Posts tagged with "competition"

BeBe Shopp illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Miss America Partners with Rowan University

Miss America Partners with Rowan University for 100th Anniversary Archival Project

With an eye on history and ideals of beauty, students digitize Miss America archives

“There she is…”

One hundred years of artifacts from the Miss America Competition—from jeweled crowns and velvet capes to programs, photographs, judges’ books, oil paintings, films, and business records—tell more than the story of the competition.

They also provide a rich look at both American and New Jersey history and help illustrate how ideas surrounding beauty and women’s roles in society have changed over a century. 

Now, through a unique partnership with the Miss America Organization, Rowan University students are sifting through the organization’s expansive archives and digitizing the artifacts. Their work, currently underway in the Digital Scholarship Center at Campbell Library, will be the cornerstone of the new Rowan Digital Collections.

Scholars worldwide eventually will have access to the artifacts through the archive, hosted by Rowan Libraries.

Currently, the massive Miss America collection is tucked away in storage in South Jersey. The storage contains a treasure trove of floor-to-ceiling artifacts from the competition.

The Miss America Organization will continue to retain the physical artifacts. But the digitization, which began with program books and some oil paintings of former winners, will ensure the artifacts are categorized and documented–and available widely to future scholars.

The preservation partnership was orchestrated by University administrators, who were approached by the Miss America Organization.

‘An enduring feature of American culture’

“We’re excited Rowan is doing this, and we’re thrilled the University sees value in this project,” says Shantel Krebs, chair of the board and interim president and CEO of the Miss America Organization.

“This is New Jersey history. The digitization project will help others learn more about the quintessential competition and its evolution from a ‘bather’s revue’ into a nationally recognized non-profit that offers scholarship assistance and helps thousands of young women from America to improve their communities through service.”

The project will be a crucial resource to scholars and students, notes College of Humanities & Social Sciences Dean Nawal Ammar.  

“The Miss America competition has been an enduring feature of American culture, producing idealized images of female beauty and achievement,” says Ammar.

“However, the pageant also has been a space to challenge those images, both inside and outside the competition hall. This collection will be an invaluable source for the study of American history, culture, women’s history, business history, media studies, and many other topics.”

Project manager Katie Turner, a professor of history and American Studies, says Rowan students working on digitization are gaining first-hand experience of the archival process. 

“This is a great opportunity for our students to get their hands on history and to really see what goes into making a collection,” adds Turner. “Everything today is digitized for students. They often don’t get to see and touch historical documents. When you sift through paper and do research in an archive, there’s a real commitment to the work.”

Founded as a bather’s revue by businessmen in 1921 as a gimmick to lengthen the summer tourist season in Atlantic City by capitalizing on popular American ideals of female beauty, the competition in its early years was often a steppingstone for women who wanted to pursue show business careers. More than 100,000 people swarmed onto the Atlantic City Boardwalk the first year to watch 16-year-old Margaret Gorman be crowned.

Candidates in the 1920s were rated by judges on everything from the construction of their heads to their “grace of bearing” to their eyes, hair, torso, and hands. Every measurement—from ankles to biceps to head—was recorded by judges and assessed on a points system.

By the 1950s, the competition, under the leadership of Lenora Slaughter, the program’s director for more than 25 years, had been transformed into a source of scholarships for contestants. In 1958, more than $200,000 in scholarships were awarded.

A crown jewel for Atlantic City.

But the competition, a crown jewel for Atlantic City, has not been devoid of controversy. In 1968, it was the site of the first major women’s liberation protest in the United States, when the New York Radical Women, some 400 strong, protested on the Atlantic City Boardwalk. They maintained that the competition objectified women and upheld female stereotypes.

Protestors through the years also objected to the program’s exclusion of women of color. The first Black Miss America, Vanessa Williams, was crowned in 1983—more than 60 years after the competition’s founding.

That isn’t lost on Rowan senior English and writing arts major Destiny Hall, who is working on digitization. She started with the 1984 Miss America magazine, where Williams is featured prominently. Hall, a women’s and gender studies minor, says work on the project has been eye-opening as she explores her own views of feminism.

