Posts tagged with "chef"

What to do with your old kitchenware

Over the years it is easy to pick up lots of kitchenware and utensils. However, what is not so easy is keeping them all in good condition. Many people find themselves looking around their kitchen and thinking that the only solution would be to rip it all out and start again. Whilst everyone would like to be able to afford a brand-new kitchen, sometimes it is not financially affordable. This does not mean that you are stuck though. There are plenty of options out there for you to breathe life into your kitchen and this article will give you some ideas on how to do it.

Old Knives

Whether you have invested in a really premium set, or they are just favorites that you have held onto, knives will inevitably lose their sharpness and shine. The simple thing to do is to replace them with a newer set. However, this is not the cheapest thing to do. One way in which you can avoid this is to use a wet stone sharpener. This will bring back the blade to your knife and allow you to keep your favorites without them becoming useless. 

Revitalize your woods

One way to breathe some life back into your kitchen and its wares is to give the cupboards, worktops, and tables a good clean and sand. Sanding them down will take off any surface damages like scratches and marks and smooth it all down. If you are looking to change the color scheme of your kitchen then sanding down all of these features is essential. It can be done by getting the right tools or even the handy DIY sanding pads. 

Removing the blemishes from your wood will make your kitchen look brand new again. This can be especially helpful if you have had children who have taken their toll on the surfaces. It is cheap and easy to do even for a DIY novice.

Kitchen art

If you have found yourself with an abundance of kitchen equipment that is either rubbish or too old to be of any good to anyone, then why don’t you think about repurposing it. You can be surprised at how creative you can get with old pots and pans. They can make quirky art deco pieces that people won’t believe you whipped up in an afternoon. It is all about knowing what you want to do. 

For example, old Teflon frying pans make great chalkboards. This is a great way to get the kids involved. If you have an old skillet pan lying around, you could add art to the back of it and hang it up. You can glue pieces of tile and glass to completely change its look. Or you can repurpose a cake tin as a decorative cake stand for your coffee table. You are only limited by your creativity.

Old Kitchenware

There is so much more that you can do to your old kitchen that does not involve throwing it away. If you don’t have the money or just want to be a little bit greener, then you can investigate how to repurpose all your old kitchenware. Some things like knives can be rejuvenated whilst others can be transformed.

 

Five Tips for Starting a Gluten-Free Diet

In 2022, consumers have a large selection of gluten-free options, improving their quality of life. For individuals diagnosed with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivities (NCGS) in past decades, their dietary selection was minimal. Whether you live in a region with a vast selection of gluten-free options or a limited variety, you may utilize these five tips to effectively start your diet.

Many individuals struggle to maintain a celiac-friendly diet because of limited awareness and education. When consumers increase their recognition of gluten-free labels and naturally allergy-safe foods, they can achieve a healthy diet without stress. Before evaluating the five tips, individuals may benefit from exploring gluten allergies and their physical impacts.

What Are Gluten Allergies?

Celiac disease results in an immune reaction when one’s intestines come in contact with gluten. The physical response damages the small intestine over time, causing malabsorption. Intestinal degradation causes anemia, weight loss, bloating, fatigue, and diarrhea.

The disease may also cause osteoporosis, skin rashes, mouth ulcers, migraines, and fatigue. Other individuals with the condition experience numbness of the feet, legs, and hands, as well as joint pain. People effectively reduce their symptoms over time by consuming a strict gluten-free diet.

Individuals also treat NCGS with gluten-free diets. The illness is similar to celiac disease, except the condition is non-detectable by certain testing. People with NCGS experience brain fog, abdominal pain, migraines, chronic fatigue, bloating, joint pain, diarrhea, and constipation.

A team of researchers at Columbia University identified the effects of gluten on the intestinal health of individuals with NCGS. They discovered similar immune responses and stomach cell destruction associated with consumption. Researchers believe the reaction may relate to a different component in gluten that causes its lack of appearance on celiac tests.

Scientists look at individuals’ reactions to amylase-trypsin inhibitors (ATIs) and fructans when assessing the cause of NCGS symptoms. Understanding the severity of gluten allergies and their probable causes can support informed dietary choices. The first step to starting a successful gluten-free diet is deepening your understanding of the allergen.

1. Expand Your Gluten Education

Gluten is a protein found in various grains like wheat and rye. It is a naturally occurring part of many plants, and researchers discovered a way to extract the protein. Many processed foods contain gluten as a binding agent, holding them together and adding texture.

The protein is present in bread and pasta because it comes from barley, wheat, spelt, rye, durum, emmer, farro, triticale, and other grains. Some naturally gluten-free grains include rice, quinoa, and oats. It is important to look out for specifically gluten-free oats at the store because some products experience cross-contamination.

If oats grow in a field with wheat or rye, they may receive a coating of gluten, decreasing the safety of their consumption by individuals with allergies. When oats are processed in the same facilities as gluten-containing grains, they also may experience cross-contamination. Remaining aware of the naturally celiac-friendly foods and the risk of contamination supports a successful diet.

2. Identify Sneaky Sources of Gluten

Another beneficial tip for starting your gluten-free diet is remaining aware of the sneaky sources of allergens. Medications and supplements often use gluten as an external coating or filler. Before consuming a new pill, it is important to contact your doctor to evaluate its dietary safety.

