Posts tagged with "kids"

Kicking a Soccer Ball illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

CVB Virtual GO 92.0 

The Greater Green Bay Convention & Visitors Bureau has created a virtual race called GO 92.0.  The CVB is inviting outdoor enthusiasts to join this virtual 92.0-mile run, walk or bike challenge that begins September 1, 2020 and ends September 30, 2020. Participants choose how to trek the 92.0 miles, while keeping tabs on progress using a favorite tracker app. For every 9.20 miles completed, participants will earn a virtual “badge” to celebrate their accomplishment. The CVB’s “virtual road team” plans to keep motivating those participating in the GO 92.0 by highlighting fun facts about Green Bay landmarks and tourist attractions.

“Many people have become active in the outdoors. Whether you’re biking a trail, walking your dog or hiking a path to see a waterfall, you’re challenging yourself to get out into nature,” says Toni Jaeckles, CVB Partnerships Director. “This virtual challenge can be done anywhere, whether you are at home or on the road,” she added.

“We’ve even created a version for our youngest athletes. There’s a 9.20 Kids Movement Challenge. We hope everyone in the family will participate,” says Jaeckles.

Proceeds for the virtual event go back to support Green Bay area tourism.

Follow Go 92.0: Facebook

Mask illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Indiana School Quarantines on First Day

By Eamonn Burke

Greenfield Central Junior High School in Indiana opened on Thursday, as one of the first high schools to do so in the country. Within hours, the school had to quarantine when a student tested positive for the COVID-19 virus. It appears that the student was tested days before and went to school without knowing the results.

The emergency “Positive COVID-19 Test Protocol” that went into action following the testing involved isolating the student and a two week quarantine order for those who had come in contact. The schools superintendent, Harold E. Olin, knew the situation was coming but was “shocked it was on Day 1.” Nonetheless, Olin said in a letter that “It was very evident today that nearly all of our families and students were prepared to properly follow the safety protocols we have established”.

This comes amidst a national debate over the re-opening of schools in the fall. While most major school districts have announced a remote start, some in places like Texas and Florida, where the virus is running rampant, plan to open in the fall. Teachers unions have been vehemently opposing an in-person opening, threatening and executing lawsuits and strikes to make their point. They put pressure on Trump’s administration, who is urging for children to get back to school.

Further complicating matters is a study from Northwestern and a Chicago Pediatric Hospital found that children five years and younger carry the virus in high concentrations, although a study on their transmission rate has not been conducted.

On top of all the virus concerns is that of the mental health and success of students who are learning virtually. This spans everything from eye health to sleep patterns to ability to socialize. In addition, it can be harder for many students to pay attention and retain material when studying from home.

Roblox Mobile Player Spending Surge

Roblox Mobile Player Spending Hit $102.9 Million in May, a 175% Jump in a Year

As one of the most popular mobile games worldwide, Roblox has witnessed a surge in revenue amid the COVID-19 lockdowns. According to data gathered by SafeBettingSites.com, Roblox Mobile player spending hit $102.9 million in May, a 175% jump compared to the same month in 2019.

Over $1.5 bn in Lifetime Revenue

In May 2019, Roblox Mobile players worldwide spent $37.5 million on the game, revealed Statista and SensorTower data. In the next three months, this figure rose to $50.9 million. Thanks to in-app purchases and microtransactions, the app generated $79.3 million profit in December 2019, the highest value in the second half of the year.

However, with millions of Roblox fans spending more time indoors and online amid coronavirus lockdown, the famous kid-friendly creation hit a new record in 2020. Statistics show that in January, Roblox Mobile player spending amounted to $65.2 million. After a slight drop to $54.6 million in February, this figure jumped to $68.9 million in March.

The increasing trend continued in the next two months, with Roblox players spending nearly $103 million in May, a 55% increase since the beginning of the year. The Sensor Tower data also revealed the mobile version of the popular game hit over $1.5 bn in lifetime revenue.

