring” Violin Concerto and Chopin’s Nocturne in E-flat major, Op. 9, No. 2.

That night in Baylor’s sleep lab, research personnel applied electrodes and used computers to monitor sleep patterns of both test and control groups. Once technicians observed a person was in deep sleep, they played either the classical music or the white noise — depending on whether the individual was in the test or control group — for about 15 minutes.

“Deep slow wave sleep won’t last super long before shifting back to light sleep, so we couldn’t play them endlessly,” Scullin said. “If we played it during light sleep, the music probably would have awoken participants. The first slow wave cycle is the deepest and longest.”

The music choice was important, researchers said.

“We ruled out jazz because it’s too sporadic and would probably cause people to wake,” Scullin said. “We ruled out popular music because lyrical music disrupts initial studying. You can’t read words and sing lyrics — just try it. We also ruled out ocean waves and ambient music because it’s very easy to ignore. You’re going to have a heck of a time forming a strong association between some learning material and a bland song or ambient noise.

“That left us with classical music, which many students already listen to while studying,” he said. “The songs can be very distinctive and therefore pair well with learning material.”

In the microeconomics exam the next day, the TMR of classical music more than doubled the likelihood of passing the test when compared with the control condition of white noise.

Scullin cautioned against confusing the Baylor study’s findings with the so-called “Mozart Effect” — the finding that having students listen to Mozart pieces led to better scores on intelligence tests. Subsequent tests of the “Mozart Effect” found that it either did not replicate or that boosts were strictly due to increased arousal when listening to energetic music.

“Mozart doesn’t make memories,” Scullin said.

Previous researchers have found that memories associated with sensory cues — such as an odor or song — are re-activated when the same cue is received later. When that happens during deep sleep, the corresponding memories are activated and strengthened, said co-researcher Chenlu Gao, a doctoral candidate of psychology and neuroscience at Baylor.

Early experimenters also played audio tapes during sleep to test whether individuals can learn new knowledge while sleeping. But while those experiments failed to create new memories, “our study suggests it is possible to reactivate and strengthen existing memories of lecture materials during sleep,” Gao said. “Our next step is to implement this technique in classrooms — or in online lectures while students complete their education at home due to COVID-19 social distancing measures — so we can help college students ‘re-study’ their class materials during sleep.”

“We think it is possible there could be long-term benefits of using TMR but that you might have to repeat the music across multiple nights,” Scullin added. “After all, you wouldn’t just study material a single time and then expect to remember it months later for a final exam. The best learning is repeated at spaced-out intervals — and, of course, while maintaining good sleep habits.”

*The study was supported by the National Science Foundation. Paul Fillmore, assistant professor of communication sciences and disorders in Baylor’s Robbins College of Health and Human Sciences, also was a co-researcher.

ABOUT BAYLOR UNIVERSITY

Baylor University is a private Christian University and a nationally ranked research institution. The University provides a vibrant campus community for more than 18,000 students by blending interdisciplinary research with an international reputation for educational excellence and a faculty commitment to teaching and scholarship. Chartered in 1845 by the Republic of Texas through the efforts of Baptist pioneers, Baylor is the oldest continually operating University in Texas. Located in Waco, Baylor welcomes students from all 50 states and more than 90 countries to study a broad range of degrees among its 12 nationally recognized academic divisions.

ABOUT THE COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES AT BAYLOR UNIVERSITY

The College of Arts & Sciences is Baylor University’s oldest and largest academic division, consisting of 25 academic departments and seven academic centers and institutes. The more than 5,000 courses taught in the College span topics from art and theatre to religion, philosophy, sociology and the natural sciences. Faculty conduct research around the world, and research on the undergraduate and graduate level is prevalent throughout all disciplines. Visit www.baylor.edu/artsandsciences.