Processed meat, poultry, and fish often contain wheat as a filler or bast. Most deli meats, hot dogs, and sausages contain gluten, making them not suitable for consumption by individuals with celiac disease or NCGS. Some meat substitutes also use the protein as a filler, creating dietary challenges.

Imitation seafood, like the crab inside sushi rolls, and seitan, always contain gluten. Some veggie burgers also use wheat and other grains to bind the other ingredients. Many sauces additionally utilize wheat as a thickening agent.

Soy sauce is a common culprit of accidental gluten exposure. Restaurants also regularly add barley to miso, making it not suitable for gluten-free consumers. Fortunately, there are many safe alternatives to wheat-containing foods, like tamari or coconut aminos instead of soy sauce.

3. Plan Ahead When Eating Out

The worst feeling is showing up to a dinner out with friends only to realize you cannot eat anything on the menu. Researching a menu before attending a restaurant is the best way to avoid dietary mishaps. Some eateries have designated gluten-free menus whereas others may have zero options.

Calling a restaurant ahead of time is the best way to ensure your ability to safely eat there. Some chefs may even encourage individuals to bring their own gluten-free bread, flour, or pasta to accommodate their dietary restrictions. Individuals can also plan ahead when eating at a friend’s house by bringing a celiac-friendly option.

4. Convert Your Favorite Home-Cooked Meals to Gluten-Free Options

While traditional Italian dishes often contain gluten, individuals can substitute wheat components with chickpea, almond, or rice flour. Consumers with celiac disease and NCGS may make their favorite dishes like pizza using gluten-free substitutes. One pizza recipe uses rice and tapioca flour instead of wheat to create the crust.

It also utilizes xanthan gum to keep the dough together, binding it as gluten would. The crust is also dairy-free and egg-free, making it a suitable option for vegans and lactose-intolerant individuals as well. When making celiac-friendly pizza, it is important to prepare the dough away from wheat-containing dishes to limit cross-contamination.

5. Beware of Cross-Contamination

The final tip for starting a gluten-free diet revolves around cross-contamination. When individuals cook celiac-friendly foods in a wheat-containing kitchen, the meal may come in contact with gluten. Sharing cooking surfaces, utensils, and containers with wheat-containing items can create unsafe dishes for consumers with celiac disease and NCGS.

Flour containing wheat can remain airborne in bakeries for hours, increasing the rate of cross-contamination. Before ordering food from a restaurant or eating at a friend’s house, ensure they have a celiac-friendly kitchen. Many Individuals designate a section of their kitchens to gluten-free meal prep to decrease the risk of cross-contamination.

The Benefits of Eating Gluten-Free

Many individuals benefit from eating a gluten-free diet, especially consumers with celiac disease and NCGS. When you eliminate gluten from your diet, you preserve your small intestinal lining. The diet also decreases abdominal discomfort, migraines, brain fog, and rashes, helping individuals live a normal life without adverse symptoms.

Eight of the Best Ways to Cook Sirloins Steak

Sirloins steak is a popular cut of beef that’s affordable and versatile. Whether you’re a novice in the kitchen or an experienced home cook, preparing delicious, juicy sirloins steak can be a daunting task.

With so many different methods to choose from, how do you know which one is right for you? Here are the eight methods to prepare your sirloins.

1. Grilling

Grilling a sirloin steak is one of the most popular techniques to cook meat. The high direct heat, caramelised texture, and smoky flavour from grilling make it an ideal cooking method for your favourite cut of beef.

While you can use a gas or charcoal grill, using a cast-iron skillet on the grill allows you to make a delicious crust on your steak. You can also use skewers or kitchen strings to tie your steak for uniform cooking.

2. Pan Frying

Pan-frying is another common method of cooking steaks. It involves browning meat quickly in a skillet over high heat with very little oil, thus creating a lovely caramelised crust on the surface of your meat. The key to pan-frying is using a cast-iron skillet and removing your steak from the pan when it’s done for maximum flavour and juiciness.

You can also try cooking sirloins in butter for incredible flavour.

3. Pan Roasting

Pan roasting is a combination of both pan-frying and oven roasting. It involves browning meat, then cooking it in a covered pot over low heat for an extended period. This method works best when cooking sirloins rump roast or other large cuts of steak because the long cooking process will break down the connective tissue and make the meat tenderer.

4. Braising and Stewing

Braising and stewing is an ideal cooking method for tougher cuts of meat because it requires slowly simmering tougher pieces of beef until they’re very tender and moist, usually in some type of liquid like broth or water. This produces a wonderfully flavourful and moister steak that tastes just as good the next day. You can also try adding vegetables like potatoes, carrots and onions to your braising liquid for a complete meal.

5. Roasting

Roasting is one of the healthiest ways to prepare sirloins steak because it involves cooking in an oven. This steak cooking method is excellent for creating a juicy, tender steak while maintaining the natural flavours of your meat. You can also roast sirloins in a marinade or dry rub to infuse your steak with extra flavour.

6. Sous-Vide Cooking

Sous-vide cooking is a method of cooking that involves slowly cooking meat in a vacuum-sealed pouch with boiling water to create tender steaks.

Once you’ve sous vide your meat, you can sear it in a cast-iron skillet for incredible texture and flavour. This technique creates the most succulent, juiciest steak you’ll ever taste.

