Posts tagged with "cook"

glass of wine via Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

My Wine Moment Photo Giveaway

HALL, WALT and BACA Wines, a set of family-owned wineries based in both Napa and Sonoma counties, has launched its first ever My Wine Moment Giveaway, ahead of the much anticipated holiday season. The Photo Giveaway, which is open for entry October 1 through November 24, 2021, will award one participant with the ultimate Napa Valley retreat package.

Prospective entrants are invited to share an image enjoying wine as part of a special moment. The lucky winner and a guest will receive a four-day, three-night accommodations package in Napa Valley, roundtrip airfare, and private ground transportation. Additionally, the winner and a guest will visit all five HALL, WALT and BACA luxury Tasting Room locations for a series of private food and wine experiences, with private transportation being provided to and from each. The winners will also receive a $500 Visa Gift Card for a selection of HALL, WALT and BACA wines. Additionally, multiple ‘Honorable Mention’ special wine moments photographs will be selected.

“Wine has been a part of so many special moments throughout the course of my life –birthdays, graduations, countless holiday gatherings, as well as simple moments like an evening stroll through the vineyard with Craig” says Vintner Kathryn Hall. “We know others have these moments too and we love hearing about them.  I hope this Giveaway will encourage you to share the joy of your own special wine moments.”

The My Wine Moment Giveaway is free to enter, and entries are being accepted October 1 through November 24. There are two ways to enter. Participants may submit a photo and comment on the HALL, WALT, or BACA websites at My Wine Moment or by posting a picture on Instagram using the hashtag #MyWineMoment and one of the brand hashtags; #HALLWines, #WALTWines or #BACAWines. The winner will be selected Monday, November 29. To review the official giveaway rules, please see the Terms & Conditions. Entrants must be 21 and over to be eligible.  

For more information on the prize packages and to enter, please see the My Wine Moment Giveaway Submission page.

About Hall Family Wines                                                                                                                          

HALL Family Wines produces high quality Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir and Zinfandel under the HALL, WALT and BACA brand monikers. HALL Family Wines collectively owns five wine country tasting rooms including HALL St. Helena, HALL Rutherford, WALT Sonoma, WALT Oxbow, and WALT | BACA Healdsburg. Owned by Craig and Kathryn Hall, the family-owned winery produces artisan wines that express the unique and diverse character of the wine country’s soils and climates through meticulous attention to detail in the vineyards and throughout the winemaking process.  The family’s luxury wine portfolio, led by Vice President of Winemaking Megan Gunderson Paredes, sources fruit from some of the most prominent vineyards up and down the West Coast including twelve Estate vineyards– Sacrashe, Bergfeld, Hardester, Beller, Atlas Peak, Lamoreaux, Rainin, Dellar-Freidkin, Cook, Bob’s Ranch, Clos Pepe and The Corners. The HALL St. Helena winery was the first LEED® Gold Certified Winery in the State of California in 2009 and earned another LEED® Gold certification for its hightech production facility and Tasting Room in 2014. Since the inception of HALL in 1995, the three luxury wine brands have earned over 700 ratings of 90 points or above from the industry’s top critics, including four 100-point scores.

A Simple Guide To Beef Cuts And How Best To Cook Them

Many people get stuck in a cooking rut. The problem is that we tend to keep cooking the things that we already know. And since there is a lot of mystery surrounding the different cuts of beef, many people either cook a steak or a simple beef stew. They don’t have the knowledge of the cuts to add some variety. 

With so many people becoming foodies these days, there is more interest in learning the best ways to cook various cuts to add some variety. This is especially true with so many people getting interested in some prime cuts of meat that cost quite a bit. They don’t want to risk ruining a wagyu picanha, for example, by using the wrong cooking method. 

In this article, we will go over several cuts of beef with the preferred cooking method to be able to get the most out of them. 