ABOUT THE SLEEP NEUROSCIENCE AND COGNITION LABORATORY

The goal of the Sleep Neuroscience and Cognition Laboratory at Baylor University is to understand the basic processes supporting cognition and to translate that knowledge to promote health and flourishing across the adult lifespan. The two lines of inquiry focus on the sleep-based underpinnings of health and cognitive flourishing; and how technology can be leveraged to support prospective memory and quality of life in persons with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers.

 

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

Understanding The Responsibilities Of A Personal Injury Lawyer

Personal injury lawyers are civil litigators that represent clients who face injuries or economic harm due to the actions of another party. A personal injury claim can mainly help a victim avail some benefits against the negligent party; to secure the compensation of the damages that may have been caused due to the incident. Now for a victim, it is obvious to file a personal injury claim as their right. Yet, to take the claim further and avail the compensations, personal injury lawyers play an important role for the victims. 

But when it comes to hiring a personal injury lawyer, the victim needs to understand the actual responsibilities that they’ll be offering in terms of the claim and its entire process. This is simply because their legal duties are pretty specific in terms of representing their clients. So, if you’re someone who’s planning to pursue a personal injury claim or know someone who would; it’s better to understand what appropriate representations you should be expecting from your lawyer.

Their Responsibilities

Explaining The Process

Going through the process of personal injury compensation is probably new to many, in comparison to the specific type of injury compensation. Other than that, the state to state differences in the personal injury law also make it uncommon for everyone to be aware of completely. That is why, when you hire a personal injury lawyer; their utmost responsibility is to explain to you the details about the process of filing a claim. Along with that, the personal injury lawyer also informs you about what you should be expecting to happen in the coming weeks or months; so that you can be completely prepared for it.

Giving Personal Advice

Other than explaining to you of your rights and the entire process, the personal injury lawyer will also provide you their advice according to their professional experience. This advice will mainly be based on what you should and shouldn’t do following your injury and case details. This professional advice would be another responsibility of your injury lawyer; that would benefit you to take the claim further. As an example, your injury lawyer can advise you on what medical treatment you can take to back up your medical records while ensuring the damages you’re claiming for.

Deeply Investigating

Another important responsibility of a personal injury lawyer is to deeply investigate your case and understand all the major and minor details. This would help them understand what compensation you deserve (according to them). This way, with the help of proper assessment of the medical details and injuries you’re facing, your injury lawyer would more strongly be able to handle the argument and negotiate for your settlement amount suitably. Although, when it comes to having a personal injury lawyer that would handle your case strongly and help you get better claims, it’s always recommended to go for professional help, especially in the larger cities of Los Angeles, like Pasadena. The professionals at https://usa-law.org/ believe that having a strong understanding of personal injury cases and having more experience in it; makes it far easier to achieve a better claim. Besides, the more experienced and professional personal injury lawyers you hire, the least stressful the whole process of claiming can be for you, right?

Negotiating For A Settlement

Now we mentioned how a professional personal injury lawyer would make it easier for you to go through the entire claiming process, right? But that isn’t all, as a professional personal injury lawyer also goes through the responsibility of negotiating a settlement with the at-fault party; from your side. With the help of the expert knowledge they have, the personal injury lawyers ensure that you rightly avail what you deserve; while professionally and suitably dealing with the insurance companies as well as other attorneys. As a result, personal injury lawyers tend to look at the situation a lot more than just the immediate effects that might take place, and handle it accordingly.

Representing You

Normally, personal injury cases are settled outside the court easily. Although, in cases where the settlement isn’t possible without having third-party interference; taking the case to a trial becomes important. At times like this, (which are also quite rare); it is the responsibility of your injury lawyer to represent you in the court and fight for the compensation you deserve. Yet, since such cases don’t go to the court often; it’s also important to ensure that your injury lawyer is suitable for representing you (in case if the case goes to court)!

When you hire an attorney, you don’t only increase the chances of success of your injury claim, but also secure a better compensation in comparison to what you would have received without an attorney. Yet, since not many are aware of how a personal injury lawyer serves us; it’s better to be aware of their responsibilities and look for an attorney that professionally fulfills them all.

