Posts tagged with "chef"

Mauro Colagreco at The Maybourne Riviera

Chef Mauro Colagreco at The Maybourne Riviera: A marine immersion

Chef Mauro Colagreco will take the helm of two dedicated restaurants within The Maybourne Riviera. The soon-to-be-launched hotel joins London’s iconic Claridge’s, The Connaught and The Berkeley as part of the Maybourne Hotel Group. The restaurants will hold pole positions within the strikingly modernist hotel, built on a rocky peninsula high above the town of Roquebrune-Cap-Martin.

His flagship will be Ceto, focusing on the sea and will open on Saturday 9th October. Located on the hotel’s top floor with dramatic panoramic views out over the Mediterranean, it is a true parallel between the sky and sea and will reflect Mauro’s ambition and passion. However, Ceto will be more than just a restaurant, but also a ‘marine culinary workshop’ to deepen knowledge of the region’s aquatic species and research sustainable ecological solutions.

Dishes will play with texture, flavour and cooking processes, with the grill the centrepiece of the restaurant’s open kitchen. The menu will represent the whole of the Mediterranean according to the seasons, using not only fish and shellfish but will include ingredients such as seaweed, sea herbs, samphire, sea fennel, sea cucumber and snails. Sample dishes include Red Tuna – matured belly with Kombu seaweed, XO sauce; Red Scorpionfish – grilled cèpes, roasted Cévennes onion sauce and Monkfish – kale on the embers, bread crust sauce. A selection of vegetarian and pasture-fed meat dishes will also be offered, such as tiger veal reared by the sea in Corsica.

The restaurant will also house a maturation chamber for research and development. This will allow the team to deepen its methods of preserving fish and prolong its maturation by allowing all the flavour and texture to develop in the meat. Each species will be studied individually, and the entire fish used whenever possible (skin, fins, bones and eyes).

Mauro aims to bring this approach and his expertise to help change perspectives on fishing. He desires to shake up traditional codes: the distance and depth of fishing, seasonality, the use of the maturation chamber, anti-waste and the collaboration with renowned scientists.

The décor of Ceto restaurant has been created by architect-designer Marcelo Joulia, with tableware specially sourced and pieces created exclusively by local artists and artisan producers.

In addition, Mauro will also oversee the venue on the ground floor of the hotel. The Riviera Restaurant, already opened on the 22nd of September, offers regional gastronomy in its simplest form. Available for lunch, dinner, snacks or coffees and teas throughout the day, menus naturally retrace the region’s local gastronomic history: from Genoa to Saint Tropez, between mountain and sea. His creations will highlight regional specialities with the greatest respect for the product, season and producer. From Niçoise salad, Spaghetti alla Genovese, grilled fish, sun-soaked vegetables in olive oil, and the famous sweet-tart, Tropézienne, dishes are colourful and cooked simply to reflect the area’s rich variety.

Already established on the Cote D’Azur at his three Michelin starred Mirazur in Menton, Mauro is a cook unrestrained by borders and one who sets his own culinary rules. This ambitious project is a further opportunity for the globally acclaimed chef to showcase his culinary vision and continue to place the region at the forefront of the international gastronomic scene. At The Maybourne Riviera, he will mix this with one of his favourite playgrounds, the sea and hopefully, through careful participation, will help safeguard the diversity of its marine heritage.

“I am extremely proud to be a player in this unique project in The Maybourne Riviera and with a hotel group recognised around the world for its quality and excellence. It is a wonderful setting for guests to enjoy all that is so exceptional about this area of the Mediterranean.”

A Simple Guide To Beef Cuts And How Best To Cook Them

Many people get stuck in a cooking rut. The problem is that we tend to keep cooking the things that we already know. And since there is a lot of mystery surrounding the different cuts of beef, many people either cook a steak or a simple beef stew. They don’t have the knowledge of the cuts to add some variety. 

With so many people becoming foodies these days, there is more interest in learning the best ways to cook various cuts to add some variety. This is especially true with so many people getting interested in some prime cuts of meat that cost quite a bit. They don’t want to risk ruining a wagyu picanha, for example, by using the wrong cooking method. 

In this article, we will go over several cuts of beef with the preferred cooking method to be able to get the most out of them. 

The Basics

When a butcher receives a whole beef carcass, it needs to be divided up. This is so that the parts can be sold, otherwise there would be nobody buying meat if they had to cut it up themselves. 

Besides the commercial aspect, the meat needs to be divided into cuts since the various muscles will cook differently. To make sure they have a cut that cooks the same way throughout they turn a side of beef into primal cuts. From there it gets further divided into sub-primal cuts. 

The general rule of thumb is that the further the cuts are from the hooves or the horn of the animal the more tender they will be. Tender cuts should be cooked quickly and tough ones more slowly.

Chuck Beef

The forequarter includes parts that are generally called chuck but there are various parts within that description. It includes parts of the neck, shoulder blade, and what could be imagined as the upper arm as cows don’t have arms. These are generally parts that have quite consistent fat marbling and some collagen.

As such the chuck is good for braising and stewing. Any long cooking method that slowly melts the collagen and makes the meat soft and tender. 

For quicker cooking, it is often ground up and used as burger meat. The amount of fat and connective tissue makes for a juicy burger.

Not all of the chuck cuts from the forequarter are all for low and slow cooking. Part of the ribeye is also from the end of the chuck off of the ribs. This is a tender and very juicy steak that should be cooked to medium-rare.

Brisket, Flank and Plate

These parts are getting closer to the hoof which means that they are muscles that are worked quite a bit. As such, they can be tough if not cooked properly. This isn’t to say that they all need slow and low cooking methods. 

The brisket, however, is inedible if it is not cooked for long periods. It stands up very well to smoking and cooking over coals at a very low temperature. It is most famous as a classic Texas barbecue meat

The flank is a piece that is very good as a steak although it can be tough if not treated properly. It should be marinated for a while to help break down the connective tissue. Then it has to be cut a certain way for the grain of the meat to be such that it is easy to chew. It will never be totally tender, but the flavor makes up for that. It’s great in tacos, for example. 

The Short Loin

This is the area with the most expensive cuts of meat since they are the most tender. They don’t require slow cooking or marinades to make them tender. 

The T-bone, porterhouse and sirloin steak all come from the short loin and are what you will be served in any steakhouse. They have excellent flavor and do well with quick, dry cooking such as grilling or being cooked on a flat top. 

The most expensive cut is the tenderloin, however, this comes from its own primal cut area and not the short loin. Although the name implies it should be from the short loin area, it is located right next to it. It is a muscle that does little movement so it is extremely tender but lacks the flavor of other cuts like a ribeye or sirloin. To make up for the lack of flavor, tenderloin is often served with a sauce of some kind. 

Chef Domenico Boschi image from Biancalucia Perna at Hotel Maalot for use by 360 Magazine

MAALOT ROMA – DON PASQUALE RESTAURANT

Maalot Roma reveals food concepts of its Don Pasquale Restaurant

Reassessing the traditional Roman dishes and ingredients to create the unexpected gastronomic experience by executive chef Domenico Boschi. 

Maalot Roma, set to become the new “lounge” in the Eternal City for those who want to be in the know, introduces its restaurant’s food concept, created by Don Pasquale’s executive chef Domenico Boschi.

