Posts tagged with "influential"

Page Kennedy illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Q×A with Page Kennedy

ACTOR & RAPPER PAGE KENNEDY JOINS 360 MAGAZINE FOR SOME Q&A

By: Heather Skovlund-Reibsamen

Page Kennedy is well known as a rapper and actor within our entertainment industry. Kennedy’s recent acting skills brought him to play “Duck” on Netflix’s “The Upshaws”, one of their newest series to hit streaming platforms starring alongside Kim Fields (Regina Upshaw), Mike Epps (Bennie Upshaw), and Wanda Skyes (Lucretia). He is also known for his roles in “Blue Mountain State”, “Weeds” and his comedic genius skits shared on Instagram and TikTok.

Kennedy’s self-titled album ‘Page’ was released in February 2021 featuring heavyweight rappers Xzibit and Method Man is available now on all streaming platforms – make sure you go check it out!

360 Magazine had the pleasure of interviewing Page Kennedy where we discussed “The Upshaws”, his character ‘Duck’, music, and his fitness journey. We had an amazing conversation about his media roles, the love for Eminem, and also found out that we both favor Cardi B because of the way she represents herself: “Cardi B makes me feel like I know her”, said Kennedy.

Read on to hear about our conversation with Page!

Your Netflix series, “The Upshaws”, came out today- how do you feel about working with it?

PK: I love it, you know I was a part of it, and I still watch the series multiple times. I can’t get tired of it. I can just go to any episode and watch it- it has so many great jokes and the characters are diverse, and they bring their own style, energy and creativity. I think it’s the funniest show on TV.

How is it working with the cast?

PK: Working with the cast is great. You know, you got legends there. You’ve got Kim Fields, the ultimate foremost legend, Mike Epps who is a comic genius, Wanda Skyes- comic genius. They are good people, and everybody is happy to be here, so it makes it fun.

Do you feel that you have any similar traits to your character Duck within yourself?

PK: I’ve been asked that question and, let me see, I look at Duck as a different character than what I typically play. The only similarity that I see between me and Duck is his loyalty. He is loyal to a fault. You know, he spent 7-10 years in jail where he could have gotten less time where he could have ratted out his friend who could have been his co-defendant, but he just took it. I think I have a loyalty like Duck. Other than that, he’s a little different than me.

Let’s talk about your latest album. How did you feel about the creative direction within the videos for “Fear” and “Safe”? How did you work through the process of such a real and raw album?

PK: I wanted to make use of all of my talents to create an art- that was my goal. My goal was to take the amalgamation of talents that I have to coalesce to create art that could be ubiquitous forever. You know, that’s what I feel I accomplished because things are great 20 years from now and it’s still going to be great. You can still listen to Biggie because it’s incredible, it’s timeless and that’s what I wanted to do. I feel like I accomplished that.

Can you tell us about the song “Shine”?

PK: I think that the album needed some respite because it’s very heavy and after you listen to Fear and Safe, it’s so cumbersome that you need some respite. And so that’s what Shine provides. It still takes a look at how difficult 2019 was personally for me and then 2020 was for everyone. The face of darkness, there is light after, and I wanted to show that the Devil will not take that light away. We will shine.

Can you tell us about your album cover?

PK: The cover of the album is confluence of tragic incident of black Americans who have had their lives taken from them at the hands of police brutality. That confluence is to show that they are me. You know, they all make up me; I am the same as them and so I wanted to, through me, show them. Wait until you get to the song “Flowers”, that is my favorite song on the album.

At the end of some of your videos, there is mention of voting- what are you trying to show viewers?

PK: So, creating Fear was so I could galvanize the troops to go vote because we can’t just yell from the rafters “We are being disrespected”, “We are being overlooked”. We have to actually get in the dirt and, you know, do things that cause change. Our biggest voice was our vote. The virality of those videos was to have the embolism of to vote throughout the video. To help people want to get out and vote after they see the deleterious effects of what fear can do on both sides so that’s why you see that throughout the videos.

Let’s talk about your fitness journey. What motivated you to get started?

PK: I got tired of looking at myself in movies and TV fat as hell and I was more attractive in my head than I was externally, so I wanted to match that.

So, there’s a lot of excuses that I think many people use such as “I can’t afford to go to the gym” or “I hurt too much to do this”. How did you push past your own excuses?

