Posts tagged with "Black Lives Matter Movement"

MLWXBF chapter 4 illustration via Alison Christenson for use by 360 Magazine

Ivy League BLM Courses

By: Emily Bunn

Ivy League Schools to Begin Teaching “Black Lives Matter” Courses

Proving their commitment to diversity and understanding, several Ivy League colleges will begin offering courses on the Black Lives Matter Movement. Whereas other Ivy League schools, such as Cornell, have created Africana Departments that focus on the centrality of Africa and the African Diaspora to the modern world, BlackLivesMatter classes are situated in a specific cultural moment. Though, of course, the Black Lives Matter falls under the umbrella of contemporary African history, it is positioned in a more concentrated, modern application. Princeton and Dartmouth are the two first schools to begin accrediting this intersectional coursework. While Princeton most recently enacted their BLM coursework, Dartmouth has been pioneering this change since 2015.

Dartmouth’s Black Lives Matter course discusses topics such as The Ivory Tower, understanding St. Louis and its racial history, race and class, racial violence, and systemic and unconscious racism, among other topics. Part of Dartmouth’s course description reads, “though the academy can never lay claim to social movements, this course seeks in part to answer the call of students and young activists around the country to take the opportunity to raise questions about, offer studied reflection upon, and allocate dedicated institutional space to the failures of democracy, capitalism, and leadership and to make #BlackLivesMatter. Developed through a group effort, this course brings to bear collective thinking, teaching, research, and focus on questions around race, structural inequality, and violence.” The course is taught by a wide variety of professors from different academic disciplines and social backgrounds. Taught for ten weeks by close to 20 different professors, Dartmouth’s Black Lives Matter coursework stands as a comprehensive example of a cross-disciplinary concentration that recognizes and situates history in a contemporary, American context.

Princeton’s #BlackLivesMatter class looks to examine the “historical roots and growth of the Black Lives Matter social movement,” and is “committed to resisting, unveiling, and undoing histories of state sanctioned violence against Black and Brown bodies.” Princeton’s #BlackLivesMatter’s course description reads as such: “This seminar traces the historical roots and growth of the Black Lives Matter social movement in the United States and comparative global contexts. The movement and course are committed to resisting, unveiling, and undoing histories of state sanctioned violence against Black and Brown bodies. The course seeks to document the forms of dispossession that Black Americans face and offers a critical examination of the prison industrial complex, police brutality, urban poverty, and white supremacy in the US.” The course’ sample reading list includes selections from Angela Davis, Claudia Rankin, and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor.

Princeton’s course will be taught by Professor Hanna Garth, who has previously taught “Race and Racisms,” “Postcolonial and Decolonial Theory,” and “Theories of Social Justice.” Garth’s self-defined interest in “the ways in which people struggle to overcome structural violence” and past experience has well-prepared her for teaching this class. Garth remarks, “All of my research, teaching, and mentoring is designed around my commitment to feminist methodologies and critical race theory.”

While some have aggressively asserted that Princeton’s course readings are from a former communist party leader who once made it on the FBI’s Most Wanted List, their negativity further highlights the necessity of this course. While these assertions may be true, it is telling that certain critics commonly overlook the individual’s many (more recent) accomplishments. The author in question is Angela Davis – a revered, respected, and well-educated civil rights activist, philosopher, academic, and author. By painting Davis as an unpatriotic, dangerous criminal, it distracts from the important lessons that are to be learned from this influential leader. Similarly, Fox News’ article on Princeton’s new course links their mention of the “Black Lives Matter” movement not to an explanation of what the movement is, but instead to a page on US protests. As opposed to creating an educational resource for what the BLM Movement is, conservative critics are quick to jump to claims of Black violence and riots.

Especially in 2021, as the United States grapples with the fight for racial and civil justice, discussions surround race, policing, prison reform, and politics are more pertinent than ever. It is absolutely essential that our nation’s college students are exposed to critical race theory and critical thinking. By shielding America’s youth from the necessary history of this country – which is still being experienced today – we are only putting them in a position of increased vulnerability and ignorance. Knowledge is power and educating oneself on society’s issues is the only way to efficient work towards progressive social change. Hopefully, as the most prestigious academic institutions begin to model examples of intersectional and anti-racist coursework, other colleges and universities will soon follow suit.

360 Magazine bottle illustrated by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Good Vibes

By: Emily Bunn × Vaughn Lowery × Gabe Majalca

360 Magazine has revealed a new, bedazzled brand bottle in collaboration with Integrity Bottles. Decorated with approximately 6,040 Swarovski crystal gems, this lavish flask radiates glamour and elegance. The shimmering container was created by artist Gabe Majalca of Good Vibe Gliders, who constructed the piece in over thirty hours of dedicated craftsmanship. Thousands of glimmering gems encase the container, creating a luxurious, polished and sophisticated look, as 360 Magazine represents. The bottle is to be debuted at the upcoming 360 Magazine Immersive Bodega Pop-Up.

Chrysolite, which is Greek for “gold stone,” sheaths the outside of the gleaming bottle in a rich yellow-green hue. For the “360” design on the side of the bottle, Chrysolite AB was utilized. Further, the cork is detailed with Electric White DeLite. The construction of the flagon took 30 hours in total. Overall, the process in creating this custom Swarovski-swathed bottle was time consuming, but the end result is an incredible feat of precision and dazzling artistry.

