Posts tagged with "college students"

Heather Skovlund computer illustration for use by 360 Magazine

CSR In The Digital Age: With 360 Magazine

By: Kai Yeo

“We’re all connected through culture. Basically, we all must learn to adapt. We learn more through traveling and seeing more. When you’re in a different environment, everybody must love and laugh and dance. I don’t need to know your language. But companies need to focus on connecting everyone through love, not war.” – Vaughn Lowery

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been around for years, with its’ roots being found as early as the 18th Century. In my CSR research assignment before, I wrote that “the key idea of CSR is for companies to pursue pro-social objectives and promote volunteerism among employees (such as through donating to charity and participating in volunteer work), as well as by minimizing environmental externalities.” As an international student trying to find my career path in the United States, I find that company CSR is one of the first few things I look for when finding a suitable company to work with: how genuine they are and how much they care for their employees. The process of researching and writing my essay on CSR in the modern day and CSR within my internship site provided me with the valuable opportunity not only to learn about an important business topic, but also allowed me to develop a better understanding of what it is.

For my CSR Interview, I got the opportunity to speak on the phone with my supervisor Vaughn Lowery. His career started from “humble beginnings in Detroit to a full scholarship in Cornell University under the ILR program. From there, he became active in modeling, acting, and producing screenplays.” Now, Vaughn is the publisher and founder of leading fashion and lifestyle magazine, 360 Magazine, which is also my internship site. His job involves fostering relationships within the community and being an editorial director that curates and oversees content for all columns of the magazine. The position also entails making sure that Apple News, LinkedIn, Twitter, and all other news sites are updated. As a pop culture and design magazine, it is important to constantly be up to date with relevant content and breaking news. Being a quarterly publication, 360 is also working on their summer magazine issue. Vaughn mentions that with COVID making everything digital, the team has been working on expanding the business: creating a self-publishing division, developing e-commerce, getting sponsors, and most importantly, waiting for things to start opening back up.

With a background in studying business and company culture, Vaughn says that his education helped him design a company culture that made sense, “Transparency, cool kids, intelligence. I wanted a space for comfort regardless of race, age, and religion. Education was not the answer to my business but a part of the process to help with preparing for my magazine. The most important thing is life experiences, there are no books on it.” Vaughn emphasizes sending people in his company for events and communicating with clientele because “you can’t speak about things you don’t know.” COVID has made jobs in the media a little more mundane, but he’s excited about things opening back up and is hopeful for the future. Without in-person experiences, it is hard to understand the inner workings of media companies with everything being digitally produced.

Vaughn defines Corporate Social Responsibility at 360 Magazine as “having an environment that is inviting and inclusive, especially showcasing inclusivity.” As a magazine that promotes culture and lifestyle, it is important that everyone he works with is aware of what is going on in the world that we live in and what is happening with minority populations. He speaks about being the only African American in a lot of his school and work experiences, and he created 360 with the ideal of having more minorities and women working in his company: “We all live in the same world… and some people don’t know that. But we need representation and for people to see us. It’s not on us to educate them, but it’s on us to speak up.” 360 avidly speaks up for diversity (#metoo) and openly supports nonprofit organizations.

When asked about how veritable he thinks big companies are with CSR movements, he says that they’re doing it for a myriad of reasons. Companies get away with more stuff as a corporation, “But the responsibility is about being genuine. The board of directors and Zoom calls and the whole spiel. If they’re trying to just make money, revenue principals are not true to themselves. 360 was founded on real culture. The diversity is important. It is what it is.”

“Your company diversity is a reflection of the world, we’ve been doing this since the start of 360, we’ve been ahead of the trend.” The magazine has always featured drag queens, people who are transgender, and minorities, “This is very important when doing events and stuff, it’s a big family. We have less than 50 people. And it’s important for our clients to know that we have each other and rely on each other. That we know how to respect one another and appreciate each other, despite all odds.” Vaughn believes that diversity and inclusion of people of color has always been important, and he emphasizes that 360 will keep pushing these agendas and morals as long as he’s the head of the company. I see this in his effort to get everyone together (even if it is just on Zoom for now) to celebrate big articles, book releases, sponsorships, and so on.

As I type this interview essay, I find two key points to really reflect on: 1) assumptions about company morale and 2) why diversity is so important to me.

1) I think back on everyone else I’ve spoken to during my time as an intern here with 360, and I find that these core values that Vaughn spoke about with me are reflected in all the conversations I’ve had with him and other employees. Coming from a very structured, patriarchal Asian background, I came into this internship thinking that it would be like all my previous experiences (they talk of diversity, but it’s never really executed once you’re a part of it – school projects, internships, part-time jobs, and so on). However, no one in the company has been curt or condescending when speaking with me, and they truly mean it when they point out mistakes and gently correct me. Maybe it is because of the way I was brought up, or the environment I was most familiar in, but these good intentions had me on my toes for the first couple weeks I was here, and I’m honestly still getting used to it.

2) With the rise of Asian hate crimes in the past year, I find myself turning very reclusive and immediately trying to find fault with people when something brushes me the wrong way (though sometimes it really is a racist comment or remark). It’s been difficult having to correct people when they say my name wrong or trying to explain my culture when these simple things can so easily be looked up online. I’ve been very lucky growing up well-traveled and seeing different parts of the world, and I understand that not everyone has that privilege, but how far does “I don’t know” get you in the digital age? I need to work in a company where people are willing to learn and grow new perspectives, and I see this quality in Vaughn too as he speaks about his loneliness as the only African American in his industry when he was first starting out.

After 45 minutes of talking about diversity and the whole CSR conversation winding down, Vaughn tells me to keep doing what I love, “Understanding the industry through work experiences is how you’ll get in. It’s constantly changing.” He talks about learning to forecast and foreshadow and having connections at arms’ reach. By the end of our conversation, I felt that I learnt a lot and could have a clearer vision of what I wanted out of this internship. I’ve had the opportunities to go for company events (for brands including Lillet, Chinese Laundry, Rockstar Original, etc.), though I would really like to be able to go to a CSR event in the near future to promote these same values that I share with 360 Magazine.

To read more about Vaughn Lowery, please visit his Wikipedia and IMBD.

