Posts tagged with " Notorious B.I.G."

DMX via shotbyjacques for use by 360 Magazine

DMX Estate Given to Family

DMX‘s ex wife, Tashera Simmons oldest sons , Xavier Simmons, Sean Simmons and Tacoma Simmons have been appointed temporary co-administrators of the estate of Earl “DMX” Simmons pursuant to a decision of the Westchester county Surrogate’s Court today. They will now exclusively manage the affairs of their late father’s estate.  The estate has retained entertainment attorney Ron Sweeney of Ron Sweeney and Company to exclusively handle all entertainment related matters.  Estate Attorney, Herb Nass is the attorney for the Earl “DMX” Simmons estate and the sons as co-administrators..”

When it comes to DMX, a man blessed with a vicious bark of a voice, there is no such thing as half-stepping. Born Earl Simmons in 1970, the Yonkers-raised MC arrived as the physical embodiment of unbridled energy—a one-man distillation of fellow rugged New York acts like Wu-Tang Clan. With the release of his 1998 debut, It’s Dark and Hell Is Hot, DMX wrapped himself in musical aggression that enhanced his imposing presence across songs like the minimal, clanging “Get at Me Dog,” and rowdy breakout “Ruff Ryders’ Anthem.” But X scaled back the pugnacity on that same album’s introspective “How’s It Goin’ Down,” which featured angelic vocals from R&B’s Faith Evans and painted a vivid picture of a complex relationship headed down the wrong path.

DMX would revisit that sensitivity on “Slippin’,” a heart-rending track from 1998’s Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood that found him expressing a desire to live a less tumultuous life. As at odds as the rapper’s two sides may seem to be, he’s always thrived most while letting his emotions fly unrestrained. In 2000, he released ...And Then There Was X, where even the anthemic “Party Up” served as a prime example of DMX’s uniquely intense take on hardcore hip-hop. But whether ferocious, amped up, or introspective, the MC has remained grounded by his faith, which, especially in the later years of his career, he approaches with nothing short of absolute devotion.

Following the deaths of Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.I.G., DMX took over as the undisputed reigning king of hardcore rap. He was that rare commodity: a commercial powerhouse with artistic and street credibility to spare. His rapid ascent to stardom was actually almost a decade in the making, which gave him a chance to develop the theatrical image that made him one of rap’s most distinctive personalities during his heyday. Everything about DMX was unremittingly intense, from his muscular, tattooed physique to his gruff, barking delivery, which made a perfect match for his trademark lyrical obsession with dogs. Plus, there was substance behind the style; much of his work was tied together by a fascination with the split between the sacred and the profane. He could move from spiritual anguish one minute to a narrative about the sins of the streets the next, yet keep it all part of the same complex character, sort of like a hip-hop Johnny Cash. The results were compelling enough to make DMX the first artist ever to have his first four albums enter the charts at number one.

Page Kennedy illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Q×A with Page Kennedy

ACTOR & RAPPER PAGE KENNEDY JOINS 360 MAGAZINE FOR SOME Q&A

By: Heather Skovlund-Reibsamen

Page Kennedy is well known as a rapper and actor within our entertainment industry. Kennedy’s recent acting skills brought him to play “Duck” on Netflix’s “The Upshaws”, one of their newest series to hit streaming platforms starring alongside Kim Fields (Regina Upshaw), Mike Epps (Bennie Upshaw), and Wanda Skyes (Lucretia). He is also known for his roles in “Blue Mountain State”, “Weeds” and his comedic genius skits shared on Instagram and TikTok.

Kennedy’s self-titled album ‘Page’ was released in February 2021 featuring heavyweight rappers Xzibit and Method Man is available now on all streaming platforms – make sure you go check it out!

360 Magazine had the pleasure of interviewing Page Kennedy where we discussed “The Upshaws”, his character ‘Duck’, music, and his fitness journey. We had an amazing conversation about his media roles, the love for Eminem, and also found out that we both favor Cardi B because of the way she represents herself: “Cardi B makes me feel like I know her”, said Kennedy.

Read on to hear about our conversation with Page!

Your Netflix series, “The Upshaws”, came out today- how do you feel about working with it?

PK: I love it, you know I was a part of it, and I still watch the series multiple times. I can’t get tired of it. I can just go to any episode and watch it- it has so many great jokes and the characters are diverse, and they bring their own style, energy and creativity. I think it’s the funniest show on TV.

How is it working with the cast?

PK: Working with the cast is great. You know, you got legends there. You’ve got Kim Fields, the ultimate foremost legend, Mike Epps who is a comic genius, Wanda Skyes- comic genius. They are good people, and everybody is happy to be here, so it makes it fun.

