Posts tagged with "American history"

Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson became the first Black woman to serve upon the highest court of the United States via 360 MAGAZINE

Jackson Makes History

Thursday April 7 will be remembered as one of the most historic days in American history as Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson became the first Black woman confirmed to serve upon the highest court of the United States. In a 53-to-47 vote, Judge Jackson was confirmed a place upon the Supreme Court as nominated by President Joe Biden in February.

Judge Jackson becomes only the eighth person to sit upon the Supreme Court that has not been a White man. The confirmation continues to make history as this will be the firs time that we see four women upon the court and the majority of justices is not White men.

Of the 53 that voted in favor of Biden’s nomination, three Republican senators joined Democrats in support of Judge Jackson. Senators Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Mitt Romney of Utah. Despite Republicans loathing and attempting to prolong the voting process, Judge Jackson was confirmed to replace Justice Stephen Breyer once he officially steps down.

Republican Senator Rand Paul attempted to halt the vote while being the only senator not in attendance for the voting. He stalled the decision from being finalized, and he voted from the cloakroom out of dress code.

When asked about Paul’s lack of dress code for the vote, White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki stated, “I will tell you I’m not spending a lot of time, nor is the president (Joe Biden), thinking about the dress code of Rand Paul today, […] We’re thinking about the historic confirmation of an eminently qualified Black woman to serve on SCOTUS. I’m not really worried about his khakis.”

On April 8, inbound Justice Jackson participated in a ceremony on the lawn of the White House, where she spoke to the weight of the confirmation. The former federal appellate judge spoke to the history that was made the day prior.

Judge Jackson stated, “It has taken 232 years and 115 prior appointments for a Black woman to be selected to serve on the Supreme Court of the United States, but we’ve made it – we’ve made it – all of us, all of us.”

President and Vice President Kamala Harris, the first Black and Asian American woman to hold the title, spoke at the ceremony together while stating, “We’re going to look back and see this as a moment of real change in American history.” 

Judge Jackson referenced the late Maya Angelou, another historic Black woman, when speaking about what this confirmation means to the Black community, while stating, “‘Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave, I am the dream and the hope of the slave,'”

In my family, it took just one generation to go from segregation to the Supreme Court of the United States.”

Let that sink in.

Written by: McKinley Franklin

Motorcycle illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

HD Museum Events

It’s time again for Mama Tried, the indoor invitational motorcycle show that connects motorcycles and builders to fans and riders alike. And the Harley-Davidson Museum is doing its part to keep the fire stoked all winter long by hosting the Mama Tried Official Pre-Party, powered by Budweiser® and Bulleit® Bourbon, which will be taking over MOTOR® Bar and Restaurant on Thursday, March 3. The Boonie Bike World Series will light up the track and your favorite Flat Out Friday racers and Mama Tried Motorcycle Show builders will be a part of the fun. Plus, 88.9 Radio Milwaukee‘s Marcus Doucette will be spinning the tunes that will have the crowd shaking their money makers.

The fun won’t stop when Mama Tried packs it up. Mark your calendars for Thursday, March 17 when the shenanigans reappear at MOTOR® Bar and Restaurant for the St. Patrick’s Day Indoor Bike Night. With live music from the Lil Rev & Will Branch duo, everyone will be enjoying the luck of the Irish.

Please note the H-D Museum™ campus has resumed seven days a week operation.

Programming/Events

Mama Tried Motorcycle Show Official Pre-Party at MOTOR® Bar & Restaurant, March 3, 5 – 9 p.m.

The world’s only Harley-Davidson Museum kicks off the Midwest’s preeminent motorcycle show weekend with the Official Mama Tried Pre-Party, powered by Budweiser® & Bulleit® Bourbon.

The Flat Out Friday Boonie Bike World Series will light up the track outside on Motorcycle Plaza. Rub elbows with Flat Out Friday racers and Mama Tried Motorcycle Show builders inside and outside MOTOR® Bar & Restaurant. Top off the night with music by DJ Marcus Doucette from 88.9 Radio Milwaukee, raffles, outdoor fire pits, Busch Light Bike Night Koozie and Bulleit Cocktail specials all night long. Don’t miss it! Come early and visit the Harley-Davidson Museum from 10 a.m.–5 p.m. H.O.G.® members get in free to the H-D Museum every day. For more information or to purchase H-D Museum™ tickets in advance, click HERE.

Free Shuttles to Mama Tried Motorcycle Show (March 5, 10 AM–6 PM): Two shuttles will loop continuously from the H-D Museum, stop at Fuel Café 5th St. and head to The Rave/Eagles Club on Saturday, March 5 from 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

St. Patrick’s Day Indoor Bike Night, (March 17, 5–9 PM): Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day at MOTOR® Bar & Restaurant where everyone’s Irish and an Indoor Bike Night fan powered by Budweiser® and Bulleit® Bourbon. Live music by LIL REV & WILL BRANCH duo featuring some traditional Irish music, Celtic music plus a mix of blues, bluegrass, roots and rock from two of the top musicians in the industry. Traditional raffles and festive food & drink specials including Busch Light Bike Night Koozie deal and Bulleit Cocktail specials all night long.