“Part of being a feminist is allowing women to be whatever they want to be. I have a complicated history with Miss America. In the beginning, I saw it as sexist. Now, I see it as a celebration of womanhood. Many of these women compete to further their careers,” says Hall, 22, who will attend graduate school at Columbia University in the fall as she pursues a career writing fiction for women.

“Through this project, I feel like I’m preserving history and I really appreciate that. It’s important to have this information and to have access to it.”

Freshman English major Grace Fox, who is pursuing the Thomas N. Bantivoglio Honors Concentration in the Honors College, is digitizing program books.

“I’m hoping I’ll find one nugget…something nobody knows about,” says Fox. “I’m definitely looking at the advertisements, the kinds of products they marketed, the images of fashion. There’s so much value in this work. It’s so applicable to things we talk about in class, including how societal views on women’s bodies are enmeshed in the culture we see.”

Robert Hilliker, interim associate provost and director of research engagement and scholarship at Rowan Libraries, and Michael Benson, digital scholarship specialist, are overseeing the digitization work. Additionally, Center for the Advancement of Women in Communication Director Julie Haynes, whose research focuses on depictions of gender in popular culture, is involved in the project.

About the collection

While programs, photos, and other ephemera are being scanned, other artifacts, such as crowns, trophies, and a Waterford scepter carried by winners, will be photographed. Scores of oil paintings and sketches of winners, including some sketches by renowned portrait artist Everett Kintsler, whose work includes official White House portraits of Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan, will be digitized under the guidance of Rowan art historians.

Rowan’s Department of Radio/Television/Film may assist in digitizing hundreds of films and slides, some of which were donated by shore-area residents who religiously attended the annual Miss America parade on the Boardwalk.

“Prioritization of the digitization will be quite a project,” Hilliker notes. “The collection is so special from an archivist’s standpoint because it contains varied materials. That will make for some interesting research projects, but it also presents a lot of technical challenges. For our students, this project certainly will be an excellent apprenticeship in digital preservation.”

The collection is an eclectic mix.

The same storage that currently houses the unwieldy Golden Mermaid trophy, presented in the early 1920s to the winner, also includes the crown of 1955 winner Lee Meriwether, who went on to a successful television career. Then Miss California, Meriwether was the first Miss America to be crowned on television, an event that drew 27 million viewers.

Stars flocked to the competition over the years. Grace Kelly was a judge. Marilyn Monroe was the grand marshal of the parade in 1952. Eddie Fischer was a host before Bert Parks, famed singer of the “There She Is” Miss America theme, emceed for 24 years.

The collection also includes Slaughter’s personal scrapbooks. Some of her other papers are housed at the Smithsonian Institution.

Some of the artifacts, such as the film of Meriwether being crowned, were lost during an Atlantic City Nor’easter some years ago. That makes the digitization project particularly valuable, Krebs notes.

BeBe Shopp, Miss America 1948, says she’s delighted Rowan students are preserving Miss America’s legacy.

“This will make it easier for anyone to view our history and learn how Miss America has grown and become even more vital to young women today,” says Shopp, who represented Minnesota in the competition. “This is important. What an experience the students must be having combing through hundreds of thousands of documents and learning about our past. At my age, I’m thrilled that they are going to preserve me for ages to come.”

Supporting the archival work

The Miss America Organization has established a campaign to help fund the digitization project and preserve the thousands of artifacts in the organization’s 100-year history. Visit the organization’s funding site to learn more about supporting the work.

Microphone illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Red Bull Batalla

WORLD’S LARGEST SPANISH FREESTYLE RAP BATTLE, RED BULL BATALLA OPENS APPLICATION PERIOD FOR 2021 U.S. NATIONAL FINALS

Top MCs who have what it takes will advance to next round and compete in the global rap competition’s 15-anniversary season

The new season of Red Bull Batalla kicks off as the largest Spanish freestyle rap battle in the world announces the application phase is now live for the U.S. National Finals. Seeking to uncover the country’s best Spanish freestyle talent around, any MC interested in applying can upload their freestyle submission video via the official Bull Batalla app. This will give them the chance to compete in a virtual qualifier as part of the 15-anniversary of the biggest international freestyle competition in the world.