Domenico and Edoardo Officioso, Maalot Roma’s General Manager, comment; “Don Pasquale wants to attract not only an international clientele but also the food connoisseurs in Rome. Our menu includes authentic Italian and Roman dishes together with innovative recipes that give homage to the tradition winking to unexpected and modern paring.” 360 Magazine is excited to try the menu as its hearing these interesting meals. 

The breakfast features a wide selection of pastries, but also Roman Maritozzo con la Panna, Pizza with Mortadella and vast choice of cooked eggs reinvented with roman traditional ingredients – eggs with basil and tomatoes, eggs al Matriciana and eggs al Cacio and Pepe. However, the unexpected combinations don’t end here. The Maritozzo Salato featuring aubergines, cod, and potato, and meatballs is the menu’s most anticipated surprise.

Lunch and dinner options include a wide range of vegetables from local producers to meet the needs of modern trends. Those keen on plant-based gastronomic experiences can choose from Zucchine Romanesche, I Famosi Friggitelli, Le Puntarelle, and Cicoria. Among the starters is the fried octopus with chickpeas and chicory standouts.  Main courses include Amatriciana Don Pasquale with smoked pig cheek by Sauris with handmade Pici and Roman pecorino DOP; Pappardelle, Ajo, Ojo, Baccalà, and Ceci for a rustic dish full of flavors; Vitella alla Fornara and Galletto alla Cacciatora, both meat dishes in which traditional recipes are re-created with innovative cooking technics to soften the meat and make it tasty and juicy.

The traditional Tiramisu or the Apple and Cinnamon Crumble delight those with a sweet tooth.

Image via Bricoleur Vineyards for 360 Magazine

Bricoleur Vineyards Gains Award-Winning Chefs

James Beard Award-Winning Chefs Charlie Palmer and Nate Appleman Partner with Bricoleur Vineyards as Culinary Advisors

The winery’s first joint event with Chef Palmer is Project Zin on August 21st, which is already sold out

Bricoleur Vineyards is excited to announce that James Beard Award-winning chefs Charlie Palmer and Nate Appleman are joining the Bricoleur Vineyards team as Culinary Advisors. The winery’s first join event with Chef Palmer will be Project Zin, a sold out fundraiser for Down Syndrome Association North Bay, at Bricoleur Vineyards on August 21st. 

We couldn’t be more thrilled. Our family has long admired Chef Palmer and Chef Appleman’s talent, said Bricoleur Vineyards’ co-founder Mark Hanson. Our culinary team already creates amazing wine & food experiences for our guests, which will be enhanced by working with Chef Palmer and Chef Appleman. A mutual friend introduced us, and we really connected with Chef Palmer and Chef Appleman on our shared values of supporting philanthropy, our local community, and great wine and food. We’re excited to add their expertise and collaborative enthusiasm to our team.

Bricoleur Vineyards opened in the Sonoma County town of Windsor, just south of Healdsburg, last spring in the midst of the pandemic and in a short time has already earned recognition from San Francisco Bay Area press as the region’s Best New Emerging Winery and Most Romantic Winery.  A 40-acre picturesque destination with 21 acres of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay vineyards that have produced critically acclaimed, award-winning wines, the sustainably farmed estate also features expansive culinary gardens, fruit trees, olive groves, chickens, and honeybees.

Chef Palmer brings his signature Progressive American Cooking to Bricoleur Vineyards and will team up with the estate’s culinary team on menu creation and concept to further elevate the winery’s already robust offerings. With 13 acclaimed restaurants and rooftop bars across the United States, Palmer has chosen Sonoma County as his home, designing wine-forward tasting menus for Bricoleur Vineyards that emphasize the fresh, seasonal produce grown on the estate, reflecting the bounty of the land that Palmer knows so well.

I’m excited to work with the team at Bricoleur Vineyards as Culinary Advisor, said Palmer. A close friend brought me to the estate for a tasting earlier this year and I was impressed with their tasting menus and the way their wines pair so beautifully with dishes made from their estate-grown fruits and vegetables. I cannot wait to collaborate further on wine and food experiences and events in the future.

In keeping with their shared devotion to philanthropy and supporting the local community, Chef Palmer is excited to host the 11th Annual Project Zin event at Bricoleur Vineyards on August 21, 2021. Project Zin is a celebratory event hosted by Winemaker Clay Mauritson and Chef Palmer that benefits Down Syndrome Association North Bay. Palmer and Mauritson launched Project Zin in 2012, and the annual event has raised over $1,000,000 for DSANB. This year’s event is sold out, but to learn more about Project Zin and Down Syndrome Association North Bay, please visit their website.

At Bricoleur Vineyards, we’re all about celebrating life’s moments with wine and food, while supporting charities across the country and here at home, added Bricoleur Vineyards’ co-founder Sarah Hanson Citron. Bricoleur Vineyards is a beautiful place to gather, where social connections are fostered, and communities are built. Chef Palmer and Chef Appleman share our enthusiasm for bringing people together and we’re excited to welcome them to our team.

Bricoleur Vineyards is open Thursday – Monday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. by appointment only and reservations can be made by visiting their website or by calling 707-857-5700. Bricoleur Vineyards is close to the Santa Rosa airport, which accommodates both commercial and private planes, and it’s only an hour north of San Francisco. Bricoleur Vineyards is located at 7394 Starr Road in Windsor, California and can be found on Instagram.

Here is a link that includes photos of Chef Palmer, Chef Appleman, Mark Hanson, Sarah Hanson Citron, and beauty shots of Bricoleur Vineyards.

About Bricoleur Vineyards

Bricoleur Vineyards, which launched its first vintage in 2017 and opened its tasting room in 2020, is tucked away in Sonoma’s Russian River Valley – just south of Healdsburg. Founded by the Hanson family, Bricoleur Vineyards can be found at the end of a winding road in the charming, bucolic town of Windsor, only an hour north of San Francisco – and very close to the Santa Rosa airport. The distinctive name, Bricoleur, is French for one who starts building something with no clear plan, adding bits here and there, cobbling together a whole while flying by the seat of their pants.

The Bricoleur Vineyards estate produces two families of critically-acclaimed, award-winning wines – Bricoleur and Flying by the Seat of Our Pants. Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Viognier, Cabernet Sauvignon, Sauvignon Blanc, Rosé of Pinot Noir and Zinfandel are crafted under the Bricoleur label, while Rosé of Grenache and Brut are produced under the humorous, irreverent Flying by the Seat of Our Pants label. The wines are crafted by veteran Winemaker Cary Gott and Assistant Winemaker Tom Pierson.

In addition to Bricoleur Vineyards, the Hanson family also owns Kick Ranch Vineyard in Sonoma County’s Fountaingrove District AVA. The Hanson family’s roots run deep in Sonoma County. Mark Hanson was born in Santa Rosa, and Beth Wall Hanson’s great grandfather, Pietro Carlo Rossi, was the original oenologist for Sonoma County’s historic Italian Swiss Colony. Rossi revolutionized California winemaking in the 19th century and under his direction, the Italian Swiss Colony became one of America’s leading wineries. 