7. Steaming

Steaming is the best cooking method to avoid overcooking sirloins steaks because it uses steam heat to cook your meat. This technique is great for creating tender steaks that are moist and flavourful. You can also try adding garlic, rosemary or other herbs for an incredible accompaniment.

8. Deep Frying

Deep frying is one of the most popular cooking methods when preparing sirloins steak because it creates a delicious crispy shell around your meat that tastes amazing. Making deep fried steaks can be difficult but can also yield fantastic results. However, deep-frying isn’t the healthiest method of cooking.

Conclusion

There are many different ways to prepare sirloins steak, but the best way is up to your personal preference. No matter what cooking method you choose, sirloins will remain one of the most popular cuts of beef, thanks to its unique texture and flavour. Bon appetit!

Five Ways to Add Heat Without Ruining the Meal

Is your favorite part of the day the meal you’ll make at night but missing that je ne sais quoi is driving you up a wall? Some heat might very well be the thing you are looking for. It’s more versatile than you’d expect and has its place no matter the type of cuisine you are craving. If this is a new avenue for you, here’s some surefire ways to bring the heat.

Crushed Red Pepper

You probably know this best from its place among the shakers in your favorite pizza joint, but it might be time to stop only enjoying it there. The secret combination is a mixture or various red peppers that would be sure to add a little kick to your next meal all without dipping too far into the unfamiliar.

Pepper Jelly

You might be used to saving your pepper jelly for cheese and crackers but there’s no need for it to end there. This treat is perfect for meats, poultry, fish, you name it. It’ll add the perfect kick you are craving along with a few other flavors you didn’t realize you needed. Depending on what you are making, cranberry pepper jelly might be what you want or mango habanero might be the perfect way to reinvent your kitchen staples. 

If you somehow don’t have any on hand and aren’t sure where to buy pepper jelly, don’t forget the internet is your best friend in finding exactly what you need. Sure, there’s always what’s in the stores, but don’t settle if it’s not exactly what you want. At least, make sure you do a little research on the net; you’d be surprised how many varieties of pepper jelly are out there for the taking. 

Sriracha

It might look like it, but don’t think this is in any way ketchup. Thankfully, as the years have gone by, it’s become just as common in some places. Like it’s similarly colored, albeit more traditional friend, ketchup, people put it on just about anything. 

 Inside the bottle, you’ll find the perfect mixture of jalapeno and serrano peppers, garlic, brown sugar, salt and vinegar so it’s easy to imagine all the possibilities when looking to add this to your kitchen. 

 There’s plenty of copycats out there, so if you are looking for the original, make sure you grab the bottle with the rooster front and center.

Fresh Peppers

These are perfect if you are hesitant about adding heat to your next meal. Given it’s not a spice you’re adding, but actual peppers you might need to base the dish around this a little more than you would otherwise. 

The reason it’s such a great choice for those starting their spice journey lies in the seeds. Taking those first steps, take all the seeds out and you’ll have a more mild experience. If you do that and it actually ends up more mild than you were thinking, keep some in. Feeling adventurous? Leave as many as possible and enjoy the ride. 

Garam Masala

A great choice if you aren’t sure how to dress meat or tofu the next time you are preparing either. Don’t think it’s only useful on either of those; it is a key spice when making the wonderful dish that is butter chicken. 

This blend is often the basis of many Indian dishes and the name literally means “hot spices;” learning that is sure to excite some and give pause to others but don’t have fear when it comes to adding some heat into your staple dishes. 

Mauro Colagreco at The Maybourne Riviera

Chef Mauro Colagreco at The Maybourne Riviera: A marine immersion

Chef Mauro Colagreco will take the helm of two dedicated restaurants within The Maybourne Riviera. The soon-to-be-launched hotel joins London’s iconic Claridge’s, The Connaught and The Berkeley as part of the Maybourne Hotel Group. The restaurants will hold pole positions within the strikingly modernist hotel, built on a rocky peninsula high above the town of Roquebrune-Cap-Martin.

His flagship will be Ceto, focusing on the sea and will open on Saturday 9th October. Located on the hotel’s top floor with dramatic panoramic views out over the Mediterranean, it is a true parallel between the sky and sea and will reflect Mauro’s ambition and passion. However, Ceto will be more than just a restaurant, but also a ‘marine culinary workshop’ to deepen knowledge of the region’s aquatic species and research sustainable ecological solutions.

Dishes will play with texture, flavour and cooking processes, with the grill the centrepiece of the restaurant’s open kitchen. The menu will represent the whole of the Mediterranean according to the seasons, using not only fish and shellfish but will include ingredients such as seaweed, sea herbs, samphire, sea fennel, sea cucumber and snails. Sample dishes include Red Tuna – matured belly with Kombu seaweed, XO sauce; Red Scorpionfish – grilled cèpes, roasted Cévennes onion sauce and Monkfish – kale on the embers, bread crust sauce. A selection of vegetarian and pasture-fed meat dishes will also be offered, such as tiger veal reared by the sea in Corsica.

The restaurant will also house a maturation chamber for research and development. This will allow the team to deepen its methods of preserving fish and prolong its maturation by allowing all the flavour and texture to develop in the meat. Each species will be studied individually, and the entire fish used whenever possible (skin, fins, bones and eyes).

Mauro aims to bring this approach and his expertise to help change perspectives on fishing. He desires to shake up traditional codes: the distance and depth of fishing, seasonality, the use of the maturation chamber, anti-waste and the collaboration with renowned scientists.