Sara Sandman, 360 MAGAZINE, illustration, community service, philanthropy, humanitarian

COVID-19 TOWN HALL

Today, BET announced a partnership with civil rights organization and stewards of human rights, the NAACP, on a four-part tele-town hall series “Unmasked: A COVID-19 Virtual Town Hall Series Powered by NAACP & BET” focused on how the pandemic is affecting African Americans and what steps the community can take to build an action plan for positive change. The first town hall kicks-off on Wednesday, April 8, at 8 PM ET/ 5 PM PT, and will focus on the health, emotional, economic toll, congressional response and how activists can apply pressure to ensure legislation is equitable. Viewers can participate LIVE via an interactive toll-free conference call that will also be streamed at https://naacp.org/call-to-action-program/. To participate via phone dial 866-757-0756 and to join the conversation on social media follow @NAACP and @BET.
 
“As the world faces unprecedented times and new realities during this global pandemic, the health and safety of people around the planet, particularly African Americans, are at an unparalleled risk,” said Derrick Johnson, president and CEO, NAACP. “The occasion to uplift and educate our community during this pivotal moment charts a pathway forward through uncertain times. The NAACP, in partnership with BET, is committed to rising to meet this moment head-on through this informative four-part series focused on the health, economic and social impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the African American Community.”
 
“As the devastation from the COVID-19 pandemic mounts, BET is developing partnerships and programs to support our community through this global health and financial crisis,” said Scott Mills, President of BET.  “We’re proud to work with our long-time partner the NAACP on this important town hall series that will provide comprehensive information for African Americans that will empower and help the community move forward during these difficult times.”
 
In the United States alone, close to 200,000 cases of the coronavirus have been confirmed. Because of the racial and economic inequities embedded in our country’s infrastructure, the effects of the coronavirus could be compounded for Black and Brown communities. The town hall series will help separate facts from myths and directly address how to ensure that the policies and practices that are born out of this pandemic justly address the health, economic and social needs of all people. The weekly series will focus on issues such as the state impact, response, and what comes next to advocating for your local community to the impact to schools, school systems, colleges, and exposed divisions.

Laurence Fishburne × Adult ADHD Empowerment

Adult ADHD And Empowering Those With The Condition Featured On “Behind The Scenes” With Laurence Fishburne

Award-winning American actor Laurence Fishburne is the host of the informative show “Behind The Scenes“. The TV program covers a wide array of topics of educating its viewing audience about issues impacting people across the globe. A new episode will feature adult ADHD and how to empower and support those affected by the condition.

Of all of the adults living in the U.S., an estimated 4.4% has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). ADHD symptoms may include absent-mindedness, forgetfulness, short attention span, anxiety, boredom, mood swings, depression, hyperactivity, and lack of restraint. While ADHD can feel frustrating and cumbersome for those suffering, it does not have to be. Understanding the symptoms and treatment options available can help one take control of their disorder.

Adult ADHD can improve with medications and non-prescription alternatives. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is one of the top options for medication treatment. CBT is a type of therapy that can aid those struggling with ADHD to manage their thoughts healthily. People who have ADHD can benefit from a good night’s sleep, as well, since inadequate sleep can worsen ADHD symptoms. There are prescription options for ADHD treatment, too. The most commonly prescribed drugs to treat ADHD are stimulants, non-stimulants, and antidepressants.

“Behind The Scenes” will further delve into empowering adults dealing with the disorder on an episode airing soon. The segment will feature medical professionals within the space as well as those who are becoming difference-makers in society.

“Behind The Scenes” with Laurence Fishburne is a high-quality television program. The education show has received a multitude of awards for its achievements in TV.