The Basics

When a butcher receives a whole beef carcass, it needs to be divided up. This is so that the parts can be sold, otherwise there would be nobody buying meat if they had to cut it up themselves. 

Besides the commercial aspect, the meat needs to be divided into cuts since the various muscles will cook differently. To make sure they have a cut that cooks the same way throughout they turn a side of beef into primal cuts. From there it gets further divided into sub-primal cuts. 

The general rule of thumb is that the further the cuts are from the hooves or the horn of the animal the more tender they will be. Tender cuts should be cooked quickly and tough ones more slowly.

Chuck Beef

The forequarter includes parts that are generally called chuck but there are various parts within that description. It includes parts of the neck, shoulder blade, and what could be imagined as the upper arm as cows don’t have arms. These are generally parts that have quite consistent fat marbling and some collagen.

As such the chuck is good for braising and stewing. Any long cooking method that slowly melts the collagen and makes the meat soft and tender. 

For quicker cooking, it is often ground up and used as burger meat. The amount of fat and connective tissue makes for a juicy burger.

Not all of the chuck cuts from the forequarter are all for low and slow cooking. Part of the ribeye is also from the end of the chuck off of the ribs. This is a tender and very juicy steak that should be cooked to medium-rare.

Brisket, Flank and Plate

These parts are getting closer to the hoof which means that they are muscles that are worked quite a bit. As such, they can be tough if not cooked properly. This isn’t to say that they all need slow and low cooking methods. 

The brisket, however, is inedible if it is not cooked for long periods. It stands up very well to smoking and cooking over coals at a very low temperature. It is most famous as a classic Texas barbecue meat

The flank is a piece that is very good as a steak although it can be tough if not treated properly. It should be marinated for a while to help break down the connective tissue. Then it has to be cut a certain way for the grain of the meat to be such that it is easy to chew. It will never be totally tender, but the flavor makes up for that. It’s great in tacos, for example. 

The Short Loin

This is the area with the most expensive cuts of meat since they are the most tender. They don’t require slow cooking or marinades to make them tender. 

The T-bone, porterhouse and sirloin steak all come from the short loin and are what you will be served in any steakhouse. They have excellent flavor and do well with quick, dry cooking such as grilling or being cooked on a flat top. 

The most expensive cut is the tenderloin, however, this comes from its own primal cut area and not the short loin. Although the name implies it should be from the short loin area, it is located right next to it. It is a muscle that does little movement so it is extremely tender but lacks the flavor of other cuts like a ribeye or sirloin. To make up for the lack of flavor, tenderloin is often served with a sauce of some kind. 

Glass of Wine Illustration by Mina Tocalini

HALL Wines in Napa Valley Heads to Guana Island (BVI)

Guana Island, the award-winning resort in the British Virgin Islands, is collaborating with renowned California wine brand, HALL Wines, to offer a three-day Wine Program from January 12 – 14, 2022. The program will bring some of HALL’s most celebrated vintages as well as its Director of Winemaking, Megan Gunderson, to Guana for a dynamic program for travelers and food- and wine-lovers alike.

The HALL team will work closely with Guana’s Executive Chef to prepare a program celebrating the flavors of the California wines alongside the island’s natural bounty. Director of Winemaking for HALL Wines, Megan Gunderson, will work with the culinary team to create special menu pairings inspired by the flavors of Guana. She will also personally pour wines from across the HALL Family Wine brands portfolio including HALL, WALT and BACA Wines, and be available to chat with guests about the brand’s extensive West Coast vineyards, and the winemaking process.

The Guana culinary team will be creating new menus for the program, pulling as many ingredients as possible from the island’s orchard, including fresh herbs, fruits, vegetables and microgreens. The four-acre orchard has been recently expanded to include three new greenhouses and is home to tropical fruits such as breadfruit, soursop, and papaya as well as more exotic items such as lemongrass and pomegranate. Guana guests also enjoy fresh fish from the surrounding waters, including grouper, yellowfin tuna and mahi-mahi.