MLWXBF chapter 4 illustration via Alison Christenson for use by 360 Magazine

Ivy League BLM Courses

By: Emily Bunn

Ivy League Schools to Begin Teaching “Black Lives Matter” Courses

Proving their commitment to diversity and understanding, several Ivy League colleges will begin offering courses on the Black Lives Matter Movement. Whereas other Ivy League schools, such as Cornell, have created Africana Departments that focus on the centrality of Africa and the African Diaspora to the modern world, BlackLivesMatter classes are situated in a specific cultural moment. Though, of course, the Black Lives Matter falls under the umbrella of contemporary African history, it is positioned in a more concentrated, modern application. Princeton and Dartmouth are the two first schools to begin accrediting this intersectional coursework. While Princeton most recently enacted their BLM coursework, Dartmouth has been pioneering this change since 2015.

Dartmouth’s Black Lives Matter course discusses topics such as The Ivory Tower, understanding St. Louis and its racial history, race and class, racial violence, and systemic and unconscious racism, among other topics. Part of Dartmouth’s course description reads, “though the academy can never lay claim to social movements, this course seeks in part to answer the call of students and young activists around the country to take the opportunity to raise questions about, offer studied reflection upon, and allocate dedicated institutional space to the failures of democracy, capitalism, and leadership and to make #BlackLivesMatter. Developed through a group effort, this course brings to bear collective thinking, teaching, research, and focus on questions around race, structural inequality, and violence.” The course is taught by a wide variety of professors from different academic disciplines and social backgrounds. Taught for ten weeks by close to 20 different professors, Dartmouth’s Black Lives Matter coursework stands as a comprehensive example of a cross-disciplinary concentration that recognizes and situates history in a contemporary, American context.

Princeton’s #BlackLivesMatter class looks to examine the “historical roots and growth of the Black Lives Matter social movement,” and is “committed to resisting, unveiling, and undoing histories of state sanctioned violence against Black and Brown bodies.” Princeton’s #BlackLivesMatter’s course description reads as such: “This seminar traces the historical roots and growth of the Black Lives Matter social movement in the United States and comparative global contexts. The movement and course are committed to resisting, unveiling, and undoing histories of state sanctioned violence against Black and Brown bodies. The course seeks to document the forms of dispossession that Black Americans face and offers a critical examination of the prison industrial complex, police brutality, urban poverty, and white supremacy in the US.” The course’ sample reading list includes selections from Angela Davis, Claudia Rankin, and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor.

Princeton’s course will be taught by Professor Hanna Garth, who has previously taught “Race and Racisms,” “Postcolonial and Decolonial Theory,” and “Theories of Social Justice.” Garth’s self-defined interest in “the ways in which people struggle to overcome structural violence” and past experience has well-prepared her for teaching this class. Garth remarks, “All of my research, teaching, and mentoring is designed around my commitment to feminist methodologies and critical race theory.”

While some have aggressively asserted that Princeton’s course readings are from a former communist party leader who once made it on the FBI’s Most Wanted List, their negativity further highlights the necessity of this course. While these assertions may be true, it is telling that certain critics commonly overlook the individual’s many (more recent) accomplishments. The author in question is Angela Davis – a revered, respected, and well-educated civil rights activist, philosopher, academic, and author. By painting Davis as an unpatriotic, dangerous criminal, it distracts from the important lessons that are to be learned from this influential leader. Similarly, Fox News’ article on Princeton’s new course links their mention of the “Black Lives Matter” movement not to an explanation of what the movement is, but instead to a page on US protests. As opposed to creating an educational resource for what the BLM Movement is, conservative critics are quick to jump to claims of Black violence and riots.

Especially in 2021, as the United States grapples with the fight for racial and civil justice, discussions surround race, policing, prison reform, and politics are more pertinent than ever. It is absolutely essential that our nation’s college students are exposed to critical race theory and critical thinking. By shielding America’s youth from the necessary history of this country – which is still being experienced today – we are only putting them in a position of increased vulnerability and ignorance. Knowledge is power and educating oneself on society’s issues is the only way to efficient work towards progressive social change. Hopefully, as the most prestigious academic institutions begin to model examples of intersectional and anti-racist coursework, other colleges and universities will soon follow suit.

College Student illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Independence University Closure and Investigation

By: Emily Bunn × Heather Reibsamen

In the wake of the weekend, Independence University is suddenly closing, causing panic and confusion for its student body and the federal government. Still, as of Wednesday morning, the University’s website hasn’t been updated to publicly broadcast the closing. Independence University’s website’s owner, The Center for Excellence in Higher Education, has not been updated either. The Center for Excellence in Higher Education owns three other colleges that are also in the process of closing. Now, the university looks to push its students to new colleges, raising suspicion about the reason for the closure.

Independence University is chiefly focusing on relocating its student body to Miami International University of Art & Design or Georgia’s South University. Students additionally have the option of stopping their schooling and requesting a return of their federal student loans. However, upon looking into the transfer plans, the Education Department said that Independence University’s “students are being pressured to transfer,” and that the arrangement is “unusual.” Students are worried about credit transfer, falling behind in classes, and the impact of relocation.

One Independence University student – who had been working to get her Bachelor of Science in the college’s Web Design and Development program, Dianne Eveler, expressed frustration about the scandal:

“The most I can say about these tragic findings is this.  Finding only a few days before you are expected to graduate was disheartening.  Also, the terrifying item was to see the hard work you put into place disappear in a moment with no warning, no idea this was happening.

For the most part, the College lacks empathy because many of the faculty were given very little notice or lost their job that day. We have no support in who to contact, or in my case, am I getting my degree.

The truth be told, I went into my Student Portal before I lost access and saw my credits of 180 go to zero, and a new graduation date appear. I’m so scared I lost my degree. I was working so hard to get a perfect 4.0 to have that work lost.  I have learned a valuable lesson, do more research in a college, and never ever do an online learning program again.”

Furthermore, this isn’t the first time that Independence University has been federally scrutinized. The Federal Student Aid chief operation officer, Richard Cordray, commented that the university chose to shut down to avoid the findings of the earlier examination. In 2020, the Center for Excellence in Higher Education has been discovered to be in connection to fraud by the Colorado Government. Independence University had then been placed on a monitoring list and had government restrictions placed on the college’s receival of taxpayer money. Due to the impending pressure on students to transfer, federal employees warranted that a more in-depth investigating is required regarding the university’s reason for shutting down.