Must-See Exhibits and Installations

Keith Brammer (Die Kreuzen) leather jacket: Perhaps no other genre of music is so closely associated with the classic black leather jacket than punk rock. Keith Brammer, of Milwaukee’s hardcore punk band Die Kreuzen, has graciously lent his well-worn leather to the H-D Museum. The jacket was purchased in New York City in the 1980s and was a constant companion for Brammer throughout his touring days. Check out the Custom Culture gallery to view this piece of Milwaukee music history.

Inspiration and Recovery: Wounded Veteran Climbs the Seven Summits: In September 2009, Specialist Benjamin Breckheimer, a Cavalry Scout with the U.S. Army 2nd Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, was severely wounded during a tour in Afghanistan. His rehabilitation was difficult as he endured numerous surgeries. During this same time, the Harley-Davidson Museum regularly sent care packages–including H-D Museum™ flags dotted with well wishes–to active-duty military personnel. Breckheimer took to mountaineering during his recovery and over the summer carried the H-D Museum™ flag to the summit of Denali, the highest point in North America. With that peak reached, Breckheimer became the first and only Purple Heart recipient to reach all the Seven Summits, the highest peaks on each of the seven continents. He continues to climb, and he shares his inspiring story to encourage resiliency and support the mental health of veterans and current service members.

Revolution® Max Engine: The brand-new Revolution® Max 1250cc engine powers a new generation of Harley-Davidson® motorcycles. See the liquid-cooled, 60-degree V-Twin that delivers for the Pan America™ adventure touring model and the performance cruiser Sportster® S motorcycle. On view in the Museum lobby.

Clubs & Competition: In the early part of the 20th century, motorcycle culture was a homegrown phenomenon. It grew out of the passion of riders for their evolving sport. The camaraderie that developed around riding and attending competitive events led to the formation of motorcycle clubs that hosted destination rides, family picnics with motorcycle games and other riding competitions.

Harley Fox: Gail Anderson’s 1986 Softail® Custom motorcycle, “Harley Fox,” built by her partner Bob Burrows, took top prize at the first Ladies of Harley® (LOH) ride-in show during Daytona Beach Bike Week in 1987. With her custom bike and themed riding gear, Anderson presented a striking image that fit the growing visibility and exciting new options for women riders in the 1980s.

Alfonso Sotomayor’s 1957 Model FL: The Harley-Davidson Museum is proud to announce its collection has recently grown with the addition of a 1957 Model FL that was ridden by famed Mexican stunt rider and racer Alfonso Sotomayor Canales.

Harley-Davidson’s history in Mexico dates back to at least 1913. In the 1920s, the brand was more frequently spotted throughout Mexico City as the motorcycles proved popular with the local traffic police who would also perform stunts with their Harley-Davidson® bikes. After racing from the 1930s into the 1960s, Sotomayor launched his own stunt riding career by performing the famed “Salto de la Muerte” or Jump of Death. Learn more about Sotomayor’s feats of derring-do and Harley-Davidson’s early entry into Mexico with this new display located in the Custom Culture area.

“Off-Road Harley-Davidson”: In the decades before America paved its highways, early riders had to be prepared for all sorts of terrain: sand, clay or dirt—and wandering those makeshift byways were Harley-Davidson® motorcycles. It’s called off-road or adventure touring; back then it was just called riding. Since 1903, Harley-Davidson motorcycles proved their toughness by riding over wooded hills, through stone-choked creek beds and up mountain sides. “Off-Road Harley-Davidson” tells the history of motorcycles designed for rough roads, the people who rode them and the adventures they shared.

“Building a Milwaukee Icon: Harley-Davidson’s Juneau Avenue Factory”: A recently recovered cache of architectural drawings includes plans for the original Juneau Avenue facility. The pencil drawings, along with archival photographs, demonstrate the whirlwind pace of the company’s early growth. While building an international business—going from producing just over 1,000 motorcycles in 1909 to manufacturing 27,000 motorcycles in 1920—the company’s Milwaukee factory experienced near-constant expansion. Construction through this relatively brief period created the buildings that today, a century later, are still the proud home of Harley-Davidson.

“Building a Milwaukee Icon” provides a snapshot of Harley-Davidson’s formative years and illustrates a chapter of Milwaukee history when the city was known as the “Machine Shop to the World.”

Hettema via Carla Befera and Company for use by 360 Magazine

Liberation Pavilion

Leading experiential design firm The Hettema Group (THG) will create a new immersive, cinematic experience for The National WWII Museum as part of the upcoming Liberation Pavilion. This project was funded by the third-largest individual gift in the institution’s history—a $7.5 million commitment to help complete the Pavilion and develop the Priddy Family Foundation Freedom Theater—representing a significant milestone toward the completion of the Museum’s $400 million Road to Victory Capital Campaign, thanks to the generosity of the Priddy Family Foundation led by Foundation Chairman and Museum Trustee Robert Priddy and wife, Kikie. 