The three-day program will kick off with a Beach BBQ pairing Caribbean-inspired flavors with WALT Wines, known for single vineyard Pinot Noirs, complemented by live music from a local band. The following day, Gunderson and Guana General Manager Jason du Plessis will host a formal al fresco dinner, offering tastes of some of the most celebrated bottles from the HALL wine collection, including the bold Cabernets for which they are known. Gunderson will be on-hand to personally discuss each vintage, guiding guests through an educational and flavorful evening. The program will conclude the following day, with a guided tour of the orchard and an invitation to try some lesser-known vintages, matching HALL Wines with just-picked produce and tropical fruits that are only found in the Caribbean.

HALL and WALT Wines offered during the immersive experience will be available to order throughout the program. As with all visits to Guana, meals and activities prepared as part of the wine program will be included in the cost of a room. Rates at Guana start at $890 per night.

ABOUT GUANA ISLAND

One of the few private islands in its part of the world, Guana remains the most unspoiled jewel of the British Virgin Islands. Our 850 acres, seven beaches, mountains, gardens, organic orchard, dozens of hiking trails, and even our flock of flamingos are the exclusive domain of a handful of guests for the duration of their stay. In this setting, where the sparkling Caribbean meets the vast Atlantic, you’ll find first-class dining, accommodations, and service in a tradition of low-key luxury perfected through nearly a century of family stewardship. For more information or reservations, visit the Guana website or call (800) 544-8262.

ABOUT HALL FAMILY WINES

HALL Family Wines produces high quality Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir and Zinfandel under the HALL, WALT and BACA brand monikers. Owned by Craig and Kathryn Hall, the family-owned winery produces artisan wines that express the unique and diverse character of the wine country’s soils and climates through meticulous attention to detail in the vineyards and throughout the winemaking process. The family’s luxury wine portfolio, led by Winemaker Megan Gunderson sources fruit from some of the most prominent vineyards up and down the West Coast and includes eleven Estate vineyards– Sacrashe, Bergfeld, Hardester, T Bar T Ranch, Atlas Peak, Rainin, Dellar-Freidkin, Cook, Bob’s Ranch, Clos Pepe and The Corners. The HALL St. Helena winery was the first LEED® Gold Certified Winery in the State of California in 2009 and earned another LEED® Gold certification for its high-tech production facility and Tasting Room in 2014. Since the inception of HALL in 1995, the three luxury wine brands have earned over 600 ratings of 90 points or above from the industries top critics, including five 100-point scores from the industry’s most notable wine critics. Visit Hall Wines, Walt Wines and Baca Wines for more information, or call 707-967-2626.

Town & Country’s 8th Philanthropy Summit – Pharrell Williams × José Andrés

The 8th annual Town & Country Philanthropy Summit kicked off today with an amazing conversation between Pharrell Williams and José Andrés, moderated by Soledad O’Brien.

See below for highlights from the panel as well as a link to view the interview in its entirety:

Pharrell Williams on how he thinks about philanthropy and what his goals are: 

“When we think about the African diaspora and people of color and what people who are deemed ‘minorities’ – which we are actually not—but that’s just the saying. There are three pillars that affect us the most—disproportionate access to education, disproportionate access to healthcare, and also disproportionate access to legislation. I think the first two are the ones that I want to focus on because they’re the ones that I feel like I can, through my resources and even my likenesses whenever needed, that I can actually make a difference in education and healthcare. These are the things that hurt us the most.”