The accreditor for Independence University reports that it’s approval of the college had ended in April, as the school failed to maintain acceptable graduation and employment rates among students. This end of accreditation also resulted in the loss of federal money to the University.

In a statement to USA Today, Cordray explained, “We have already emailed students to help them understand they do not have to be rushed into accepting a transfer to another school of CEHE’s choosing.” In spite of the college’s sudden closure, the Federal Student Aid chief operation officer cautions students to not make any hasty decisions. Under President Biden’s administration, the Education Department is “more willing to exercise its regulatory oversight” reports USA Today.

As uprooted students scrabble to find answers, they’ve had to resort to asking their fellow peers, college administration, and the U.S. Department of Education. Heather Reibsamen, who had been working to get her Bachelor of Science in the college’s Graphic Design program, explained how the tragic situation unfolded for her:

“The last week has been a whirlwind of emotions. Since the announcement that the school was closing, students have scrambled to figure out what their options were. We were sent a form with a few choices: transfer to a “teach-out” school or lose everything we have worked for, to put it bluntly. Initially, I thought everything would work out since I only had a few credits left until I graduate. However, I was met with disappointment and more unknowns. The “approved” teach-out school is Miami International University of Art & Design. I attended the meetings I was told to attend and was unfortunately met with the news that this school does not teach in my state. I was told I needed to find my own college to transfer to and would potentially have to pay out of pocket due to my student loans being tied up with Independence University. Many students were faced with this. Many students are not able to graduate on time because of this.

No one was prepared. No one was warned. We scrambled to get our last assignments in hoping they would count towards the credits we had been working on. There are students that were supposed to graduate last Sunday, however, they have been met with uncertainty. No one knows if the credits we have worked so hard to complete will transfer over. There are employees that have been employed through IU for years that were let go at just a moment’s notice.

I immediately began the search for a school that was accredited and not-for-profit. I reached out to Southern New Hampshire University to see what options I would have if I transferred to their school. I was greeted with understanding and encouragement. Many colleges are learning about the dilemma with Independence University and are seeing the wrongdoings towards the students and staff. SNHU has been every bit of encouraging and supportive during this transition. I consider myself one of the lucky ones so far. I found a school that is regionally accredited and is geared towards the success of the students. I am hopeful for a smooth transition.

Independence University has left the students and staff in complete confusion, and we are all struggling to make sense of it all. We have hope that everything will work out and fear of what still may come.”

Finally, on Wednesday, the college’s closure was announced to students via email. This delayed response highlights how a University can operate in complete disarray, with its students completely unaware of the behind-the-scenes scandal.

Mina tocalini illustrates article for 360 MAGAZINE

Brands You Will Love In 2021

There is no shortage of new and established products out there for consumers to try in 2021. One thing that has become obvious over the past year is consumer preference for quality. Because online shopping has skyrocketed consumers in the U.S. and around the world are seeming to tend to require more information about the products they buy. The reason being that, while browsing is something you do even when shopping in person, the level at which you can browse when ONLINE shopping is far superior. 

Say you are at a big box store looking at laptops. Maybe there will be ten options there for you to choose from or, if the place is especially large, maybe you’ll get twenty. But on the internet, there are literally hundreds of options – all of which you can research and choose from at your leisure until you choose the right one. While increased variety is certainly not a bad thing, it can also lead to something called “decision paralysis” where your mind gets overwhelmed at the number of options and defaults to something familiar. This is where curated lists like the one below come in handy: We did the research to pick out some of the best brands so that you don’t have to!

Organic Protein

Whether you are a fitness fanatic or not, protein powder is on just about everyone’s shopping list these days. Supplementation should not be thought of as a “substitute” for a good diet but, when taken in combination with a good diet, high-quality (preferably organic) protein products like those from Orgain can make a world of difference in terms of your overall health. 

Adding a high-quality protein powder or drink to your diet can lead to better muscle growth, improved appearance of your skin, more energy, less hunger, and more. 

A Secure, Portable Cubby

Tech Tub2 is a way to keep multiple electronic devices safe when you travel with kids, or students, or whatever the case may be. The device is epecially designed for educators but also has important uses for coaches, parents, and others.

Athletic Apparel

Like every other facet of life, exercise (and physical activities in general) have a uniform. That’s not to say you should be wearing a suit on the basketball court, but you should be wearing the athletic version of the RIGHT STUFF. And that’s where tasc performance comes in. Offering some of the best in bamboo-based technology, clothing from tasc will help you look the part and feel the part whenever you are doing something athletic. It’s high-performance athletic apparel for adults with an authentic approach to their fitness.

High-Quality CBD

CBD has a wide range of benefits, many of which are only now be discovered by the American public. But not all CBD is created equal. If you are looking for a product to help you sleep better or to help reduce your muscle or joint aches and pains, considering going with broad spectrum CBD from Healist Naturals.

Shaving Done Right

LTHR Shaving makes shaving a genuinely enjoyable experience. Sure we all know that a warm, old-fashioned shave feels better and makes you look better than a rush job. But who has the time? With the hot lather shaving device by LTHR, now you do!

The Best In Men’s Jewelry

JAXXON is bringing back men’s jewelry in a big way. Whether you’re thinking about a gold chain, silver bracelet or anything in-between checkout JAXXON for high-quality jewelry at reasonable prices.

The Best Way to Get Comfy

This faux fur blanket from Everlasting Comfort is the only comfort you’ll need while traveling or when snuggling up on the couch. The right blanket makes all the difference when it comes to sleep or relaxing at the end of a long day. That is why, even when it comes to your blanket, it pays to get something that is genuinely high quality and which will feel comfortable enough to help sleep better and relax easier.

Conclusion

Organic protein, athletic apparel, and more. Many products have come out over the past year with those listed here being among the best. Enjoy!

College Student illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Tutors Not Just for Kids

Tutors Are Not Just for Kids: They Help People Get Through College, Too!

Tutoring community, The Oxford Method, offers up tips to help people get through college

Many people tend to think of tutoring as being something for kids. Yet there are millions of college students who struggle and need help, too. In fact, according to EducationData.org, around 40% of undergraduate college students drop out before earning a degree. The website also reports that 30% of freshmen don’t make it to their second year of college. One of the main reasons that people drop out of college is that they struggle to keep up academically, followed by the stress, financial situations, and lack of campus connections. The good news is that there are things that can be done to help address the issues and keep on going.