The United States Leads in Roblox Player Spending

Statistics show that in June, Roblox mobile was the second top-grossing iPhone app worldwide, with $26.15 million in revenue. The kid-friendly creation platform also ranked as the sixth most popular Android game last month, with $28.28 million profit in Google Play Store. Statista data also revealed that Roblox was the most popular app among iPad users, who spent $30.34 million on the game last month.

Analyzed by geography, the United States represents the leading country with more than $1bn in lifetime player spending in May. Statistics show that Roblox Mobile was the top-grossing App Store app in the United States last month, with $21.9 million profit generated from iPhone users.

Android users spent $16.69 million on the popular game in June, ranking it as the third top-grossing Google Play Store app in the United States.

Read the full story HERE.

Kicking a Soccer Ball illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

U.S. Soccer Foundation – 300 Mini-Pitches

300 Mini-Pitches from the U.S. Soccer Foundation Bring Soccer to Underserved Communities Research shows youth sports improve physical and mental health as well as academic performance in communities hit hardest by COVID-19 July 27, 2020 U.S. Soccer Foundation As a traumatic pandemic continues to grip much of America, particularly communities of color, efforts are underway to ensure that children and families across the country have positive recreational opportunities to look forward to when they return to school and play. 

The U.S. Soccer Foundation, with the support of its partners, this week reached an important milestone with the installation of the 300th mini-pitch in underserved communities nationwide since 2015. Through a collaborative effort with local governments, youth organizations, school districts, and companies of all sizes, the U.S. Soccer Foundation has continued installing mini-pitches during the pandemic, fulfilling a long-term commitment to children living in underserved communities. 

These communities are the hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic and will be the slowest to recover, which underscores the importance of these investments. “The trauma that young people in underserved communities face from this pandemic, from the loss of lives to family member’s loss of jobs to the closure of schools and community centers, has been profound,” U.S. Soccer Foundation President & CEO Ed Foster-Simeon said. 

“This is an unprecedented escalation in the already challenging circumstances that young people live with, day after day.” “The U.S. Soccer Foundation and our partners are sending a very real message to young people and their families through these projects: We are here for you. We continue to ensure that when communities are ready, more mini-pitches will be there for play.” The U.S. Soccer Foundation’s mini-pitch initiative is responding to a significant challenge faced by youth in underserved communities—a critical shortage of safe places to play.

Since 2015, the Foundation has worked with partners to install mini-pitches in more than 200 communities across the United States and more mini-pitches are on the way. The Foundation plans to install more than 100 in the next year, with a goal of creating a total of 1,000 mini-pitches coast to coast by 2026. With safe surfaces and high-quality lighting, these mini-pitches serve as an ideal place for both pick-up games and free play, as well as high-quality programming, including the Foundation’s Soccer for Success program. 

Mini-pitches fit into urban environments or other areas where space is at a premium, providing a safe place for kids to play and for community members to gather right in their neighborhoods. Corporations including Target, Adidas, and Major League Soccer and its clubs are national partners in this initiative and have partnered with the Foundation on hundreds of mini-pitches to date. Last September, Musco Lighting partnered with the U.S. Soccer Foundation to update the mini-pitch with a new modular system including lights, fencing, and goals. On average, these lighted mini-pitches add 2.75 hours of playing time per day on each pitch. 

Although participation in youth sports is associated with better health and academic achievement, more than 80 percent of children living in households making less than $25,000 miss out on the benefits of team sports. Furthermore, one in three Americans don’t have a park within a 10-minute walk from home, leaving too many kids without access to a soccer program or safe place for free play. To address these barriers, the Foundation and its partners have committed to increasing access to quality youth development programming and creating 1,000 new mini-pitches nationwide. In addition to providing access, the creation of mini-pitches has lasting community benefits: 98% of communities report that the people in their community are more active and feel safer with the addition of a mini-pitch. 