Led by Phil Hettema, whose father was a WWII fighter pilot, The Hettema Group specializes in uniquely creative, impactful design and production of experiential entertainment. The Hettema Group has a long history with the Museum as the developers of the Solomon Victory Theater’s Beyond All Boundaries 4D experience. While Beyond All Boundaries will continue to serve as the entry point to the visitor experience, the Priddy Family Foundation Freedom Theater production will serve as the capstone experience that Museum guests will walk away with.

“We’re honored to collaborate with The National WWII Museum once again on this highly anticipated expansion,” said Phil Hettema, President and Creative Executive of The Hettema Group. “Our unique and engaging production for the Liberation Pavilion’s Priddy Family Foundation Freedom Theater will highlight how the sacrifices made to defend our freedom during World War II continue to shape us today.”

The third-floor Priddy Family Foundation Freedom Theater will help ensure that the stories of World War II remain relevant for future generations by offering audiences a 20-minute multi-sensory experience focused on the lasting impact of World War II and the ongoing struggle for freedom and human rights. Drawing upon cutting-edge technology to create an immersive, emotional experience, the production will highlight how freedom almost vanished from the world in the 1930s and 1940s, efforts to protect and promote freedom during and after World War II, movements for equality and civil rights in the aftermath of the war, and the nation’s role in the postwar global order. Powerful, original visuals will be projected throughout the show, and at a pivotal moment, the theater audience platform itself will rotate. The memorable, thought-provoking experience will highlight the importance and fragility of freedom while making the sacrifices of World War II profoundly relevant today.

Liberation Pavilion, which is expected to open in late spring 2023, will explore the end of the war, the Holocaust, the immediate postwar years, and the war’s continuing impact today. The pavilion will house two floors of exhibit space featuring personal experiences, iconic imagery, impactful artifacts, and immersive settings.

“The Museum is deeply grateful to Robert, Kikie, and the Priddy Family Foundation for their leadership, generosity, and dedication to preserving the voices and legacies of the WWII generation,” said Stephen J. Watson, Museum President & CEO. “Our mission is becoming even more critical as those who served in World War II pass away, and it is our responsibility to ensure that future generations understand the lasting impact of their sacrifice. The transformative gift to underwrite the Priddy Family Foundation Freedom Theater will enable us to complete our campus expansion plans in 2023 with the opening of the Liberation Pavilion, highlighting what World War II means today and the ongoing struggle to preserve freedom.”

A longtime supporter of The National WWII Museum, The Priddy Family Foundation previously named the US Navy flag on the campus’s Founders Plaza and supported the Museum’s oral history digitization efforts in honor of their family’s WWII service. Robert’s father, Clarence Nathern Priddy, was a Pharmacist’s Mate First Class on the USS Colorado, and Kikie’s father, Edward Hughes Fitzpatrick, served with the Navy Seabees. While the Foundation’s previous gift honored their family’s history of service, the $7.5 million commitment to underwrite the Priddy Family Foundation Freedom Theater reflects their dedication to ensuring that future audiences of all ages will continue to be inspired by the values and legacies of the WWII era.

“We believe that the Greatest Generation embodies American strength and values, and we are committed to supporting the Museum in their efforts to recognize the sacrifices of this generation and to inspire all people to embrace the lessons of this global conflict,” Robert said. “The importance of these lessons, and their relevance for today and the future, inspired us to take a leadership role in the funding of the Liberation Pavilion by underwriting the Priddy Family Foundation Freedom Theater. We hope that the central theme of human freedom and the exploration of ‘what World War II means today’ will inspire all who see it to reflect on the meaning of freedom and their role in preserving it.”

The Priddy Family Foundation Freedom Theater is being developed by The Hettema Group based in Pasadena, California. Led by Phil Hettema, whose father was a WWII fighter pilot, The Hettema Group specializes in uniquely creative, impactful design and production of experiential entertainment. The Hettema Group has a long history with the Museum as the developers of the Solomon Victory Theater’s Beyond All Boundaries 4D experience. While Beyond All Boundaries will continue to serve as the entry point to the visitor experience, the Priddy Family Foundation Freedom Theater production will serve as the capstone experience that Museum guests will walk away with.

“We’re honored to collaborate with The National WWII Museum once again on this highly anticipated expansion,” said Phil Hettema, President and Creative Executive of The Hettema Group. “Our unique and engaging production for the Liberation Pavilion’s Priddy Family Foundation Freedom Theater will highlight how the sacrifices made to defend our freedom during World War II continue to shape us today.”

Prior to the theater experience, visitors will learn about the end of World War II and the immediate postwar years through the Liberation Pavilion’s first-floor galleries, honoring those Americans who were killed or wounded as well as the immense sacrifices of an entire generation. In addition to exhibits examining the horrors of the Holocaust and moments of liberation, the floor will also include an interfaith chapel to provide a quiet space for contemplation and a gallery highlighting the story of the Monument’s Men and Women.