On 360 Magazine’s website, the popular Summer Sip List showcases some of the magazine’s favorite alcohol brands and drinks, all of which can be enjoyed in the new container. Cocktail recipes like Pinnacle Vodka’s Apricot Honeysuckle Spritz, Santo Spirit’s Hibiscus Smash, D’USSE’s champagne sparkler, and Cavit Wines’ Rosjito all invite readers to host a happy hour of their own. 360 Magazine is sure that the new pitcher will bring good times spent together enjoying fine sips and spirits. Now that the careful process of creating the bottle is over with, we will be sure to use this bottle in our everyday lives, whether we’re trying out new cocktail recipes, transporting drinks on-the-go, or simply displaying the container’s magnificent beauty.

This isn’t the first time 360 Magazine has worked with Integrity Bottles. In November of 2020, Integrity Bottles unveiled the 360 Magazine collection of glassware. The collection features seven products, including decanters, a refillable bottle, a stemless wine glass, a whiskey rocks glass, a 16 oz pint glass, and a Gibraltar beer mug. As with the previously released products, the new bedazzled carafe can hold your scotch, vodka, tequila, gin, rum, or any other desired sips. As the two brands look to their most recent collaboration to create the Swarovski-coated container, Integrity and 360 Magazine gleam with pride and assurance in the highest quality of production.

Integrity Bottles started as a small business between friends, but has blossomed into a thriving online store and studio based in San Diego. The company is run by military veterans and former law enforcement officers who always place integrity and honor at the forefront of their business practices. Having sold more than 3,200 bottles and earned 100% positive reviews on Amazon, Integrity Bottle products are sure to bring more merry making into your home. Integrity Bottles’ website can be accessed here, and customers can use the discount code “GIVEBACK” for 5% off their purchase.

Gabe Majalca, who constructed the 360 Magazine × Integrity Bottles’ bottle, spoke about the design process. His brand, Good Vibe Gliders, provides custom, crystal-encrusted creations to suit customer’s vibes.

What was your process of decorating this brilliant 360 Mag bottle?

First thing was choosing the right color. We wanted something that resembled sacred water or a magical lagoon. Chrysolite and Chrysolite AB Swarovski turned out to be the color most true to my vision. Next, was construction. It’s most important to keep your lines straight at the beginning, starting with the foundation. So, by the time your pattern reaches the top, your lines will still be straight!

How long did the process of decorating the bottle with Swarovski crystals take?

It was a tedious 30-hour [long] project. The thing is, you’re not just laying stones in a line–eventually you need to fill in the 360 Logo–and that right there was a massive challenge. It’s similar to a jigsaw puzzle. Putting the right stone in the right place is paramount to the letters looking clean [and] uniform. Lots of mental energy went into the letters. I’m very pleased with how it turned out.

What did you think when Vaughn first came to you with the idea?

Vaughn’s the homie and I knew he had worked with Integrity Bottles before. So, naturally, I was stoked to hear 360 Mag was getting themselves an iced-out bottle. I’ve always wanted to complete a Swarovski bottle–so the project made perfect sense to me and I jumped right on it. Anything for Vaughn.

How do you feel after seeing the original vision tangibly come to life?

It feels great! Looks like a magical lagoon! Something to keep in mind–it’s always a marathon when doing this artwork, so seeing something come together, completely finished–well, that makes me really happy inside. This was a challenging but very satisfying project, no doubt about that.

What was your first thought when you viewed the finished bottle product?

“I’m done! I’m finally done!” Haha No really though, I’m pretty sure that’s exactly what I said. This bottle was a deceiving hard project to complete – so many elements. Since this was my first try at a something like this, there were many twists and turns to the design that I simply did not foresee. In the end, it was like someone giving me an XL pizza and sa[ying], “you can’t get up until you finish it.” Not that it wouldn’t be totally delicious while I was eating it, but eventually you slow down at about half way through [when] you’re getting full and your stomach starts to hurt, but your tastebuds and your will power keep saying MORE! That’s what this project felt like… right up to the point when [I] took the last delicious bite. Worth it.

What do you think would be the best use of this bottle? Do you have a drink of choice you imagine drinking from it?

Easy, tell Vaughn to make me a Caramelized Citrus Smash! This refreshing summer cocktail is equal parts vodka and grilled citrus juice with sparkling water or lemon-lime soda. Vaughn will need some ruby-red grapefruits, lemons, limes, and navel oranges. Slice your citrus in half, brush the cut side with some honey, and dip the cut sides in sugar. Throw your fruit cut-side-down on the grill to caramelize the sugar. Once grilled, let it rest until cool. Lastly–the booze. Mix 1.5 ounces vodka, 1.5 ounces juice, and 1 ounce of water or sparkling water.

Hey V, I’m on my way!

360 Magazine x Integrity Bottles bottle image by Gabe Maljalca for use by 360 Magazine

Vaughn Lowery, President of 360 Magazine, spoke about the concept and creation the 360 × Integrity Bottles design:

How you originally come up with this idea of encrusting a bottle in Swarovski crystals?

Not too long ago, Victoria Secret had embellished some lingerie in diamonds for a runway show. Shortly after, Joe Boxer mocked the idea with boxer briefs for a stint during NYFW in Bryant Park. As the former spokesperson for this brand [Joe Boxer], I struggled in these uncomfortable underwear (the rhinestones literally dug deep into my skin causing several scratches on my thighs).

Over the years, Gabe has bejeweled scooters and e-bikes for Good Vibe Gliders. Once we saw that he’s ventured out into sneakers with various customizations, we knew that he had to lace one of our Integrity Bottles with Swarovski crystals, adding a touch a glam and panache. This meticulous process took more than 30 hours and was executed by a total of 4 craftsmen with close to 1000 dollars of materials (not to mention intensive work).