“Millions of people dream of earning a degree, but when they begin struggling, they tend to leave,” explains David Florence, professor and founder of The Oxford Method, a community that offers tutoring services around the country. “The help is readily available, but many people are not aware of it. We want to change that, so we can help more people see their goals through.”

The Oxford Method is on a mission to share with the world that education is the great equalizer and an essential gift to the next generation. Its goal is to help more people stick with finishing their academic goals. Here are some tips it offers to college students to help them get through:

  • Stay organized. One of the most important things you can do is to organize your schedule. This way you won’t fall behind or feel as much stress. Use a good planner, plan ahead, make lists, set goals, and do things that will help keep you on the right path.
  • Become involved. Rather than feel that you are not connected at college, make a goal to connect. Choose at least one thing to become involved in, whether it’s a fun group, study group, club, or something else. Make the connection so you feel that you are not there struggling alone. This is especially important during this time when so many people are isolated with online education.
  • De-stress. When the stress of juggling everything becomes too much, that’s when many college students want to walk away. Make a commitment to yourself to reduce stress every week. To do this, you can take up hiking, meditation, yoga, or whatever it is that will help you to de-stress in a healthy way.
  • Get help. Those who are struggling academically should get the help they need, rather than fall behind, which will make them drop out. A tutor can help give you the one-on-one assistance you need to gain a better understanding of the subject or lesson and will help keep you on pace.
  • Be gentle on yourself. Many people get upset if they are struggling a little, and they beat themselves up over it. Learn to take things easy, go with the flow, and give yourself a break. Treat yourself how you would treat your best friend if they were in the same position.

“When you are struggling in college, it’s so important to know that there is help available,” added Florence. “No matter what subject you are having difficulties with, there’s a good chance that you can get the assistance you need and keep going. We are happy to be help college students around the nation continue meeting their educational goals.”

There’s good reason to finish college and earn the degree. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the more you learn, the more you tend to earn. Those with the highest educational attainment tend to make triple of those who just have a high school education. The average weekly earnings for someone with only a high school diploma is $712, compared to the average for someone with a bachelor’s degree being $1,173. Plus, the bureau reports that the unemployment rate is lower for those who have more higher education.

The Oxford Method has over 100 tutors around the country, covering all subject areas. They offer online tutoring, as well as in-person and in-classroom options. Their tutoring services are available 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Instructors have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree, with many of them having a master’s degree, PhD, and at least four years of teaching experience. The Oxford Method works with their nonprofit, Social Actualization, Inc., by giving them 10% of all profits. The funds are used to provide free computers, high-speed internet, and instruction to underprivileged families in urban and rural America. Plus, 40% of their instructors are PhDs, 40% have a master’s degree, and 20% have only a bachelor’s degree.

Subject areas include science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), as well as business, social studies, psychology, English, history, public speaking, study methods, test taking, and more. To get more information about The Oxford Method, visit the website.

About The Oxford Method

Started in 2020, The Oxford Method has over 100 instructors who provide access to tutoring 24/7. It also has a nonprofit sector of its community, which offers tutoring services and computers to underprivileged students. Its relationship-based education helps everyone, including those who need financial assistance and those with special needs. It donates 10% of its profits to social organizations that help those in urban areas. To get more information about The Oxford Method, visit the website.

Film Premiere illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Twenty Pearls Premiere

COMCAST ANNOUNCES EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE OF
TWENTY PEARLS – A DOCUMENTARY EXAMINING THE STORIED HISTORY OF ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA SORORITY, INCORPORATED – ON ITS NEWLY LAUNCHED BLACK EXPERIENCE ON XFINITY CHANNEL

Comcast NBCUniversal is excited to announce the exclusive premiere of the documentary film “Twenty Pearls: The Story of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated”, arriving Friday, March 26 on its newly launched Black Experience on Xfinity Channel, available on X1, Flex, and on-the-go with the Xfinity Stream app.

From award-winning filmmaker Deborah Riley Draper, produced by Coffee Bluff Pictures, and narrated by Phylicia Rashād, Twenty Pearls closely examines the founding and legacy of the first Black sorority, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, which is now regarded as one of the most significant and influential Black organizations in historyThe documentary tells a powerful story of sisterhood. In 1908, nine Black women enrolled at Howard University made one decision that would change the course of history. These college students created Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated. For over 113 years, the sorority has influenced many of the most famous watershed moments in history.

Through narration, interviews, and rarely seen archival materials, the audience will see the sorority’s impact on World War II, NASA, Civil Rights, Women’s Rights, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) culminating in the historic election of America’s first Black and South Asian woman Vice President. Twenty Pearls features interviews with members of the sorority including Vice President Kamala HarrisMiss Universe Ireland 2019 Fionnghuala O’ReillySmithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch III, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt Fierst, great-granddaughter of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, International President and CEO of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated Dr. Glenda Glover and many more.

 
Watch the Twenty Pearls trailer hereTrailer
 

“This is an extraordinary time to look back at our past to serve our future,” added filmmaker Deborah Riley Draper. “A future where Black women are centered. Helming this documentary love letter to the founders of Alpha Kappa Alpha, the generations of women that followed in their footsteps, and to all Black women everywhere is an honor. This is an important history for all of us to know and understand.”

“We’re thrilled to work with award-winning filmmaker, Deborah Riley Draper, and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to bring this exclusive premiere to the Black Experience on Xfinity channel, furthering our company-wide mission of investing in and showcasing authentic Black stories and culture,” said Keesha Boyd, Executive Director, Multicultural Video & Entertainment, Xfinity Consumer Services. “We launched this channel to help facilitate the discovery of stories like Twenty Pearls while providing a platform for emerging Black content creators.”

“Telling our own story is essential to preserving our history and uplifting the culture,” said Alpha Kappa Alpha International President and CEO Dr. Glenda Glover. “Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated’s remarkable 113-year journey which began on the campus of Howard University is punctuated by stories of history makers, ceiling breakers, public servants, and ordinary women who have changed the course of American history.  Through this beautifully written and narrated odyssey, this film highlights in undeniable ways the vision, courage, tenacity, determination, and power of Black women while putting to bed the age-old questions about the relevance of Historically Black Colleges and Universities and the Divine Nine sororities and fraternities.”