Following the application phase, from now until April 30th, the top MCs will be chosen to advance to the next round. Those selected will have the opportunity to showcase their lyrical talents and compete in one of the many virtual, regional qualifier battles broadcasts on Twitch this summer. Top contenders from the virtual qualifier will then travel to U.S. National Finals in September. Later this year, all eyes will be on the top MCs as they battle it out in the International Final where one winner will be crowned.

Red Bull Batalla is a global freestyle rap competition that, since 2005, has provided a platform for the best hip-hop improvisors in the Spanish world to connect, develop and compete. The Red Bull founded project has risen to become the world’s biggest international freestyle battle competition, uniting Spanish speakers across the globe. The roots of this improvised rap scene are as deeply connected to hip-hop as they are to the improvisation styles of traditional folk troubadours. With the competition, Red Bull Batalla gives an opportunity for young MCs to train, perform and improve their improvisation and lyrical skills.

The 2020 Red Bull Batalla competition was won by Mexico’s Rapder who delivered the ultimate mic drop to win the most-watched live music event of the year. For the U.S., the region’s National Final winner Yartzifrom Puerto Rico, advanced to the Quarterfinals but was eliminated by Rapder. To relive 2020 highlights head to the Red Bull Batalla website Red Bull TV Batalla.

Snoop Dogg illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Snoop Dog × The Voice

Multi-platinum artist, actor, philanthropist, and entertainment icon, the one and only Snoop Dogg, will serve as Mega Mentor on Season 20 of NBC’s four-time Emmy Award-winning musical competition series The Voice.

Snoop Dogg joins superstar coaches Kelly Clarkson, Nick Jonas, John Legend, Ariana Grande and Blake Shelton to mentor the remaining artists who have made it through the Battle Rounds, as each team prepares for the Knockouts, beginning Monday, April 19 (8-10 p.m. ET/PT). Grande, a powerhouse vocalist whose international fan base of “Arianators” has enabled her to rapidly become one of the biggest pop superstars of our generation.

During the Knockout Rounds, artists are once again paired against a teammate, but select their own song to perform individually while their direct competitor watches and waits. Drawing from his unique experience in navigating the music and entertainment industry as a renowned rapper, producer and performer, Snoop Dogg will impart a new and fresh perspective to help the artists craft their performances. Coaches alone choose the winner to advance from their team. Each coach has one steal in the Knockouts.

Additionally, the four artists that were saved by their individual coaches during the Battle Rounds will compete in the Four-Way Knockout. Each of the four artists will receive individualized coaching and rehearsals with their coach and Snoop Dogg in preparation for the Four-Way Knockout. However, the winner will ultimately be chosen by America. At the top of the final Knockouts episode, voting will open for America to choose which of the four artists moves forward in the competition after their performances. Then, at the beginning of the first Live Show, host Carson Daly will reveal which of the four artists was voted through by America, and that artist will continue to the Live Shows with their original team.

An entertainment icon, Snoop Dogg has reigned for nearly three decades as an unparalleled force, who has raised the bar as an award-winning entertainer and globally recognized entrepreneur. Snoop defines entertainment history. He has released 19 studio albums, sold over 40 million albums worldwide, reached No. 1 countless times on Billboard charts internationally and received 20 Grammy nominations. 

Snoop has also appeared in numerous films, such as, Dolemite Is My Name, The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge on the Run, The Addams Family, Beach Bum, Starsky & Hutch, Soul Plane and the Oscar-winning drama Training Day, among others. He has also produced several films, including VICE’s Reincarnated, Mac & Dean Go to High School and Hood of Horror through his production company Snoopadelic Films. He made his mark in television when he garnered an Emmy nomination as executive producer for the hit VH1 show Martha & Snoop’s Potluck Dinner. Snoop was also the executive producer of the acclaimed Netflix show Coach Snoop, GGN: Double G News, MTV’s Mary + Jane and the TNT game show Joker’s Wild, which he also hosted.