Do you feel that you have any similar traits to your character Duck within yourself?

PK: I’ve been asked that question and, let me see, I look at Duck as a different character than what I typically play. The only similarity that I see between me and Duck is his loyalty. He is loyal to a fault. You know, he spent 7-10 years in jail where he could have gotten less time where he could have ratted out his friend who could have been his co-defendant, but he just took it. I think I have a loyalty like Duck. Other than that, he’s a little different than me.

Let’s talk about your latest album. How did you feel about the creative direction within the videos for “Fear” and “Safe”? How did you work through the process of such a real and raw album?

PK: I wanted to make use of all of my talents to create an art- that was my goal. My goal was to take the amalgamation of talents that I have to coalesce to create art that could be ubiquitous forever. You know, that’s what I feel I accomplished because things are great 20 years from now and it’s still going to be great. You can still listen to Biggie because it’s incredible, it’s timeless and that’s what I wanted to do. I feel like I accomplished that.

Can you tell us about the song “Shine”?

PK: I think that the album needed some respite because it’s very heavy and after you listen to Fear and Safe, it’s so cumbersome that you need some respite. And so that’s what Shine provides. It still takes a look at how difficult 2019 was personally for me and then 2020 was for everyone. The face of darkness, there is light after, and I wanted to show that the Devil will not take that light away. We will shine.

Can you tell us about your album cover?

PK: The cover of the album is confluence of tragic incident of black Americans who have had their lives taken from them at the hands of police brutality. That confluence is to show that they are me. You know, they all make up me; I am the same as them and so I wanted to, through me, show them. Wait until you get to the song “Flowers”, that is my favorite song on the album.

At the end of some of your videos, there is mention of voting- what are you trying to show viewers?

PK: So, creating Fear was so I could galvanize the troops to go vote because we can’t just yell from the rafters “We are being disrespected”, “We are being overlooked”. We have to actually get in the dirt and, you know, do things that cause change. Our biggest voice was our vote. The virality of those videos was to have the embolism of to vote throughout the video. To help people want to get out and vote after they see the deleterious effects of what fear can do on both sides so that’s why you see that throughout the videos.

Let’s talk about your fitness journey. What motivated you to get started?

PK: I got tired of looking at myself in movies and TV fat as hell and I was more attractive in my head than I was externally, so I wanted to match that.

So, there’s a lot of excuses that I think many people use such as “I can’t afford to go to the gym” or “I hurt too much to do this”. How did you push past your own excuses?

PK: I have an additive personality so once I get into something, I’m locked in and I got my mind right and ready. I had help, a tool to help me out with the point of why I was overweight which was my addiction to food. And so, I got gastro sleeve surgery which made my stomach smaller so that I couldn’t overeat. That helped. That was like the catalyst to help me and the working out thing- I already had that down. I had challenges where I would workout 100 straight days and another challenge where I went a straight year of working out without missing any days. My mind was already set to go to the gym, I just needed to get the food stuff right.

Do you still workout consistently?

PK: Yep, I’m still in it. Even when the gyms were closed, I found a way to get the workout in.

What advice would you offer somebody as far as starting out on their journey? If they were with you and undecided about their journey because of lack of motivation.

PK: I would say to make it something that is a part of your daily life that you don’t have a choice of. You don’t have a choice if you need to go to the bathroom or not, you don’t have a choice whether you like eating or not. These are things that must happen regardless of what you want or not. So, if you make the gym or workout a part of that, you take the lack of motivation away. We can have things taken away for us and see how resilient we could be. If you’re in jail or in a weight loss camp or anywhere that caused your free will to be taken away and you are forced to do something, you can do it because you have to. So why have to be in a situation where some other exterior force forces you to when you have a mind and brain that is going to be the thing to make you do it anyway.

Do you have a specific meal plan?

PK: Sometimes, yes. I go in spurts. Some weeks I have no carbs and no sugar. Then some weeks I am a little looser. I just try to be moderate because I could easily go really far one way or really far the other way. It’s not until I’m actually preparing for something that I go super crazy. Other than that, I just try and stay in striking range.

Do you allow yourself to have treats?

PK: Yep, probably more than I should.

What kind of workouts do you do?

PK: Well, when I get off the phone with you, I have a trainer, so I am going to the gym. Wednesday is leg day, which sucks. I work out with a trainer 3-4 days a week and then two other days I have an Oculus virtual reality thing that I do a supernatural workout on or I ride my bike for 20 miles to the beach on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Is there anything else that you’d like to talk about or anything that you’d like to share with our readers?