Black Experience on Xfinity is a first-of-its-kind destination of Black entertainment, movies, TV shows, news, and more. It features high-quality content from many of Xfinity’s existing network partners, at no additional cost, while investing millions of dollars in fostering and showcasing emerging Black content creators. The channel is the only one of its kind endorsed by the African American Film Critics Association (AAFCA), the world’s largest group of Black film critics that gives annual awards for excellence in film and television. Available at home on Xfinity X1 and Flex, and on-the-go with the Xfinity Stream app, the Black Experience on Xfinity will entertain, educate and uplift, featuring Black actors, writers, producers and directors. At home, Xfinity subscribers can visit channel 1622 or simply say “Black Experience” into the Voice Remote to instantly enjoy the ultimate in Black storytelling.

Visit Xfinity to learn more about the Black Experience on Xfinity and other Black programming available on X1, Flex, and the Xfinity Stream app. Visit Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated to learn more about Twenty Pearls, which premieres on March 26 on Xfinity and is free for subscribers, and will be available nationwide, on-demand, starting on March 30, 2021.

Football Image for 360 Magazine by Rita Azar

Howard University x WHOOP

Howard University Department of Athletics and WHOOP, the human performance company, have announced a new multi-year deal that names WHOOP the Official Performance Partner of the school. The initial launch of the partnership will bring unparalleled physiological analytics via wearable technology to nearly 150 student-athletes across five programs: Men’s & Women’s Basketball, Football, and Men’s & Women’s Golf for their inaugural season.

“We are extremely excited to partner with WHOOP,” said Howard Director of Athletics Kery Davis. “This will give our department more insight on making decisions during competition, and will create healthy habits for our student-athletes, coaches and staff that last a lifetime.”

WHOOP harnesses critical biometric data to inform student-athletes’ choices around sleep (quality, duration and regularity), workout and non-workout strain (cardiovascular load) and recovery (capacity to adapt to stimulus).

“WHOOP is an invaluable resource in providing actionable feedback to our student-athletes,” said Howard Director of Sports Medicine Lynson Willis. “The technology has been a key step in moving the Sports Medicine Department forward and has already become a real game changer.”

Howard Athletics will have access to an unprecedented amount of insights into their well-being. WHOOP will empower student-athletes to optimize all aspects of human performance, offering in-depth onboarding training and ongoing support remotely to optimize the user experience.

“The best athletes in the world use WHOOP to understand their bodies and this new partnership will help Howard University’s student-athletes take their performance to the next level,” said WHOOP Founder & CEO Will Ahmed. “As the Official Fitness Wearable of both the PGA and LPGA Tours, we are especially proud to support the Men’s & Women’s Golf teams in their first-ever season.”

Howard Athletics WHOOP members will have an exclusive view into their own data for personal analysis and the ability to opt-in to team insights with coaches, colleagues, teammates and training staff.

About Howard Athletics

The Howard University Department of Intercollegiate Athletics sponsors 21 NCAA Division I men and women varsity sports. The programs represent five conferences: The Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC), Northeast Conference (NEC), Sun Belt Conference (SBC), Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) and Atlantic Sun (ASUN) Conference.

About WHOOP

WHOOP, the human performance company, provides a membership for 24/7 coaching to improve health. The WHOOP membership comes with free hardware (the new Whoop Strap 3.0), a coaching platform designed to optimize your behavior, and a community of high performers. WHOOP members range from professional athletes and Fortune 500 CEOs to fitness enthusiasts and endurance competitors to executives and military personnel. Studies show WHOOP can positively change behavior, increase sleep, and improve physiological biomarkers. Founded in 2012, WHOOP is based in Boston and has raised more than $200 million in venture capital. Visit www.whoop.com for the latest company news and connect with WHOOP on InstagramTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

For more information, visit the Bison Athletics website at www.HUBison.com, or WHOOP at www.whoop.com.

The “Magic” of the Disney College Program 

By Hannah DiPilato

“The Magic Kingdom is now open!” a loud voice blares over the intercom at the entrance of the most famous park at Disney World. Hoards of people rush towards the small gates to journey into the land of magic. Upon entering, the magic hits like a wall with Mickey Mouse balloons and a Main Street lined with buildings that look like they were pulled from a storybook. This all leads up to the glistening masterpiece that is Cinderella’s castle. 

But how magical is this experience when you have to do it daily as a burnt-out college student working to make ends meet? For thousands of college students, this is their daily life, but the magic gets dull with each screaming child and cranky parent they encounter. Does the magic truly vanish while working for the Disney College Program, or is all the hassle worth the enchantment that encompasses Disney? 

What it Takes to Work for the Mouse

Although it may seem like no one would be begging to work in a theme park, the Disney College Program gets thousands of applicants every year and only ends up accepting less than 20% of those students. The Disney College Program offers programs at both Walt Disney World in Florida and Disneyland Resort in California. There are five basic qualifications students must meet before they should begin to apply.

According to the Disney Program website, students that hope to apply to the program must be “enrolled and taking classes at an accredited program or institution” at the time they hope to apply. Students must have already completed at least one semester of classes or have graduated within 12 months. The program is specifically designed for undergraduate students, but graduate students are able to apply. Some individual universities have special requirements for students to meet such as a specific GPA, so students should meet with an advisor at their school before applying. 

The program also requires all applicants to be at least 18 years old by the time the program starts as well as possess an unrestricted work authorization. Finally, students that have done the program before must wait at least four months from their departure date to return to the program again. 

However, the program requirements go deeper than this. Since the program is so competitive applicants need to do their best to stand out. The first step of the application process is a general questionnaire that’s similar to many basic job applications. After passing this step, applicants move on to a more in-depth web interview. Finally, a phone interview makes the final decision if someone is selected for the program. 

The Captivating Cast Member Positions

There’s a variety of positions available for students that register for the program. The jobs range from working in the parks to working in the hotels and are assigned by random or based on applicants’ prior experience. These positions are no walk through wonderland, they’re full-time positions and students need to be available to work days, nights, weekends and holidays. The wage depends on the position, but most of the employees only make around $9 an hour or a similar amount close to minimum wage. The paychecks certainly aren’t fit for royalty. 

One past cast member who was a part of the Disney college program, Rebecca Condon, worked Merchandise at the Emporium on Main Street in the Magic Kingdom. This retail experience allowed her to become a manager at Lilly Pulitzer at the young age of 22. Northeastern alumni, Kayla DiPilato also participated in the program as a seater at Be Our Guest, a themed restaurant in the Magic Kingdom. She believes she received this position because of her prior experience as a hostess at Top of the Hub in Boston. 