“The Voice” is a presentation of MGM Television, Warner Bros. Unscripted Television in association with Warner Horizon, and ITV Studios The Voice USA, Inc. The series was created by John de Mol, who serves as an executive producer along with Mark Burnett, Audrey Morrissey, Amanda Zucker, Kyra Thompson and Adam H. Sher. Season 20 marks the 10-year anniversary of “The Voice.”

5G Illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Huawei Tops Share of 5G Devices

Huawei tops share of active 5G-ready devices globally with Samsung, Apple lagging behind

Data analyzed by Finbold indicates that Chinese firm Huawei is leading in active 5G-ready devices with a share of 26.9% globally during Q4 2020. Samsung ranks second with a share of 25.1%, while Apple accounts for 19.5%. Vivo, another Chinese firm, controls a share of 11.8%, with Honor accounting for 6.9% of the active 5G-ready devices. The Finbold analysis also compared the share of 5G-ready devices between Samsung and Huawei from August 2020 to December 2020. The findings show that Samsung dominated the share for the four months before December.

In August, Samsung’s share was 45.2% against Huawei’s 10.2%. As of September, the South Korean manufacturer share increased to 48.1%, with Huawei accounting for 10.1%. The dominance continued in October, with Samsung taking a share of 48.6% while Huawei accounted for 9.5%. In November, both players saw their active 5G-ready devices share drop as Samsung accounted for 44.9% against Huawei’s 8.6%. As of December, Huawei flipped the status to rank top at 27%, with Samsung accounting for 25.1%.

 Huawei leverages on pandemic to emerge top

The report explains circumstances that potentially contributed to Huawei emerging as a dominant force in active 5G-ready devices. According to the research report: “Like other industries, most of the manufacturers were impacted with Covid-19 disruption that affected global supply. However, Huawei appears to have sustained the downturn after China controlled the pandemic early, unlike competitors in the west which entered the pandemic’s second wave towards Q4.”

The growth of Huawei might soon be challenged since competitors are increasingly launching new 5G devices. For instance, Apple, with just one active 5G-ready device, ranked third.

 Read the full story with statistics here.

 

Swimming article illustration by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE

MADELINE BANIC × X1-PRO

American Record Holder, International Swim League (ISL) breakout athlete Madeline “Maddy” Banic sets sights on Tokyo Olympics by training less, using X1-PRO

Madeline “Maddy” Banic, the 18-time all-American NCAA swimmer who earned a neck-load of gold medals while swimming for the University of Tennessee and broke out on the scene for the ISL in 2020, has signed with GMX7 as an ambassador, joining GMX7 ambassador and 4-time Olympian Ryan Lochte with sights on ever bigger aspirations for 2021.

According to Banic, while she’ll continue swimming with the ISL, her next goal is to hopefully make the U.S. Olympic Team to compete in the 2021 Tokyo Olympics.

“It’s definitely my dream, and I’m pretty sure, it’s every competitive swimmer’s dream, to go to the Olympics,” said Banic, who broke the American record for the 50-meter fly at the ISL and was one of the top three breakout swimmers over the 8-week pro league. “I dream about it every day. It’s on my phone under my goals to have an American Flag Banic cap from the Olympics.”

Banic, who saw major improvements in her performance in 2020, attributes her success to a few key components, which includes practicing less.

That may sound counter intuitive, but it seems to have worked for Banic.

“Before COVID, I was absolutely murdering my body in practices, keeping my heartrate at 170 or above for several hours,” said Banic. “But when COVID hit, we weren’t able to train indoors, so I started boxing, cycling, running and kayaking and basically exercising outdoors. When I started swimming again, I was putting up decent times and that’s when I realized I had really been over doing it before.”

Then, at the end of May, Banic met David McCagg, the former 7-time gold medalist who started GMX7 and developed the X1-PRO resistance trainer, which Olympians Ryan Lochte and Caeleb Dressel also use. McCagg met Banic’s training group in Naples where she was able to try the X1-PRO.