Did you come up with the Chrysolite colorway?

We wanted the bottle to embody a monochromatic color palette to reflect today’s modern and colorless society in celebration of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Why were these gems/colors specifically chosen?

We provided Gabe with a water theme and the end product represents clarity and purity, mimicking our eclectic mantra of transparency. After all, 360 readers are permanently celebrating their uniqueness along with this masterpiece.

Does the vessel actually cost $1,000,000?

No, not at all. But Swarovski crystals are the closest thing to a blood diamond without destroying the lives of people like in the Congo. They refract light as a prism, showcasing almost all the colors of the rainbow (thus paying tribute to the LGBTQ community).

Why did you choose to work with Integrity Bottles again? What is working with them like?

Integrity Bottles is a veteran-led business and provides opportunities for people who have proudly served our country. The[y] [are the] same people who return from a period of service to find themselves displaced in society, especially [from] the work force.

How do you envision using this bottle in your own life?

We will exhibit the container in our workspaces and activations though out the world where guests will be able to witness its unforgettable beauty.

Furthermore, several team members mentioned that we could auction the carafe in the hopes of helping to raise awareness and offer them some financial support for their efforts.

How do you view this product as representative of 360 Magazine?

Everything in this made-to-measure bottle embodies 360. Similar to life’s circle, we start our journey into this world as a fragile piece of glass. Over the years, we have evolved into something bigger and better than we were before.

360 Magazine x Integrity Bottles bottle image by Gabe Maljalca for use by 360 Magazine

360 Magazine x Integrity Bottles bottle image by Gabe Maljalca for use by 360 Magazine

360 Magazine x Integrity Bottles bottle image by Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine

*This bottle is dedicated to our near and dear friend Chris March.

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Q×A

Reese Sherman is a talented photographer who creates stunning portraiture. The photographer has been featured by the likes of Town & Country, Essence, Ambassador Digital Magazine, W Magazine, Muze, and more. The vibrant portfolio of Sherman’s evocative, striking, beautiful photographs can be viewed on their website or Instagram. Sherman looks to empower viewers with their photography and highlight gender-neutral inclusivity and LGBT+ acceptance. During this pride month, we sat down with the artist to discuss their latest photography project, which involves self-exploration, unity, and love.

Could you tell us about your photographic approach to this project?

This all came about during the BLM and Trans Lives Matter movement, where I was noticing so many people were standing up and showing up as themselves. Such an array of different people showed off their style and spoke loud and proud about who they are. [It] really inspired me to pick up my camera and shoot my husband wearing masculine clothes mixed with feminine jewelry against bright, bold and colorful backdrops. [These photos] showcase[ed] him being 100% comfortable within the style of art and fashion. I wanted to explore incorporating feminine elements within a masculine framework in a way that transcends sexuality. This is all about style and freedom and identity that goes beyond any pre-conceived category.

“This is all about style, freedom, and identity…” Was your model, Jamarr, a part of the creative process as well? 

Jamarr is a creative individual… I love to collaborate with him and have him give his input into projects, especially this one, where we both styled the wardrobe and jewelry. Also having my husband a part of this, I wanted the story to stay true to his own authentic style, since his normal everyday accessory wear isn’t geared towards feminine pieces. But, styling him with a pink beaded necklace, yellow roses and eyeliner really took him out of his norm—but he was confident in wearing it all.

Did photographing your partner make this project more intimate/personal?  

Absolutely! We just know each other so well to the point when we first started to talk about this project, we spoke about the issues the LGBTQ+ community was going through. The issues that the Black community was dealing with made this personal to us. Seeing Jamarr model and stay grounded in his sexuality was inspiring to me. This made us both proud of what we’re hoping to accomplish, which is gender-neutral inclusivity.  

Some of your images are more detailed and some of them not, could you tell us what this mean/how you would like the viewers to interpret your photos?

I want the viewers to see timeless, intimate and non-conforming pictures. I want viewers to feel confident to do whatever is it that makes them happy. if you want to pile on a bunch of jewelry head-to-toe, do it! If you’re a man and you come across an accessory that is traditionally feminine, wear it and be proud! If you’re a woman, same thing applies, if you want to wear clothing that’s traditionally male. Be proud of how you present yourself. I just want people to feel empowered.

What is the most important component of this collection of work?
Two words: unity and love.

What is the most challenging component of this collection of work? 

The challenge was putting this all together and hoping the result would match what we envisioned in our minds.

Could you comment on the styling of choice and what inspired you to choose these colors in particular? (Apart from the colors of the pride flag!)

The unapologetic energy of the model, the juxtaposition of the traditionally feminine jewelry against his body hair, the structured clothing made of shiny, flowing fabrics—they all promote the idea that masculinity is what you make it. Initially the pink just felt fun and exciting. Yellow felt like sun kissed skin plus it reminded us of “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” The orange/red was striking and sexy. And a lot of the jewelry was my grandmother’s, so that added an even more personal aspect to the work.

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Page Kennedy illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Q×A with Page Kennedy

ACTOR & RAPPER PAGE KENNEDY JOINS 360 MAGAZINE FOR SOME Q&A

By: Heather Skovlund-Reibsamen

Page Kennedy is well known as a rapper and actor within our entertainment industry. Kennedy’s recent acting skills brought him to play “Duck” on Netflix’s “The Upshaws”, one of their newest series to hit streaming platforms starring alongside Kim Fields (Regina Upshaw), Mike Epps (Bennie Upshaw), and Wanda Skyes (Lucretia). He is also known for his roles in “Blue Mountain State”, “Weeds” and his comedic genius skits shared on Instagram and TikTok.