Bricoleur Vineyards is open Thursday – Monday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. by appointment only and reservations can be made by visiting their website or by calling 707-857-5700. Bricoleur Vineyards is located at 7394 Starr Road in Windsor, California and can be found on Instagram.

Town & Country’s 8th Philanthropy Summit – Pharrell Williams × José Andrés

The 8th annual Town & Country Philanthropy Summit kicked off today with an amazing conversation between Pharrell Williams and José Andrés, moderated by Soledad O’Brien.

See below for highlights from the panel as well as a link to view the interview in its entirety:

Pharrell Williams on how he thinks about philanthropy and what his goals are: 

“When we think about the African diaspora and people of color and what people who are deemed ‘minorities’ – which we are actually not—but that’s just the saying. There are three pillars that affect us the most—disproportionate access to education, disproportionate access to healthcare, and also disproportionate access to legislation. I think the first two are the ones that I want to focus on because they’re the ones that I feel like I can, through my resources and even my likenesses whenever needed, that I can actually make a difference in education and healthcare. These are the things that hurt us the most.”

José Andrés on why he focuses on food insecurity:

“I am one more cook in the universe of people that feed people in America or around the world. But people like me, we only feed the few. I am in the power, when you began thinking, we can also be a part of feeding the many. And where we can join forces to the many around America, and around many places in the world, in the most difficult moments, to be able to bring solutions. For me, food is my way of doing it, but what we do is only a drop of water in an ocean of empathy. It requires a lot of props of empathy to make things happen. Obviously what I do is more focused on emergencies, I don’t like to see people in mayhem; people who, already in the good times forgotten, that are voiceless, that nobody takes care of. It’s even worse when a hurricane, an earthquake, an explosion of fire, a pandemic, hits their communities even further. That’s the moment that I feel the urgency of now being yesterday, and I love to bring my community and try to be nice to as many people as we can in these moments of mayhem. At the end of the day, one plate of food at a time won’t solve every problem but at least you buy time. And you give hope to people who need it the most.”

Pharrell on how he and Jose met and joined forces: 

“Catherine Kimmel – the great connector – took me to an event. Here’s a guy that you really need to meet because, like you, he takes what it is he does and puts it to better usage and thinks about others… [at an event in New York] I was so impressed because there were so many chefs there but this guy – it was different. Yes, he’s a chef and he’s all about his ingredients and recipes, but his greatest meal was his operation and people and his ability to galvanize. It was really apparent that everyone was centered around him and all he wanted to do was feed people and bring people together and help people see that through our differences and our challenges are actually a lot of solutions and we can make the world a better place and I was really blown away… Then we met and we realized there were a lot of things he was doing that I could be instrumental in helping him.”

José on meeting Pharrell and what attracted him to Pharrell:

“I go and meet Pharrell and he’s even better, he’s the better half. What you get is a good vibe – it’s very difficult to describe. You know, you read about people, NBA players, amazing musicians and I’m not only looking for the amazing things they do, which I love, but what’s behind. When you see that behind is something very powerful that they’re putting at the service of others – their power, their money, their contacts but something even more powerful is their brain connecting with their empathy within their hearts… We wouldn’t be able to do what we do without people like them. Pharrell knows and more importantly loves his community. We were able to do it in Virginia Beach and be there because Pharrell opened to us the doors of being that community without being foreigners. We were able to partner with local people, with local restaurants.”

José on how his family impacted his values and his metaphor on life:

“My mom and dad always believed in longer tables, not higher ones. The table will always be ready for whoever showed up… My father would put me in charge of making the fire. I did that since I was young, and I would become very good at making the fire. But my father was very particular, and he would never let me near the chicken… [he would say] ‘My son I know you wanted to do the cooking, but actually doing the fire and controlling the fire is the most important thing, everyone wants to do the cooking without understand the fire. My son you already have the biggest gift. Control the fire, master the fire, and then you can do any cooking you want.’ (I don’t know if my father told me that story with that idea or I’m making it more romantic along the way as the years pass by). My father was giving me a mantra for life itself: find your fire, control your fire, master your fire, and then you can do any cooking you want in your life.”

Pharrell on his foundation YELLOW:

“For us, we want to even the odds. I know that I was a very lucky person who benefitted from my teachers seeing something in me. They didn’t know what they were telling me or which way the way to go but they kept telling me to keep going. I think that had a profound effect on me because essentially education is the toolbox that every human being is going to need out in the world just to function… What we wanted to do is look at a curriculum that could assess these children and figure out how they comprehend information best. Then eventually make a curriculum that is sensory based and not sensory biased. If you learn differently than how the curriculum is being taught, then automatically you’re deemed as remedial… with the YELLOW hub, it’s the space where kids can learn based on their way they process their information.”

Pharrell on the education system:

“I love public school teachers and you know, love the unions as well, but the education the educational system is antiquated. I mean just ask your favorite Fortune 500 CEO – they might not be the best, they might not be well read, but that does not stop their genius. And this is what we want. We want to make sure that we reach every child by properly assessing their learning potential and comprehension preferences, and making sure that they have a curriculum that is based for them. Sensory bias is an issue, but sensory based learning special educational systems is the future. That’s how every child slip through the cracks and we get to eventually even the odds.”

José on how the pandemic affected and influenced his philanthropy:

“I think this year has changed all of us profoundly… Fundamentally has changed me. First, obviously take care of your family. I tried to be a father who took care of his daughters and my wife and trying to keep them safe. Every mother and father tried to do that. But then I began thinking that to take care of my daughters, it’s not putting them behind walls, to take care of my daughters, is bringing down those walls and trying to work as hard to provide for the other daughters and sons of other people I don’t know that they are trying to achieve the same for their children. The way I’m going to keep my daughters safer is not behind walls but with longer tables, where I work as hard to provide for my daughters as I’m going to work to provide for the daughters I don’t know. Fundamentally this is what changed me.”

José on what people get wrong about philanthropy:

“Robert Egger, my favorite food fighter, he said that it seems philanthropy is usually about the redemption of the giver, when philanthropy essentially needs to be about the liberation of the receiver. It’s nothing wrong to give and donate time or money or your brain and feel good about it, but fundamentally in this pandemic, I learned that to give, it’s not good enough, that we must do good, yes, but we must do smart good.”

Pharrell on the changes he has noticed this year:

“Empathy is at an all-time low. It’s not where it needs to be. There’s a lot of sympathy and pity, but there’s not empathy. And we need more of that, we need more empathy, we need more humility, we need more gratitude. I think the pandemic, for me, has taken me to that place where that’s the only thing I can think about.”

View the summit here.

The T&C Summit continues tomorrow (June 22, 2021 @ 12:30-1:30 PM EDT) with a panel between the power media couple Marlo Thomas and Phil Donahue. Register directly here.

Bernardus menu item illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Lucia Restaurant & Bar New Menu

LUCIA RESTAURANT & BAR CELEBRATES SUMMER WITH A PLANT-BASED BASH

NEW COLORS OF THE SEASON MENU FOCUSED ON GREEN, GORGEOUS & GASTRONOMIC

America’s love affair with the garden has exploded with 9.7 million people now fully immersed in a plant-based diet. In fact, 2021 is projected to be THE year this diet finally goes mainstream. From plant-based beverages to meatless burgers, this trend has no signs of slowing given the benefits to both one’s body and the environment. Riding this wave, chef Cal Stamenov is culling beets, chard, asparagus and fresh fava from the Lodge’s two-acre organic garden to debut the new Colors of the Season menu. Served in addition to the la carte and five-course tasting menu, Colors of the Season is available June 1 through July 31, 2021; prices range from $16 to $36.