“At first, I was skeptical. I mean, racks and towers were the standard for resistance training, but the X1-PRO changes that. It really helped me with my underwater,” said Banic, who used the X1-PRO twice a week to prepare for ISL Budapest. “Now, I use it all the time and love the X1-PRO because it’s not jerky and it travels with you the whole 25 back and forth for continuous training.”

According to Banic, her routine typically goes like this. She wakes up at 7:45 a.m., has a banana and gets ready for practice. Then, she’s in the pool from 8:45 a.m. until 10:45 a.m. At 11:30 a.m., breakfast includes eggs, avocado, yogurt, some fruit and lots of coffee.

Then, it’s time to hang out with her 5-year-old Border Collie-Australian Shepherd mix, named Remi. At 3 p.m. lunch is served which can vary, but often includes a sandwich, crackers, guacamole, salsa and dip. From 6:30 until 8:30 p.m. she’s back in the pool. After the evening swim, dinner almost always includes a meat, carb and veggie.

“That’s my typical doubles routine, but when I have singles, I’ll add in cycling with either a road bike or stationary bike, or I’ll do some yoga,” said Banic.

In addition to the workouts, and training with the X1-PRO, according to Banic, her other secret to success is her weekly massage.

“It’s an absolute must,” Banic said.

 

While 2020 was a tough year for many, Banic, who has publicly discussed her past struggles with depression and has helped others through her transparency, seems to have flourished and discovered more about herself. It has led to the realistic possibility of her perhaps earning a spot to compete in Tokyo at the Olympics for team USA.

“I’m definitely going to try my absolute best to make the Olympics,” said Banic. “I think that the ISL season proved that I’m kind of an underdog, but no matter how it goes, look out for the next ISL season.”

About GMX7

Founded in 2018, GMX7 is based in St. Petersburg, Florida and is dedicated to changing the world of swimming by empowering competitive swimmers with the best aquatic resistance training devices ever created. GMX7 was founded by David McCagg, a 7-time gold medalist, former world record holder and winner of multiple national championships. The first device on the market by GMX7 is the X1-PRO. Designed by ROBRADY Engineering, it has already been the recipient of several international awards including the 2020 International Design Excellence Award and the 2020 Red Dot Award for product design.  

Gaming illustration by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine

Counter-Strike: The Shooting Game Taking The World By Storm

Counter-Strike began life as a fan-made modification for Valve Corporation’s much-acclaimed title Half-Life 2. Created by Minh “Gooseman” Le and Jess “Cliffe” Cliffe, Counter-Strike was acquired by Valve in 1999 and saw its first retail release later on that year. Whilst it has never been the commercial behemoth that a series such as Call of Duty has become over the years, Counter-Strike has managed to establish itself as one of the most recognisable faces in the first-person shooter (FPS) genre of gaming, with three major sequels and various spin offs titles, the latest of which, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, was released back in 2012. 

Valve have established themselves as one of the best in the business for continuing to support their games with constant tweaks and updates to keep things feeling fresh and optimised, and this has proven to be the cornerstone for Counter-Strike’s enduring popularity within the video gaming community. 

It has also been one of the biggest driving forces for the Counter-Strike franchise being able to flex itself as the most successful FPS title in the world of competitive gaming, and a huge driving force behind its growth as a multi-billion dollar industry over the past twenty years. With the series continuing its soar in popularity ahead of 2021, here’s everything you need to know about Counter-Strike: the shooting game taking the world by storm. 

Gameplay 

The Counter-Strike series has built a legacy for emphasising team play, communication, planning and short sharp bursts of action, rather than the all-out action approach of competitor titles such as Call of Duty. Whichever game in the series you play, simply running around and trying to kill opponents is not an option at a reasonable skill level. 