Kennedy’s self-titled album ‘Page’ was released in February 2021 featuring heavyweight rappers Xzibit and Method Man is available now on all streaming platforms – make sure you go check it out!

360 Magazine had the pleasure of interviewing Page Kennedy where we discussed “The Upshaws”, his character ‘Duck’, music, and his fitness journey. We had an amazing conversation about his media roles, the love for Eminem, and also found out that we both favor Cardi B because of the way she represents herself: “Cardi B makes me feel like I know her”, said Kennedy.

Read on to hear about our conversation with Page!

Your Netflix series, “The Upshaws”, came out today- how do you feel about working with it?

PK: I love it, you know I was a part of it, and I still watch the series multiple times. I can’t get tired of it. I can just go to any episode and watch it- it has so many great jokes and the characters are diverse, and they bring their own style, energy and creativity. I think it’s the funniest show on TV.

How is it working with the cast?

PK: Working with the cast is great. You know, you got legends there. You’ve got Kim Fields, the ultimate foremost legend, Mike Epps who is a comic genius, Wanda Skyes- comic genius. They are good people, and everybody is happy to be here, so it makes it fun.

Do you feel that you have any similar traits to your character Duck within yourself?

PK: I’ve been asked that question and, let me see, I look at Duck as a different character than what I typically play. The only similarity that I see between me and Duck is his loyalty. He is loyal to a fault. You know, he spent 7-10 years in jail where he could have gotten less time where he could have ratted out his friend who could have been his co-defendant, but he just took it. I think I have a loyalty like Duck. Other than that, he’s a little different than me.

Let’s talk about your latest album. How did you feel about the creative direction within the videos for “Fear” and “Safe”? How did you work through the process of such a real and raw album?

PK: I wanted to make use of all of my talents to create an art- that was my goal. My goal was to take the amalgamation of talents that I have to coalesce to create art that could be ubiquitous forever. You know, that’s what I feel I accomplished because things are great 20 years from now and it’s still going to be great. You can still listen to Biggie because it’s incredible, it’s timeless and that’s what I wanted to do. I feel like I accomplished that.

Can you tell us about the song “Shine”?

PK: I think that the album needed some respite because it’s very heavy and after you listen to Fear and Safe, it’s so cumbersome that you need some respite. And so that’s what Shine provides. It still takes a look at how difficult 2019 was personally for me and then 2020 was for everyone. The face of darkness, there is light after, and I wanted to show that the Devil will not take that light away. We will shine.

Can you tell us about your album cover?

PK: The cover of the album is confluence of tragic incident of black Americans who have had their lives taken from them at the hands of police brutality. That confluence is to show that they are me. You know, they all make up me; I am the same as them and so I wanted to, through me, show them. Wait until you get to the song “Flowers”, that is my favorite song on the album.

At the end of some of your videos, there is mention of voting- what are you trying to show viewers?

PK: So, creating Fear was so I could galvanize the troops to go vote because we can’t just yell from the rafters “We are being disrespected”, “We are being overlooked”. We have to actually get in the dirt and, you know, do things that cause change. Our biggest voice was our vote. The virality of those videos was to have the embolism of to vote throughout the video. To help people want to get out and vote after they see the deleterious effects of what fear can do on both sides so that’s why you see that throughout the videos.

Let’s talk about your fitness journey. What motivated you to get started?

PK: I got tired of looking at myself in movies and TV fat as hell and I was more attractive in my head than I was externally, so I wanted to match that.

So, there’s a lot of excuses that I think many people use such as “I can’t afford to go to the gym” or “I hurt too much to do this”. How did you push past your own excuses?

PK: I have an additive personality so once I get into something, I’m locked in and I got my mind right and ready. I had help, a tool to help me out with the point of why I was overweight which was my addiction to food. And so, I got gastro sleeve surgery which made my stomach smaller so that I couldn’t overeat. That helped. That was like the catalyst to help me and the working out thing- I already had that down. I had challenges where I would workout 100 straight days and another challenge where I went a straight year of working out without missing any days. My mind was already set to go to the gym, I just needed to get the food stuff right.

Do you still workout consistently?

PK: Yep, I’m still in it. Even when the gyms were closed, I found a way to get the workout in.

What advice would you offer somebody as far as starting out on their journey? If they were with you and undecided about their journey because of lack of motivation.

PK: I would say to make it something that is a part of your daily life that you don’t have a choice of. You don’t have a choice if you need to go to the bathroom or not, you don’t have a choice whether you like eating or not. These are things that must happen regardless of what you want or not. So, if you make the gym or workout a part of that, you take the lack of motivation away. We can have things taken away for us and see how resilient we could be. If you’re in jail or in a weight loss camp or anywhere that caused your free will to be taken away and you are forced to do something, you can do it because you have to. So why have to be in a situation where some other exterior force forces you to when you have a mind and brain that is going to be the thing to make you do it anyway.

Do you have a specific meal plan?

PK: Sometimes, yes. I go in spurts. Some weeks I have no carbs and no sugar. Then some weeks I am a little looser. I just try to be moderate because I could easily go really far one way or really far the other way. It’s not until I’m actually preparing for something that I go super crazy. Other than that, I just try and stay in striking range.