The décor of Ceto restaurant has been created by architect-designer Marcelo Joulia, with tableware specially sourced and pieces created exclusively by local artists and artisan producers.

In addition, Mauro will also oversee the venue on the ground floor of the hotel. The Riviera Restaurant, already opened on the 22nd of September, offers regional gastronomy in its simplest form. Available for lunch, dinner, snacks or coffees and teas throughout the day, menus naturally retrace the region’s local gastronomic history: from Genoa to Saint Tropez, between mountain and sea. His creations will highlight regional specialities with the greatest respect for the product, season and producer. From Niçoise salad, Spaghetti alla Genovese, grilled fish, sun-soaked vegetables in olive oil, and the famous sweet-tart, Tropézienne, dishes are colourful and cooked simply to reflect the area’s rich variety.

Already established on the Cote D’Azur at his three Michelin starred Mirazur in Menton, Mauro is a cook unrestrained by borders and one who sets his own culinary rules. This ambitious project is a further opportunity for the globally acclaimed chef to showcase his culinary vision and continue to place the region at the forefront of the international gastronomic scene. At The Maybourne Riviera, he will mix this with one of his favourite playgrounds, the sea and hopefully, through careful participation, will help safeguard the diversity of its marine heritage.

“I am extremely proud to be a player in this unique project in The Maybourne Riviera and with a hotel group recognised around the world for its quality and excellence. It is a wonderful setting for guests to enjoy all that is so exceptional about this area of the Mediterranean.”

A Simple Guide To Beef Cuts And How Best To Cook Them

Many people get stuck in a cooking rut. The problem is that we tend to keep cooking the things that we already know. And since there is a lot of mystery surrounding the different cuts of beef, many people either cook a steak or a simple beef stew. They don’t have the knowledge of the cuts to add some variety. 

With so many people becoming foodies these days, there is more interest in learning the best ways to cook various cuts to add some variety. This is especially true with so many people getting interested in some prime cuts of meat that cost quite a bit. They don’t want to risk ruining a wagyu picanha, for example, by using the wrong cooking method. 

In this article, we will go over several cuts of beef with the preferred cooking method to be able to get the most out of them. 

The Basics

When a butcher receives a whole beef carcass, it needs to be divided up. This is so that the parts can be sold, otherwise there would be nobody buying meat if they had to cut it up themselves. 

Besides the commercial aspect, the meat needs to be divided into cuts since the various muscles will cook differently. To make sure they have a cut that cooks the same way throughout they turn a side of beef into primal cuts. From there it gets further divided into sub-primal cuts. 

The general rule of thumb is that the further the cuts are from the hooves or the horn of the animal the more tender they will be. Tender cuts should be cooked quickly and tough ones more slowly.

Chuck Beef

The forequarter includes parts that are generally called chuck but there are various parts within that description. It includes parts of the neck, shoulder blade, and what could be imagined as the upper arm as cows don’t have arms. These are generally parts that have quite consistent fat marbling and some collagen.

As such the chuck is good for braising and stewing. Any long cooking method that slowly melts the collagen and makes the meat soft and tender. 

For quicker cooking, it is often ground up and used as burger meat. The amount of fat and connective tissue makes for a juicy burger.

Not all of the chuck cuts from the forequarter are all for low and slow cooking. Part of the ribeye is also from the end of the chuck off of the ribs. This is a tender and very juicy steak that should be cooked to medium-rare.

Brisket, Flank and Plate

These parts are getting closer to the hoof which means that they are muscles that are worked quite a bit. As such, they can be tough if not cooked properly. This isn’t to say that they all need slow and low cooking methods. 

The brisket, however, is inedible if it is not cooked for long periods. It stands up very well to smoking and cooking over coals at a very low temperature. It is most famous as a classic Texas barbecue meat

The flank is a piece that is very good as a steak although it can be tough if not treated properly. It should be marinated for a while to help break down the connective tissue. Then it has to be cut a certain way for the grain of the meat to be such that it is easy to chew. It will never be totally tender, but the flavor makes up for that. It’s great in tacos, for example. 

The Short Loin

This is the area with the most expensive cuts of meat since they are the most tender. They don’t require slow cooking or marinades to make them tender. 

The T-bone, porterhouse and sirloin steak all come from the short loin and are what you will be served in any steakhouse. They have excellent flavor and do well with quick, dry cooking such as grilling or being cooked on a flat top. 

The most expensive cut is the tenderloin, however, this comes from its own primal cut area and not the short loin. Although the name implies it should be from the short loin area, it is located right next to it. It is a muscle that does little movement so it is extremely tender but lacks the flavor of other cuts like a ribeye or sirloin. To make up for the lack of flavor, tenderloin is often served with a sauce of some kind. 

Chef Domenico Boschi image from Biancalucia Perna at Hotel Maalot for use by 360 Magazine

MAALOT ROMA – DON PASQUALE RESTAURANT

Maalot Roma reveals food concepts of its Don Pasquale Restaurant

Reassessing the traditional Roman dishes and ingredients to create the unexpected gastronomic experience by executive chef Domenico Boschi. 

Maalot Roma, set to become the new “lounge” in the Eternal City for those who want to be in the know, introduces its restaurant’s food concept, created by Don Pasquale’s executive chef Domenico Boschi.