NATURE’S BOUNTY

Crafting vegetable-driven dishes requires equal parts timing and finesse. Picked at their peak, kale, sweet peas, chard and fresh fava share short lifespans. Coaxing their distinct flavors while marrying ingredients into a leafy risotto, humble ratatouille or goat cheese terrine is an art. Take the elevated Red Striped Beet Spring Roll, a visual stunner with pops of cilantro, olives and creamy avocado, balancing texture and flavor for a full palate immersion. Purple Cauliflower Soup, blending purple basil and purple radish with fresh black beets puts a colorful spin on comfort food.

Other starters include lip-smacking Local Asparagus, steamed with saffron couscous, curly purple mustard and a passionfruit emulsion. The Backdoor Avocado Salad, spotlighting fruit culled from nearby Salinas Valley, delivers a mélange of quinoa, heirloom tomatoes, fennel and fresh basil lightly dressed in Meyer lemon-olive oil with a dusting of Big Sur Sea salt. There is also a spin on crudité, with the Colorful Pickled Veggies Around and an ethereal Beautiful Strawberries, pairing arugula, lemon confit and aged balsamic with a dollop of fluffy Italian burrata.

Green Gazpacho makes a showing on the new menu, with a deft blend of celery, cilantro, avocado and piquant Padron peppers. The Leafy Green Risotto, focused on kale, Swiss chard, spinach, chervil and fresh fava is a flavor explosion, as is the Portobello Wellington, stuffed with zucchini, kale, goat cheese and pine nuts with a rich butternut squash sauce. Corn hounds will love the Agnolotti Pasta, prepared with fresh yellow corn, just-picked sweet peas and shave or two of Australian black winter truffles. Rounding out the menu is a Stuffed Rainbow Chard, easy on both the eyes and palate, pairing green lentils du puy, zucchini, brown rice and goat cheese.

SOURCING SUPERFOODS

The switch to a plant-based diet is not a fad. According to Gallup, 77 percent of Americans have reduced their meat consumption in the past 12 months, with almost six in 10 Americans reporting transitioning to a more flexitarian or semi-vegetarian diet. This bodes well for chefs who have long refined their craft in this category.

There is no shortage of benefits for those who aligned with a vegetable-forward diet. According to Everyday Health, the nine scientific benefits from following this menu regimen include lower blood pressure, reduction in cardiovascular disease, weight loss, reduction in Type 2 diabetes, stroke and risk of cancer, and issues surrounding cholesterol. Living longer is another key benefit. The Journal of the American Heart Association study found that a plant-based diet lowers the risk of all causes of mortality by 25 percent. Finally, the noted benefits to the brain, largely due to polyphenols which are known to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive decline. Simply stated, the world is your (mushroom) oyster!

LUCIA RESTAURANT & BAR

Set in secluded Carmel Valley on 28 acres of sweeping lavender, grapevines and olive orchards, Lucia Restaurant & Bar has long set the standard for luxury dining along the California coast. Named after the majestic Santa Lucia Mountains which provide the dramatic backdrop to the 2,300 sq., ft., alfresco terrace, the contemporary 90-seat dining room is set in rich white Italian leather paired with rustic treatments crafted in marble, oxidized copper, teak and reclaimed wood. French wooden floors, chandeliers and stunning exterior fireplaces grace the mixed-use table layout with a focal point fireplace styled from Bagattini Oregon stone marking the main entrance. Paired with Stamenov’s light touch and artisanal integrity, the restaurant underscores the authentic relationship between food and terroir.

Classically trained with an eye to sustainability, Stamenov’s light touch and artisanal integrity are evident in every offering. Wielding an impressive resume working under the ardent eye of such culinary greats as Pierre Gagnaire, Michel Richard, Alain Ducasse, Eric Ripert and the legendary Masa Kobayashi, his California country cuisine plays off locally sourced product with the essence of the dish taking center stage. Subtle reductions and thoughtful flavor marriages are his mantra, paired with a back pocket of local farmers and foragers keeping Lucia’s kitchen at a steady simmer.

Culling from the Lodge’s two-acre backdoor organic garden and a private cache of 150+ fruit trees, heirloom vegetables, 180,000 Italian honeybees and resident Plymouth, Barred Rock, Rhode Island, Speckled Sussex and Ameraucana chickens, Stamenov’s seasonal spotlight menu is certain to please.

Colors of the Season:

Red Striped Beet Spring Rolls | cilantro, avocado, olives, spicy hummus | $16

Herb Goat Cheese Terrine | beets, carrots, celery root remoulade | $16

Beautiful Strawberries | italian burrata, arugula, lemon confit, aged balsamic | $18

Colorful Pickled Veggies Around | leeks vinaigrette, parmesan toast, garden herbs | $17

Local Asparagus | steamed, passionfruit emulsion, saffron couscous, curly purple mustard | $18

Swank Farm Purple Cauliflower Soup | purple basil, purple radish | $12

Backdoor Avocado Salad | quinoa, heirloom tomatoes, fennel, fresh-picked basil, olive oil, big sur sea salt, meyer lemon| $18

Australian Winter Black Truffle Risotto | carnaroli rice, glazed spring vegetables, chervil| $36

Baked Ratatouille | marble potatoes, rosemary, fresh spaghetti, olives | $32

Agnolotti Pasta | yellow corn, australian black winter truffles, sweet peas | $36

Stuffed Rainbow Chard | green lentils du puy, brown rice, zucchini, goat cheese | $34

Green Gazpacho | avocado, celery, cilantro, peppers, leafy greens, lime | $14

Leafy Green Risotto | kale, asparagus, chard, spinach, parmesan, fresh fava, parsley, chervil| $27

Portobello Wellington | kale, swiss chard, zucchini, goat cheese, pine nuts, butternut squash sauce | $36

Wild Mushroom | brown rice with roasted garlic, black truffle potatoes, parmesan, arugula | $32

Fresh Raspberry Vacherin | raspberry sorbet, baked lavender meringue | $14

Blenheim Apricot Tart | almonds, lavender-honey ice cream | $14

Christine’s Organic Strawberries | lemon verbena ice cream, sauternes granite| $14

A variety of coveted private dining venues from the casual Cooper’s Den to the 12-seat private Wine Cellar, exclusive five-seat Chef’s Table and 16-seat Magnum Room offer extensive tasting menus backed by an impressive 25,000-bottle wine cellar. Light dining is also available in Lucia Bar and patio.

Worldly Old Fashioned illustration by Heather Skovlund (Photo Credit: Robert Flicker) for 360 Magazine

Bellagio’s Petrossian Bar

Bellagio’s Petrossian Bar in Las Vegas Debuts Caviar and Cocktails for the Modern Traveler

Caviar Tacos, “Worldly” Old Fashioned, and cocktail pairings highlight new experience from The Strip’s most iconic lobby bar

Caviar Tacos and captivating cocktail pairings take center stage at Petrossian Bar’s new epicurean experience at Bellagio Resort & Casino. Along with live piano sounds and views of Dale Chihuly’s “Fiori di Como” over the resort’s bustling lobby, the legendary bar’s evolved menu blends signature components of Las Vegas’ culinary scene with extravagant ingredients to create an approachable way to indulge in the world’s finest spirits and caviar.