PK: I just want them to the importance of the album “Page” and how it’s important to everyone in the world right to be aware of everything that happening right now and everything that’s going on. And that if this album was released by a bigger artist, it would be a Grammy-nominated type of album – that’s how important this album is. I just implore everyone to continue to listen to it and check it out because I think it’s necessary. That’s the main thing that I want- and watch “The Upshaws” on Netflix streaming now.

DMX illustration by Heather Skovlund (Photo Credit Jonathan Mannion) for 360 Magazine

DMX

Official Statements from DMX’s Family & White Plains Hospital

“We are deeply saddened to announce today that our loved one, DMX, birth name of Earl Simmons, passed away at 50-years-old at White Plains Hospital with his family by his side after being placed on life support for the past few days. Earl was a warrior who fought till the very end. He loved his family with all of his heart, and we cherish the times we spent with him. Earl’s music inspired countless fans across the world and his iconic legacy will live on forever. We appreciate all of the love and support during this incredibly difficult time. Please respect our privacy as we grieve the loss of our brother, father, uncle and the man the world knew as DMX. We will share information about his memorial service once details are finalized.” – Earl “DMX” Simmons’ Family

“White Plains Hospital extends its deepest condolences to the family of Mr. Simmons, as well as his friends and legions of fans who expressed their unwavering support during this difficult time. Earl Simmons passed away peacefully with family present after suffering a catastrophic cardiac arrest.”   

When it comes to DMX, a man blessed with a vicious bark of a voice, there is no such thing as half-stepping. Born Earl Simmons in 1970, the Yonkers-raised MC arrived as the physical embodiment of unbridled energy—a one-man distillation of fellow rugged New York acts like Wu-Tang Clan. With the release of his 1998 debut, It’s Dark and Hell Is Hot, DMX wrapped himself in musical aggression that enhanced his imposing presence across songs like the minimal, clanging “Get at Me Dog” and rowdy breakout “Ruff Ryders’ Anthem.” But X scaled back the pugnacity on that same album’s introspective “How’s It Goin’ Down,” which featured angelic vocals from R&B’s Faith Evans and painted a vivid picture of a complex relationship headed down the wrong path. DMX would revisit that sensitivity on “Slippin’,” a heart-rending track from 1998’s Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood that found him expressing a desire to live a less tumultuous life. As at odds as the rapper’s two sides may seem to be, he’s always thrived most while letting his emotions fly unrestrained. In 2000, he released …And Then There Was X, where even the anthemic “Party Up” served as a prime example of DMX’s uniquely intense take on hardcore hip-hop. But whether ferocious, amped up, or introspective, the MC has remained grounded by his faith, which, especially in the later years of his career, he approaches with nothing short of absolute devotion.

Following the deaths of Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.I.G., DMX took over as the undisputed reigning king of hardcore rap. He was that rare commodity: a commercial powerhouse with artistic and street credibility to spare. His rapid ascent to stardom was actually almost a decade in the making, which gave him a chance to develop the theatrical image that made him one of rap’s most distinctive personalities during his heyday. Everything about DMX was unremittingly intense, from his muscular, tattooed physique to his gruff, barking delivery, which made a perfect match for his trademark lyrical obsession with dogs. Plus, there was substance behind the style; much of his work was tied together by a fascination with the split between the sacred and the profane. He could move from spiritual anguish one minute to a narrative about the sins of the streets the next yet keep it all part of the same complex character, sort of like a hip-hop Johnny Cash. The results were compelling enough to make DMX the first artist ever to have his first four albums enter the charts at number one.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Mannion

Photo credit: Jonathan Mannion

Fuse celebrates “Hip-Hop at 45”

The Thursday, June 28th launch lineup:

  • Fuse.tv will premiere three all new episodes of Rant & Rave featuring two of the hottest ladies in the rap game today, Young M.A and Snow tha Product as well as hip-hop royalty, Salt-N-Pepa. A fresh episode of Lie Detector with hip-hop legends DJ Skribble & Kid Capri follows along with a brand new episode of the ASMR-triggering, digital series Mind Massage with Tierra Whack.
  • FM @ 8 p.m. ET The Artists to Watch weekly block celebrates the future of hip-hop, spotlighting the freshest up-and-coming artists making waves in the industry, both today and tomorrow such as Trippie Redd, Sango, and HoodCelebrityy.
  • Fuse @ 9 p.m. ET It’s a triple-hitter movie night, beginning with the classics Torque, Rhyme & Reason, and I Got The Hook Up starring hip-hop greats including Ice Cube, Master P, Sean ‘Diddy’ Combs, and Lauryn Hill, among others. Additional featured movies throughout the summer are top lined by bevy of hip-hop star power including Jay Z, Nas, Kanye West, Snoop Dogg, Dr. Dre, Method Man, Redman, Cam’ron, Trey Songz, T.I., Chris Brown, Ja Rule, and more.
  • Across all Fuse social channels, Hip-Hop at 45 launches with the biggest “beefs” in hip-hop, and a “Today in Hip-Hop history” #TBT. Featured social content rollout includes “Hip-Hop + album/street art” on Mondays, “Fashion in Hip-Hop” on Tuesdays, “Women in Hip-Hop“ #WCW on Wednesdays, “Hip-Hop playlists by the decade” on Fridays, “Photography in Hip-Hop” on Saturdays, and “Sports + Hip-Hop” on Sundays.