The game pits two teams of five players against each other on a map in a best of thirty match. Rounds last 1:55 and teams are split into either the T (Terrorist) or CT (Counter-Terrorist) side. Terrorists can win rounds by either killing the entire enemy team or successfully planting and defending a bomb until it detonates after a forty second countdown. There are two bombsites on every defusal map, and Counter-Terrorists can win rounds by either killing the enemy team before a bomb is planted, waiting out the round timer without the bomb being planted, or defusing the bomb once it has been placed. 

Teams are given an economy for each round that they have to manage, meaning that planning ahead, saving weapons, choosing between armour, utility and weaponry each round can be a crucial factor in deciding the outcome of games even before a bullet is fired. 

All these factors have helped Counter-Strike develop one of the highest skill ceilings found anywhere in the gaming world, and subsequently developed an hyper-competitive professional scene.

Counter-Strike In Esports

Counter-Strike: Global Offensive is the latest game in the series and, despite being over eight years old now, has actually seen its numbers soar over the past year or so. Not only is it one of the most watched games on online streaming platforms such as Twitch.tv with hundreds of thousands of hours digested by viewers, but 2020 saw it peak past the one million concurrent player mark several times for the first time in its history. As of February 2021, the game averages roughly 24 million users a month, over double the amount recorded in 2016. 

For the first time in the franchise’s history, Global Offensive was moved to a free to play model by Valve in 2018 and can still be picked up and played for absolutely nothing via Steam even today. 

Naturally, with so many players and so much interest, the competitive scene for the game is one of the most heavily invested in and fleshed out in the entire Esports industry. CS:GO betting has become increasingly popular for events and tournaments right across the world and, thanks to the influx of investment from the likes of Intel, Monster, Alienware and even the United States Air Force, the standard for competition hosting has risen substantially over the past couple of years. 

The very first Counter-Strike tournament was hosted in 2001 for the original game in the series at the Cyberathlete Professional League, and the likes of the World Cyber Games and Electronic Sports World Cup hosted Counter-Strike tournaments in the early to mid 2000s as the Esports industry grew. It wasn’t until the release of Global Offensive in 2012 however that the industry really began to ramp up, coinciding with the boom in popularity of games such as Dota 2 and League of Legends. 

Valve began hosting the very first Major Championship for the game in 2013 at DreamHack Winter, and have gone on to host two annual tournaments ever since. These tournaments tend to carry with them a prize pool of $1 million dollars and are still regarded as the most prestigious events in the game to this day. 

Beating the Competition: How to Make More From Your Airbnb 

If you have some space to spare in your home, Airbnb is an excellent way to make a good income. But today, there are loads of listings in almost any neighborhood, and let’s face it; better homes, better amenities, nicer views… And the truth is that these days you can’t compete on prices alone.

This spells the need to rethink how you run your facility. 

You want first-time guests to love it so much that not only will they long to come back, but also they refer you to their circles. For this to happen, you need to bring your A-game. Roll up your sleeves and get ready. Here’s to make more from your Airbnb.

  1. Focus on the Bedrooms

You will be surprised at how much attention people give to bedrooms and sleeping areas when choosing vacations. This is an area that will require you to put your best foot forward if you are to stand out. 

Think doonas with quality filling, white hotel-style linen, and so on. 

Ensure to capture these details in your listing as well so that potential guests know what to expect beforehand. This can significantly help increase your bookings.

  1. Think Sustainability

Going green campaigns in recent years have increasingly focused on what individuals can do on a smaller scale. Combined with national-level policy, individual efforts create a considerable impact as well. 

As a business owner, running a sustainable property is advantageous on several fronts. 

The key ones are that one, you are likely to attract like-minded, pro-green proponents to your property. 

The second is that you can use the specific sustainability features on your property to separate yourself from other Airbnb’s in your locale when marketing. This does not have to be anything complicated; water conservation, live plants, composting, and so on are small touches that can amplify your brand. 

  1. Welcome Pack

Let’s face it: everyone loves freebies. To understand just how much, look at reviews left for different hotels and see how prominently the idea of welcome packs feature. 

This will require some creativity, however. Because you are a business looking to make a profit, your accommodation fees will dictate what your welcome pack should hold. Ultimately, it’s the time and effort you put into making your guests feel warm and fuzzy that matters.