PK: I have an additive personality so once I get into something, I’m locked in and I got my mind right and ready. I had help, a tool to help me out with the point of why I was overweight which was my addiction to food. And so, I got gastro sleeve surgery which made my stomach smaller so that I couldn’t overeat. That helped. That was like the catalyst to help me and the working out thing- I already had that down. I had challenges where I would workout 100 straight days and another challenge where I went a straight year of working out without missing any days. My mind was already set to go to the gym, I just needed to get the food stuff right.

Do you still workout consistently?

PK: Yep, I’m still in it. Even when the gyms were closed, I found a way to get the workout in.

What advice would you offer somebody as far as starting out on their journey? If they were with you and undecided about their journey because of lack of motivation.

PK: I would say to make it something that is a part of your daily life that you don’t have a choice of. You don’t have a choice if you need to go to the bathroom or not, you don’t have a choice whether you like eating or not. These are things that must happen regardless of what you want or not. So, if you make the gym or workout a part of that, you take the lack of motivation away. We can have things taken away for us and see how resilient we could be. If you’re in jail or in a weight loss camp or anywhere that caused your free will to be taken away and you are forced to do something, you can do it because you have to. So why have to be in a situation where some other exterior force forces you to when you have a mind and brain that is going to be the thing to make you do it anyway.

Do you have a specific meal plan?

PK: Sometimes, yes. I go in spurts. Some weeks I have no carbs and no sugar. Then some weeks I am a little looser. I just try to be moderate because I could easily go really far one way or really far the other way. It’s not until I’m actually preparing for something that I go super crazy. Other than that, I just try and stay in striking range.

Do you allow yourself to have treats?

PK: Yep, probably more than I should.

What kind of workouts do you do?

PK: Well, when I get off the phone with you, I have a trainer, so I am going to the gym. Wednesday is leg day, which sucks. I work out with a trainer 3-4 days a week and then two other days I have an Oculus virtual reality thing that I do a supernatural workout on or I ride my bike for 20 miles to the beach on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Is there anything else that you’d like to talk about or anything that you’d like to share with our readers?

PK: I just want them to the importance of the album “Page” and how it’s important to everyone in the world right to be aware of everything that happening right now and everything that’s going on. And that if this album was released by a bigger artist, it would be a Grammy-nominated type of album – that’s how important this album is. I just implore everyone to continue to listen to it and check it out because I think it’s necessary. That’s the main thing that I want- and watch “The Upshaws” on Netflix streaming now.

Film Premiere illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Twenty Pearls Premiere

COMCAST ANNOUNCES EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE OF
TWENTY PEARLS – A DOCUMENTARY EXAMINING THE STORIED HISTORY OF ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA SORORITY, INCORPORATED – ON ITS NEWLY LAUNCHED BLACK EXPERIENCE ON XFINITY CHANNEL

Comcast NBCUniversal is excited to announce the exclusive premiere of the documentary film “Twenty Pearls: The Story of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated”, arriving Friday, March 26 on its newly launched Black Experience on Xfinity Channel, available on X1, Flex, and on-the-go with the Xfinity Stream app.

From award-winning filmmaker Deborah Riley Draper, produced by Coffee Bluff Pictures, and narrated by Phylicia Rashād, Twenty Pearls closely examines the founding and legacy of the first Black sorority, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, which is now regarded as one of the most significant and influential Black organizations in historyThe documentary tells a powerful story of sisterhood. In 1908, nine Black women enrolled at Howard University made one decision that would change the course of history. These college students created Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated. For over 113 years, the sorority has influenced many of the most famous watershed moments in history.

Through narration, interviews, and rarely seen archival materials, the audience will see the sorority’s impact on World War II, NASA, Civil Rights, Women’s Rights, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) culminating in the historic election of America’s first Black and South Asian woman Vice President. Twenty Pearls features interviews with members of the sorority including Vice President Kamala HarrisMiss Universe Ireland 2019 Fionnghuala O’ReillySmithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch III, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt Fierst, great-granddaughter of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, International President and CEO of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated Dr. Glenda Glover and many more.

 
Watch the Twenty Pearls trailer hereTrailer
 

“This is an extraordinary time to look back at our past to serve our future,” added filmmaker Deborah Riley Draper. “A future where Black women are centered. Helming this documentary love letter to the founders of Alpha Kappa Alpha, the generations of women that followed in their footsteps, and to all Black women everywhere is an honor. This is an important history for all of us to know and understand.”