From these somber stories, visitors will transition into the brighter narrative of hope and progress on the Pavilion’s second floor, which will examine the war’s impact in the postwar period: from the joys of homecoming and transitions back home from the battlefields to the war crimes trials, new technological innovations, movements for social change and civil rights, and developments in international and domestic affairs. Connections will be drawn between World War II and its profound meaning and relevance today.

The National WWII Museum

The National WWII Museum tells the story of the American experience in the war that changed the world—why it was fought, how it was won, and what it means today—so that all generations will understand the price of freedom and be inspired by what they learn. Dedicated in 2000 as The National D-Day Museum and now designated by Congress as America’s National WWII Museum, the institution celebrates the American spirit, the teamwork, optimism, courage, and sacrifices of the men and women who fought on the battlefront and served on the Home Front.

Law created by Gabrielle at 360 Magazine use by 360 Magazine

POMPEO, O’BRIEN – Nixon Awards

2021 Architect of Peace Award recipients to headline Nixon Library fundraiser. Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and former National Security Adviser Robert C. O’Brien were jointly selected to receive the Richard Nixon Foundation’s 2021 Architect of Peace Award for their work developing and implementing both the 2020 Abraham Accords and the 2020 Serbia-Kosovo economic normalization agreements, as well as their oversight of the repatriation of more than 50 American hostages detained abroad. 

The awards will be presented at a Nixon Library gala on October 14, 2021, in front of 250 supporters of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Foundation. In accepting their respective awards, both men are expected to deliver remarks at 6:30 PM Pacific time. The Architect of Peace Award was established in 1995 shortly after President Nixon’s death and is given to individuals who embody his lifelong goal of shaping a more peaceful world.

Its recipients include former Presidents Gerald Ford and George H.W. Bush, former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, Senators Elizabeth Dole, Joe Lieberman, and John McCain, and both Walter and Leonore Annenberg. 360 Magazine is excited to see people get the recognition they need for their work.

Funds raised from the black-tie gala will support the ongoing works of the Nixon Foundation, which include operation of the Nixon Library as well as encouragement and support of scholarship, in-person and online programs that engage the public with American civics, the creation and promotion of educational programs and exhibits rooted in American history, and the fostering of discussion and debate about America’s thirty-seventh president. The program will be streamed live on the Richard Nixon Foundation YouTube channel here: https://youtu.be/dyvtsC0xxrI 

Tracy Sugarman’s Works Offered at Auction

“AND ALL THAT JAZZ”! WORKS BY TRACY SUGARMAN – ARTIST TO THE MUSIC INDUSTRY, TO BE OFFERED AT AUCTION

September 2021. Artworks by the American illustrator, Tracy Sugarman (1921-2013), who documented some of the most momentous events in American history, such as Mississippi’s Freedom Summer of 1964 (a milestone in the civil rights movement in America) and images of World War II, will be offered in Dreweatts Modern and Contemporary Art sale on October 12, 2021.

As well as encapsulating historical moments in a unique way, Sugarman illustrated hundreds of books and record covers in a career spanning 50 years. The group of works coming up for auction spotlights Sugarman’s work for the music industry. Between 1954 and 1959 he produced more than a hundred album covers for the record labels Grand Award and Waldorf Music Hall Records. These were later reissued on CDS.

His illustrations were published in hundreds of magazines and books, as well being shown as on TV (PBS, ABC TV, NBC TV, and CBS TV). He was in high demand as a multi-talented artist, scriptwriter, producer, and author and won numerous awards from the Society of Illustrators in New York and the Art Directors Club in Washington, D.C. He was also a civil rights activist, something he also captured in his artworks.

While carrying out his commissions for the music industry he was given complete artistic freedom to create the works as he wished. Commenting he said: “I had been able to explore every medium from scratch-board to oils, from pastels to watercolors and seen them reproduced. I had captured Mahalia Jackson singing gospel and Knuckles O’Toole playing ragtime piano.” A work in 2007 marked the beginning of a lifelong love affair with jazz and the works in this sale show how he creatively captures the spirit and energy of Jazz.

In the Studio (lot 301) in its bright red hues, communicates the passion and vibrancy of Jazz and music in general. Dark lines contrast the colour, creating the shapes of the figures, resulting in a simple, but powerful piece. It carries an estimate of £400-£600. Portrait of a Trumpet Player (lot 299) by Tracy Sugarman captures a trumpet player in full flow. Created in wax crayon, the raw image brings the paper to life. It is estimated to fetch £400-£600. The Thinker (Lot 300) in wax crayon and watercolor shows the creative process and thinking behind the creation of music. In rough strokes Sugarman conveys all of this in a minimal way, creating the impact by its very simplicity.  The work is estimated to fetch £400-£600.

More works by Sugarman can be seen in the online catalogue, follow the link here

Art Exhibition illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

A Conversation with Grandmother Edna in Franklin County, PA

Franklin County Visitors Bureau Invites All to A Conversation with Grandmother Edna: Fabric Artist and Storyteller

Franklin County Visitors Bureau hosts Edna Williams, a fabric artist and storyteller, at the 11/30 Visitors Center on July 17.