“Petrossian Bar has long been heralded as an iconic people-watching destination featuring exceptional caviar, high-end spirits, and tea service,” said Bellagio Executive Chef Wesley Holton. “We took those core elements and world-renowned offerings, then infused them with modern concepts for an engaging lobby bar experience that cannot be found anywhere else.”

A Glimpse into Petrossian Bar’s New Menu

Signature Sips

  • Worldly Old Fashioned: A glass globe transports an international Old Fashioned tableside with Yamazaki 12-Year Japanese Whisky, WhistlePig 10-Year Whiskey, Craigelliache 13-Year Scotch, Demerara Syrup and Angostura Bitters.
  • Poof!: Encapsulated in a glass of smoke is an exquisite cocktail-pairing experience. Once the smoke dissipates, Poof! reveals a concoction of Bulliet Rye Whiskey, Copper & King Apple Brandy and Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth sitting side-by-side with Duck Confit Croquettes for a smoky and surprising delight to be enjoyed together.
  • The Bellagio Martini: Exuding elegance with a beautifully shaped ice sphere at the center of the glass, this quintessential vodka-based martini features lemon essence for a splash of citrus to pair with the lavish and edible Ossetra Caviar Cigar.

Caviar Creations

  • Caviar Taco: One of the planet’s most opulent and scrumptious tacos features a thin and crispy potato shell filled with layered flavors of Hamachi, lemon, chives and olive oil and then topped with Daurenkie caviar.
  • Caviar Pie: Crème fraiche and brown butter filling upon a flaky crust create a savory tart garnished with green apples, lemons, and flowers to complement the caviar in this indulgent pie.
  • Dark Chocolate Caviar: Petrossian Bar’s delectable dessert mimics caviar service through dark chocolate “pearls” presented with Meyer lemon gelee, fresh citrus supremes, Rose champagne sorbet and vanilla chantilly.

In addition to these new signature cocktails and decadent dishes, Petrossian Bar offers an elevated Afternoon Tea experience from 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. The experience includes freshly baked scones, flavorful desserts, and choice of tea.

Reservations are required at Petrossian Bar. Visit Bellagio online for more information. 

Worldly Old Fashioned
Worldly Old Fashioned
Photo Credit: Robert Flicker
Cigar Caviar
Cigar Caviar
Photo Credit: Robert Flicker
Poof!
Poof!
Photo Credit: Robert Flicker
Mighty Sesame Sauce illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Mighty Sesame Harissa Tahini

NEW MIGHTY SESAME HARISSA TAHINI PUTS A SPICY SPIN ON A CONSUMER FAVORITE

Mighty Sesame Co. Adds a Bold New Variation to its Popular Squeeze & Serve Line

Mighty Sesame Co., the maker of all-natural, squeeze-and-serve tahini, is upping the tahini game with the first-ever harissa flavored tahini on the market.

Tahini continues to trend globally as consumers and chefs discover new ways to use the creamy, nutrient-rich condiment. With the rollout of Mighty Sesame Harissa Tahini, it’s easier than ever to add extra zip to everything from dressings and dips to meat and veggies.

The sesame experts make their tahini from the finest Ethiopian sesame seeds and serve it up in shake-and-squeeze bottles—the first tahini packaging of its kind in the U.S.—for maximum convenience. The new variety contains a blend of 100% natural harissa spices for a distinctively aromatic, roasted-chile pepper flavor profile with a kick.

Mighty Sesame’s Chef Gregg is available to whip up a great Mom’s Day brunch recipe.  See him in action on this YouTube video.

Like all Mighty Sesame tahinis, the Harissa variety is ready to use with just a shake and a squeeze, no stirring required. It is packed with protein and contains 260mg of calcium per serving. Organic, vegan, gluten- and dairy-free, kosher, and halal, it’s a 100% guilt-free option for everyone.

The original Mighty Sesame Organic Squeezable Tahini, introduced in 2018 and was anointed The Best Tahini You Can Buy, by Epicurious Magazine.

Mighty Sesame Harissa Tahini comes in 10.9 oz / Master Pack of 8 bottles with an MSRP $4.99 per 10.9 oz. bottle. Mighty Sesame is distributed by Kayco, headquartered in Bayonne, NJ.

About Kayco Beyond

Kayco is one of the largest manufacturers and suppliers of specialty and kosher foods. Kayco Beyond Division sources and distributes new products to the general market beyond kosher to meet the demands of consumers looking for optional products that are healthful, convenient, or for restricted diets and lifestyles. These brands include Dorot Gardens, Absolutely Gluten Free, Beetology, Mighty Sesame, Tuscanini Foods, and new Wonder Melon.

Kia Damon illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Chef Kia Damon: Culinary Compassion In The Kitchen

By: Emily Bunn

This Women’s History Month, 360 Magazine sat down with Chef Kia Damon. Kia is the founder of Kia Feeds The People (KFTTP) and is a cofounder of Auxilio, both of which are non-profits aimed at combating food apartheid. We dished with Kia on how she discovered her passion for cooking, pathways towards increased Black and QTPOC representation in the culinary industry, and her upcoming video release with EFFEN Vodka and Queer Foods, which can be viewed here.

When did you first begin cooking? When did you realize you wanted to pursue it professionally?

“I started cooking in my early preteens. I have younger brothers as well, so once we were too old for day care, I had to step up as the older sibling to make sure we ate, especially more so during the summertime because I have working parents. But, it wasn’t until some years later when I started cooking independently for my own health reasons that I truly saw my strengths in cooking and realized that cooking professionally wasn’t a world that was so far away for me, that it was actually extremely attainable and extremely real. So I took the plunge, and to this day some of my family’s still very surprised, because I was definitely burning pots of rice, and they were like ‘this girl has no talents for the kitchen.’ Now I’m cooking and they still can’t believe it.”

We all know foods brings communities together. Are there any experiences you’ve had with community members through Kia Feeds The People that have stuck with you?

Yes! Honestly, the most connective part was before I even started cooking with KFTTP people when I was looking for guidance from a lot of my friends in the cooking community. Because KFTTP was birthed in a really tumultuous time, I felt like I couldn’t quite gather my thoughts and my feelings. I just felt so emotionally charged and stunted that I felt like I couldn’t even work or think or move because I felt so emotional about everything. But being able to lean into my friends and my chosen family who see me for who I am, who know me intimately and know my heart, they were able to guide me to where I am now and toward my mission for KFTTP. I’m super grateful. These are people that I’ve been able to cook with before, these are people that I’ve literally eaten with before–we’ve shared food out of deli containers at 3am–I’m very grateful for them. And I definitely could not have got to this place without them.”

Are you looking to expand KFTPP outside of Brooklyn, or just focus on this specific community?