“We’re thrilled to work with award-winning filmmaker, Deborah Riley Draper, and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to bring this exclusive premiere to the Black Experience on Xfinity channel, furthering our company-wide mission of investing in and showcasing authentic Black stories and culture,” said Keesha Boyd, Executive Director, Multicultural Video & Entertainment, Xfinity Consumer Services. “We launched this channel to help facilitate the discovery of stories like Twenty Pearls while providing a platform for emerging Black content creators.”

“Telling our own story is essential to preserving our history and uplifting the culture,” said Alpha Kappa Alpha International President and CEO Dr. Glenda Glover. “Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated’s remarkable 113-year journey which began on the campus of Howard University is punctuated by stories of history makers, ceiling breakers, public servants, and ordinary women who have changed the course of American history.  Through this beautifully written and narrated odyssey, this film highlights in undeniable ways the vision, courage, tenacity, determination, and power of Black women while putting to bed the age-old questions about the relevance of Historically Black Colleges and Universities and the Divine Nine sororities and fraternities.”

Black Experience on Xfinity is a first-of-its-kind destination of Black entertainment, movies, TV shows, news, and more. It features high-quality content from many of Xfinity’s existing network partners, at no additional cost, while investing millions of dollars in fostering and showcasing emerging Black content creators. The channel is the only one of its kind endorsed by the African American Film Critics Association (AAFCA), the world’s largest group of Black film critics that gives annual awards for excellence in film and television. Available at home on Xfinity X1 and Flex, and on-the-go with the Xfinity Stream app, the Black Experience on Xfinity will entertain, educate and uplift, featuring Black actors, writers, producers and directors. At home, Xfinity subscribers can visit channel 1622 or simply say “Black Experience” into the Voice Remote to instantly enjoy the ultimate in Black storytelling.

Visit Xfinity to learn more about the Black Experience on Xfinity and other Black programming available on X1, Flex, and the Xfinity Stream app. Visit Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated to learn more about Twenty Pearls, which premieres on March 26 on Xfinity and is free for subscribers, and will be available nationwide, on-demand, starting on March 30, 2021.

Emmett Till illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Emmett Till × Mamie Till Mobley

National Trust Partners’ Advocacy Leads to Roberts Temple: Emmett Till and Mamie Till Mobley Senate Bill

Sen. Tammy Duckworth introduced a bill with Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL), Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ), and Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS) as co-sponsors to establish Chicago’s Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ as a National Monument. The move would offer the highest level of federal support for the church and would ensure that the National Park Service will preserve, protect, and interpret its powerful impact on American civil rights history for generations to come. Civil rights activist Mamie Till Mobley was a member of Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ, and the church played a historic role in the funeral of Emmett Till, her fourteen-year-old son killed on August 28, 1955, during a visit with relatives in Money, Mississippi.

Rather than cover up the brutality of the murder, Mobley bravely decided to hold an open casket funeral at Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ so people could witness the bitter consequences of racism. When tens of thousands of people came to view young Till’s mangled body from September 3-6, 1955, and photographs of his mangled face were published in journals around the country, it ignited the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s, similar to the way George Floyd’s death has impacted movements today. TIME magazine named a photo of the Till funeral one of the 100 most influential images of all time.

Last year, the National Trust for Historic Preservation placed Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ on its 11 Most Endangered Historic Places list, recognizing its groundbreaking significance and the need to restore and preserve the site. Support has continued through Trust grants and technical assistance as well as through advocacy to gain federal support to maintain the site. The Trust has partnered in this work with members of the Till and Roberts families, The Emmett Till Interpretive Center, the National Parks Conservation Association, Latham & Watkins LLP pro bono program, and other interests committed to the longevity of this historic landmark. Efforts are also ensuing to obtain National Park status for Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ, as well as for important sites linked to Emmett Till in Mississippi.

“The Roberts Temple Church is both extraordinarily and heartbreakingly important to Chicago, our state, and to our country’s history,” Sen. Tammy Duckworth said. “It’s time we recognize how historic sites can not only teach us about our history – but provoke us to build a more just future. By designating this church a historic site, we will help ensure that this awful chapter is not erased and that generations of Americans to come can show respect to Mamie and Emmett’s stories.”

The National Trust’s Chief Preservation Officer Katherine Malone-France said, “Our nation will benefit tremendously when Roberts Temple is designated a National Monument, lifting up its profoundly important role in American history. It is imperative that our country appropriately honors the site of Emmett Till’s funeral and of Mamie Till Mobley’s remarkable courage. We are honored to support the Roberts Temple congregation, the Till family, and the local community as they advance this designation and determine how to carry forward the legacies of this powerful place, as a unit of the National Park system.”