José Andrés on why he focuses on food insecurity:

“I am one more cook in the universe of people that feed people in America or around the world. But people like me, we only feed the few. I am in the power, when you began thinking, we can also be a part of feeding the many. And where we can join forces to the many around America, and around many places in the world, in the most difficult moments, to be able to bring solutions. For me, food is my way of doing it, but what we do is only a drop of water in an ocean of empathy. It requires a lot of props of empathy to make things happen. Obviously what I do is more focused on emergencies, I don’t like to see people in mayhem; people who, already in the good times forgotten, that are voiceless, that nobody takes care of. It’s even worse when a hurricane, an earthquake, an explosion of fire, a pandemic, hits their communities even further. That’s the moment that I feel the urgency of now being yesterday, and I love to bring my community and try to be nice to as many people as we can in these moments of mayhem. At the end of the day, one plate of food at a time won’t solve every problem but at least you buy time. And you give hope to people who need it the most.”

Pharrell on how he and Jose met and joined forces: 

“Catherine Kimmel – the great connector – took me to an event. Here’s a guy that you really need to meet because, like you, he takes what it is he does and puts it to better usage and thinks about others… [at an event in New York] I was so impressed because there were so many chefs there but this guy – it was different. Yes, he’s a chef and he’s all about his ingredients and recipes, but his greatest meal was his operation and people and his ability to galvanize. It was really apparent that everyone was centered around him and all he wanted to do was feed people and bring people together and help people see that through our differences and our challenges are actually a lot of solutions and we can make the world a better place and I was really blown away… Then we met and we realized there were a lot of things he was doing that I could be instrumental in helping him.”

José on meeting Pharrell and what attracted him to Pharrell:

“I go and meet Pharrell and he’s even better, he’s the better half. What you get is a good vibe – it’s very difficult to describe. You know, you read about people, NBA players, amazing musicians and I’m not only looking for the amazing things they do, which I love, but what’s behind. When you see that behind is something very powerful that they’re putting at the service of others – their power, their money, their contacts but something even more powerful is their brain connecting with their empathy within their hearts… We wouldn’t be able to do what we do without people like them. Pharrell knows and more importantly loves his community. We were able to do it in Virginia Beach and be there because Pharrell opened to us the doors of being that community without being foreigners. We were able to partner with local people, with local restaurants.”

José on how his family impacted his values and his metaphor on life:

“My mom and dad always believed in longer tables, not higher ones. The table will always be ready for whoever showed up… My father would put me in charge of making the fire. I did that since I was young, and I would become very good at making the fire. But my father was very particular, and he would never let me near the chicken… [he would say] ‘My son I know you wanted to do the cooking, but actually doing the fire and controlling the fire is the most important thing, everyone wants to do the cooking without understand the fire. My son you already have the biggest gift. Control the fire, master the fire, and then you can do any cooking you want.’ (I don’t know if my father told me that story with that idea or I’m making it more romantic along the way as the years pass by). My father was giving me a mantra for life itself: find your fire, control your fire, master your fire, and then you can do any cooking you want in your life.”

Pharrell on his foundation YELLOW:

“For us, we want to even the odds. I know that I was a very lucky person who benefitted from my teachers seeing something in me. They didn’t know what they were telling me or which way the way to go but they kept telling me to keep going. I think that had a profound effect on me because essentially education is the toolbox that every human being is going to need out in the world just to function… What we wanted to do is look at a curriculum that could assess these children and figure out how they comprehend information best. Then eventually make a curriculum that is sensory based and not sensory biased. If you learn differently than how the curriculum is being taught, then automatically you’re deemed as remedial… with the YELLOW hub, it’s the space where kids can learn based on their way they process their information.”

Pharrell on the education system:

“I love public school teachers and you know, love the unions as well, but the education the educational system is antiquated. I mean just ask your favorite Fortune 500 CEO – they might not be the best, they might not be well read, but that does not stop their genius. And this is what we want. We want to make sure that we reach every child by properly assessing their learning potential and comprehension preferences, and making sure that they have a curriculum that is based for them. Sensory bias is an issue, but sensory based learning special educational systems is the future. That’s how every child slip through the cracks and we get to eventually even the odds.”