Franklin County Visitors Bureau invites the public to A Conversation with Grandmother Edna: Fabric Artist and Storyteller on July 17 at 1 PM in the Great Room of the 11/30 Visitors Center, on the square in Chambersburg PA. Visitors can enjoy more than a dozen quilts and pillow covers, created by Grandmother Edna and learn how she expresses herself through art to tell stories of her life and America’s history. The art, called Pillow Talk is on display in the lobby of the Franklin County 11/30 Visitors Centers.

Williams hails from Baltimore and is displayed at the 11/30 Visitors Center through the Franklin County Visitors Bureau’s relationship with the African American Historical Association of Western Maryland.

I reach back to move forward. It is the only way to grow, said Grandmother Edna. Her Pillow Talk display includes stories that connect directly to her mother, father, and grandmother as well as highlight her meetings with poet Maya Angelou and actor Harry Belafonte. Others tell stories related to enslavement and civil justice. Williams believes storytelling is a means to connecting people and endorses the importance of history stating, Why create a mountain when you can cross a hill.

Pillow Talk is displayed as part of the Franklin County 11/30 Visitors Center’s Let The Journey Begin…People, Places, Possibilities. In addition to the storytelling quilts of Grandmother Edna, the exhibit looks at the quest for freedom from the earliest European settlers to the importance of the Pennsylvania Constitution’s Environmental Amendment.

A Conversation with Grandmother Edna is free and open to the public. Following the presentation, Grandmother Edna will offer a quilting and storytelling activity to participants who want to learn a little more. To reserve seating, please register here. A Conversation with Grandmother Edna is presented by the Franklin County Visitors Bureau as part of the July 17 Chambersburg Comes To Life Celebration, which includes the living history portrayal and light show depicting the 1864 Ransoming, Burning & Rebirth of Chambersburg.

The Franklin County Visitors Bureau invites all to explore Franklin County PA and enjoy trails of history, arts and architecture, recreation, natural beauty, fresh foods, and the warm hospitality of communities like Chambersburg, Greencastle, Mercersburg, Shippensburg, and Waynesboro. Franklin County PA is located just north of the Mason Dixon Line and is an easy drive from Washington DC, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh. Discover more and plan a visit at their website or by contacting 866-646-(8060).

Q×A with Grandmother Edna 

By: Emily Bunn

Showcasing over a dozen quilts and pillow covers, Grandmother Edna weaves stories of her own life and chronicles American history into her fabric fashioning. The complex interweaving of Edna’s own life fluidly connects with the United States’ grappling with enslavement, civil justice, and the quest for freedom. Depicting familial relations, as well as Edna’s encounters with Maya Angelou and Harry Belafonte, Grandmother Edna brings history to life with her quilting and storytelling. 360 Magazine spoke with the artist about the success of “Pillow Talk”, what inspires her to create art, and her upcoming CD release.

When did you begin creating fabric art?

Really, I mentally began in the 1950’s [while] sitting on a stairway watching my grandmother quilting. Then, maybe somewhere around the late 80’s, I decided to pick my poems up from midnight brown paper bags writings to hand sewn quilting.

What first got you interested in American history?

Being Black in the 50’s going with my grandmother to be the help/maid. And, in the 60’s, attending an all white school.

If you were to create fabric art to express our current moment in time, what would that design look like?

I have a new quilt on exhibit titled: “There Was A Time When The Universe Was FREE.”

What inspired you to start selling your quilted creations, pillow covers, and fabric art?

First of all, my quilts will never be for sale. My pillow covers sales will I hope help fund my free educational mobile classroom called “A Grandmother’s Pilgrimage, INC.” and my Grace Wisher Reparation Recovery Youth Scholarship Fund, LLC. 

What inspired the name “pillow talk” for your exhibition?

I travel through the country as an invisible soul, no one seems to listen to anything I had to say. I decided to create a nightcap to relax the busy minds of everyone–and just maybe they would have time to hear me.

What has the reaction to “pillow talk” been like?

Amazing, fresh. It’s a newness in the art world.

What has working with the The Franklin County Visitors Bureau and The African American Historical Association of Western Maryland been like?

Exciting, cool and [represents] that change is coming, History being over-hauled. Janet and Ron have been great to partner with. I hope this [exhibit] will … improve that culture sock everyone keep avoiding in this America.

Your fabric art often reflects stories from your own life. What milestones from your life have you felt were most important to include in your artwork?

It’s that front door entry thing for me. The lost traditions of my people.

Are you currently working on any exciting fabric art projects that you can reveal to 360 Magazine’s readers?

Yes, I have my new CD on release. I have a file cabinet packed with poems to be quilted. I have faith the money will come. It’s appears to be easy, but it’s very hard to get paid for a job very well done. This is all fun and relaxing for me. I tell everyone to Just sew your emotions. Thanks 360 Magazine for this new media.