Reverend Wheeler Parker, who witnessed his cousin Emmett’s abduction in 1955, and his wife, Dr. Marvel McCain Parker, said, “We are grateful for the introduction of legislation to preserve the legacy of Emmett Till and Mamie Till Mobley by making Roberts Temple a National Monument, which will help to fulfill Mamie’s request for my wife and I to continue her work to ensure her son’s death was not in vain.”

Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ was founded in 1916 and is known as the “mother of all of the Churches of God in Christ in Illinois.” With its founding, it became a central place of worship and political organizing for many who migrated to Chicago from the South during the early 20th Century.

Today, the building remains in use by the Church of God in Christ denomination, now led by Elder Cleven Wardlow who said, “On behalf of the congregants of Roberts Temple and members of the Roberts Family, we strongly support this endeavor as well as the ongoing efforts by racial justice and preservation organizations to obtain federal protection for Roberts Temple.”

Patrick Weems, Executive Director of the Emmett Till Interpretive Center stated, “What took place at Roberts Temple changed the world. We commend the Roberts Temple congregation, the Roberts and Till families, especially Rev. Wheeler Parker, Jr., Dr. Marvel McCain Parker, and Ollie Gordon for their commitment to telling the truth, and we want to thank Senator Duckworth for her leadership in bringing forth this legislation.”

“The time for turning away from this painful chapter in American history is long over” stated Alan Spears, Senior Director for Cultural Resources. “The National Parks Conservation Association applauds Senator Duckworth for introducing this very significant piece of legislation commemorating the legacies of Emmett Till and Mamie Till Mobley.”
For more information on the campaign to designate the Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ National Monument visit their website.

Szemui ho, 360 MAGAZINE, illustration, tennis

Is Serena Williams the most influential sportswoman ever? 

There are few things that magazines, websites and blogs like better than a good “who or what is the greatest” article. It gives writers the chance to inflict their opinions on others and inevitably provokes controversy and debate as readers chip in as to how the Ferrari Testarossa is a better supercar than the Lamborghini Diablo or why Daniel Craig will never be as good a James Bond as Sean Connery. 


When it comes to sport, the debate ratchets up a notch. Comparing the top achievers from different sports is difficult enough, but when you are also talking about different eras, it becomes an exercise in the futile. Still, even in a top ten in no particular order, there are certain names you are certain to see. These might include Joe Montana, Pele, Usain Bolt, Michael Schumacher, Tiger Woods, Roger Federer, Mohammed Ali and Michael Jordan to name just a few. 

Different people from different eras with very little in common, right? Well, not exactly. Look at that list again and there is one fundamental thing they all share. In short, there’s a complete absence of female representation. In some ways, that is not surprising, not because women are any less talented in sport but because, for so many years, women’s sport has lagged behind the men in terms of spectator support, media coverage and funding. You need only look at the pay gaps between the top male and female players to see it. In soccer, for example, the top male player earns around 100 times more than his female counterpart, while in boxing, the difference between Saul Alvarez and Katie Taylor’s top pay days is a factor of almost 1000.

Yet there is one sport in which the divide, while still present, is far less pronounced. Over recent years, women’s tennis has attracted higher viewing figures than the men’s game. In part, that’s due to the nature of the serve producing fewer aces, more rallies and therefore a better spectacle. But it is also due to the pioneering and inspirational nature of one woman who has been at the top of the game for two decades and fully deserves a place on any all time list you can think of. 

A legend of the game

Before we even consider anything else, let’s look at Serena Williams in purely sporting terms. Having turned pro at the age of 15, she has been on the professional tour since October 1995, almost a quarter of a century. Tennis players of either sex typically peak in their mid to late 20s and are past their best at 30, yet at age 38, Serena is still ranked in the top 10. 

To put it bluntly, Serena has owned women’s tennis for two decades, and you have to feel a little sorry for other pros who have been unfortunate enough to be on the circuit in the Serena era. There are only two other players that have managed to grasp the number one spot more than twice during Serena’s dominance. One is Kim Clijsters and the other Maria Sharapova. 