Do you allow yourself to have treats?

PK: Yep, probably more than I should.

What kind of workouts do you do?

PK: Well, when I get off the phone with you, I have a trainer, so I am going to the gym. Wednesday is leg day, which sucks. I work out with a trainer 3-4 days a week and then two other days I have an Oculus virtual reality thing that I do a supernatural workout on or I ride my bike for 20 miles to the beach on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Is there anything else that you’d like to talk about or anything that you’d like to share with our readers?

PK: I just want them to the importance of the album “Page” and how it’s important to everyone in the world right to be aware of everything that happening right now and everything that’s going on. And that if this album was released by a bigger artist, it would be a Grammy-nominated type of album – that’s how important this album is. I just implore everyone to continue to listen to it and check it out because I think it’s necessary. That’s the main thing that I want- and watch “The Upshaws” on Netflix streaming now.

Black Lives Matter for 360 Magazine by Symara Briel Wilson

Black Lives Matter in Pittsburgh

By: Symara Wilson

In the last five months, protests have sparked across the world in response to several devastating acts of injustice against black people. It began in Minneapolis, Minnesota, home to George Floyd, a man killed by three Minneapolis police officers after allegedly trying to make a purchase with a counterfeit bill. Officers Derek Chauvin, J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao were all charged in the murder of George Floyd. From that moment, protests and riots erupted across the nation and even ventured beyond the United States. Unfortunately, George Floyd wasn’t the only killing prompting outrage. Countless other incidents have occurred since then, and even those resurfacing from years before fuel the momentum of the movement. Black people being unjustly killed by police has been an act of violence prevalent in the media as of recent years. Now, people are no longer staying silent on how they feel. Millions of people have come together everywhere in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement.

As protests erupted across the United States, four months have passed and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is still going strong in their fight for justice—and this sadly isn’t the first time. In June of 2018, 17-year old Antwon Rose ll was shot in the back in East Pittsburgh by officer Michael Rosfield, who was not found guilty, even though Antwon was unarmed. Protests filled the streets that summer and fast forward years later, Pittsburgh still marches for Antwon and several others. George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Elijah McClain, Robert Fuller, Rayshard Brooks, Oluwatoyin Salau, Daniel Prude and Jacob Blake compile just a small list of Black lives that have been at the forefront of the Black Lives Matter movement recently.

Protests in Pittsburgh have gone on for a consecutive 16 weeks. Started by Black, Young, And Educated, “Civil Saturdays” were youth-led protests that called for the amendment of PA Section 508, which is the justification for the use of force (even deadly) by law enforcement officers in Pennsylvania. Black, Young, And Educated is one of several black-led organizations in Pittsburgh fighting to make a difference in the community. Though Civil Saturdays have recently ended, protests in the city are not letting up.

Some other Black organizations are Pittsburgh Feminists for Intersectionality, an organization created to promote intersectional feminism, and SisTers, a Black and trans-led organization providing education and resources to local transgender, non-binary, and other gender-nonconforming individuals, as well as helping with transitioning and providing shelter. Protests in support of Black trans lives have been happening in Pittsburgh recently as well. With how big the Black Lives Matter movement has gotten; the Black Trans Lives Matter movement has also grown in notability and is just as important.

Crimes against those who are transgender are often times swept under the rug and don not receive attention in the media. We already know anti-transgender violence is not a new occurrence, but according to a 2018 report from the Human Rights Campaign, we also know that “it disproportionately impacts young transgender women of color, and we can identify common risk factors shared among many of its victims.” It is even said that the life expectancy of Black trans women is just 35 years old. Why do Black trans women and men face an alarmingly greater rate of violence than those who are white and/or cisgender? This is where the importance of intersectionality within activism lies.

The term “intersectionality” has caught on more in recent years, but has been around since 1989, coined by law professor, Kimberlé Crenshaw. In a paper, she argued Black women face more discrimination because of racism and sexism within our society. Since then, the term has grown and shows us that oppression can come from multiple sources. Race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and physical ability all play a part in intersectionality. In order to progress, we have to look at the way oppression overlaps, and appreciate the reality that certain marginalized groups are more susceptible to violence and discrimination than others. This is why organizations like Pittsburgh Feminists for Intersectionality and SisTers are crucial to provide advocacy and resources for the LGBTQ+ community. Tony McDade, Riah Milton, Tete Gulley, Dominique Fells, Aaliyah Denise Johnson, Nina Pop, and Monika Diamond are just a few examples of Black trans lives lost this year that protestors have also been marching for. Their stories deserve just as much attention, as well as justice.

So, when will justice finally be served?

It’s no secret that America has a very long way to go when it comes to repairing a system that was built on racism since the beginning. The Supreme Court’s recent upsetting decision in the Breonna Taylor case has only motivated protestors all over the country, especially in Breonna’s home of Louisville, Kentucky. Brett Hankison, only one of three officers involved, was indicted on charges for shooting into the neighbor’s house, not for the actual murder of Breonna in her sleep. Therefore, the end of the fight for equality is still nowhere in sight. Although many argue that the protests are doing nothing to help the movement, Elijah McClain’s case being reopened and the Supreme Court choosing to further investigate Breonna Taylor’s case demonstrates actions matter. Sharing resources, donating, making calls and emails to officials, protesting, signing petitions— it all counts.. There is much more to be done here and America’s youth has shown the world that they are not letting up anytime soon.