Juneteenth Image via Rita Azar for use by 360 Magazine

TIDAL x Angela Rye – Triumph Over Trauma

TIDAL, in partnership with influential politico, lawyer and advocate Angela Rye, is announcing the premiere of “Triumph Over Trauma: Black Wall Street Then and Now” – a one-hour long special commemorating the centennial of one of the worst attacks of racial violence in American history: the Tulsa Race Massacre. The special will premiere on Saturday, June 19 at 6 pm ET to also honor the Juneteenth holiday, which celebrates the effective end of slavery in the United States.

The Tulsa Race Massacre devastated the prosperous African-American business community in Tulsa, Oklahoma’s Greenwood District known as “Black Wall Street” and claimed hundreds of lives. Viewers will hear from three living survivors of the massacre – Mother Fletcher, Mother Randle, and Uncle Red – who will discuss memories of Black Wall Street, escaping the night of the massacre, their legacy, and much more. The hour-long special will also feature local politicians, business leaders, Black youth of Tusla, activists, writers, and more reflecting, learning, inspiring, and growing – and most importantly shedding light on untold history.

The special will be broadcast simultaneously on TIDAL’s YouTube channel as well as in-app – both members and non-members alike will be able to view. You can find a preview HERE.

Highlighting the historical moments that impact society is an integral part of TIDAL’s DNA. By celebrating how integral all voices are to culture and community, TIDAL continues its commitment to providing its members with culture-shifting content.

BeBe Shopp illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Miss America Partners with Rowan University

Miss America Partners with Rowan University for 100th Anniversary Archival Project

With an eye on history and ideals of beauty, students digitize Miss America archives

“There she is…”

One hundred years of artifacts from the Miss America Competition—from jeweled crowns and velvet capes to programs, photographs, judges’ books, oil paintings, films, and business records—tell more than the story of the competition.

They also provide a rich look at both American and New Jersey history and help illustrate how ideas surrounding beauty and women’s roles in society have changed over a century. 

Now, through a unique partnership with the Miss America Organization, Rowan University students are sifting through the organization’s expansive archives and digitizing the artifacts. Their work, currently underway in the Digital Scholarship Center at Campbell Library, will be the cornerstone of the new Rowan Digital Collections.

Scholars worldwide eventually will have access to the artifacts through the archive, hosted by Rowan Libraries.

Currently, the massive Miss America collection is tucked away in storage in South Jersey. The storage contains a treasure trove of floor-to-ceiling artifacts from the competition.

The Miss America Organization will continue to retain the physical artifacts. But the digitization, which began with program books and some oil paintings of former winners, will ensure the artifacts are categorized and documented–and available widely to future scholars.

The preservation partnership was orchestrated by University administrators, who were approached by the Miss America Organization.

‘An enduring feature of American culture’

“We’re excited Rowan is doing this, and we’re thrilled the University sees value in this project,” says Shantel Krebs, chair of the board and interim president and CEO of the Miss America Organization.

“This is New Jersey history. The digitization project will help others learn more about the quintessential competition and its evolution from a ‘bather’s revue’ into a nationally recognized non-profit that offers scholarship assistance and helps thousands of young women from America to improve their communities through service.”

The project will be a crucial resource to scholars and students, notes College of Humanities & Social Sciences Dean Nawal Ammar.  

“The Miss America competition has been an enduring feature of American culture, producing idealized images of female beauty and achievement,” says Ammar.

“However, the pageant also has been a space to challenge those images, both inside and outside the competition hall. This collection will be an invaluable source for the study of American history, culture, women’s history, business history, media studies, and many other topics.”

Project manager Katie Turner, a professor of history and American Studies, says Rowan students working on digitization are gaining first-hand experience of the archival process. 

“This is a great opportunity for our students to get their hands on history and to really see what goes into making a collection,” adds Turner. “Everything today is digitized for students. They often don’t get to see and touch historical documents. When you sift through paper and do research in an archive, there’s a real commitment to the work.”

Founded as a bather’s revue by businessmen in 1921 as a gimmick to lengthen the summer tourist season in Atlantic City by capitalizing on popular American ideals of female beauty, the competition in its early years was often a steppingstone for women who wanted to pursue show business careers. More than 100,000 people swarmed onto the Atlantic City Boardwalk the first year to watch 16-year-old Margaret Gorman be crowned.

Candidates in the 1920s were rated by judges on everything from the construction of their heads to their “grace of bearing” to their eyes, hair, torso, and hands. Every measurement—from ankles to biceps to head—was recorded by judges and assessed on a points system.

By the 1950s, the competition, under the leadership of Lenora Slaughter, the program’s director for more than 25 years, had been transformed into a source of scholarships for contestants. In 1958, more than $200,000 in scholarships were awarded.

A crown jewel for Atlantic City.

But the competition, a crown jewel for Atlantic City, has not been devoid of controversy. In 1968, it was the site of the first major women’s liberation protest in the United States, when the New York Radical Women, some 400 strong, protested on the Atlantic City Boardwalk. They maintained that the competition objectified women and upheld female stereotypes.

Protestors through the years also objected to the program’s exclusion of women of color. The first Black Miss America, Vanessa Williams, was crowned in 1983—more than 60 years after the competition’s founding.