This lineup also includes:

  • Fuse.tv debut special 45th Anniversary-themed episodes of Weekly News Rap, the original digital series recapping the week’s hottest news and trends, performed by today’s emerging rap stars, kicking off with Harlem battle rapper, Loaded Lux, spitting the history of battle rap. And we’ll have A Seat With… rap legend Big Daddy Kane. Also debuting during Hip-Hop at 45 is Made from Scratch with Ayo & Teo. Additionally, Fuse.tv will celebrate Hip-Hop at 45 with the premieres of two original digital series: Deep Cuts (working title), an interview series delivering an intimate look into the lives and creative process of emerging and established producers in the hip-hop industry; and The Kickback (working title), a roundtable-style digital series exploring hip-hop culture.
  • Every Saturday at 6p ET/3p PT throughout the 45 days, FM will offer a series of Hip-Hop at 45 video countdowns, celebrating the latest and greatest hip-hop artists in the game. Featured music video blocks:45 Legends of Hip-Hop, will lace you with the classic videos from the legends that paved the way in hip-hop such as The Notorious B.I.G., 2Pac and Big Pun; Hip-Hop’s First Hits drops the music videos that made you fall in love with some of your favorite hip-hop artists including 50 Cent’s “In Da Club,” Eminem’s “Slim Shady,” Kanye West’s “Through the Wire” and more; 45 Freshman of Hip-Hop gets you acquainted with the freshman class of hip-hop stars like Flatbush Zombies, Lil Uzi Vert, and Goldlink who are making waves in the culture; 45 Videos of the 2000s drops it like it’s hot with the best music videos of the 2000s from Snoop Dogg, 50 Cent, Outkast, and UGK; Iconic Hip-Hop Videos flashes back to the most iconic hip-hop videos of all time such as 2Pac’s “Changes”, NWA’s “Straight Outta Compton” and Nas’ “If I Ruled the World”; 45 Hip-Hop Crossovers highlights some of the most unlikely collabs in hip-hop like Aerosmith’s “Walk This Way,” Lincoln Park’s “Numb,” and Marshmello’s “Silence”; and FM’s Guide to the 45 Best Hip-Hop Videos will school you on the best hip-hop videos of all time including The Notorious B.I.G. “Juicy,” Childish Gambino’s “This Is America,” and Missy Elliot’s “Work It.”
  • Tune in to Fuse for a four-night event beginning Sunday, August 5th, for the television premiere of Hip-Hop Evolution. This docu-series chronicles the life and career of hip-hop pioneers such as Kool Herc, Afrika Bambaataa, Grandmaster Flash, Melle Mel, Grandmaster Caz, DJ Jazzy Jay, Kool Moe Dee, Big Daddy Kane, Kurtis Blow, Chuck D, Fab 5 Freddy, Sugarhill Gang, Russell Simmons and LL Cool J, among others through in-depth interviews, archived footage and more. And for the duration of the stunt, Fuse will be commemorating with featured episodes starring a lineup of hip-hop all-stars with guest appearances on Moesha (Jamie Foxx, Russell Simmons, A Tribe Called Quest, Usher Raymond, Mary J. Blige, and Dr. Dre); Sister, Sister (Mya, Tyrese, and BlackStreet); and The Parkers (Warren G, Nick Cannon, and Lil’ Kim).

Fuse’s Hip Hop at 45 programming:

http://www.fuse.tv/shows/hip-hop-at-45

New episode of Lie Detector featuring DJ Skribble and Kid Capri:

http://www.fuse.tv/videos/2018/06/dj-skribble-kid-capri-hip-hip-at-45-lie-detector-interview

New episode of Rant & Rave featuring Snow tha Product:

http://www.fuse.tv/videos/2018/06/snow-tha-product-hip-hop-at-45-rant-and-rave-interview

New episode of Rant & Rave featuring Salt-N-Pepa:

http://www.fuse.tv/videos/2018/06/salt-n-pepa-hip-hop-at-45-rant-and-rave-interview

New episode of Rant & Rave featuring Young M.A:

http://www.fuse.tv/videos/2018/06/young-ma-hip-hop-at-45-rant-and-rave-interview