“Because I am a Sagittarius, I definitely am looking to expand and looking to grow. I definitely have to make sure I build and flesh KFTTP out as much as possible in Brooklyn before I start thinking about moving other places. But I do have visions, not necessarily to just expand Kia Feeds The People, but to collaborate with other mutual aid organizations and non-profits that already exist in other cities, so that I can support them and [they] have more coverage where they are. I’m not the only one who’s doing this kind of work and it is definitely a collaborative, lifelong mission, so I want to lend hands to the people who are already in this game.”

What do you think is the biggest obstacle facing overcoming food apartheid?

Personally I think the biggest obstacle is still convincing people that it exists, because we live in such a individualistic world. If something doesn’t affect the next person, then they’re more likely to ignore it, you know. That’s why I think COVID really shook things up, because a lot of us were collectively put on our butts. you know. We’re like “whoa, wait a minute, is this one thing that is really proactively affecting us.” But regarding food apartheid, a lot of people are still familiar with it in terms of a “food desert.” Food desert is a word that’s been used for many years to describe this situation, and a “desert” implies that it is natural, because the world naturally created deserts. When you apply “food desert” to that idea, it implies that this place without food, this place without access to meals, is natural and that’s just the way that it’s supposed to be. But it’s completely unnatural, it’s completely systematic, and [after recognizing that] then we can start looking at it as something that is created by is created by systems. Then, we can put some realness to it and find how all of us are truly affected by them. So I think right now, it’s making sure people know what food apartheid is, and that it actually exists.”

Do you have a favorite meal or cocktail to prepare when you’re bringing family or friends together?

“My favorite meal is red beans and rice. I love a good pot of Louisiana-style red beans and rice, because honestly that–with some corn bread on top and so hot sauce– that really is the whole meal. You think you would need something else on the side but that’s really it. It’s so fulfilling, it’s so delicious, and I definitely try to bring it out when I get to be with my friends and family.”

The culinary world is a male-dominated industry. How can the culinary industry work to become more diverse, and have more Black, QTPOC chefs?

“I think it’s a starts with actually investing in the lives and careers of these black/brown/trans/ LGBTQ chefs because they exist. I know they exist because they’re my friends. And what happens is that maybe they’re put in positions of leadership or maybe not, but they’re they’re not given the same care, support or investment in their skills and education and their needs. You could put someone in a line chef position or position of leadership or whatever, but if there’s no follow through to make sure that they have what they need to be supported in those positions, they’re usually set up for failure, or set up to be harmed in some way. Or maybe a small business that’s LGBTQ or Black has a good profile, [but they may not be] getting access to grants or money. You have to have the follow through. It’s not that we don’t exist, it’s that we’re not properly supported when we are put at the forefront. That’s when it gets tricky and that’s when we’re left open to harm and failure.”

What are you most excited about regarding this video release with Queer Foods and EFFEN Vodka?

“I’m very excited for mom to see it first of all, I love my mommy and she is my number one fan. And she’s a Gemini, so I’m always looking for her approval. But I’m also excited to get to Kia Feeds The People and Queer Stories in front of the world. I feel like we can’t tell enough queer stories, there’s always someone’s story out there. Even though there’s this myth out there that there’s already enough representation, or that maybe it’s too much to keep talking about queer people, that’s actually far from the truth. I’m proud and honored that EFFEN Vodka wants to support what I’m doing and wants to get my story out there. My story is the story of a lot of other Black and brown and trans people’s stories, and it also feels good to partner with someone who sees me and wants to invest in my story and invest in supporting other diverse artists, both in their representation and practice. It just feels good to be seen, and I’m excited for everyone else to see me and to be seen. Just look! Everyone just look! I want everyone to look and feel pride in who we are.”

How can readers donate to Kia Feeds The People?

“You can head to my GoFundMe if you’re not in the city, or if you’re in Brooklyn you can come to a pop up. Please donate to my GoFundMe, I have it on my Instagram page. Share it with your friends, let them know what’s up. Or if you are in Bed-Stuy, you can find me at a pop-up– I have a few coming up in April, so I’m going to be all over the place. Come get some food or throw some money, either way I’ll be very grateful.”

To learn more about Kia, visit her website.

Kia’s EFFEN Rosé Vodka Grapefruit Cocktail

Ingredients: 

  • 2 parts EFFEN Rosé vodka
  • 1 oz of lime juice
  • ½ oz of cane syrup
  • 2 or 3 parts grapefruit juice

Mix the grapefruit juice, lime juice, simple syrup, EFFEN Rosé vodka and a spoonful of ice in a cocktail shaker. Stir and taste. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with grapefruit, and thyme. Drink responsibly + enjoy!

Kia’s Gumbo Recipe 

Ingredients

  • 8 oz andouille sausage
  • 1lb Boneless skinless chicken thighs
  • 2 large yellow onions, diced
  • 4 stalks of celery, diced
  • 2 green bell peppers, diced
  • 2 cups sliced okra, fresh or frozen
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 cup of oil
  • 1 cup AP flour
  • 6 cups chicken stock
  • 4 tbsp Creole seasoning
  • 1 tbsp of fresh thyme
  • 1 tbsp Smoked paprika
  • ½ tbsp Ground sage
  • 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • Hot sauce to taste
  • Black pepper
  • Kosher salt
  • Fresh parsley

Directions

  • Season the chicken thighs with 2 tablespoons of creole seasoning, salt and pepper. Season well on both sides. Heat a skillet or cast iron to medium heat with enough oil to cover the bottom. When the pan is hot, sear the chicken in batches. Brown the chicken on both sides and set aside. The chicken does not have to be cooked through just yet.
  • In a large pot add the oil and heat to a medium high heat. Add the flour and whisk until it begins to cook. Lower the heat to medium low. Keep whisking the roux over a controlled and steady heat until the flour begins to darken into a deep brown. This takes about 30 minutes, so pace yourself.
  • Turn the heat down on the roux and add in your onion, bell pepper and celery. Stir into the roux, season with a few pinches of salt and sauté until fragrant and translucent. Add in your minced garlic and fresh thyme. Stir for another 2 minutes. Slowly pour in the chicken stock while whisking the roux. Do this part slowly because the roux will begin to thicken. Take your time and continue pouring in the stock until it’s completely incorporated.
  • Bring the pot to a boil, meanwhile slice the sausage in ¼ inch rounds on a slight bias. When the pot begins to boil, reduce to a simmer and add the chicken and sausage. Let the gumbo cook on low for an hour. You want time for the flour taste to cook out.
  • After an hour, add the remaining two tablespoons of creole seasoning, smoked paprika, ground sage and Worcestershire sauce to the pot. Stir and add your sliced okra. Cook for another 10 minutes, add salt and pepper and hot sauce to taste then serve with rice and chopped parsley.
  • Enjoy!

