Posts tagged with "Black Lives Matter Movement"

Black Lives Matter for 360 Magazine by Symara Briel Wilson

Black Lives Matter in Pittsburgh

By: Symara Wilson

In the last five months, protests have sparked across the world in response to several devastating acts of injustice against black people. It began in Minneapolis, Minnesota, home to George Floyd, a man killed by three Minneapolis police officers after allegedly trying to make a purchase with a counterfeit bill. Officers Derek Chauvin, J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao were all charged in the murder of George Floyd. From that moment, protests and riots erupted across the nation and even ventured beyond the United States. Unfortunately, George Floyd wasn’t the only killing prompting outrage. Countless other incidents have occurred since then, and even those resurfacing from years before fuel the momentum of the movement. Black people being unjustly killed by police has been an act of violence prevalent in the media as of recent years. Now, people are no longer staying silent on how they feel. Millions of people have come together everywhere in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement.

As protests erupted across the United States, four months have passed and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is still going strong in their fight for justice—and this sadly isn’t the first time. In June of 2018, 17-year old Antwon Rose ll was shot in the back in East Pittsburgh by officer Michael Rosfield, who was not found guilty, even though Antwon was unarmed. Protests filled the streets that summer and fast forward years later, Pittsburgh still marches for Antwon and several others. George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Elijah McClain, Robert Fuller, Rayshard Brooks, Oluwatoyin Salau, Daniel Prude and Jacob Blake compile just a small list of Black lives that have been at the forefront of the Black Lives Matter movement recently.

Protests in Pittsburgh have gone on for a consecutive 16 weeks. Started by Black, Young, And Educated, “Civil Saturdays” were youth-led protests that called for the amendment of PA Section 508, which is the justification for the use of force (even deadly) by law enforcement officers in Pennsylvania. Black, Young, And Educated is one of several black-led organizations in Pittsburgh fighting to make a difference in the community. Though Civil Saturdays have recently ended, protests in the city are not letting up.

Some other Black organizations are Pittsburgh Feminists for Intersectionality, an organization created to promote intersectional feminism, and SisTers, a Black and trans-led organization providing education and resources to local transgender, non-binary, and other gender-nonconforming individuals, as well as helping with transitioning and providing shelter. Protests in support of Black trans lives have been happening in Pittsburgh recently as well. With how big the Black Lives Matter movement has gotten; the Black Trans Lives Matter movement has also grown in notability and is just as important.

Crimes against those who are transgender are often times swept under the rug and don not receive attention in the media. We already know anti-transgender violence is not a new occurrence, but according to a 2018 report from the Human Rights Campaign, we also know that “it disproportionately impacts young transgender women of color, and we can identify common risk factors shared among many of its victims.” It is even said that the life expectancy of Black trans women is just 35 years old. Why do Black trans women and men face an alarmingly greater rate of violence than those who are white and/or cisgender? This is where the importance of intersectionality within activism lies.

The term “intersectionality” has caught on more in recent years, but has been around since 1989, coined by law professor, Kimberlé Crenshaw. In a paper, she argued Black women face more discrimination because of racism and sexism within our society. Since then, the term has grown and shows us that oppression can come from multiple sources. Race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and physical ability all play a part in intersectionality. In order to progress, we have to look at the way oppression overlaps, and appreciate the reality that certain marginalized groups are more susceptible to violence and discrimination than others. This is why organizations like Pittsburgh Feminists for Intersectionality and SisTers are crucial to provide advocacy and resources for the LGBTQ+ community. Tony McDade, Riah Milton, Tete Gulley, Dominique Fells, Aaliyah Denise Johnson, Nina Pop, and Monika Diamond are just a few examples of Black trans lives lost this year that protestors have also been marching for. Their stories deserve just as much attention, as well as justice.

So, when will justice finally be served?

It’s no secret that America has a very long way to go when it comes to repairing a system that was built on racism since the beginning. The Supreme Court’s recent upsetting decision in the Breonna Taylor case has only motivated protestors all over the country, especially in Breonna’s home of Louisville, Kentucky. Brett Hankison, only one of three officers involved, was indicted on charges for shooting into the neighbor’s house, not for the actual murder of Breonna in her sleep. Therefore, the end of the fight for equality is still nowhere in sight. Although many argue that the protests are doing nothing to help the movement, Elijah McClain’s case being reopened and the Supreme Court choosing to further investigate Breonna Taylor’s case demonstrates actions matter. Sharing resources, donating, making calls and emails to officials, protesting, signing petitions— it all counts.. There is much more to be done here and America’s youth has shown the world that they are not letting up anytime soon.