The latter seemed set to embark on a period of her own domination, yet over a 16 year period, Sharapova has won only three of her 23 professional encounters with Williams. Indeed, aside from one walkover last year when Williams had to pull out of the French Open, it’s been an incredible 15 years since Sharapova last beat Williams at the JP Morgan Chase Open in 2004 – that’s a run of 19 defeats for the Russian.

As for out and out victories, Serena is also comfortably at the top of the pile. By winning the Australian Open in 2017, she took her grand slam tally to 23 to go one ahead of Steffi Graf. Not only was she 35 years of age, but it later emerged that she was eight to nine weeks pregnant at the time. Her record also puts her comfortably ahead of the most successful male tennis star, Roger Federer, who has 20 grand slam titles to his name. 

Overcoming adversity

Achieving greatness in sport, or in any discipline, often takes more than skill and talent, however. It is this extra factor that catapults Serena to more than just a sporting legend and makes her an inspiration to girls and women across the globe. 

Beating the opposition is one thing, but when your fiercest rival also happens to be your big sister, it adds a whole new dimension. Yet Serena and Venus’ dominance did not go down well in all circles. Until they arrived on the scene there was an embarrassing lack of non-white pros on the circuit, male or female, and both faced both casual and sometimes overt racial abuse on their journey to the top. 

This culminated in the India Wells fiasco in 2001, when Venus withdrew from the semi final at short notice, citing a knee injury, to effectively allow her sister a free pass to the final. Media speculation that this had been orchestrated by Venus and Serena’s father Richard Williams led to booing from the crowd that took on ugly racist overtones. As recently as this year, the racial slurs have continued, including some outrageously obnoxious comments from a Romanian TV presenter.

Both sisters’ determination to inject their own style into their tennis has also attracted criticism. Their choice of clothing and accessories that added expression to the somewhat staid world of tennis whites resulted in frequent and very personal attacks from media commentators. 

21st century influencer

As well as coming through this adversity with a world leading record and her head held high, Serena’s determination to do things her way has also earned her place as one of the biggest style icons to emerge from the world of sport. 

On top of her many sponsorship and endorsement deals, both Puma and Nike have released special product lines bearing her name. In 2004, Serena released her own jewelry brand, Aneres, and last year, she launched the Serena clothing line. 

Yet her influence goes way beyond fashion. Serena has proved that anything is possible. Even now, in the twilight of her career, she shows that same determination that has been core to her success, and this is what makes her one of the most influential women of our generation. 

GOO GOO DOLLS “BOXES”

GOO GOO DOLLS RELEASE
“BOXES (ACOUSTIC)” TODAY

AVAILABLE ON ALL DIGITAL RETAILERS HERE


Yesterday, multi-platinum, Grammy-nominated band Goo Goo Dolls release their single, “Boxes (Acoustic)“. On Thursday, the band announced a special free download of the song ahead of it’s official release saying, “Hey, Goo Goo Dolls fans! We are giving you the chance to download our new single ‘Boxes (Acoustic)’ today for FREE as a special gift and thank you to all of you!” The single is now available for purchase or stream on all digital retailers HERE

Thursday, Goo Goo Dolls made an appearance in Macy’s 91st Annual Thanksgiving Day Parade. The band rode on the King Hawaiian float and performed their song “So Alive“, which was recently featured in a BMW National TV Spot, to an audience of over 22 million viewers worldwide. 

About Goo Goo Dolls
The multi-platinum, Grammy-nominated Goo Goo Dolls are one of the most globally respected and influential forces in popular music, selling more than 12 million albums since 1986. They have scored 14 Top 10 radio hits (more than any other artist in the history of the Hot AC format), including “Name,” “Slide,” and “Iris,” the latter spending nearly 12 straight months on the Billboard charts and holding the No. 1 position for 17 consecutive weeks. The band has toured the globe countless times, performed in front of millions of fans, received numerous awards (including four Grammy nominations), and recorded and released 11 studio albums, including 2016’s Boxes. Rzeznik has also been honored with the Songwriters Hall of Fame Hal David Starlight Award.

PRINCE

The Prince Estate, alongside Pantone Color Institute™, the global color authority, announced today the creation of a standardized custom color to represent and honor international icon, Prince. The (naturally) purple hue, represented by his “Love Symbol #2” was inspired by his custom-made Yamaha purple piano, which was originally scheduled to go on tour with the performer before his untimely passing at the age of 57. The color pays tribute to Prince’s indelible mark on music, art, fashion and culture. The announcement was first made on Refinery29, read here

Prince’s association with the color purple was galvanized in 1984 with the release of the film Purple Rain, along with its Academy Award-winning soundtrack featuring the eponymous song. While the spectrum of the color purple will still be used in respect to the “Purple One,” Love Symbol #2, will be the official color across the brand he left behind.