That isn’t lost on Rowan senior English and writing arts major Destiny Hall, who is working on digitization. She started with the 1984 Miss America magazine, where Williams is featured prominently. Hall, a women’s and gender studies minor, says work on the project has been eye-opening as she explores her own views of feminism.

“Part of being a feminist is allowing women to be whatever they want to be. I have a complicated history with Miss America. In the beginning, I saw it as sexist. Now, I see it as a celebration of womanhood. Many of these women compete to further their careers,” says Hall, 22, who will attend graduate school at Columbia University in the fall as she pursues a career writing fiction for women.

“Through this project, I feel like I’m preserving history and I really appreciate that. It’s important to have this information and to have access to it.”

Freshman English major Grace Fox, who is pursuing the Thomas N. Bantivoglio Honors Concentration in the Honors College, is digitizing program books.

“I’m hoping I’ll find one nugget…something nobody knows about,” says Fox. “I’m definitely looking at the advertisements, the kinds of products they marketed, the images of fashion. There’s so much value in this work. It’s so applicable to things we talk about in class, including how societal views on women’s bodies are enmeshed in the culture we see.”

Robert Hilliker, interim associate provost and director of research engagement and scholarship at Rowan Libraries, and Michael Benson, digital scholarship specialist, are overseeing the digitization work. Additionally, Center for the Advancement of Women in Communication Director Julie Haynes, whose research focuses on depictions of gender in popular culture, is involved in the project.

About the collection

While programs, photos, and other ephemera are being scanned, other artifacts, such as crowns, trophies, and a Waterford scepter carried by winners, will be photographed. Scores of oil paintings and sketches of winners, including some sketches by renowned portrait artist Everett Kintsler, whose work includes official White House portraits of Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan, will be digitized under the guidance of Rowan art historians.

Rowan’s Department of Radio/Television/Film may assist in digitizing hundreds of films and slides, some of which were donated by shore-area residents who religiously attended the annual Miss America parade on the Boardwalk.

“Prioritization of the digitization will be quite a project,” Hilliker notes. “The collection is so special from an archivist’s standpoint because it contains varied materials. That will make for some interesting research projects, but it also presents a lot of technical challenges. For our students, this project certainly will be an excellent apprenticeship in digital preservation.”

The collection is an eclectic mix.

The same storage that currently houses the unwieldy Golden Mermaid trophy, presented in the early 1920s to the winner, also includes the crown of 1955 winner Lee Meriwether, who went on to a successful television career. Then Miss California, Meriwether was the first Miss America to be crowned on television, an event that drew 27 million viewers.

Stars flocked to the competition over the years. Grace Kelly was a judge. Marilyn Monroe was the grand marshal of the parade in 1952. Eddie Fischer was a host before Bert Parks, famed singer of the “There She Is” Miss America theme, emceed for 24 years.

The collection also includes Slaughter’s personal scrapbooks. Some of her other papers are housed at the Smithsonian Institution.

Some of the artifacts, such as the film of Meriwether being crowned, were lost during an Atlantic City Nor’easter some years ago. That makes the digitization project particularly valuable, Krebs notes.

BeBe Shopp, Miss America 1948, says she’s delighted Rowan students are preserving Miss America’s legacy.

“This will make it easier for anyone to view our history and learn how Miss America has grown and become even more vital to young women today,” says Shopp, who represented Minnesota in the competition. “This is important. What an experience the students must be having combing through hundreds of thousands of documents and learning about our past. At my age, I’m thrilled that they are going to preserve me for ages to come.”

Supporting the archival work

The Miss America Organization has established a campaign to help fund the digitization project and preserve the thousands of artifacts in the organization’s 100-year history. Visit the organization’s funding site to learn more about supporting the work.

Emmett Till illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Emmett Till × Mamie Till Mobley

National Trust Partners’ Advocacy Leads to Roberts Temple: Emmett Till and Mamie Till Mobley Senate Bill

Sen. Tammy Duckworth introduced a bill with Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL), Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ), and Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS) as co-sponsors to establish Chicago’s Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ as a National Monument. The move would offer the highest level of federal support for the church and would ensure that the National Park Service will preserve, protect, and interpret its powerful impact on American civil rights history for generations to come. Civil rights activist Mamie Till Mobley was a member of Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ, and the church played a historic role in the funeral of Emmett Till, her fourteen-year-old son killed on August 28, 1955, during a visit with relatives in Money, Mississippi.

Rather than cover up the brutality of the murder, Mobley bravely decided to hold an open casket funeral at Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ so people could witness the bitter consequences of racism. When tens of thousands of people came to view young Till’s mangled body from September 3-6, 1955, and photographs of his mangled face were published in journals around the country, it ignited the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s, similar to the way George Floyd’s death has impacted movements today. TIME magazine named a photo of the Till funeral one of the 100 most influential images of all time.