As both of these jobs seem to capture the whimsical essence of Disney, many positions in the program are not as sought over. Some roles such as custodial or food prep, are minimum wage jobs that can be found at most basic establishments all around the country. However, what would be a part-time job in a fast-food restaurant or a business turns into hours on hours in an amusement park to make ends meet. Depending on which job an applicant is selected for could determine whether they love or hate the program. Although, one person’s job nightmare could be a dream come true for somebody else. 

Not a Castle Nor a Carriage 

The housing and transportation for the program has not received stellar reviews from past cast members. Members of the Disney College Program are housed in apartments and rent is taken weekly from their paychecks. Rent can cost anywhere from $114 to $205 a week depending on what housing a person is placed in. Many times cast members have to share a room as well as sharing the apartment with a few other workers. The rules of housing are apparently incredibly strict, with restrictions against alcohol as well as overnight guests of the opposite gender. 

“My least favorite part of the job was the apartments they housed us in,” said Rebecca Condon. “My apartment was the oldest Disney property and had tons of issues. My toilet overflowed 7 times during the program because of bad pipes in the wall to the point where it flooded our whole apartment with about 2 inches of water.” The rent might be cheap, but in the end you get what you pay for. 

If students were unable to bring their own car, they had to rely on the transportation provided by Disney. The college program in Orlando provides a shuttle service to help transport cast members, but the Anaheim program only provides cast members with a free city bus pass. Although the shuttle sounds like a convenient option, it was much less practical than having a car on the property. 

“It is unbelievable how they are able to transport thousands of us,” expressed Condon. “Although, with that being said, it was really hard because I would have to leave two hours before my shift to make sure I got there in time and I often wasn’t home until two to three hours after my shift.” After an incredibly long day of working in a busy park, a two-hour commute is much longer than anyone would want to endure. 

The unreliable shuttle was one reason DiPilato decided to drive her car all the way from Massachusetts to use during her time in the program. “I knew how disastrous it would be to take the shuttle for commuting,” she said. “I also wanted to have the freedom to explore Orlando.”

Experience the Magic but Fight the Villains 

Disney has its perks as well as its downsides just as any normal day job does. DiPilato said her favorite part of the job was making magic for guests, especially for kids that were part of the Make A Wish program. However, she also recalled that families would often get hot and tired after a long day in the park and take out their frustrations on her.  

There were also a lot of strict rules such as never being allowed to point with one finger, never calling guests “people” instead of guests, not being able to have piercings besides one on your earlobes and not being able to wear too much makeup. 

“Once I got yelled at because a child threw his shoe into our moat. How was that my fault?” recalled DiPilato. “Although, I did get to meet Josh Gad in promotion of the Beauty and The Beast live-action movie that was set to come out at the time, so that was a super cool experience.”

Condon recalled one occurrence where the cast members got to experience an exclusive party for the cast members. “Disney opened up one of their water parks for cast members after hours,” she recalled. “They hired a DJ and catered with some of the best Disney Treats, especially the Mickey Bars!”

Every day working at Disney for the Disney College Program is a unique experience. DiPilato mentioned that guests would often sprinkle ashes of relatives within the rides and cast members would have to clean them up. “Yeah, that happened a lot, mostly in the Haunted Mansion,” she said nonchalantly. She also touched on the fact that kids would often get separated from their families, throw up randomly and scream… a lot. “Giving kids a magical experience is amazing, but it comes with so many more problems than would come with working strictly with adults,” she said. 

Is the Work Worth the Pixie Dust?

It takes a special and dedicated person to participate in the Disney College Program. Days are full of long hours of work and lots of cranky families. However, the perks and experience a cast member receives from the job will last a lifetime. 

“I absolutely loved the program and feel like I grew so much from it,” concluded Condon. “The skills I learned from working for this Fortune 500 company is something I carry around with me every day.” 

If you could walk through the streets of Magic Kingdom daily without it ever getting old, or eat a Mickey Ice Cream bar every day without ever getting sick of them, you could have what it takes to become a cast member. To many, it is the job of a lifetime to be able to play an important role in millions of children’s most magical memories and the free park entry doesn’t hurt either. 

If you can get over the job’s flaws, you could have Mickey Mouse as your coworker. And hey, don’t all jobs have their downsides? 

COLLEGE STUDENTS × HOMELESSNESS

For the fifth year in row, the #RealCollege survey has documented a crisis affecting American higher education. Researchers conclude that more than 6 million students are affected by food and/or housing insecurity.

The #RealCollege survey is led by the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice at Temple University.  In 2019, the survey was completed by more than 167,000 students at 227 community colleges and four-year colleges and universities located in 44 states and the District of Columbia.

A remarkable 17% of students who answered the survey were homeless at some point in the last year, almost 40% were food insecure, and almost half faced housing insecurity.  The results are consistent with the prior #RealCollege surveys and those led by other researchers around the nation.

“It is clear that college is now about serious financial struggles, not partying.  Money weighs heavily on students’ minds, and without a safe place to sleep and enough to eat they cannot concentrate on learning,” said Dr. Sara Goldrick-Rab, founding director of the Hope Center and the leading expert on basic needs insecurity among college students. “This is a waste of talent and it undermines our economy. To become student-ready, colleges need to move beyond food pantries and take preventative measures, and policymakers must support them. There are six pieces of federal legislation to address these issues pending in Congress now—it is time to act!”

Among the 167,000 respondents in this year’s survey:

·      39% were food insecure in the last 30 days;

·      46% were housing insecure in the previous year;

·      17% were homeless in the previous year; and

·      Some groups of students were more at risk than others: community college students, racial/ethnic minorities, and LGBTQ students were all more likely than others to face one or more of these challenges

This year’s response rate of 167,000 students represents about 8% of the total number of students contacted for the survey, according to the Hope Center.  “We think these are conservative estimates of the true extent of the problem, since students without funds rarely have time to do surveys or access to the necessary technology for e-surveys like this one,” said Christine Baker-Smith, Managing Director of the Hope Center. “We don’t advertise the survey as focused on food or housing, and do not offer any help.”  The Hope Center’s research team estimates that that the figures extrapolate to at least 6 million affected students.