Further, soccer mini-pitches serve as neighborhood gathering places for families, and nearly one-third of the kids who come to play on them are new to soccer. To learn more about the U.S. Soccer Foundation’s work to make soccer everyone’s game, visit itseveryonesgame.org

The U.S. Soccer Foundation’s programs are the national model for sports-based youth development in underserved communities. Since its founding in 1994, the Foundation has established programs proven to help children embrace an active and healthy lifestyle while nurturing their personal growth beyond sports. Its cost-effective, high-impact initiatives offer safe environments where kids and communities thrive. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., the U.S. Soccer Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization.

Follow U.S. Soccer Foundation: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Beach Amusement Park

Make Summer Memories  at WonderWorks!

After months of being quarantined at home, mixed with the tribulations of online learning, families are ready to get out, have fun, and make a memorable summer. The good news is that there are plenty of ways to make that happen in Myrtle Beach, starting with WonderWorks.

“In lieu of everything that has happened this year, we want to offer families and guests a place to come and have fun for the summer,” explained Robert Stinnett, general manager of WonderWorks Myrtle Beach.  “At this time, our goal is to keep guests safe while still giving them summer memories to remember forever.”

Soar + Explore. WonderWorks offers an exciting outdoor zip line course that will take you 50 feet above water, giving guests a breathtaking view of Myrtle Beach.

Get hands-on.  Whether you are learning about the Tesla Coil or laying on a bed of nails, WonderWorks makes learning fun. Families can check out the many STEM-focused activities and exhibits that WonderWorks has to offer that will bring their online curriculum to life.

Learn origami. The art of origami is great for enhancing math skills, problem-solving skills, patience, and attention. WonderWorks Myrtle Beach recently opened a new exhibit that explores the art form’s connections to STEM.

Flip Upside-down. The indoor attraction offers the thrills of a roller coaster without ever leaving the walls of the building. Pick your desired intensity and get turned upside-down on this virtual experience.

Take a Wild Ride. Get strapped in to the 6D XD Motion Theater at WonderWorks and go on an epic adventure back in time to a Dino Safari, travel down a Wild West Mine train, or get caught on canyon coaster misadventure with twists and turns that will feel like you’re actually there. 

Discover space. WonderWorks gives guests a space experience without ever leaving Myrtle Beach. The Space Discovery Zone offers an Astronaut Training Challenge, a Mercury capsule, a shuttle lander experience, and more.

“As kids and families adjust to new ways of learning, we want to be a place where learning and education can be fun and exciting,” added Stinnett. “Myrtle Beach offers a great mix of indoor and outdoor fun for families who want adventure and hands-on learning.”

WonderWorks Myrtle Beach opened following the pandemic with new safety measures in place. This includes reduced hours, enhanced cleaning regimens, spatial distancing protocols, employee health screenings and employee personal protective equipment (PPE). 

Current promotions include free admission for doctors, nurses, first responders, and healthcare workers with valid identification now through August 9, 2020. Teachers and all education support staff also receive free admission through August 9, 2020, with valid credentials. Guests with doctors, nurses, teachers, and education support staff will receive 50% off admission price. The offer cannot be combined with any other offers.

WonderWorks continues to add programs and exhibits in an effort to further expand its educational offerings. WonderWorks offers 50,000 square feet of “edu-tainment” opportunities, billing itself as an amusement park for the mind. It offers over 100 hands-on exhibits covering natural disasters and space discovery, an Imagination Lab, a physical challenge zone, a Far Out Art Gallery, and a light and sound zone. For more information, log on here.

WonderWorks, a science focused indoor amusement park, combines education and entertainment. With over 100 hands-on exhibits, there is something unique and challenging for all ages. Feel the power of an 84 mph hurricane–force winds in the Hurricane Shack. Make huge, life–sized bubbles in the Bubble Lab. Get the NASA treatment in our Astronaut Training Gyro and experience zero gravity. Nail it by lying on the death–defying Bed of Nails. WonderWorks has locations in Orlando, Pigeon Forge, Panama City Beach, Myrtle Beach, Syracuse and Branson. 