THE NEW SCHOOL ZOOM WORKSHOP

ART • WORK • PLACE: EMERGENCY SESSION 

Tuesday, April 7, 2020
7:30 pm– 9:30 pm  EDT
Vera List Center for Art and Politics (via Zoom)
The New School 
Free with registration

As the COVID-19 pandemic worsens, cultural workers are experiencing mass layoffs, and it is clear the art world will never look the same. In the first hour of this emergency forum, speakers will present ten-minute reports from the field; the second hour will feature breakout Q&A sessions with the speakers as well as a labor lawyer and a children’s therapist.

Art • Work • Place was originally planned as a two-day summit on efforts to create a just and equitable workplace in the art world—union organizing at museums, protests against toxic philanthropy, challenges to institutional racism, and lawsuits against sexual harassment and gender discrimination. But the current health emergency has drastically changed our conversations and needs. This online forum will instead focus on the immediate moment, sharing concrete information and ideas: What is happening to workers at art institutions across the country? What coalition groups have been formed for solidarity and support? What are our strategies going forward?

Confirmed speakers include:

Ian Epps (Art Handlers Alliance) will explain what is occurring at the city, state, and federal levels to support precarious workers, and what actions we can take.

Michelle Millar Fisher (Art + Museum Transparency) will describe the layoffs, furloughs, and pay cuts taking place at museums and galleries, and the consequences for unionization.

Kate Zayko, LCSW,will answer questions about the new struggles parents and children are now facing.

The forum will be chaired by Nikki Columbus.

The organizers are reallocating the budget for the planned summit and speakers are forgoing their usual honorarium so that funding can be directed to aid groups and individuals in need. For more information and to apply, please click here

Organized by the PhD Program in Art History (CUNY Graduate Center), in collaboration with the James Gallery/Center for the Humanities (CUNY Graduate Center) and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics (The New School), where it is sponsored in part by the Helen Shapiro Lectureship.

Roybi Robot, 360 MAGAZINE, ai, tech, kids, children, youth, school

ROYBI ROBOT – AI-powered EdTech

A growing number of states say their schools will stay closed for the rest of the 2019-20 academic year to stem the Coronavirus outbreak. At Roybi Robot, a leader in AI-powered EdTech and personalized education, they know first hand the importance of AI in connection with remote education and learning.

At ROYBI, they’re already noticing a big shift towards remote learning due to the recent circumstances and headlines. And throughout this all, one thing seems inevitable: school settings, as they stand today, will change. Online and remote learning will be systems that educational institutions will adopt for future emergencies. They envision a future where the new culture of learning begins at home through devices with sophisticated AI technology such as Roybi Robot. Artificial Intelligence allows educators to follow the child’s progress in a smarter way and provides a personalized approach to each child individually. Additionally, it provides a closer collaboration between parents and educators, because it can connect in a joint force to education.

With many uncertainties around the school closures, many educators have already started approaching distance and remote learning in the long term, but lack of personalized attention and progress tracking has been a major challenge for them. The role of artificial intelligence becomes even more significant for a modern world as it can monitor each child individually and provide feedback to educators more accurately than traditional approaches.

At Roybi, they are NOT saying to eliminate school and the classroom. They are saying that to save time and cost, we can be educating children more at home (by the educators) and use AI to personalize the educational experience for each child. They envision a future where they can connect learners, parents, educators, and even their Roybi Robots together while creating an engaging and interactive learning experience.

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE, coronavirus, COVID-19

In COVID Fashion

With the recent outbreak of the Coronavirus pandemic, the shortfall of supplies and equipment for healthcare workers was inevitable. In this time of uncertainty, New Yorkers as well members of a global society are dependent upon community outreach and government. Leaders like Michael Costillo, Christian Soriano and GAP have taken action by lending their resources to impact the scarcity in surgical mask industry.

As of late, stylist/designer Armon Hayes created a protective mask for 360 Magazine’s Vaughn Lowery. Not your typical medical face mask, it was derived from Gucci fabric from a vintage belt bag with velcro stone wash denim straps. Designed out of necessity, fashionable protection is sweeping the market. The idea of a protective mask is becoming a part of our normalcy, inducing creativity during these turbulent times.