Items like candy, fruit, or local delicacies will work well enough. 

While it’s okay to mention this in your advert, you can opt to leave it as a surprise. There is no expectation of a grand welcome pack, and the surprise element can add you extra guest points.

  1. Make It Family-Friendly

Most vacationers with young children will tell you the hassle they go through to find family-friendly accommodations. If you have a location where families will make up a significant percentage of guests, making your facility family-friendly can give you an edge. 

Think about things like cots, high chairs, laundry powder, free washing/machine, extra mattresses, and so on. 

You can also consider building a safe child corner where parents can leave their kids playing as they unwind. You can take this a notch higher and have a resident baby minder at a fee. 

The opportunity to explore, relax and unwind while a resident baby minder takes care of their little ones for a couple of hours is a dream come true for most parents. 

Think Outside the Box

Guests have lots of options today more than ever before, and being the choice facility will take some thinking outside the box. Luckily, these do not have to be expensive undertakings. Small, thoughtful additions are often enough to woo your guest and keep them coming back for more.

Jamaine Ortiz Illustration for 360 Magazine by Kaelen Felix

Q×A with Jamaine Ortiz

Jamaine “The Technician” Ortiz, an up and coming, 23-year-old boxer, is making his name in the world of boxing. After growing up in Worcester, Massachusetts, the young boxer turned pro in 2016. His amateur record is 100-14 and he has already won many awards for his skill.

During the recent Mike Tyson vs. Roy Jones Jr. fight that was shown on pay-per-view, Ortiz was victorious over Sulaiman Segawa of Silver Spring, Maryland. After scoring a technical knockout in the last 10 seconds of the seventh round, Ortiz gained the WBC USNBC Silver lightweight title. This was his first fight outside of New England and he certainly made himself known in the fighting community. After winning this fight, Ortiz jumped from 76th to 44th in the world for the lightweight division. If he keeps winning, Ortiz is predicted to fight for a major world title by late 2021.

360 Magazine sat down with Ortiz to ask him questions about his professional career, personal life and future.

What was your upbringing like? Was there always a focus on athletics?

I started boxing at seven years old, and I was always an athletic kid, playing sports and outside.

Where did you learn to box?

I learned how to box at the Boys & Girls Club of Ionic Ave.

Why boxing?

I use to get into fights as a kid, I like that its a one on one sport I don’t have to rely on anyone. Over time, I noticed I was winning a lot and kept it going.

Who are your role models, boxing or otherwise?

My role model was my coach Carlos Garcia.

You’re currently the Undefeated World Boxing Youth World lightweight champion. What does this accomplishment mean to you?

I’m actually the former Youth World lightweight champion due to my age since I turned 24 last April, currently, I hold the WBC USNBC Silver lightweight title. The accomplishment is just a stepping stone, I have far more to go and I understand its a process and this is part of the process.

Your nickname is ‘The Technician’ where does this come from?

A technician is a person skilled in an art or craft by dictionary standards and when it comes to boxing, and me being a carpenter, I’m now an active trader. It was a perfect fit since everything I do, including things in my personal life, I’m technical about it. So it’s a name that reflects more than just boxing.

You’ve been boxing competitively for more than a decade. How have you evolved during that time, technique-wise and also personally?

Time is the mother of greatness, practicing repeatedly overtime is only natural; I’m going to get better.

How has your career been impacted by COVID-19 and 2020?

Luckily I was able to get a fight right before the impact of covid came I didn’t get to fight as much as I normally would. I probably would have had about 4 fights in a year but I had two with the last one being a great exposure bout.

Tell us about your interests outside of boxing.

I enjoy nature and I spend most of my time with family. Always working on self-development, a lot of stocks, and trying to find real estate deals.

Do you still have Olympic aspirations? What are your future boxing goals?

Olympics of boxing is an amateur sport but recently I think in 2016, they allowed pros to compete but it is heavily dominated by amateurs. In the next year, I see myself becoming World Champion at the lightweight Division and reaching for that pound for pound list.