Follow WonderWorks: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Nickelodeon, SpongeBob, 360 MAGAZINE

SpongeBob Games

SpongeBob SquarePants has been enchanting kids and adults alike for what feels like generations! It’s one of the longest running shows on Nickelodeon and a true pop culture icon.

Goliath has brought back some classic games – with a SpongeBob twist! Kids will love the SpongeBob SquarePants Big Roll Bingo and the SpongeBob SquarePants Pop ‘N’ Race. Both of these games are easy for your little ones to learn and feature all of your favorite SpongeBob Squarepants characters.

Enjoy family time with the best cartoon characters with a game of Big Roll Bingo! SpongeBob SquarePants Big Roll Bingo is for 2 – 6 players, ages 4 and up and a must-have game for your children. After you’ve had a blast with bingo, have a jelly fishing good time with SpongeBob in this Pop ‘N’ Race. SpongeBob Pop N’ Race is for 2 – 4 players, ages 5 and up.

These two games hit shelves in 2020 and are perfect for incorporating more tech-free time this summer, while also allowing kids to hang out with their favorite characters.

Parenting Tips During COVID-19

While this summer may look different than you and your family imagined, it can still be a happy, healthy time for growth and positive development. The Children and Screens network of experts is here to help you have the best summer possible with tips for managing summertime with your children and tweens on- and off-screens.

Read on for details, and be sure to tune in to the next “Ask The Experts” interactive webinar series brought to you by Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development this coming Friday, June 5th, at noon EDT, when an esteemed panel of experts will talk about how to navigate this unique summer with your school-aged children and teens and answer your questions via Zoom. RSVP here.

The workshop will be moderated by Dr. David Hill, a national authority on Child Development, Hospital Pediatrician at Goldsboro Pediatrics, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at UNC School of Medicine, and the author of the new book Co-parenting Through Separation and Divorce.

  • FIND A BALANCE
    Kids thrive in environments that help regulate their sensory systems—sight, sound, touch, hearing, taste, smell, vestibular, and proprioceptive, among others—because it makes them feel calm and ready to learn. Understand that kids may be using media devices to help regulate sensation when ordinary supports like playgrounds and resource rooms are unavailable. Instead of viewing media use as inherently problematic, work with your child to explore other environments, inside and out, that support their sensory regulation so that media use is just one of many options available to them.         

 -Kristen Harrison, Professor of Communication and Media, University of Michigan

  • KIDS PITCH IN
    Parents need help around the house, and children need variety, so take this summer as an opportunity to show your kids how to pitch in. Cooking, cleaning the car, watering the plants – these all give your child a sense of purpose and new skills they’ll need as they grow up. Plus, it provides a welcome hand for overburdened parents and guardians!                                                                                                           

-Susan Tapert, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry and Associate Director, Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development, UC San Diego.

  • KEEP IN TOUCH
    As your child progresses from early to middle childhood, peer interactions become even more important. Peer relationships help children develop important skills like cooperation, conflict resolution, emotional management, perspective taking, creativity, and identity presentation. Even if your family is social distancing, encourage your child to engage with other kids. This can be through video chat (e.g., Zoom, FaceTime, Skype), online games (e.g., Minecraft, Roblox), walkie-talkies, or even talking across fences or through windows. Children need social interactions, and peers are important social partners. Even if parks and camps are limited or closed, social interactions should still be encouraged, and the thoughtful use of technology can help facilitate them.                       

 -Stephanie M. Reich, Associate Professor of Education, University of California, Irvine.

  • GO OUTSIDE
    Strangely enough, stay-at-home orders seem to have reminded people how important it is to get outdoors. Being outside is generally regarded as safe, so long as basic public health guidelines are still observed. Playing in nature promotes curiosity, initiative, and creativity, and it’s a great way to take a break from the screen. The Children in Nature Network (CINN) provides resources for parents and guardians who want to promote exploration and unstructured play in backyards, parks, and other wild spaces during the pandemic. With many local and state parks starting to open back up, families can take advantage of this opportunity to instill a lifelong interest in nature.           