There are many interconnected reasons college students are facing basic needs insecurity today, according to the report. Some of these are:

· Tuition is up, but more importantly, financial aid to students has not kept up with the cost of living although college loans are still available;

·      Students are being asked to pay for books and tuition but lack the financial support the system demands—many students today are themselves parents or are supporting other family members;

·      Employers are less likely to want to hire students since they may have complicated schedules, and for the students who can find flexible work, the minimum wage has not kept up with cost of living increases;

·      Th social safety net is not what it used to be—today, many college students are excluded from programs such as SNAP, for example; and

·      College themselves are struggling with insufficient money to help students in need. For example, in public higher education, budgets have been cut 25% on a per-student basis over the last 30 years.

Because the problem stems from many different avenues, the solutions are multi-pronged as well. The first step, according to the report, is for colleges and universities to admit there is a problem. The Hope Center is offering to support any institution that wants to address these problems; they can sign up here.  Among the programs the report describes that have helped at campuses across the U.S.:

·      Meal vouchers or swipes;

·      Access to public benefits, such as SNAP, or transportation/housing assistance;

·      Emergency aid that students can access quickly, for unforeseen expenses like car repairs or groceries;

·      Case management, so the students have a contact on campus who can help them navigate the help available to them.

In 2020, the Hope Center plans to release the following reports that focus on different college student populations and aspects of student life:

·      March 24: Student Athletes 

·      April TBA: Staff and Faculty

·      April 8: Parenting Students

·      April 13Philadelphia

·      May 13: Transportation

·      May TBA: Mental Health

The full #RealCollege National Survey 2020 can be found online at this link: http://hope4college.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/2019_RealCollege_Survey_Report.pdf  

The colleges and universities that took part in this year’s #RealCollege Survey are:

Two-Year Colleges

Aims Community College (CO)

Alexandria Technical & Community College (MN)

Amarillo College (TX)

Anoka Technical College (MN)

Anoka-Ramsey Community College (MN)

Arapahoe Community College (CO)

Atlantic Cape Community College (NJ)

Austin Community College District (TX)

Bay de Noc Community College (MI)

Bellevue College (WA)

Bergen Community College (NJ)

Blackhawk Technical College (WI)

Blue Mountain Community College (OR)

Bristol Community College (MA)

Brookdale Community College (NJ)

Brookhaven College (TX)

Bucks County Community College (PA)

Bunker Hill Community College (MA)

Camden County College (NJ)

Cayuga Community College (NY)

Cedar Valley College (TX)

Central Lakes College Brainerd (MN)

Central Lakes College Staples (MN)

Central Oregon Community College (OR)

Centralia College (WA)Cerritos College (CA)

Chaffey College (CA)

Clackamas Community College (OR)

Clark College (WA)

Clatsop Community College (OR)

Clover Park Technical College (WA)

Columbia Basin College (WA)

Columbia Gorge Community College (OR)

Community College of Allegheny County (PA)

Community College of Baltimore County (MD)

Community College of Philadelphia (PA)

Community College of Rhode Island (RI)

Compton College (CA)

County College of Morris (NJ)

Cuyamaca College (CA)

Dabney S. Lancaster Community College (VA)

Delaware County Community College (PA)

Durham Technical Community College (NC)

Dutchess Community College (NY)

Eastfield College (TX)

Edmonds Community College (WA)

El Centro College (TX)

Essex County College (NJ)

Everett Community College (WA)

Finger Lakes Community College (NY)

Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College (MN)

Galveston College (TX)

Glendale Community College (CA)

Grayson College (TX)

Green River College (WA)

Greenville Technical College (SC)

Grossmont College (CA)

Hibbing Community College (MN)

Highline College (WA)

Holyoke Community College (MA)

Hudson County Community College (NJ)

Hudson Valley Community College (NY)

Itasca Community College (MN)

Ivy Tech Community College (IN)

Jamestown Community College (NY)

Jefferson State Community College (AL)

Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College (WI)

Lake Washington Institute of Technology (WA)

Leeward Community College (HI)

Linn-Benton Community College (OR)

Lone Star College (TX)

Lower Columbia College (WA)

Massasoit Community College (MA)

Mesabi Range College (MN)

Middlesex Community College (MA)

Middlesex County College (NJ)

Minneapolis Community and Technical College (MN)

Minnesota State College Southeast (MN)

Minnesota State Community and Technical College (MN)

Mohawk Valley Community College (NY)

Monroe Community College (NY)

Montgomery College (MD)

Mountain View College (TX)

Mt. Hood Community College (OR)

Napa Valley College (CA)

Nassau Community College (NY)

North Central Texas College (TX)

North Lake College (TX)

North Seattle College (WA)

Northern Essex Community College (MA)

Northern Virginia Community College (VA)

Northland Community and Technical College (MN)

Northwest Technical College (MN)

Ocean County College (NJ)

Olympic College (WA)

Onondaga Community College (NY)

Oregon Coast Community College (OR)

Orleans Technical College (PA)

Ozarks Technical Community College (MO)

Passaic County Community College (NJ)

Patrick Henry Community College (VA)

Pellissippi State Community College (TN)

Pierce College-Fort Steilacoom (WA)

Pierce College-Puyallup (WA)

Portland Community College (OR)

Rainy River Community College (MN)

Raritan Valley Community College (NJ)

Red Rocks Community College (CO)

Reedley College (CA)

Renton Technical College (WA)

Richland College (TX)

Ridgewater College (MN)

Riverland Community College (MN)

Riverside City College (CA)

Rochester Community and Technical College (MN)

Rogue Community College (OR)

Rowan College at Burlington County (NJ)

Rowan College of South Jersey (NJ)

SUNY Adirondack (NY)

SUNY Corning Community College (NY)

SUNY Erie Community College (NY)

SUNY Morrisville (NY)

SUNY Orange (NY)

Saint Paul College (MN)

Salish Kootenai College (MT)

San Diego City College (CA)

San Diego Continuing Education (CA)

San Diego Mesa College (CA)

San Diego Miramar College (CA)

San Jose City College (CA)

Santa Rosa Junior College (CA)

Santiago Canyon College (CA)

Seattle Central College (WA)

Shoreline Community College (WA)

Skagit Valley College (WA)

South Puget Sound Community College (WA)

South Seattle College (WA)

Southwestern Oregon Community College (OR)

Spokane Community College (WA)

Spokane Falls Community College (WA)