What is your go-to move in a fight?

Not sure, probably switching from orthodox to southpaw.

What makes you unique as a boxer?

My ability to switch stances easily and my technique.

BoxRec

Tapology

RingTV

Behind The Ropes

High Times x Oregon

High Times announced Monday its return to Oregon where more than 150 products will compete for the People’s Choice Cannabis Cup.

Consumers will be able to purchase the products and participate as judges in the competition from the safety of their own homes.

A portion of proceeds will also go toward the Cannabis Cares Wildfire Relief Fund, which helps support cannabis brands affected by the fires.

Originally founded in 1988 in Amsterdam, the High Times Cannabis Cup is the world’s most famous cannabis festival. Though the festival typically lasts two or three days, COVID-19 has pushed High Times to allow consumers to judge from home.

28 different strains will be available to try in a one ounce judging kit, then they will be ranked.

The judging kits are expected to sell out quickly, and they will be sold on a first-come, first-serve basis. The categories up for judgement include flower, pre-rolls, concentrates, vape pens and cartridges as well as two edible categories, gummies or candies and baked goods.

The kits are available in over two dozen of the state’s best products through retail partners like TJ’s Gardens on Eugene and Portland, Oregon Euphorics in Bend, Bahama Buds in Coos Bay, Top Crop in Ontario and Rogue Valley Cannabis in Medford.

High Times has also partnered with Oregon cannabis operator STEM Holdings, the owner of TJ’s Gardens and Yerba Buena Farms, to use more than 75 pounds of product during the competition.

For more information, you can click right here.

You can also follow High Times on Twitter.

A SHOC ENERGY BEVERAGE INSIDE 360 MAGAZINE

Join the A SHOC Challenge!

Adrenaline Shoc (aka A SHOC), a modern fitness enhanced energy drink designed for an active lifestyle, recently launched their first fitness challenge. 

www.ashoc.com/challenge

A SHOC Challenge Description:

Join the A SHOC community from November 2nd to 22nd and complete in their virtual challenge: A 3-week fitness virtual event with 2 main challenges and multiple bonus challenges presented by pro athletes. The main challenge is to crush 300 minutes of activity each week and to get outside and cover 10 miles of distance. Any sport, any time; run, bike, walk, or surf, just get after it. Compete with top Olympic, X Games, and professional athletes from Billy Kemper, Big Wave Surf World Champion, to Gwen Berry, U.S. Olympic Hammer Thrower, who will guide you through some of their unique workouts. View your results on the leaderboard for motivation to push your limits. Whether you are a runner, cyclist, speed walker, weight lifter, or weekend warrior– you were made for this challenge.

About A SHOC

Stay Energized this Fall with Adrenaline Shoc’s newest flavors Blue Raspberry and Orange Freeze, which just hit shelves.

Adrenaline Shoc (aka A SHOC) is a modern fitness enhanced energy drink designed for an active lifestyle, and is growing in popularity by the day amongst fitness enthusiasts. Designed as a performance energy drink, A SHOC was created to inspire people everyday to live an active and healthy lifestyle, offering a natural smart energy blend that is a guilt-free boost to maximize the day.

With 300mg of natural caffeine sourced from yerba mate, green coffee beans, coffee fruit extract and guarana, electrolytes sourced from ocean minerals, 9 essential amino acids to boost performance, and BCAA’s for muscle recovery, A SHOC is the smart energy and a guilt free choice.  But it doesn’t stop there! A SHOC also contains zero sugar, zero chemical preservatives, zero artificial flavors, and zero artificial colors, what more can you ask for?

A SHOC is sold at retailers nationwide including 7-Eleven, Target, CVS, and is now available on Amazon. The flavor offerings include Acai Berry, Shoc Wave, Peach Mango, Frozen Ice, Cotton Candy, Fruit Punch, Watermelon and Sour Candy, with two new flavors  Blue Raspberry and Orange Freeze. To find a store near you visit the store locator on www.ashoc.com
 
Follow A SHOC on Instagram  @AShocEnergy #ReachYourPeak