Kia's EFFEN Rosé Vodka Grapefruit Cocktail Photo credit: Solène Michel  Recipe credit: Kia Damon, Kia Feeds The People for use by 360 Magazine

Photo credit: Solène Michel Recipe credit: Kia Damon, Kia Feeds The People

Kia Damon image shot by Elina Street for EFFEN Vodka and Queer Foods for use by 360 Magazine

Photo Credit: Solène Michel 

Kayaking illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

What’s Trending in Tennessee

What’s New, Trending and Blooming this Spring in Tennessee

  • Memphis – Memphis Zoo’s all-new Kangazoo Experience lets you get face-to-face with kangaroos roaming free in the walk-through exhibit. Visitor favorites also include giraffe-feeding, the panda exhibit and Sting Ray Cove.
  • Jackson – Discover what makes Jackson a unique place for music lovers of all backgrounds whether you’re looking for new eclectic sounds, blues and gospel, country music or more with live performances of Jackson’s Hidden Tracks.
  • Nashville – Enjoy premiere shopping, world-class dining, live music and views of downtown at Fifth + Broadway. This 300,000 square foot multi-level mecca is a must-see and home to the National Museum of African American Musicand Assembly Food Hall featuring two dozen restaurants on multiple levels.
  • Columbia – The Mulehouse is a 55,000 square feet new music and event venue located a few blocks from the downtown square, established by country radio personality and broadcaster, Blair Garner.
  • Manchester – A brand new concert series features live, in-person performances in a socially-distanced setting at the Bonnaroo Farm. Concerts on the Farm includes performances by Billy Strings, Jon Pardy, Jameson Rodgers, The Avett Brothers and more.
  • Chattanooga – Grab your thinking caps, maps and don’t forget your mask. Take adventure to the next level. Learn more about Chattanooga’s top attractions and neighborhoods during the Spring Break Safari Scavenger Hunt.
  • Knoxville – Three levels of magical crystal barrooms wait to be discovered in downtown Knoxville. Bernadette’sbarrooms include the Knox County Quartz House, the Amethyst Lounge, and a stunning rooftop of Crystal Gardens.
  • Gatlinburg – Anakeesta will be in full bloom with the launch of Blooms and Tunes featuring colorful nature-themed art installations, live music and a new spring-themed menu at four restaurants in the park.
  • Townsend – The Smoky Mountain Bigfoot Festival Noon-10 p.m. May 22 includes live music, vendors, food trucks, bigfoot competitions, oral histories, 1-mile fun run and more at the Townsend Visitor’s Center.
  • Johnson City – Grab a scavenger hunt clue card online or from a downtown business to search for 15 bronze animal sculptures as part of Wildabout Walkabout Scavenger Hunt from the public library and King Commons Park to Main and Market Streets.

New Restaurants, Breweries and Distilleries

  • Memphis – Renowned chefs Andrew Ticer and Michael Hudman are at it again, this time with their Little Bettie pizza joint inside Wiseacre’s newly opened downtown taproom.
  • Clarksville – The Thirsty Goat is a newer gathering place outside of the city that features a beer garden, artisan coffee shop and oven-fired pizzas.
  • Murfreesboro – Biscuit-based meals made baked fresh daily are at the forefront of Maple Street Biscuit Co. Jams and jellies are also made in-store. Featured on Food Network, The Squawking Goat dish is an all-natural fried chicken breast, fried goat cheese medallion and house-made pepper jelly atop a flaky biscuit.
  • Columbia – Wolf and Scout Coffee Car is located in the Columbia Arts Building serving varieties of coffees and their signature drink, the Wolfhunter.
  • Carthage – Cajun wings, honey BBQ wings, onion rings, fries and delicious sides are on tap at Something 2 Wing About.
  • Farragut – 35 North, located in the heart of Farragut, features the area’s best food trucks, local brews, wine and spirits and features two patios, an outdoor fireplace and a place for gathering.
  • LaFollette – Twin Flame features amazing hot dogs, burgers, wings, catfish, specialty drinks and much more with carry-out and dining room seating available.
  • Wartburg – The MoCo Brewing Project is Morgan County’s latest brewery and coffee shop with signature beers named and influenced by local landmarks. The owners brew beer, coffee and offer flavored coffee and hot chocolate.
  • Sevierville – Tennessee Shine Co.uses family recipes and small-batch distilling, features a tasting bar and Moonshine Tour.
  • Johnson City – Watauga Brewing Company is a three story brewery, restaurant and rooftop bar. Restaurant On 2 combines upscale New American cuisine with Appalachian and southern roots. The chef uses local, seasonal foods in her menu. 

New Attractions and Exhibits

  • Memphis –Visitors can enjoy movie nights and world-renowned musicians in an all-new outdoor setting at The Grove at GPAC.
  • Memphis – Graceland celebrates the 50 anniversary King of Rock ‘n’ Roll meeting then President Richard Nixon with a special pop-up exhibit and artifacts with Dear Mr. President: Elvis and Mr. Nixon.
  • Nashville – Once Upon a Spring at Gaylord Opryland includes a live story time show, art activities, cookie decorating, scavenger hunt, boat rides and other fun programming.
  • Knoxville – Zoo Knoxville’s The ARC (Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Campus), open spring 2021, will showcase the zoo’s pioneering conservation work with these species and feature revolutionary STEM education resources.
  • Johnson City – Paradise Acresis a family farm park with an 18-hole mini-golf course, outdoor laser tag, barn-side drive-in theater and U-Pick produce.

New Hotels & Places to Stay

  • Memphis – Walk the line between southern hospitality, offbeat and elevated cuisine to get a genuine taste of Midtown’s unconventional personality, storied art district and Overton Square at The Memphian, set to open April 2021.
  • Memphis – Hyatt Centric Beale Street Memphis is within walking distance of the city’s famed entertainment district, nestled in a vibrant neighborhood known for lauded music venues, historic landmarks, southern comfort and Memphis-style barbecue.
  • Nashville – W Hotel Nashville is set to take the stage in the heart of the Gulch. Opening spring 2021 with 346 rooms, the new hotel will welcome visitors with curated local tunes, garden-to-glass cocktails and welcoming communal spaces.
  • Pigeon Forge – Pigeon Forge RV Resort along the Little Pigeon River includes 149 RV sites, camping, riverside fishing, illuminated river walk. On-property offerings include on-site concierge services, a pool, and hot tub, playground, picnic pavilion, a dog park, golf cart rentals, a retail store, conference room, gym, and laundry facilities.

New Stores

  • Columbia – Columbia features several new stores including Cope (in the Columbia Arts Building with a variety of trendy plants), family-owned jewelry store Tillis Jewelry on the downtown square and Southern Clutter Boutique with a variety of clothing, accessories, home goods and crafts.
  • Farragut – Euphoric Cheese features cut-to-order cheeses from all around the world, a wide variety of charcuterie items, specialty groceries and a selection of local brews. Items such as chocolate-covered figs, blue cheese stuffed olives, creamed honey and rosemary crackers will make your grazing board memorable.
  • Kingston – That Local Cheeseboard Co.features handcrafted charcuterie boards & boxes, grazing tables, customizable boxes, corporate catering, and gifts and items for special occasions.