-Jayson Seaman, Associate Professor of Outdoor Leadership and Management, University of
New Hampshire.

  • ENCOURAGE EXPLORATION
    It is important to remember that learning happens through interaction with our environment. We learn through what we do. Letting children come up with ideas important to them, avoiding prescribed activities, taking time, and being patient provides space for creativity to emerge. Whatever the activity – whether a walk in the woods, drawing a picture, experimenting with a recipe or what might seem like just fooling around- letting kids, particularly young ones explore in unstructured ways helps them understand their world and cultivate deeper interest.                 

-Stephen Uzzo, Chief Scientist, New York Hall of Science and Adjunct Professor, Teaching and Learning, New York Institute of Technology Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

  • EXPECT AN ADJUSTMENT PERIOD
    Your child has been using screens to fend off boredom, but that’s not all. Screens are an easy way to distract ourselves from all those uncomfortable feelings during a pandemic: Disappointment. Sadness. Anxiety. Fear. Annoyance. Anger. So be sure to build in antidotes, like daily roughhousing, to help kids work through emotions. And you can expect a certain amount of volatility from your child as they begin spending less time with screens, so ratchet up your patience level. But after this transitional time period, you’ll see your child becoming less irritable and aggressive. You’ll notice more initiative, self-discipline and focus when they play. And best of all, you’ll see your child developing their inner life and discovering who they are by playing, learning and engaging with the world, instead of losing themselves to a screen.             

-Laura Markham, Editor of Ahaparenting.com, Author of Peaceful Parent, Happy Kids: How to Stop Yelling and Start  Connecting and Peaceful Parent, Happy Siblings: How to Stop the Fighting and Raise Friends for Life

  • USE YOUR TOOLS
    Families can find a great tool to help them have a screen-use discussion with their kids by checking out the interactive Family Media Use Plan
    at HealthyChildren.org. Not sure how much time your kids really have? Would it help to have some visuals? It’s all there!   

-David L Hill, Hospital Pediatrician at Goldsboro Pediatrics, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at UNC School of Medicine, and the author of the new book Co-parenting Through Separation and Divorce.

  • DETOX FROM SCREENS
    Consider setting aside a full day (perhaps Saturday or Sunday) as screen-free time. If you can’t commit to a day, at least try a designated evening. This regular break allows children to do a “screen detox” and creates a void to be filled with other activities. Not a bad routine for the whole family to do together.   

-Daniel G. Shapiro, M.D., Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics

  • FAMILY FUN WITH MEDIA
    When you do watch media, make it a family affair. We know from research that when children and caregivers watch screens together, children are more likely to learn from what they are viewing. So, bring out the popcorn and have a special movie night, or designate some time during the day when you can sit down and watch educational media together to help make it a positive experience for kids. Children are more likely to learn from what they are viewing if you direct them to specific content (“Elmo is red”) and make it relatable (“that car is blue, we have a blue car too!”).  For older children, you can get them talking or thinking about what’s on the screen by asking engaging, open ended questions (“The dragon seems upset, why do you think that is?”). When family screen time is over, try to engage children in offline activities that get them playing or moving, to help keep their brains and bodies healthy.             

-Sheri Madigan, PhD, Clinical Psychologist, Canada Research Chair in Determinants of Child Development, Associate Professor, University of Calgary and Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute

“Just as resources have been recently prioritized to the transition from work to home,” says Dr. Pamela Hurst-Della Pietra, President and Founder of Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development, “for the foreseeable future, parents need to explore new avenues and adapt their child-rearing techniques to best serve their children’s needs in an uncertain and challenging milieu. It is a lot of ask, especially with fewer outside resources, less time, near constant change, circumscribed opportunities and, on top of it, the constant allure of screen time for everyone, but the payoff is worth the extra effort. We are here to support parents in coping with the new reality.”