Last year, the National Trust for Historic Preservation placed Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ on its 11 Most Endangered Historic Places list, recognizing its groundbreaking significance and the need to restore and preserve the site. Support has continued through Trust grants and technical assistance as well as through advocacy to gain federal support to maintain the site. The Trust has partnered in this work with members of the Till and Roberts families, The Emmett Till Interpretive Center, the National Parks Conservation Association, Latham & Watkins LLP pro bono program, and other interests committed to the longevity of this historic landmark. Efforts are also ensuing to obtain National Park status for Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ, as well as for important sites linked to Emmett Till in Mississippi.

“The Roberts Temple Church is both extraordinarily and heartbreakingly important to Chicago, our state, and to our country’s history,” Sen. Tammy Duckworth said. “It’s time we recognize how historic sites can not only teach us about our history – but provoke us to build a more just future. By designating this church a historic site, we will help ensure that this awful chapter is not erased and that generations of Americans to come can show respect to Mamie and Emmett’s stories.”

The National Trust’s Chief Preservation Officer Katherine Malone-France said, “Our nation will benefit tremendously when Roberts Temple is designated a National Monument, lifting up its profoundly important role in American history. It is imperative that our country appropriately honors the site of Emmett Till’s funeral and of Mamie Till Mobley’s remarkable courage. We are honored to support the Roberts Temple congregation, the Till family, and the local community as they advance this designation and determine how to carry forward the legacies of this powerful place, as a unit of the National Park system.”

Reverend Wheeler Parker, who witnessed his cousin Emmett’s abduction in 1955, and his wife, Dr. Marvel McCain Parker, said, “We are grateful for the introduction of legislation to preserve the legacy of Emmett Till and Mamie Till Mobley by making Roberts Temple a National Monument, which will help to fulfill Mamie’s request for my wife and I to continue her work to ensure her son’s death was not in vain.”

Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ was founded in 1916 and is known as the “mother of all of the Churches of God in Christ in Illinois.” With its founding, it became a central place of worship and political organizing for many who migrated to Chicago from the South during the early 20th Century.

Today, the building remains in use by the Church of God in Christ denomination, now led by Elder Cleven Wardlow who said, “On behalf of the congregants of Roberts Temple and members of the Roberts Family, we strongly support this endeavor as well as the ongoing efforts by racial justice and preservation organizations to obtain federal protection for Roberts Temple.”

Patrick Weems, Executive Director of the Emmett Till Interpretive Center stated, “What took place at Roberts Temple changed the world. We commend the Roberts Temple congregation, the Roberts and Till families, especially Rev. Wheeler Parker, Jr., Dr. Marvel McCain Parker, and Ollie Gordon for their commitment to telling the truth, and we want to thank Senator Duckworth for her leadership in bringing forth this legislation.”

“The time for turning away from this painful chapter in American history is long over” stated Alan Spears, Senior Director for Cultural Resources. “The National Parks Conservation Association applauds Senator Duckworth for introducing this very significant piece of legislation commemorating the legacies of Emmett Till and Mamie Till Mobley.”
For more information on the campaign to designate the Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ National Monument visit their website.

Kaelen Felix illustrates WEB DUBOIS FOR 360 MAGAZINE

W.E.B. Du Bois: The Lost and the Found

W.E.B. Du Bois spent many decades fighting to ensure that African Americans could claim their place as full citizens and thereby fulfill the deeply compromised ideals of American democracy. Yet he died in Africa, having apparently given up on the United States.

In 1909, Du Bois was among the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), according to the organization’s website. During his time serving as the director of publicity and research, Du Bois founded The Crisis, a publication that focused on the African American pride and always published works from young members of this community.

After leaving the NAACP in 1934, Du Bois went on to become a voice in the civil rights movement. He was a leader of protests and was a part of the socialist party. In his lifetime, Du Bois wrote two books, The Souls of Black Folk and Black Reconstruction, in addition to his publication The Crisis.

In 1951, Du Bois was indicted as “an unregistered agent of a foreign power,” but was acquitted by a judge according to Britannica

Becoming increasingly radical and being intrigued with the principles of communism, Du Bois left America and moved to Ghana in 1961, according to the History Channels’ online publication. He then became a member of the American Communist Party. 

Poet and assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Massachusetts, Elvira Basevuch, has taken a deeper look at Du Bois’ ideology and analyzed it in her upcoming book, W.E.B Du Bois: The Lost and the Found.

In this book, Elvira Basevich looks at the paradox of a man who wanted to change America but left in defeat by tracing the development of his life and thought and the relevance of his legacy to our our current state. She adeptly analyzes the main concepts that inform Du Bois’ critique of American democracy, such as the color line and double consciousness, before examining how these concepts might inform our understanding of contemporary struggles, from Black Lives Matter to the campaign for reparations for slavery.

She stresses the continuity in Du Bois’ thought, from his early writings to his later embrace of self-segregation and Pan-Africanism, while not shying away from assessing the challenging implications of his later work.

This wonderful book vindicates the power of Du Bois’ thought to help transform a stubbornly unjust world. It is essential reading for racial justice activists as well as students of African American philosophy and political thought.

Du Bois’ ideas and teachings were too radical for the time, but Basevich is taking a closer look at them and finding that many of these teachings a relevant today.

Her book is available for pre-order now and will be released on December 29, 2020.