Beer illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Black is Beautiful

SLO Brew & Liquid Gravity Brewing Co. have come together to craft a Coconut Coffee Stout in an effort to raise awareness against race-based injustice as a part of the Black is Beautiful initiative. Today the collaboration is going live for presale. Drink well, do good.

Brewed in a 20 BBL batch with 1800 lbs of malt for toasted notes of caramel followed by light additions of CTZ hop to tease a slight bitterness. This deep, rich brew is layered with fresh ground coffee & coconut for an 8% summer stout.

We are incredibly humbled to join up with our friends Liquid Gravity Brewing Co. down the road & hundreds of breweries worldwide to raise awareness for race-based injustice. As part of the Black is Beautiful beer initiative we will be making a collective donation to the NAACP SLO County Branch. Get in on the good stuff.

Available starting 8/5 online and in brewery taprooms.

 SLO Brew Rock Taproom Hours Outdoor Dining (855 Aerovista Place)

Tues. – Thurs. 11:30 AM – 9:00 PM

Fri. – Sat. 11:30 AM – 10:00 PM

Sunday: 11:30 AM – 6:00 PM

 SLO Stills Tasting Room Hours Outdoor Dining (855 Aerovista Place)

Wed. – Thurs. 3:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Fri. – Sat. 12:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Sunday: 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

 The Carrisa Creekside Dining Hours Outdoor Dining (Downtown, SLO)

Wed. – Thurs. 4:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Fri. – Sat. 12:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Sunday: 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

 SLO Stills Pop Up Shop Hours (Downtown, SLO)

Wed. – Thurs. 4:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Fri. – Sat. 12:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Sunday: 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

 Bring Summer Home. Get SLO Brew Craft Beer, Porch Pounder Canned Wine & SLO Stills Small-Batch Whiskey delivered straight to your door.

 Follow Liquid Gravity Brewing Company: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter 

Follow SLO Brew: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Graffiti illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

The Fabric of America: Artists in Protest

In solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, the Museum of Graffiti will open a new exhibition titled The Fabric of America: Artists in Protest. Over 30 South Florida graffiti artists and illustrators were invited to create protest themed art on denim jackets in the tradition of the protest signs seen at marches.

“Providing a platform for artists to contribute to the national discussion is important to the Museum and a way for local artists to join the conversation,” states the Museum’s curator Alan Ket, he adds, “These artists work in the streets but we have invited them indoors to engage in a dialogue of resistance with our audience.”

“These wearable artworks articulate what you believe in at all times, without you having to say a word” said Allison Freidin, co-founder of the Museum of Graffiti.

Included in the show will be an audio/visual installation that counts down to 0 from 8 minutes and 46 seconds, the time a Minneapolis police officer had his knee on George Floyd’s neck and video works by Chintz and Alan Ket.

Internationally recognized artists Futura 2000, Tristan Eaton, and Cey Adams will contribute new posters and prints that are in line with their staunch dissatisfaction with what has become our country’s status quo.

The new exhibit ties in with the recently created large-scale mural titled AMERICAN HISTORY on the walls of two adjacent buildings at NW 25th Street and 3rd Avenue. Focusing on the Black experience in US history starting in the early 1800s through current day, the giant mural, curated by the Museum of Graffiti, tackles the subjects of police brutality, racial injustice, and resistance.

The local artists taking part in the exhibit include: Chillski, Crome, Tackz, Disem, Ahol Sniffs Glue, Cash4, Rasterms, Klass, Cyst, Grab, Tragek, Delvs, Quake, Ticoe, View2, Chnk, Jel Martinez, Etone, Rage, Krave, June, Keds, Junk, Meta4, Drums Brown, Santiago Rubino, Cale K2S, Ruth, Faves, Blackbrain, Emerald, and Tierra Armstrong.

The exhibition also presents the photographic works of Pablo Allison, a human rights worker and documentarian who since 2017, has been following the migrant trail from Central America to the USA. Each photograph depicts powerful instances of protest graffiti that Allison captured on the trains used by migrants to escape inhumane conditions.

A portion of the proceeds will benefit Empowered Youth, a Miami based not-for-profit dedicated to enhancing the lives of inner-city, at-risk youth. Their programs teach career skills that help to eradicate poverty and violence. They serve young men between the ages of 12-21, most of whom have been referred by the Department of Juvenile Justice.