Parenting Tips

Summer is fast approaching, and while that usually means barbecues, beach days, and family vacations, this summer promises to be very different due to the COVID-19 pandemic. States around the country are slowly beginning to open back up, but everyday life is still far from being back to normal, which means parents will need to get more creative than ever to keep their young children healthy, happy, and mentally stimulated in the days and months ahead.

As part of our ongoing series aimed at helping parents navigate these uncertain times, Children and Screens teamed up once again with some of the top experts in the fields of parenting, education, and child psychology to bring you some new tips for the summer season that will help you make the most of this critical time in your child’s development. Read on for details, and be sure to tune in to the next installment of Children and Screens “Ask The Experts” interactive webinar series this coming Wednesday, June 3rd, at noon EDT, when an esteemed panel of experts will talk about how to navigate summer with your toddler while observing social distancing and answer your questions via Zoom. Moderated by Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, PhD, Director of Temple University’s Infant Language Laboratory and Professor of Psychology.

STOP, DROP, AND PLAY

Parents are the first and most influential teachers a child will ever have, but more than that, they’re also first responders during this pandemic. Play is medicine for young children, so be sure to stop and drop what you’re doing regularly for short bouts of play. – Mary Gordon, Founder/President, Roots of Empathy

TELL ME A STORY

With some prompting and support, you can help your child develop their language and storytelling skills while spending quality time together. Take photos and videos next time your child is playing with puppets or stuffed animals, building with blocks, or drawing with chalk on the sidewalk. Later, you can review the photos or videos together and invite your child to tell a story about what was happening in the town they built with their blocks, or what they drew with the chalk, or how they used the hose to fill up the plastic pool. – Katie Paciga, Associate Professor of Education, Columbia College Chicago

FLIGHTS OF FANTASY

Most children delight in letting their imagination run wild. Give them the ‘driving seat” and belt up for a pretend adventure to the jungle, the Egyptian desert, the North Pole, or even the moon. Turn a room upside-down to create “caves” and let the fun begin! – Claire Hughes, Professor of Psychology and Deputy Director of the Centre for Family Research, University of Cambridge

GET CREATIVE

Kids get the most out of play when they can use materials like sand, water, paint, playdough, dress-ups, markers and paper, generic animals and people, and building materials like blocks. That’s because these items encourage children to tell their own stories and invite them to incorporate their own feelings, imaginations, and experiences as they play. Media-based and defined toys overly influence how children play, which edges out kids’ needs and ideas, dampens their creativity, and minimizes the benefits of high quality play. – Nancy Carlsson-Paige, Ed.D., Professor Emerita Lesley University, co-founder Defending the Early Years

MAKE THE MOST OF MEALTIME

Children who engage in more conversations at home are better at processing language, which is essential for learning. Mealtimes are an excellent opportunity to talk with your kids, so try to put all devices aside at the table and focus on conversation. You can talk about something fun you did together recently, discuss plans for a future event, ask your child questions about how they’re feeling, share interesting facts you recently learned, or see if they have any questions for you. – Meredith Rowe, Saul Zaentz Professor of Early Learning and Development, Harvard University Graduate School ofEducation

FRESH AIR & FACETIME

We all need fresh air, and kids especially need to run and jump and build those bones. If you have children who are reluctant to go outside, tell them you’re going to make a video together to send to a family member who’s far away. Ask them to tell you about what they’re doing and get them talking. Using this medium to solicit language from children accomplishes three things: it gets them outside and exercising, it invites them to narrate their activities, and it makes a far-away grandparent, aunt, or uncle very happy! When your children talk about what they’re doing, they’re improving their language development, especially when you ask them to clarify what they mean. – Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Unidel H. Rodney Sharp Professor of Education at the University of Delaware