José on how the pandemic affected and influenced his philanthropy:

“I think this year has changed all of us profoundly… Fundamentally has changed me. First, obviously take care of your family. I tried to be a father who took care of his daughters and my wife and trying to keep them safe. Every mother and father tried to do that. But then I began thinking that to take care of my daughters, it’s not putting them behind walls, to take care of my daughters, is bringing down those walls and trying to work as hard to provide for the other daughters and sons of other people I don’t know that they are trying to achieve the same for their children. The way I’m going to keep my daughters safer is not behind walls but with longer tables, where I work as hard to provide for my daughters as I’m going to work to provide for the daughters I don’t know. Fundamentally this is what changed me.”

José on what people get wrong about philanthropy:

“Robert Egger, my favorite food fighter, he said that it seems philanthropy is usually about the redemption of the giver, when philanthropy essentially needs to be about the liberation of the receiver. It’s nothing wrong to give and donate time or money or your brain and feel good about it, but fundamentally in this pandemic, I learned that to give, it’s not good enough, that we must do good, yes, but we must do smart good.”

Pharrell on the changes he has noticed this year:

“Empathy is at an all-time low. It’s not where it needs to be. There’s a lot of sympathy and pity, but there’s not empathy. And we need more of that, we need more empathy, we need more humility, we need more gratitude. I think the pandemic, for me, has taken me to that place where that’s the only thing I can think about.”

View the summit here.

The T&C Summit continues tomorrow (June 22, 2021 @ 12:30-1:30 PM EDT) with a panel between the power media couple Marlo Thomas and Phil Donahue. Register directly here.

Kia Damon illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Chef Kia Damon: Culinary Compassion In The Kitchen

By: Emily Bunn

This Women’s History Month, 360 Magazine sat down with Chef Kia Damon. Kia is the founder of Kia Feeds The People (KFTTP) and is a cofounder of Auxilio, both of which are non-profits aimed at combating food apartheid. We dished with Kia on how she discovered her passion for cooking, pathways towards increased Black and QTPOC representation in the culinary industry, and her upcoming video release with EFFEN Vodka and Queer Foods, which can be viewed here.

When did you first begin cooking? When did you realize you wanted to pursue it professionally?

“I started cooking in my early preteens. I have younger brothers as well, so once we were too old for day care, I had to step up as the older sibling to make sure we ate, especially more so during the summertime because I have working parents. But, it wasn’t until some years later when I started cooking independently for my own health reasons that I truly saw my strengths in cooking and realized that cooking professionally wasn’t a world that was so far away for me, that it was actually extremely attainable and extremely real. So I took the plunge, and to this day some of my family’s still very surprised, because I was definitely burning pots of rice, and they were like ‘this girl has no talents for the kitchen.’ Now I’m cooking and they still can’t believe it.”

We all know foods brings communities together. Are there any experiences you’ve had with community members through Kia Feeds The People that have stuck with you?

Yes! Honestly, the most connective part was before I even started cooking with KFTTP people when I was looking for guidance from a lot of my friends in the cooking community. Because KFTTP was birthed in a really tumultuous time, I felt like I couldn’t quite gather my thoughts and my feelings. I just felt so emotionally charged and stunted that I felt like I couldn’t even work or think or move because I felt so emotional about everything. But being able to lean into my friends and my chosen family who see me for who I am, who know me intimately and know my heart, they were able to guide me to where I am now and toward my mission for KFTTP. I’m super grateful. These are people that I’ve been able to cook with before, these are people that I’ve literally eaten with before–we’ve shared food out of deli containers at 3am–I’m very grateful for them. And I definitely could not have got to this place without them.”

Are you looking to expand KFTPP outside of Brooklyn, or just focus on this specific community?