Beer illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Black is Beautiful

SLO Brew & Liquid Gravity Brewing Co. have come together to craft a Coconut Coffee Stout in an effort to raise awareness against race-based injustice as a part of the Black is Beautiful initiative. Today the collaboration is going live for presale. Drink well, do good.

Brewed in a 20 BBL batch with 1800 lbs of malt for toasted notes of caramel followed by light additions of CTZ hop to tease a slight bitterness. This deep, rich brew is layered with fresh ground coffee & coconut for an 8% summer stout.

We are incredibly humbled to join up with our friends Liquid Gravity Brewing Co. down the road & hundreds of breweries worldwide to raise awareness for race-based injustice. As part of the Black is Beautiful beer initiative we will be making a collective donation to the NAACP SLO County Branch. Get in on the good stuff.

Available starting 8/5 online and in brewery taprooms.

 SLO Brew Rock Taproom Hours Outdoor Dining (855 Aerovista Place)

Tues. – Thurs. 11:30 AM – 9:00 PM

Fri. – Sat. 11:30 AM – 10:00 PM

Sunday: 11:30 AM – 6:00 PM

 SLO Stills Tasting Room Hours Outdoor Dining (855 Aerovista Place)

Wed. – Thurs. 3:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Fri. – Sat. 12:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Sunday: 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

 The Carrisa Creekside Dining Hours Outdoor Dining (Downtown, SLO)

Wed. – Thurs. 4:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Fri. – Sat. 12:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Sunday: 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

 SLO Stills Pop Up Shop Hours (Downtown, SLO)

Wed. – Thurs. 4:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Fri. – Sat. 12:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Sunday: 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

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Graffiti illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

The Fabric of America: Artists in Protest

In solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, the Museum of Graffiti will open a new exhibition titled The Fabric of America: Artists in Protest. Over 30 South Florida graffiti artists and illustrators were invited to create protest themed art on denim jackets in the tradition of the protest signs seen at marches.

“Providing a platform for artists to contribute to the national discussion is important to the Museum and a way for local artists to join the conversation,” states the Museum’s curator Alan Ket, he adds, “These artists work in the streets but we have invited them indoors to engage in a dialogue of resistance with our audience.”

“These wearable artworks articulate what you believe in at all times, without you having to say a word” said Allison Freidin, co-founder of the Museum of Graffiti.

Included in the show will be an audio/visual installation that counts down to 0 from 8 minutes and 46 seconds, the time a Minneapolis police officer had his knee on George Floyd’s neck and video works by Chintz and Alan Ket.

Internationally recognized artists Futura 2000, Tristan Eaton, and Cey Adams will contribute new posters and prints that are in line with their staunch dissatisfaction with what has become our country’s status quo.

The new exhibit ties in with the recently created large-scale mural titled AMERICAN HISTORY on the walls of two adjacent buildings at NW 25th Street and 3rd Avenue. Focusing on the Black experience in US history starting in the early 1800s through current day, the giant mural, curated by the Museum of Graffiti, tackles the subjects of police brutality, racial injustice, and resistance.

The local artists taking part in the exhibit include: Chillski, Crome, Tackz, Disem, Ahol Sniffs Glue, Cash4, Rasterms, Klass, Cyst, Grab, Tragek, Delvs, Quake, Ticoe, View2, Chnk, Jel Martinez, Etone, Rage, Krave, June, Keds, Junk, Meta4, Drums Brown, Santiago Rubino, Cale K2S, Ruth, Faves, Blackbrain, Emerald, and Tierra Armstrong.

The exhibition also presents the photographic works of Pablo Allison, a human rights worker and documentarian who since 2017, has been following the migrant trail from Central America to the USA. Each photograph depicts powerful instances of protest graffiti that Allison captured on the trains used by migrants to escape inhumane conditions.

A portion of the proceeds will benefit Empowered Youth, a Miami based not-for-profit dedicated to enhancing the lives of inner-city, at-risk youth. Their programs teach career skills that help to eradicate poverty and violence. They serve young men between the ages of 12-21, most of whom have been referred by the Department of Juvenile Justice.

The Museum of Graffiti is open to the public with safety-first procedures, including an admission system that only allows for 6 people to enter the premises every 15 minutes. Guests must purchase tickets in advance online or from their mobile devices as they approach the Museum in order to avoid on-site transactions.

TICKETS & HOURS

General Admission tickets are $16, Children 13 and under are free. Tickets are available online and include access to all museum exhibitions. 

The Museum of Graffiti is open from 11 AM – 5 PM on Wednesdays through Mondays and it is closed on Tuesdays. Please check www.museumofgraffiti.com for special holidays, extended hours and unexpected closings.

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Superhero illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Black-Owned Superhero Brand

Aza Comics, owned by black woman creator Jazmin Truesdale and known for its roster of multicultural female superheroes, is aiming to continue providing hope and escapism for the world as people support the Black Lives Matter movement. “Aza Comics has always addressed the issues of black people in its storylines,” says Truesdale, “I’m just happy that now people are finally understanding what is happening and joining this fight that is truly everyone’s fight.”

The Aza Universe is centered almost entirely around women of color and has always tried to provide hope and inspiration for women around the world as they face various issues like racial inequity, sexism, misogyny and homophobia. This hits especially close to home for Truesdale as countless black women like Sandra Bland and Breonna Taylor have yet to see justice in a time when black women face the highest rates of homicide in the US.  During this time, Aza Comics received an incredible growth in sales and exposure as more people discovered what the Aza superhero universe is all about. “I just want people to at least feel safe in their imagination,” says Truesdale.  “For black people and many other people of color, everywhere we look pain is reflecting back at us.  I want Aza Comics to be that escape where you can feel heard and empowered to fight another day.”