NURTURE IN NATURE

Outdoor time is great for parents and kids alike. The evidence is clear that nature-based experiences contribute to relaxation, reduced stress, and overall health and well-being. Playing outdoors stimulates children’s creativity, self-confidence, and resilience. Time together in nature also helps make shared memories and strengthens family ties. Wherever you live, look for ways to get outside with your children in order to learn, play, explore, and adventure. From birdwatching to growing a garden, making mud pies to having a picnic, nearby nature isan endless source of healthy and healing connections. – Cheryl Charles, Ph.D., Co-Founder and CEO Emerita, Children & Nature Network

covid-19, coronavirus, sara sandman, 360 MAGAZINE, health

Parenting Kids During Covid-19

12 TIPS FOR PARENTING YOUNG KIDS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

After the overwhelming response to our recent newsletter about at-home learning amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, Children and Screens has teamed up with some of the top experts in the fields of parenting, education, and child psychology to bring you a new series of helpful hints and common-sense suggestions for navigating the uncertain days and weeks ahead. Raising young kids can be tricky, even under the best of circumstances, but as our experts share here, adaptability, patience, and understanding are the keys to ensuring healthy growth and relationship building during this crucial time in your child’s development.

Check out these 12 tips for parents of young children below, and be sure to tune in to the first installment of our upcoming interactive webinar series on April 27, when our panel of experts will chat about healthy screen habits for kids ages 5 and under and answer your questions via Zoom. RSVP here.

DON’T FEEL GUILTY
We know you’re stretched thin and doing your best to manage a whole host of issues, so please don’t feel guilty if your kids are engaging in more screen time than you’d typically allow. There are so many wonderful educational resources out there, even for very young children, and we recommend making the most of them (and getting other family members involved where possible). The use of video chat on a regular basis is also highly recommended to maintain social ties with friends and family members. – Dr. Sarah M. Coyne, PhD, Professor Associate Director, School of Family Life Brigham Young University

ROLE WITH IT
Both you and your children will need time to adjust to your new roles. In one fell swoop, you’ve become a stay-at-home parent, a teacher, and a frontline responder (aka superhero). Be patient with this transition. It may be rocky at first, but children are adaptable and will thrive with well-intentioned efforts. – Kara Bagot, MD, Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Department of Psychiatry

REACH OUT AND TOUCH SOMEONE
With social distancing in full effect, it’s impossible for toddlers to get the kind of in-person attention they’d normally receive from friends and family. In order to maintain those tactile connections, it can be helpful to serve as the “hands and heart” for your loved ones while video chatting. For instance, if Grandpa motions to “tickle” your baby’s tummy, give your child’s tummy a tickle. If Grandma leans toward the screen for a kiss, give your toddler a kiss on the cheek. By taking on this role, you can help nurture the relationship between the child and their loved ones on screen. – Rachel Barr, Georgetown University; Rebecca Palarkain, ZeroToThree; Elisabeth McClure, Lego Foundation

GAME ON
When video chatting with young children, try rhymes, songs, dancing, finger plays, and games like peek-a-boo and hide-and-seek. The more toddlers can participate in screen time, the more they’ll get out of it. – Rachel Barr, Georgetown University; Rebecca Palarkain, ZeroToThree; Elisabeth McClure, Lego Foundation

TALK TALK TALK
Be a part of your young child’s screen time. Sitting with them, holding them, and, most importantly, talking to them are all important ways to help children learn and feel safe. Make a game out of describing what different characters on the screen are doing. Point and label the objects and people that appear in the videos you watch. Sharing screen time can be an excellent opportunity to talk with and engage your toddler. – Ellen Wartella, Director of the Center on Media and Human Development, Northwestern University

ONE MORE TIME!
It’s OK if your child wants to watch the same show or series over and over again. Children learn more with each repetition of a book or a song, and the same goes for screen media. The more children watch the same show or play the same game, the more they understand the storyline and educational content. – Alexis R. Lauricella, Associate Professor and Director of the Technology in Early Childhood (TEC) Center, Erikson Institute

PAJAMA DAY (ONLY 1X/WEEK)
In anxious times, kids benefit from predictability and daily structure. As best as you can, maintain a basic schedule for things like meals, self-care, schoolwork, and screen time. Invite them to help you make and decorate a weekly schedule, and be sure to include some fun ideas for joint parent/kid break times. – Meredith Gansner, MD, Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Cambridge Health Alliance