 
“The color purple was synonymous with who Prince was and will always be. This is an incredible way for his legacy to live on forever,” said Troy Carter, Entertainment Advisor to Prince’s Estate.

 
The ‘Purple One’ made a statement and challenged cultural norms through both his well-known music and personal style. In addition to the Oscar, Prince won seven Grammy Awards and a Golden Globe Award for Purple Rain. Both “Purple Rain” and “1999” were entered into the Grammy Hall of Fame, and Prince was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004, the very first year he was eligible.

 
Laurie Pressman, Vice President of the Pantone Color Institute said: “We are honored to have worked on the development of Love Symbol #2, a distinctive new purple shade created in memory of Prince, ‘the purple one.’ A musical icon known for his artistic brilliance, Love Symbol #2 is emblematic of Prince’s distinctive style. Long associated with the purple family, Love Symbol #2 enables Prince’s unique purple shade to be consistently replicated and maintain the same iconic status as the man himself.”

 
The Estate is in conversation with various partners about collaboration on products that incorporate the custom color.

        

 

About Prince

Prince endures as one of the most important, influential, and impactful artists in history. Selling 100 million records worldwide, he remains one of the best-selling artists of all time. A 2004 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee, he garnered a 1985 Academy Award® in the category of “Best Original Song Score” for the film Purple Rain, a total of seven GRAMMY Awards®, a 2006 Golden Globe Award for “Best Original Song” in Happy Feet, and an American Music Award, among countless other accolades. He holds #27 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 100 Greatest Artists. 1984’s Purple Rain remains a high watermark for Prince, changing the worlds of film and music. Minted Diamond by the RIAA for sales exceeding 13 million, the record stands out as the sixth best-selling soundtrack album in history, moving more than 22 million copies. 

 
Known for his marathon shows, he delivered countless historic performances such as the Super Bowl XLI Halftime Show. Enchanting the modern era, he headlined festivals such as Coachella and Montreux Jazz Festival in addition to selling out arenas and stadiums everywhere. Along the way, he collaborated with everyone from Michael Jackson, James Brown, Beyoncé and Amy Winehouse to Tom Petty, Madonna, and Mary J. Blige. In 2016, Prince passed, but his spirit continued to shine in the hearts and minds of fans worldwide. President Barack Obama lauded his legacy as his music blared from every corner of the globe. Ushering his talent to the forefront of the digital age for a new generation, Warner Bros. Records along with NPG Records re-introduced some of his legendary catalog to streaming platforms in early 2017. 

 

About Pantone Color Institute™

Pantone Color Institute™ is the consulting arm within Pantone that forecasts global color trends, advises companies on color in brand identity and product development, and on color assurance programs.
Through seasonal trend forecasts, color psychology, and custom color consulting, Pantone Color Institute partners with global brands to leverage the power, psychology and emotion of color in their design strategy.

 

About Pantone

Pantone, a wholly owned subsidiary of X-Rite, Incorporated, enables color-critical decisions for brands and manufacturers to ensure the color imagined is the color achieved.

 
Over 10 million designers and producers around the world employ Pantone products and services to communicate through color, and control consistency across various materials and finishes. 

Pantone offers designers, and design-minded consumers, products and services through three unique business divisions: Pantone Standards, which includes digital and physical workflow tools and the revolutionary Pantone color language; trend forecasting, brand identity, and color assurance consulting services through Pantone Color Institute™; and Pantone Lifestyle, the consumer products division that brings color and design together across apparel, home, and accessories.

 
More information is available at www.pantone.com.

 
For the latest news, trends, information and conversations, connect with Pantone on Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

LARSEN THOMPSON ATTENDS BEAUTYCON LOS ANGELES

Larsen Thompson attended the BeautyCon Festival where she served as a special guest speaker on the MODEL BEHAVIOR panel alongside Shaun Ross, Barbie Ferreira (Barbienox) and Khoudia Diop moderated by Ireland Baldwin

WARDROBE CREDITS: 
Dress- Alessandra Rich
Boots- Stuart Weitzman
Jewlery- Leibish
Clutch- Tory Burch

Styled By: Andrew Gelwicks