Aza Comics has a lot in store this year for its growing number of fans. “We will do what we’ve always done,” says Truesdale,” Continue to grow and enrich the lives of people of color around the world and partner with people and brands who truly care about the lives of others.”  The company plans to use its revenue to invest in entrepreneurs of color, support women athletes, expand its universe with more inclusive superheroes and do what it can to continue being a voice.

Aza Comics is a superhero brand based in Durham, North Carolina founded by serial entrepreneur and author Jazmin Truesdale.  The company is known for its multicultural female superheroes and philanthropic initiatives that have been featured in Vogue, TIME, USA Today, and various other national and international publications.

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Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Fireworks

DON’T PLAY W/ FIRE

By Gabriella Scerbo

Fireworks: Usually an item associated with July 4th or any sort of celebration. Every year around the major cities hundreds of people gather to watch fireworks, and are in awe of their multicolors, and unique pulsating sounds. Another thing that many love about fireworks, is the excuse to sip a cold beer (maybe a little too much) but overall spend quality time with family. This time of celebration and positive correlation seems to be out the window when discussing fireworks in the political climate of 2020.

Fireworks are illegal in many states without a permit, and police departments across the country are cracking down on the abundant use. Law enforcement is once again restating the ordinances regarding these fireworks. In Illinois, the Police Department posted a Facebook update, once again reminding residents of the policy. In June, New York City firework complaints have more than tripled within the past year. This influx in fireworks is due to the fact that large gatherings are cancelled, such as concerts, sporting events and many other celebrations due to the spread of COVID-19.

Another theory regarding the influx of fireworks, are the protests following the death of George Floyd. In New York City and major cities around the country, thousands protest police brutality and years of systemic racism, and racial injustice faced by the Black Community. The Black Lives Matter movement have also been involved in directly using fireworks in addition to peaceful protests, and a larger national conversation about the system injustices.

Pasadena, California has seen a 400% increase of fireworks related complaints. Around 40% (2 in 5) of Americans plan on buying their own fireworks this year, due to the cancellations of many celebrations due to COVID-19. In the Big Apple, Firework complaints have rose to 13,109 compared to just 32 last year.

Not only are these fireworks having a large affect on humans, they also affect everyone’s favorite member of their families: pets.

Although the fireworks seem to glisten in the sky, used for either boredom or to reiterate an important movement, they can also cause serious physical injuries. These effects include loss of fingers, hands, and even tissue damage on the face. Fireworks should be left to people that know how to properly use them.

Not only are the fireworks causing physical injuries to many, they are also causing light pollution and air pollution, which has a direct negative effect on the environment. These fireworks put harmful chemicals and smoke in the air, these chemicals have negative implications such as coughing, shortness of breath, and even heart attacks.

The loud noises are causing concern to frontline workers during the pandemic, looking to get a good night’s rest from another stressful day in the hospital. As well as officer workers, eager to get back to some sense of normalcy during Phase 2 of reopening following COVID-19.

Not only are these fireworks having a large negative on humans, they also affect everyone’s favorite member of their families: pets. Similar to humans, the loud noise is not the most pleasing one, and can cause mental problems. Dogs specifically, when hearing these noises tend to self mutilate, due to anxiety.  Smaller dogs, such as border collies, Australian Shepherds and chihuahua’s can be especially sensitive.

Unfortunately, the amount of pets that are entered in the shelters post July 4th are around 80% higher  than normal. Imagine the potential increase in  shelters with the fireworks in 2020.

These astronomical numbers will be steadily increasing if this firework predicament is not properly taken care of. Many amazing pets lives will be destroyed, as well as there loving families.

 In the grand schemes of things, fireworks are a very small issue in the sea of large issues. However, right now they have been brought into the spotlight as yet another concern for the safety of major cities around the country.

Future Galerie’s Social Justice Auctions

Future Galerie, a unified art auction and sweepstakes platform, today announced the debut of its ongoing series of art auctions, with 100% of proceeds going to support social justice organizations that are taking deliberate actions to end systemic racism and create a more just and tolerant future. Future Galerie is produced by creative production house CANVAS Chicago.

CANVAS’ Creative Director Alaiia Gujral, along with co-curators Lonnie Edwards and Dont Fret, have assembled an impressive roster of acclaimed participating artists including Max Sansing, Adam Lucas (formerly Hanksy), JC Rivera, Kate Lynn Lewis, Dont Fret, Mauricio Ramirez, Lefty Out There, Langston Allston, Lala Abaddon, Liz Flores, Eva Carlini, Afrokilla, Shaurya Kumar (SAIC), Revise CMW, Troy Scat, and more to be announced.

Those wishing to participate in the auction have the option to bid to win available artwork. Each online auction will last 8-10 days, with the first pieces for bid to be available July 1, including BLM by Left Out There, DuSable by Marco Miller and a piece from Shaurya Kumar’s series “if in a sacred land a traveler…”

Each auction will culminate with an Instagram Live Chat with the artists, hosted by Gujral. Alternatively, select pieces will be available through a sweepstakes series for those that want to participate at a lower price point to win premium artwork, but still want to support the cause.

The sweepstakes series will each run for 10-14 days. This curated selection of artists include several with a background in street art, a subculture that has risen to become recognized as a major branch of contemporary art, but has frequently been rooted in social justice messages. Max Sansing is a Chicago-based artist, with works influenced by his upbringing on the South Side of the city and most known for his piece “Culture is Power.” Sansing was the winner of the ‘Best Street Artist’ category in the 2017 “Best of Chicago” awards and has received commissions from Nike and Chicago Fire, among other accolades.