Domenico and Edoardo Officioso, Maalot Roma’s General Manager, comment; “Don Pasquale wants to attract not only an international clientele but also the food connoisseurs in Rome. Our menu includes authentic Italian and Roman dishes together with innovative recipes that give homage to the tradition winking to unexpected and modern paring.” 360 Magazine is excited to try the menu as its hearing these interesting meals. 

The breakfast features a wide selection of pastries, but also Roman Maritozzo con la Panna, Pizza with Mortadella and vast choice of cooked eggs reinvented with roman traditional ingredients – eggs with basil and tomatoes, eggs al Matriciana and eggs al Cacio and Pepe. However, the unexpected combinations don’t end here. The Maritozzo Salato featuring aubergines, cod, and potato, and meatballs is the menu’s most anticipated surprise.

Lunch and dinner options include a wide range of vegetables from local producers to meet the needs of modern trends. Those keen on plant-based gastronomic experiences can choose from Zucchine Romanesche, I Famosi Friggitelli, Le Puntarelle, and Cicoria. Among the starters is the fried octopus with chickpeas and chicory standouts.  Main courses include Amatriciana Don Pasquale with smoked pig cheek by Sauris with handmade Pici and Roman pecorino DOP; Pappardelle, Ajo, Ojo, Baccalà, and Ceci for a rustic dish full of flavors; Vitella alla Fornara and Galletto alla Cacciatora, both meat dishes in which traditional recipes are re-created with innovative cooking technics to soften the meat and make it tasty and juicy.

The traditional Tiramisu or the Apple and Cinnamon Crumble delight those with a sweet tooth.

Image via Bricoleur Vineyards for 360 Magazine

Bricoleur Vineyards Gains Award-Winning Chefs

James Beard Award-Winning Chefs Charlie Palmer and Nate Appleman Partner with Bricoleur Vineyards as Culinary Advisors

The winery’s first joint event with Chef Palmer is Project Zin on August 21st, which is already sold out

Bricoleur Vineyards is excited to announce that James Beard Award-winning chefs Charlie Palmer and Nate Appleman are joining the Bricoleur Vineyards team as Culinary Advisors. The winery’s first join event with Chef Palmer will be Project Zin, a sold out fundraiser for Down Syndrome Association North Bay, at Bricoleur Vineyards on August 21st. 

We couldn’t be more thrilled. Our family has long admired Chef Palmer and Chef Appleman’s talent, said Bricoleur Vineyards’ co-founder Mark Hanson. Our culinary team already creates amazing wine & food experiences for our guests, which will be enhanced by working with Chef Palmer and Chef Appleman. A mutual friend introduced us, and we really connected with Chef Palmer and Chef Appleman on our shared values of supporting philanthropy, our local community, and great wine and food. We’re excited to add their expertise and collaborative enthusiasm to our team.

Bricoleur Vineyards opened in the Sonoma County town of Windsor, just south of Healdsburg, last spring in the midst of the pandemic and in a short time has already earned recognition from San Francisco Bay Area press as the region’s Best New Emerging Winery and Most Romantic Winery.  A 40-acre picturesque destination with 21 acres of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay vineyards that have produced critically acclaimed, award-winning wines, the sustainably farmed estate also features expansive culinary gardens, fruit trees, olive groves, chickens, and honeybees.

Chef Palmer brings his signature Progressive American Cooking to Bricoleur Vineyards and will team up with the estate’s culinary team on menu creation and concept to further elevate the winery’s already robust offerings. With 13 acclaimed restaurants and rooftop bars across the United States, Palmer has chosen Sonoma County as his home, designing wine-forward tasting menus for Bricoleur Vineyards that emphasize the fresh, seasonal produce grown on the estate, reflecting the bounty of the land that Palmer knows so well.

I’m excited to work with the team at Bricoleur Vineyards as Culinary Advisor, said Palmer. A close friend brought me to the estate for a tasting earlier this year and I was impressed with their tasting menus and the way their wines pair so beautifully with dishes made from their estate-grown fruits and vegetables. I cannot wait to collaborate further on wine and food experiences and events in the future.

In keeping with their shared devotion to philanthropy and supporting the local community, Chef Palmer is excited to host the 11th Annual Project Zin event at Bricoleur Vineyards on August 21, 2021. Project Zin is a celebratory event hosted by Winemaker Clay Mauritson and Chef Palmer that benefits Down Syndrome Association North Bay. Palmer and Mauritson launched Project Zin in 2012, and the annual event has raised over $1,000,000 for DSANB. This year’s event is sold out, but to learn more about Project Zin and Down Syndrome Association North Bay, please visit their website.

At Bricoleur Vineyards, we’re all about celebrating life’s moments with wine and food, while supporting charities across the country and here at home, added Bricoleur Vineyards’ co-founder Sarah Hanson Citron. Bricoleur Vineyards is a beautiful place to gather, where social connections are fostered, and communities are built. Chef Palmer and Chef Appleman share our enthusiasm for bringing people together and we’re excited to welcome them to our team.

Bricoleur Vineyards is open Thursday – Monday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. by appointment only and reservations can be made by visiting their website or by calling 707-857-5700. Bricoleur Vineyards is close to the Santa Rosa airport, which accommodates both commercial and private planes, and it’s only an hour north of San Francisco. Bricoleur Vineyards is located at 7394 Starr Road in Windsor, California and can be found on Instagram.