St. Cloud Technical and Community College (MN)

St. Philip’s College (TX)

Sussex County Community College (NJ)

Tacoma Community College (WA)

Tallahassee Community College (FL)

Texas Southmost College (TX)

Tillamook Bay Community College (OR)

Treasure Valley Community College (OR)

Trinity Valley Community College (TX)

Umpqua Community College (OR)

Union County College (NJ)

Wake Technical Community College (NC)

Walla Walla Community College (WA)

Wallace State Community College Hanceville (AL)

Warren County Community College (NJ)

Wenatchee Valley College (WA)

Westchester Community College (NY)

Western Technical College (WI)

Whatcom Community College (WA)

White Earth Tribal and Community College (MN)

Yakima Valley College (WA)

Four-Year Colleges and Universities

Alfred State College (NY)*

Bridgewater State University (MA)

Cedar Crest College (PA)

Colorado School of Mines (CO)

Colorado State University—Fort Collins (CO)

Colorado State University— Global (CO)

Daytona State College (FL)*

Diné College (AZ)*

Drexel University (PA)

Emporia State University (KS)

Fashion Institute of Technology (NY)*

Fitchburg State University (MA)

Florida State College at Jacksonville (FL)*

Fort Lewis College (CO)

Framingham State University (MA)

George Fox University (OR)

Grand Valley State University (MI)

La Salle University (PA)

Lehigh University (PA)

Maryville College (TN)

Massachusetts College of Art and Design (MA)

Mercy College of Ohio (OH)*

Metropolitan State University (MN)

Metropolitan State University of Denver (CO)

Miami Dade College (FL)*

Minnesota State University Moorhead (MN)

Muhlenberg College (PA)

Northern Vermont University Johnson (VT)

Oglala Lakota College (SD)

Rhode Island College (RI)

SUNY Cobleskill (NY)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (NY)

SUNY College Old Westbury (NY)

SUNY Cortland (NY)

SUNY Delhi (NY)*

SUNY Empire State College (NY)

SUNY Fredonia (NY)

SUNY Maritime College (NY)

SUNY Morrisville (NY)*

SUNY New Paltz (NY)

SUNY Oneonta (NY)

SUNY Oswego (NY)

SUNY Polytechnic institute (NY)

SUNY Potsdam (NY)

SUNY Upstate Medical University (NY)

Salem Community College (NJ)

Southwest Minnesota State University (MN)

St. John’s University (NY)

St. Norbert College (WI)

Stony Brook University (NY)

Temple University (PA)

The College at Brockport (NY)

The University of Montana (MT)

United Tribes Technical College (ND)*

University of Alaska Fairbanks (AK)

University of Central Missouri (MO)

University of Colorado Denver (CO)

University of Kansas (KS)

University of Massachusetts Boston (MA)

University of Massachusetts Lowell (MA)

University of Memphis (TN)

University of Missouri St. Louis (MO)

University of Northern Colorado (CO)

West Virginia University (WV)

Western Washington University (WA)

Westfield State University (MA)

York College of Pennsylvania (PA)

* Institution primarily offer credentials other than a Bachelor’s degree and was included in two-year rates.

Cbd, 360 magazine

CBD and Studying – How CBD IS Better Than Coffee for Students

When it comes time for finals, you probably turn mostly to energy drinks and other unhealthy habits. It’s very common for students to use coffee, energy drinks, or even concentrated shots of caffeine to keep them awake and help them focus. You probably know that it’s not the best thing for you, but if you feel like it’s your only option, you’ll probably keep doing it. In fact, there are other great ways to do better in school that don’t rely on caffeine. Here are five of them.

1. You Can Avoid Test Anxiousness

Test anxiousness is a big part of why people sometimes do worse on tests than they do on take-home quizzes and homework. Even if you know all the material, being faced with a big test that’s a huge part of your grade is daunting. It’s tough for even the best students. This can actually be exacerbated by caffeine — although it may keep you up and could possibly help you focus, it’s also frequently tied to higher levels of tension.

CBD, on the other hand, helps you to maintain a calm, focused mindset. Using CBD can make it easier to tackle your finals with as much diligence as you do your homework. That’s much better for your state of mind than going into a test already worried about the results.

2. You May Be Able to Focus Better

For some people, caffeine helps them to focus better. However, although it can keep you up, it also makes some people’s brains race. When that happens, you’re likely to have a hard time getting anything done, much less thought-intensive activities like studying.

When you tackle coursework with CBD, you’re more likely to be able to actually focus on your studies. In fact, it’s much less likely that you’ll need to use caffeine to stay up for dozens of hours because you can get your work done more effectively. By promoting focus and concentration, CBD can help make your study hours more effective, not just more lengthy.

3. You Can Alleviate Daily Stress

The actual tests aren’t the only reason most people get stressed during finals week. Everyday stresses are difficult to handle at the best of times, and finals are hardly the best time to be dealing with those everyday issues. Instead of just trying to handle your schoolwork, you need to handle all of it.

CBD is useful for your daily life, not just around finals. When you’re able to approach issues with a calm, rational mindset, you’re likely to be able to untangle that stress. It’s also easy to include in your daily routine — you can take CBD in many ways, including oral solutions, CBD gummies, and even baths.

4. You’ll Maintain More Healthy Coping Strategies

Coping strategies are useful for anyone, because everyone deals with stress at some point in their life. People who teach about coping strategies emphasize making sure that those strategies are healthy, so you can successfully rely on them. Energy drinks just cover up the problem, they don’t actually deal with it.

There are many ways CBD can help with your coping abilities. In your general life, you may be able to deploy coping strategies more effectively. For example, it’s easier to step back and take yourself out of a stressful situation if you’re able to stay calm. You also don’t have to supplement with caffeine in order to stay focused, so you won’t be disrupting healthy strategies with unhealthy ones.

5. You’ll Enjoy Your Time at College More Fully

At the end of the day, you want to be able to enjoy college. It’s true that coursework can be stressful, and it’s hard to make sure you’re able to pass a number of classes when you’re taking them all at the same time. However, it doesn’t have to be so stressful that you can barely keep yourself together.

CBD provides a simple way for you to stay focused and calm throughout your time at college and beyond. or even opt for CBD gummies, you’re more likely to have a great time. Use Charlotte’s Web to make sure you’re getting high-quality CBD from a company you can trust.