The Museum of Graffiti is open to the public with safety-first procedures, including an admission system that only allows for 6 people to enter the premises every 15 minutes. Guests must purchase tickets in advance online or from their mobile devices as they approach the Museum in order to avoid on-site transactions.

TICKETS & HOURS

General Admission tickets are $16, Children 13 and under are free. Tickets are available online and include access to all museum exhibitions. 

The Museum of Graffiti is open from 11 AM – 5 PM on Wednesdays through Mondays and it is closed on Tuesdays. Please check www.museumofgraffiti.com for special holidays, extended hours and unexpected closings.

Follow Museum of Graffiti: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Superhero illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Black-Owned Superhero Brand

Aza Comics, owned by black woman creator Jazmin Truesdale and known for its roster of multicultural female superheroes, is aiming to continue providing hope and escapism for the world as people support the Black Lives Matter movement. “Aza Comics has always addressed the issues of black people in its storylines,” says Truesdale, “I’m just happy that now people are finally understanding what is happening and joining this fight that is truly everyone’s fight.”

The Aza Universe is centered almost entirely around women of color and has always tried to provide hope and inspiration for women around the world as they face various issues like racial inequity, sexism, misogyny and homophobia. This hits especially close to home for Truesdale as countless black women like Sandra Bland and Breonna Taylor have yet to see justice in a time when black women face the highest rates of homicide in the US.  During this time, Aza Comics received an incredible growth in sales and exposure as more people discovered what the Aza superhero universe is all about. “I just want people to at least feel safe in their imagination,” says Truesdale.  “For black people and many other people of color, everywhere we look pain is reflecting back at us.  I want Aza Comics to be that escape where you can feel heard and empowered to fight another day.”

Aza Comics has a lot in store this year for its growing number of fans. “We will do what we’ve always done,” says Truesdale,” Continue to grow and enrich the lives of people of color around the world and partner with people and brands who truly care about the lives of others.”  The company plans to use its revenue to invest in entrepreneurs of color, support women athletes, expand its universe with more inclusive superheroes and do what it can to continue being a voice.

Aza Comics is a superhero brand based in Durham, North Carolina founded by serial entrepreneur and author Jazmin Truesdale.  The company is known for its multicultural female superheroes and philanthropic initiatives that have been featured in Vogue, TIME, USA Today, and various other national and international publications.

Follow Aza Comics:  Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Follow Jazmin Truesdale:  Facebook | Instagram | Twitter 

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Fireworks

DON’T PLAY W/ FIRE

By Gabriella Scerbo

Fireworks: Usually an item associated with July 4th or any sort of celebration. Every year around the major cities hundreds of people gather to watch fireworks, and are in awe of their multicolors, and unique pulsating sounds. Another thing that many love about fireworks, is the excuse to sip a cold beer (maybe a little too much) but overall spend quality time with family. This time of celebration and positive correlation seems to be out the window when discussing fireworks in the political climate of 2020.

Fireworks are illegal in many states without a permit, and police departments across the country are cracking down on the abundant use. Law enforcement is once again restating the ordinances regarding these fireworks. In Illinois, the Police Department posted a Facebook update, once again reminding residents of the policy. In June, New York City firework complaints have more than tripled within the past year. This influx in fireworks is due to the fact that large gatherings are cancelled, such as concerts, sporting events and many other celebrations due to the spread of COVID-19.

Another theory regarding the influx of fireworks, are the protests following the death of George Floyd. In New York City and major cities around the country, thousands protest police brutality and years of systemic racism, and racial injustice faced by the Black Community. The Black Lives Matter movement have also been involved in directly using fireworks in addition to peaceful protests, and a larger national conversation about the system injustices.

Pasadena, California has seen a 400% increase of fireworks related complaints. Around 40% (2 in 5) of Americans plan on buying their own fireworks this year, due to the cancellations of many celebrations due to COVID-19. In the Big Apple, Firework complaints have rose to 13,109 compared to just 32 last year.

Not only are these fireworks having a large affect on humans, they also affect everyone’s favorite member of their families: pets.

Although the fireworks seem to glisten in the sky, used for either boredom or to reiterate an important movement, they can also cause serious physical injuries. These effects include loss of fingers, hands, and even tissue damage on the face. Fireworks should be left to people that know how to properly use them.

Not only are the fireworks causing physical injuries to many, they are also causing light pollution and air pollution, which has a direct negative effect on the environment. These fireworks put harmful chemicals and smoke in the air, these chemicals have negative implications such as coughing, shortness of breath, and even heart attacks.