Here is a link that includes photos of Chef Palmer, Chef Appleman, Mark Hanson, Sarah Hanson Citron, and beauty shots of Bricoleur Vineyards.

About Bricoleur Vineyards

Bricoleur Vineyards, which launched its first vintage in 2017 and opened its tasting room in 2020, is tucked away in Sonoma’s Russian River Valley – just south of Healdsburg. Founded by the Hanson family, Bricoleur Vineyards can be found at the end of a winding road in the charming, bucolic town of Windsor, only an hour north of San Francisco – and very close to the Santa Rosa airport. The distinctive name, Bricoleur, is French for one who starts building something with no clear plan, adding bits here and there, cobbling together a whole while flying by the seat of their pants.

The Bricoleur Vineyards estate produces two families of critically-acclaimed, award-winning wines – Bricoleur and Flying by the Seat of Our Pants. Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Viognier, Cabernet Sauvignon, Sauvignon Blanc, Rosé of Pinot Noir and Zinfandel are crafted under the Bricoleur label, while Rosé of Grenache and Brut are produced under the humorous, irreverent Flying by the Seat of Our Pants label. The wines are crafted by veteran Winemaker Cary Gott and Assistant Winemaker Tom Pierson.

In addition to Bricoleur Vineyards, the Hanson family also owns Kick Ranch Vineyard in Sonoma County’s Fountaingrove District AVA. The Hanson family’s roots run deep in Sonoma County. Mark Hanson was born in Santa Rosa, and Beth Wall Hanson’s great grandfather, Pietro Carlo Rossi, was the original oenologist for Sonoma County’s historic Italian Swiss Colony. Rossi revolutionized California winemaking in the 19th century and under his direction, the Italian Swiss Colony became one of America’s leading wineries. 

Bricoleur Vineyards is open Thursday – Monday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. by appointment only and reservations can be made by visiting their website or by calling 707-857-5700. Bricoleur Vineyards is located at 7394 Starr Road in Windsor, California and can be found on Instagram.

Town & Country’s 8th Philanthropy Summit – Pharrell Williams × José Andrés

The 8th annual Town & Country Philanthropy Summit kicked off today with an amazing conversation between Pharrell Williams and José Andrés, moderated by Soledad O’Brien.

See below for highlights from the panel as well as a link to view the interview in its entirety:

Pharrell Williams on how he thinks about philanthropy and what his goals are: 

“When we think about the African diaspora and people of color and what people who are deemed ‘minorities’ – which we are actually not—but that’s just the saying. There are three pillars that affect us the most—disproportionate access to education, disproportionate access to healthcare, and also disproportionate access to legislation. I think the first two are the ones that I want to focus on because they’re the ones that I feel like I can, through my resources and even my likenesses whenever needed, that I can actually make a difference in education and healthcare. These are the things that hurt us the most.”

José Andrés on why he focuses on food insecurity:

“I am one more cook in the universe of people that feed people in America or around the world. But people like me, we only feed the few. I am in the power, when you began thinking, we can also be a part of feeding the many. And where we can join forces to the many around America, and around many places in the world, in the most difficult moments, to be able to bring solutions. For me, food is my way of doing it, but what we do is only a drop of water in an ocean of empathy. It requires a lot of props of empathy to make things happen. Obviously what I do is more focused on emergencies, I don’t like to see people in mayhem; people who, already in the good times forgotten, that are voiceless, that nobody takes care of. It’s even worse when a hurricane, an earthquake, an explosion of fire, a pandemic, hits their communities even further. That’s the moment that I feel the urgency of now being yesterday, and I love to bring my community and try to be nice to as many people as we can in these moments of mayhem. At the end of the day, one plate of food at a time won’t solve every problem but at least you buy time. And you give hope to people who need it the most.”

Pharrell on how he and Jose met and joined forces: 

“Catherine Kimmel – the great connector – took me to an event. Here’s a guy that you really need to meet because, like you, he takes what it is he does and puts it to better usage and thinks about others… [at an event in New York] I was so impressed because there were so many chefs there but this guy – it was different. Yes, he’s a chef and he’s all about his ingredients and recipes, but his greatest meal was his operation and people and his ability to galvanize. It was really apparent that everyone was centered around him and all he wanted to do was feed people and bring people together and help people see that through our differences and our challenges are actually a lot of solutions and we can make the world a better place and I was really blown away… Then we met and we realized there were a lot of things he was doing that I could be instrumental in helping him.”

José on meeting Pharrell and what attracted him to Pharrell:

“I go and meet Pharrell and he’s even better, he’s the better half. What you get is a good vibe – it’s very difficult to describe. You know, you read about people, NBA players, amazing musicians and I’m not only looking for the amazing things they do, which I love, but what’s behind. When you see that behind is something very powerful that they’re putting at the service of others – their power, their money, their contacts but something even more powerful is their brain connecting with their empathy within their hearts… We wouldn’t be able to do what we do without people like them. Pharrell knows and more importantly loves his community. We were able to do it in Virginia Beach and be there because Pharrell opened to us the doors of being that community without being foreigners. We were able to partner with local people, with local restaurants.”