READY, SET, PLAY!
It’s a good time for all of us, kids and adults to like, to PLAY. Put on music and dance! Work on a puzzle, break out a board game! Grab those Legos and build a castle! Don’t forget how to have fun with your little ones. – Elizabeth K. Englander, PhD Director, Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center, Bridgewater State University

ONE SIZE DOESN’T FIT ALL
Understand that there are developmental differences between children of different ages. Homeschooling a kindergartener will be very different than homeschooling a seventh grader. While younger children may need you to keep a closer eye on them, older and more independent kids can set goals and check in with you on their progress. – Colleen Kraft, MD

STAY CONNECTED
Physical objects and activities can help bridge the gaps presented by social distancing. When video chatting, encourage your child’s screen partner to read a favorite book while the child follows along with his or her own copy. Invite the video partner to play with a toy car while your child rolls around in their own. Puppets and stuffed animals are great props for playing together virtually, and sharing a snack together is always a favorite for young children. Joint activities will help your kids stay connected with their on-screen partners. – Rachel Barr, Georgetown University; Rebecca Palarkain, ZeroToThree; Elisabeth McClure, Lego Foundation

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE INTERACTIVE
Screen time isn’t inherently good or bad; what matters is how we choose to use it. Screens can take us to the zoo, guide us through the great museums of the world, and keep us fit with healthy movement games. Make the most of the current situation by finding active, engaging, meaningful, fun, and socially interactive choices to invest in. – Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Ph.D Temple University, senior fellow Brookings Institution; author Becoming Brilliant

BORED IN THE USA
Not only is it OK to be bored, it’s beneficial! These days, we’re all so constantly bombarded with stimulation and entertainment that we’re left with little time to explore our own thoughts and dreams. Let’s use this time to develop that important skill, and to appreciate the healthy power of boredom. – Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Ph.D Temple University, senior fellow Brookings Institution; author Becoming Brilliant

At the end of the day, nothing is more important than making sure your child feels safe, nourished, and loved. It won’t always be easy, but we hope parents can incorporate these 12 tips, along with a little extra kindness and creativity, as they adjust to their new roles and make the most out of the unexpected.

For more tips, and to have your questions answered by experts, don’t forget to register for our virtual workshop here.

About Children and Screens
Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development is a 501C(3) national non-profit organization founded by Dr. Pamela Hurst-Della Pietra. Children and Screens advances interdisciplinary research, supports human capital in the field, informs and educates the public, and advocates for sound public policy for child health and wellness.

Roybi Robot, 360 MAGAZINE, ai, tech, kids, children, youth, school

ROYBI ROBOT – AI-powered EdTech

A growing number of states say their schools will stay closed for the rest of the 2019-20 academic year to stem the Coronavirus outbreak. At Roybi Robot, a leader in AI-powered EdTech and personalized education, they know first hand the importance of AI in connection with remote education and learning.

At ROYBI, they’re already noticing a big shift towards remote learning due to the recent circumstances and headlines. And throughout this all, one thing seems inevitable: school settings, as they stand today, will change. Online and remote learning will be systems that educational institutions will adopt for future emergencies. They envision a future where the new culture of learning begins at home through devices with sophisticated AI technology such as Roybi Robot. Artificial Intelligence allows educators to follow the child’s progress in a smarter way and provides a personalized approach to each child individually. Additionally, it provides a closer collaboration between parents and educators, because it can connect in a joint force to education.

With many uncertainties around the school closures, many educators have already started approaching distance and remote learning in the long term, but lack of personalized attention and progress tracking has been a major challenge for them. The role of artificial intelligence becomes even more significant for a modern world as it can monitor each child individually and provide feedback to educators more accurately than traditional approaches.

At Roybi, they are NOT saying to eliminate school and the classroom. They are saying that to save time and cost, we can be educating children more at home (by the educators) and use AI to personalize the educational experience for each child. They envision a future where they can connect learners, parents, educators, and even their Roybi Robots together while creating an engaging and interactive learning experience.