The loud noises are causing concern to frontline workers during the pandemic, looking to get a good night’s rest from another stressful day in the hospital. As well as officer workers, eager to get back to some sense of normalcy during Phase 2 of reopening following COVID-19.

Not only are these fireworks having a large negative on humans, they also affect everyone’s favorite member of their families: pets. Similar to humans, the loud noise is not the most pleasing one, and can cause mental problems. Dogs specifically, when hearing these noises tend to self mutilate, due to anxiety.  Smaller dogs, such as border collies, Australian Shepherds and chihuahua’s can be especially sensitive.

Unfortunately, the amount of pets that are entered in the shelters post July 4th are around 80% higher  than normal. Imagine the potential increase in  shelters with the fireworks in 2020.

These astronomical numbers will be steadily increasing if this firework predicament is not properly taken care of. Many amazing pets lives will be destroyed, as well as there loving families.

 In the grand schemes of things, fireworks are a very small issue in the sea of large issues. However, right now they have been brought into the spotlight as yet another concern for the safety of major cities around the country.

Future Galerie’s Social Justice Auctions

Future Galerie, a unified art auction and sweepstakes platform, today announced the debut of its ongoing series of art auctions, with 100% of proceeds going to support social justice organizations that are taking deliberate actions to end systemic racism and create a more just and tolerant future. Future Galerie is produced by creative production house CANVAS Chicago.

CANVAS’ Creative Director Alaiia Gujral, along with co-curators Lonnie Edwards and Dont Fret, have assembled an impressive roster of acclaimed participating artists including Max Sansing, Adam Lucas (formerly Hanksy), JC Rivera, Kate Lynn Lewis, Dont Fret, Mauricio Ramirez, Lefty Out There, Langston Allston, Lala Abaddon, Liz Flores, Eva Carlini, Afrokilla, Shaurya Kumar (SAIC), Revise CMW, Troy Scat, and more to be announced.

Those wishing to participate in the auction have the option to bid to win available artwork. Each online auction will last 8-10 days, with the first pieces for bid to be available July 1, including BLM by Left Out There, DuSable by Marco Miller and a piece from Shaurya Kumar’s series “if in a sacred land a traveler…”

Each auction will culminate with an Instagram Live Chat with the artists, hosted by Gujral. Alternatively, select pieces will be available through a sweepstakes series for those that want to participate at a lower price point to win premium artwork, but still want to support the cause.

The sweepstakes series will each run for 10-14 days. This curated selection of artists include several with a background in street art, a subculture that has risen to become recognized as a major branch of contemporary art, but has frequently been rooted in social justice messages. Max Sansing is a Chicago-based artist, with works influenced by his upbringing on the South Side of the city and most known for his piece “Culture is Power.” Sansing was the winner of the ‘Best Street Artist’ category in the 2017 “Best of Chicago” awards and has received commissions from Nike and Chicago Fire, among other accolades.

Another featured Chicago-based muralist is JC Rivera, known for his signature “Bear Champ” caricature that is instantly recognizable. The bright yellow, roughed-up bear with boxing gloves can be found all throughout Chicago and Rivera is said to be one of Chicago’s favorite artists. Based in New York, street artist Adam Lucas (formerly Hanksy) will also be donating work for the auction. Lucas layers images, text and bold design with playfully acerbic references culled from contemporary culture. Liz Flores is a muralist that paints the human form through shapes and colors, who has worked with Sephora and Lululemon and will be donating work as well. Of the 19 artists, others with a history in street art include Afrokilla, Kate Lynn Lewis, Lefty Out There, Dont Fret, Mauricio Ramirez, Marco Miller, Langston Allston, Lonnie Edwards and more. Pieces available for bidding will be gradually rolled out on the Future Galerie website.

“Though racial injustice issues have been an ongoing problem in our country, the gravity of recent events has created an atmosphere where we are all compelled to take immediate action to help combat systemic racism. As a creative producer, I felt the most effective way for me to make a difference was by bringing artists and the community together to generate momentum and support for urgently needed change,” said Future Galerie Creative Director Alaiia Gujral. “This has long been a priority for me, and this platform feels like a perfect way for us to use our resources and connections to raise money for social justice organizations on the front lines of building a more tolerant and equitable future.”