José on how his family impacted his values and his metaphor on life:

“My mom and dad always believed in longer tables, not higher ones. The table will always be ready for whoever showed up… My father would put me in charge of making the fire. I did that since I was young, and I would become very good at making the fire. But my father was very particular, and he would never let me near the chicken… [he would say] ‘My son I know you wanted to do the cooking, but actually doing the fire and controlling the fire is the most important thing, everyone wants to do the cooking without understand the fire. My son you already have the biggest gift. Control the fire, master the fire, and then you can do any cooking you want.’ (I don’t know if my father told me that story with that idea or I’m making it more romantic along the way as the years pass by). My father was giving me a mantra for life itself: find your fire, control your fire, master your fire, and then you can do any cooking you want in your life.”

Pharrell on his foundation YELLOW:

“For us, we want to even the odds. I know that I was a very lucky person who benefitted from my teachers seeing something in me. They didn’t know what they were telling me or which way the way to go but they kept telling me to keep going. I think that had a profound effect on me because essentially education is the toolbox that every human being is going to need out in the world just to function… What we wanted to do is look at a curriculum that could assess these children and figure out how they comprehend information best. Then eventually make a curriculum that is sensory based and not sensory biased. If you learn differently than how the curriculum is being taught, then automatically you’re deemed as remedial… with the YELLOW hub, it’s the space where kids can learn based on their way they process their information.”

Pharrell on the education system:

“I love public school teachers and you know, love the unions as well, but the education the educational system is antiquated. I mean just ask your favorite Fortune 500 CEO – they might not be the best, they might not be well read, but that does not stop their genius. And this is what we want. We want to make sure that we reach every child by properly assessing their learning potential and comprehension preferences, and making sure that they have a curriculum that is based for them. Sensory bias is an issue, but sensory based learning special educational systems is the future. That’s how every child slip through the cracks and we get to eventually even the odds.”

José on how the pandemic affected and influenced his philanthropy:

“I think this year has changed all of us profoundly… Fundamentally has changed me. First, obviously take care of your family. I tried to be a father who took care of his daughters and my wife and trying to keep them safe. Every mother and father tried to do that. But then I began thinking that to take care of my daughters, it’s not putting them behind walls, to take care of my daughters, is bringing down those walls and trying to work as hard to provide for the other daughters and sons of other people I don’t know that they are trying to achieve the same for their children. The way I’m going to keep my daughters safer is not behind walls but with longer tables, where I work as hard to provide for my daughters as I’m going to work to provide for the daughters I don’t know. Fundamentally this is what changed me.”

José on what people get wrong about philanthropy:

“Robert Egger, my favorite food fighter, he said that it seems philanthropy is usually about the redemption of the giver, when philanthropy essentially needs to be about the liberation of the receiver. It’s nothing wrong to give and donate time or money or your brain and feel good about it, but fundamentally in this pandemic, I learned that to give, it’s not good enough, that we must do good, yes, but we must do smart good.”

Pharrell on the changes he has noticed this year:

“Empathy is at an all-time low. It’s not where it needs to be. There’s a lot of sympathy and pity, but there’s not empathy. And we need more of that, we need more empathy, we need more humility, we need more gratitude. I think the pandemic, for me, has taken me to that place where that’s the only thing I can think about.”

View the summit here.

The T&C Summit continues tomorrow (June 22, 2021 @ 12:30-1:30 PM EDT) with a panel between the power media couple Marlo Thomas and Phil Donahue. Register directly here.

Bernardus menu item illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Lucia Restaurant & Bar New Menu

LUCIA RESTAURANT & BAR CELEBRATES SUMMER WITH A PLANT-BASED BASH

NEW COLORS OF THE SEASON MENU FOCUSED ON GREEN, GORGEOUS & GASTRONOMIC

America’s love affair with the garden has exploded with 9.7 million people now fully immersed in a plant-based diet. In fact, 2021 is projected to be THE year this diet finally goes mainstream. From plant-based beverages to meatless burgers, this trend has no signs of slowing given the benefits to both one’s body and the environment. Riding this wave, chef Cal Stamenov is culling beets, chard, asparagus and fresh fava from the Lodge’s two-acre organic garden to debut the new Colors of the Season menu. Served in addition to the la carte and five-course tasting menu, Colors of the Season is available June 1 through July 31, 2021; prices range from $16 to $36.

NATURE’S BOUNTY

Crafting vegetable-driven dishes requires equal parts timing and finesse. Picked at their peak, kale, sweet peas, chard and fresh fava share short lifespans. Coaxing their distinct flavors while marrying ingredients into a leafy risotto, humble ratatouille or goat cheese terrine is an art. Take the elevated Red Striped Beet Spring Roll, a visual stunner with pops of cilantro, olives and creamy avocado, balancing texture and flavor for a full palate immersion. Purple Cauliflower Soup, blending purple basil and purple radish with fresh black beets puts a colorful spin on comfort food.

Other starters include lip-smacking Local Asparagus, steamed with saffron couscous, curly purple mustard and a passionfruit emulsion. The Backdoor Avocado Salad, spotlighting fruit culled from nearby Salinas Valley, delivers a mélange of quinoa, heirloom tomatoes, fennel and fresh basil lightly dressed in Meyer lemon-olive oil with a dusting of Big Sur Sea salt. There is also a spin on crudité, with the Colorful Pickled Veggies Around and an ethereal Beautiful Strawberries, pairing arugula, lemon confit and aged balsamic with a dollop of fluffy Italian burrata.