Another featured Chicago-based muralist is JC Rivera, known for his signature “Bear Champ” caricature that is instantly recognizable. The bright yellow, roughed-up bear with boxing gloves can be found all throughout Chicago and Rivera is said to be one of Chicago’s favorite artists. Based in New York, street artist Adam Lucas (formerly Hanksy) will also be donating work for the auction. Lucas layers images, text and bold design with playfully acerbic references culled from contemporary culture. Liz Flores is a muralist that paints the human form through shapes and colors, who has worked with Sephora and Lululemon and will be donating work as well. Of the 19 artists, others with a history in street art include Afrokilla, Kate Lynn Lewis, Lefty Out There, Dont Fret, Mauricio Ramirez, Marco Miller, Langston Allston, Lonnie Edwards and more. Pieces available for bidding will be gradually rolled out on the Future Galerie website.

“Though racial injustice issues have been an ongoing problem in our country, the gravity of recent events has created an atmosphere where we are all compelled to take immediate action to help combat systemic racism. As a creative producer, I felt the most effective way for me to make a difference was by bringing artists and the community together to generate momentum and support for urgently needed change,” said Future Galerie Creative Director Alaiia Gujral. “This has long been a priority for me, and this platform feels like a perfect way for us to use our resources and connections to raise money for social justice organizations on the front lines of building a more tolerant and equitable future.”

For each auction or sweepstakes, 100% of the funds raised will support organizations of the artists’ choosing, but all are focused on taking deliberate actions to combat racism and create a more just future. Charities and organizations the artists have chosen to donate their proceeds to include SkyART, Black Youth Project, Color of Change, Story Catcher Theatre, and several others that support various aspects of the Black Lives Matter movement. Throughout the duration of the auction, each artist will go live on their Instagram pages to give insights about their chosen pieces. Bidders and viewers can tune-in to the live portion of the auction on @FutureGalerie’s and the artists’ Instagram pages.

About Future Galerie

Future Galerie is a unified art auction platform that allows prominent artists and creators to raise money for social organizations, of their choosing, that are taking deliberate actions to create a more just and tolerant future. Future Galerie unites the artists’ respective audiences into one amplified voice of support, while allowing each artist to show support for organizations they are individually passionate about. Chicago-based CANVAS, a production company with a history of producing successful in-person events fusing art and music, is the umbrella organization that is producing Future Galerie.

The organizers of Future Galerie are all creative producers and creative directors, bringing people and resources together to take an active role in a solution to social justice issues.

About Creative Director Alaiia Gujral

Born in India, Gujral earned her Bachelor’s from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she studied Print Media, Ceramics and Fibers. During her collegiate career, she was invited to show her work at a series of exhibitions that led to her discovering her passion for art curation and cultural event production. In her work with the Gujral Foundation, an international philanthropic art and culture organization, she has directed multiple national and international projects including installations in the Venice Biennale and London Design Biennale. Gujral joined CANVAS Chicago in 2017 and established herself as the creative director of several projects including The Saideira Dinner Series and, currently, the Future Galerie online art auction platform in support of combating systemic racism.

About Co-Curator Lonnie Edwards

Lonnie Edwards is an acclaimed producer and filmmaker. With his first two films, “Parietal Guidance” and “A Ferguson Story,” the Chicago-based director quickly earned a reputation for documenting and dramatizing lives in oppressed and marginalized communities. His work has won numerous festival prizes, honors from the Gene Siskel Film Center, a spot on Film50s list for most influential people in film and he was chosen as Newcity magazine’s 2016 “Filmmaker of the Year.” His short music documentary “Exodus: Sounds of the Great Migration” screened at this year’s Pan African International Film Festival in Cannes, where it won awards for “Best Experimental Short Film” and “Best New Director.” Though he most recently has taken a hiatus from filmmaking to focus on other forms of art after premiering new works for the first time at ART BASEL MIAMI. His most recent short film “Periphery” (2019) currently ranks amongst the top 100 short films internationally by LIFT-OFF Global. Edwards continues to create art that speaks to the injustices prevalently happening in America.

About Co-Curator Dont Fret

Dont Fret is an artist born, raised and currently working in Chicago. In addition to his wheat pasting, his practice includes drawing, painting, sculpture, performance and installation-based work both on the street and in the gallery space. He has produced large-scale public murals in a number of American cities including Chicago, New York, Miami, San Francisco and Denver as well as internationally in cities like London, Helsinki, São Paulo and Berlin. His work has been in a number of gallery exhibitions nationally and internationally, with shows in Chicago, New York, San Francisco, London, and Oakland. In 2014, he was included in Paint Paste Sticker – the large Chicago street art survey at the Chicago Cultural Center. In 2016-2018, his work was prominently featured in the Netflix original series “Easy.”

About CANVAS Chicago

CANVAS Chicago is a creative production and marketing company that concepts, develops, funds, and executes art-forward public initiatives and immersive event experiences that bring together innovative creatives and producers and push the threshold of what is possible in this field in Chicago and beyond. CANVAS’ consulting studio also works with clients on creative event production, digital design, and growth marketing initiatives. CANVAS has coordinated immersive events and experiences for the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Sciences, EXPO Chicago, Art Basel, Rolling Stone Magazine, Red Bull, and many more.