Hot/Trending Places for Spring

  • Hornbeak – Vacation while you dine at Blue Bank Fishhouse & Grill at Blue Bank Resort with delicious weekend specials, local craft beer, live music, fire pits, butterfly garden & front row seating to a beautiful sunset on Reelfoot Lake.
  • Alamo – Drive through the 5.5 miles of safari roads in your own car, interact and feed animals at Tennessee Safari Park. After the journey, experience the walk-through zoo, enjoy refreshments at the concessions, the playground area, and the petting zoo.
  • Clarksville – Downtown at Sundown Concerts at Downtown Commons includes free live music the first and third Friday nights May through October. The large urban outdoor park allows space to socially distance with your chairs or blanket.
  • Linden – Experience serenity on the water. Commodore River Adventures offers an uncrowded, individual or small-group, artisan kayaking experience.
  • Nashville – Celebrate spring, warmer weather and longer days with more than 150,000 blooming bulbs and fun seasonal activities during Cheekwood in Bloom.
  • Nashville – Board the General Jackson Showboat, one of Gaylord Opryland’s most popular attractions, for cruises featuring first-class live entertainment, delicious meals and gorgeous views of Nashville.
  • LaFollette – Chapman Hill Winery is a quaint winery with an elegant tasting room nestled in the hills of East Tennessee on the edge of Norris Lake. Bring a lawn chair or blanket for the Vineyard Vibrations live music series.
  • Farragut – Enjoy a stroll through town, a heritage trail, cemetery and educational sites to learn history of the area, pioneer settlements and more through artifacts, photos and stories during the Farragut History Walk.
  • Harriman – Lakeshore Park offers recreation fun for the family and is home to the Gupton Wetlands area, where at least 114 species of birds can be found. Bring bikes, kayaks, fishing poles and enjoy scenery and trails.
  • Lancing – Lilly Hopyard Brewery is tucked away in the woods near the Obed Wild and Scenic River. Warm up around the campfire, watch the game, play corn hole, listen to live music and enjoy the Sauced Frog eatery.
  • Winchester – Stroll with family and friends during Food Truck Fridays at the downtown Farmers Market Pavilion on the Boulevard. Downtown merchants will stay open late on the first Friday of every month.
  • Johnson City – At the 40-acre Tannery Knobs Mountain Bike Park, riders can experience the thrill of off-road riding from the gnarly, rocky downhill of the Black Diamond to smooth dirt paths on the green trails.
  • Pigeon Forge – Explore larger-than-life plant sculptures adorned in half-a-million colorful flower blooms, dance under an Umbrella Sky and indulge in garden-fresh flavors from chefs during Dollywood’s Flower & Food Festival.

Spring Festivals & Events

  • Gatlinburg (March 18-20) – Explore the new Gatlinburg St. Patrick’s Day Celebration complete with traditional Irish music, food, fireworks, and more. The city will be decorated with Shamrock green and feature fireworks show at 10 p.m. Friday at the Space Needle.
  • Bell Buckle (March 20) – The historic town adapts Daffodil Days to include a tree seedling give away, spring bulbs vendors on the square, spring items in stores, and a book signing by beloved former Tennessee Poet Laureate Maggi Vaugn.
  • Chattanooga (March 20-21) – Come see the High Falls flow green during Shamrock City at Rock City featuring Irish food, specialty beer from Chattanooga Brewing Co., bagpipers, pop-up Irish dance performers, and virtual scavenger hunt.
  • Linden (March 26-27) – The Blooming Arts Festival mixes fine arts, local craftsmanship, performances and fantastic local eats. Masks and social distancing recommended. Sanitization stations will be up on Main Street.
  • Pigeon Forge (March 26-28) – Cowboy cooks circle the wagons for the one-of-a-kind outdoor Pigeon Forge Chuck Wagon Cookoff that features chuck wagons–the original food trucks. Attendees can sample the offerings at lunch.
  • Murfreesboro (March 29-April 2) – Looking for a fun and safe way to kick off spring? Stop by the Discovery Center for Mess Fest. Get creative and messy with free outdoor activities such as making oobleck, elephant toothpaste and more.
  • Spring Hill (April 2) – Grammy Award Winner Casting Crowns performs a socially distancing family-friendly drive-in concert 7 p.m. at RippavillaTickets benefit the Well Outreach Food Pantry.
  • Crossville (April 2-June 24) – Cumberland County Playhouse kicks off its 2021 spring season with productions like Clue on Stage, The Savannah Sipping Society, Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now and Duck Hunter Shoots Angel.
  • Savannah (April 3) – The 9th Annual Generals Breakfast kicks off at 9 a.m. at Cherry Mansion with an outdoor breakfast, storytelling program and a Q&A by the homeowners. Tickets are $15. Masks and social distancing are encouraged.
  • Murfreesboro (April 23) – Travis Tritt with special guest Frank Foster takes the stage at 7 p.m. at Hop Springs Beer Park. There’s live music every weekend at the family & dog-friendly park with food and a huge selection of craft beers on tap.
  • Harriman (May 1) – The May Day Craft and Antique Fair will have vendors that display handmade crafts, vintage items and antiques, food vendors, live entertainment and classic car show.
  • Granville (May 1) – The Cornbread & Moonshine Festival features whiskey tastings, cornbread tasting, food, music, and craftsmen. Admission is $5. The new Whiskey Decanter Museum also opens with over 3,000 whiskey decanters.
  • Cookeville (May 1) – Cookeville Storyfest 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. in the big tent in Dogwood Park includes headliners Andy Offutt Irwin and Minton Sparks, and an amateur storytelling competition.
  • Tellico Plains (May 1) – The Tellico Trout Festival 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. downtown gathers fishermen, river sports enthusiasts and families for fun, education, food, entertainment and outfitter services.
  • Gatlinburg (May 1-3) – Guests can begin a creative journey in crafts, woodworking, basket weaving, jewelry making and more during Hands on Gatlinburg in the Great Smoky Arts and Crafts Community. Register in advance before workshops sell out.
  • Pigeon Forge (May 5-8) – Textile art and techniques to stitch quilts are on display at Pigeon Forge’s A Mountain Quiltfest. Guests can register for instructional classes. The free quilt exhibit and vendor hall are open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the LeConte Center.
  • Sweetwater (May 7-8) – Head to Historic Downtown Sweetwater for the Blooms, Bluegrass and BBQ Festival with live music, barbecue competition, vendors, picker’s corner, kids’ zone and fun activities.
  • Smithville (May 8) – Center Hill Lake Fest 4-10 p.m. at The Burlap Room Beer Garden and Dispensary features plenty of space to socially-distance while enjoying food from local food trucks, craft beer and local vendors. Please wear a mask in vendor and restroom lines. Tickets for the kid and pet-friendly event start at $20.
  • Rugby (May 8) – Raise a cup to Queen Victoria during the Queen’s Tea at Historic Rugby. The festive tea will include sandwiches, scones and dessert. Tickets are $22.
  • Wartburg (May 15) – The Tennessee Mountain Laurel Festival is filled with music, food, exhibits, creative arts, crafts, a car show and 24 designated scenic trails 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. around courthouse square.
  • Harriman (May 22-23, May 29-31) – Join a weekend of fun with costume contests, pirate Olympics, treasure hunts, get a picture with a mermaid or scallywag or shop the merchant village for unique treasures at the 5th Annual Tennessee Pirate Fest.
  • Bell Buckle (May 29) – Load up the car and go on an adventure in Historic Bell Buckle geocaching for prizes 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. during the Bell Buckle Car Cache and Pig Bash. Registration information can be found here.
  • Donelson (May-October) – Stock up on fresh fruits and vegetables, shop from local vendors, listen to live music and stroll through the historic grounds of Two Rivers Mansion Fridays 4-7 p.m. during the outdoor Hip Donelson Farmers Market.

For a complete list of what’s happening in Tennessee, visit the calendar on the website.