Green Gazpacho makes a showing on the new menu, with a deft blend of celery, cilantro, avocado and piquant Padron peppers. The Leafy Green Risotto, focused on kale, Swiss chard, spinach, chervil and fresh fava is a flavor explosion, as is the Portobello Wellington, stuffed with zucchini, kale, goat cheese and pine nuts with a rich butternut squash sauce. Corn hounds will love the Agnolotti Pasta, prepared with fresh yellow corn, just-picked sweet peas and shave or two of Australian black winter truffles. Rounding out the menu is a Stuffed Rainbow Chard, easy on both the eyes and palate, pairing green lentils du puy, zucchini, brown rice and goat cheese.

SOURCING SUPERFOODS

The switch to a plant-based diet is not a fad. According to Gallup, 77 percent of Americans have reduced their meat consumption in the past 12 months, with almost six in 10 Americans reporting transitioning to a more flexitarian or semi-vegetarian diet. This bodes well for chefs who have long refined their craft in this category.

There is no shortage of benefits for those who aligned with a vegetable-forward diet. According to Everyday Health, the nine scientific benefits from following this menu regimen include lower blood pressure, reduction in cardiovascular disease, weight loss, reduction in Type 2 diabetes, stroke and risk of cancer, and issues surrounding cholesterol. Living longer is another key benefit. The Journal of the American Heart Association study found that a plant-based diet lowers the risk of all causes of mortality by 25 percent. Finally, the noted benefits to the brain, largely due to polyphenols which are known to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive decline. Simply stated, the world is your (mushroom) oyster!

LUCIA RESTAURANT & BAR

Set in secluded Carmel Valley on 28 acres of sweeping lavender, grapevines and olive orchards, Lucia Restaurant & Bar has long set the standard for luxury dining along the California coast. Named after the majestic Santa Lucia Mountains which provide the dramatic backdrop to the 2,300 sq., ft., alfresco terrace, the contemporary 90-seat dining room is set in rich white Italian leather paired with rustic treatments crafted in marble, oxidized copper, teak and reclaimed wood. French wooden floors, chandeliers and stunning exterior fireplaces grace the mixed-use table layout with a focal point fireplace styled from Bagattini Oregon stone marking the main entrance. Paired with Stamenov’s light touch and artisanal integrity, the restaurant underscores the authentic relationship between food and terroir.

Classically trained with an eye to sustainability, Stamenov’s light touch and artisanal integrity are evident in every offering. Wielding an impressive resume working under the ardent eye of such culinary greats as Pierre Gagnaire, Michel Richard, Alain Ducasse, Eric Ripert and the legendary Masa Kobayashi, his California country cuisine plays off locally sourced product with the essence of the dish taking center stage. Subtle reductions and thoughtful flavor marriages are his mantra, paired with a back pocket of local farmers and foragers keeping Lucia’s kitchen at a steady simmer.

Culling from the Lodge’s two-acre backdoor organic garden and a private cache of 150+ fruit trees, heirloom vegetables, 180,000 Italian honeybees and resident Plymouth, Barred Rock, Rhode Island, Speckled Sussex and Ameraucana chickens, Stamenov’s seasonal spotlight menu is certain to please.

Colors of the Season:

Red Striped Beet Spring Rolls | cilantro, avocado, olives, spicy hummus | $16

Herb Goat Cheese Terrine | beets, carrots, celery root remoulade | $16

Beautiful Strawberries | italian burrata, arugula, lemon confit, aged balsamic | $18

Colorful Pickled Veggies Around | leeks vinaigrette, parmesan toast, garden herbs | $17

Local Asparagus | steamed, passionfruit emulsion, saffron couscous, curly purple mustard | $18

Swank Farm Purple Cauliflower Soup | purple basil, purple radish | $12

Backdoor Avocado Salad | quinoa, heirloom tomatoes, fennel, fresh-picked basil, olive oil, big sur sea salt, meyer lemon| $18

Australian Winter Black Truffle Risotto | carnaroli rice, glazed spring vegetables, chervil| $36

Baked Ratatouille | marble potatoes, rosemary, fresh spaghetti, olives | $32

Agnolotti Pasta | yellow corn, australian black winter truffles, sweet peas | $36

Stuffed Rainbow Chard | green lentils du puy, brown rice, zucchini, goat cheese | $34

Green Gazpacho | avocado, celery, cilantro, peppers, leafy greens, lime | $14

Leafy Green Risotto | kale, asparagus, chard, spinach, parmesan, fresh fava, parsley, chervil| $27

Portobello Wellington | kale, swiss chard, zucchini, goat cheese, pine nuts, butternut squash sauce | $36

Wild Mushroom | brown rice with roasted garlic, black truffle potatoes, parmesan, arugula | $32

Fresh Raspberry Vacherin | raspberry sorbet, baked lavender meringue | $14

Blenheim Apricot Tart | almonds, lavender-honey ice cream | $14

Christine’s Organic Strawberries | lemon verbena ice cream, sauternes granite| $14

A variety of coveted private dining venues from the casual Cooper’s Den to the 12-seat private Wine Cellar, exclusive five-seat Chef’s Table and 16-seat Magnum Room offer extensive tasting menus backed by an impressive 25,000-bottle wine cellar. Light dining is also available in Lucia Bar and patio.