For each auction or sweepstakes, 100% of the funds raised will support organizations of the artists’ choosing, but all are focused on taking deliberate actions to combat racism and create a more just future. Charities and organizations the artists have chosen to donate their proceeds to include SkyART, Black Youth Project, Color of Change, Story Catcher Theatre, and several others that support various aspects of the Black Lives Matter movement. Throughout the duration of the auction, each artist will go live on their Instagram pages to give insights about their chosen pieces. Bidders and viewers can tune-in to the live portion of the auction on @FutureGalerie’s and the artists’ Instagram pages.

About Future Galerie

Future Galerie is a unified art auction platform that allows prominent artists and creators to raise money for social organizations, of their choosing, that are taking deliberate actions to create a more just and tolerant future. Future Galerie unites the artists’ respective audiences into one amplified voice of support, while allowing each artist to show support for organizations they are individually passionate about. Chicago-based CANVAS, a production company with a history of producing successful in-person events fusing art and music, is the umbrella organization that is producing Future Galerie.

The organizers of Future Galerie are all creative producers and creative directors, bringing people and resources together to take an active role in a solution to social justice issues.

About Creative Director Alaiia Gujral

Born in India, Gujral earned her Bachelor’s from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she studied Print Media, Ceramics and Fibers. During her collegiate career, she was invited to show her work at a series of exhibitions that led to her discovering her passion for art curation and cultural event production. In her work with the Gujral Foundation, an international philanthropic art and culture organization, she has directed multiple national and international projects including installations in the Venice Biennale and London Design Biennale. Gujral joined CANVAS Chicago in 2017 and established herself as the creative director of several projects including The Saideira Dinner Series and, currently, the Future Galerie online art auction platform in support of combating systemic racism.

About Co-Curator Lonnie Edwards

Lonnie Edwards is an acclaimed producer and filmmaker. With his first two films, “Parietal Guidance” and “A Ferguson Story,” the Chicago-based director quickly earned a reputation for documenting and dramatizing lives in oppressed and marginalized communities. His work has won numerous festival prizes, honors from the Gene Siskel Film Center, a spot on Film50s list for most influential people in film and he was chosen as Newcity magazine’s 2016 “Filmmaker of the Year.” His short music documentary “Exodus: Sounds of the Great Migration” screened at this year’s Pan African International Film Festival in Cannes, where it won awards for “Best Experimental Short Film” and “Best New Director.” Though he most recently has taken a hiatus from filmmaking to focus on other forms of art after premiering new works for the first time at ART BASEL MIAMI. His most recent short film “Periphery” (2019) currently ranks amongst the top 100 short films internationally by LIFT-OFF Global. Edwards continues to create art that speaks to the injustices prevalently happening in America.

About Co-Curator Dont Fret

Dont Fret is an artist born, raised and currently working in Chicago. In addition to his wheat pasting, his practice includes drawing, painting, sculpture, performance and installation-based work both on the street and in the gallery space. He has produced large-scale public murals in a number of American cities including Chicago, New York, Miami, San Francisco and Denver as well as internationally in cities like London, Helsinki, São Paulo and Berlin. His work has been in a number of gallery exhibitions nationally and internationally, with shows in Chicago, New York, San Francisco, London, and Oakland. In 2014, he was included in Paint Paste Sticker – the large Chicago street art survey at the Chicago Cultural Center. In 2016-2018, his work was prominently featured in the Netflix original series “Easy.”

About CANVAS Chicago

CANVAS Chicago is a creative production and marketing company that concepts, develops, funds, and executes art-forward public initiatives and immersive event experiences that bring together innovative creatives and producers and push the threshold of what is possible in this field in Chicago and beyond. CANVAS’ consulting studio also works with clients on creative event production, digital design, and growth marketing initiatives. CANVAS has coordinated immersive events and experiences for the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Sciences, EXPO Chicago, Art Basel, Rolling Stone Magazine, Red Bull, and many more.

Tim Kash Interviews Saweetie

“Tap In” and “My Type” Rapper, Saweetie, sits down with Tim Kash and discusses her upcoming album, as well as the current headlines surrounding the speculation of lynchings and how she is involved in the Black Lives Matter movement. Streaming today (6/24) only on Quibi. Watch a preview clip HERE.

“Musicology with Tim Kash” by iHeartRadio is a daily, fast-paced, and colorful collage of must-know information about pop music today. It will highlight everything that is worth talking about in popular music right now, go behind the scenes with artists and dive into why you like the songs you like.

Where to watch Musicology with Tim Kash: Streaming NOW on Quibi