“Because I am a Sagittarius, I definitely am looking to expand and looking to grow. I definitely have to make sure I build and flesh KFTTP out as much as possible in Brooklyn before I start thinking about moving other places. But I do have visions, not necessarily to just expand Kia Feeds The People, but to collaborate with other mutual aid organizations and non-profits that already exist in other cities, so that I can support them and [they] have more coverage where they are. I’m not the only one who’s doing this kind of work and it is definitely a collaborative, lifelong mission, so I want to lend hands to the people who are already in this game.”

What do you think is the biggest obstacle facing overcoming food apartheid?

Personally I think the biggest obstacle is still convincing people that it exists, because we live in such a individualistic world. If something doesn’t affect the next person, then they’re more likely to ignore it, you know. That’s why I think COVID really shook things up, because a lot of us were collectively put on our butts. you know. We’re like “whoa, wait a minute, is this one thing that is really proactively affecting us.” But regarding food apartheid, a lot of people are still familiar with it in terms of a “food desert.” Food desert is a word that’s been used for many years to describe this situation, and a “desert” implies that it is natural, because the world naturally created deserts. When you apply “food desert” to that idea, it implies that this place without food, this place without access to meals, is natural and that’s just the way that it’s supposed to be. But it’s completely unnatural, it’s completely systematic, and [after recognizing that] then we can start looking at it as something that is created by is created by systems. Then, we can put some realness to it and find how all of us are truly affected by them. So I think right now, it’s making sure people know what food apartheid is, and that it actually exists.”

Do you have a favorite meal or cocktail to prepare when you’re bringing family or friends together?

“My favorite meal is red beans and rice. I love a good pot of Louisiana-style red beans and rice, because honestly that–with some corn bread on top and so hot sauce– that really is the whole meal. You think you would need something else on the side but that’s really it. It’s so fulfilling, it’s so delicious, and I definitely try to bring it out when I get to be with my friends and family.”

The culinary world is a male-dominated industry. How can the culinary industry work to become more diverse, and have more Black, QTPOC chefs?

“I think it’s a starts with actually investing in the lives and careers of these black/brown/trans/ LGBTQ chefs because they exist. I know they exist because they’re my friends. And what happens is that maybe they’re put in positions of leadership or maybe not, but they’re they’re not given the same care, support or investment in their skills and education and their needs. You could put someone in a line chef position or position of leadership or whatever, but if there’s no follow through to make sure that they have what they need to be supported in those positions, they’re usually set up for failure, or set up to be harmed in some way. Or maybe a small business that’s LGBTQ or Black has a good profile, [but they may not be] getting access to grants or money. You have to have the follow through. It’s not that we don’t exist, it’s that we’re not properly supported when we are put at the forefront. That’s when it gets tricky and that’s when we’re left open to harm and failure.”

What are you most excited about regarding this video release with Queer Foods and EFFEN Vodka?

“I’m very excited for mom to see it first of all, I love my mommy and she is my number one fan. And she’s a Gemini, so I’m always looking for her approval. But I’m also excited to get to Kia Feeds The People and Queer Stories in front of the world. I feel like we can’t tell enough queer stories, there’s always someone’s story out there. Even though there’s this myth out there that there’s already enough representation, or that maybe it’s too much to keep talking about queer people, that’s actually far from the truth. I’m proud and honored that EFFEN Vodka wants to support what I’m doing and wants to get my story out there. My story is the story of a lot of other Black and brown and trans people’s stories, and it also feels good to partner with someone who sees me and wants to invest in my story and invest in supporting other diverse artists, both in their representation and practice. It just feels good to be seen, and I’m excited for everyone else to see me and to be seen. Just look! Everyone just look! I want everyone to look and feel pride in who we are.”

How can readers donate to Kia Feeds The People?

“You can head to my GoFundMe if you’re not in the city, or if you’re in Brooklyn you can come to a pop up. Please donate to my GoFundMe, I have it on my Instagram page. Share it with your friends, let them know what’s up. Or if you are in Bed-Stuy, you can find me at a pop-up– I have a few coming up in April, so I’m going to be all over the place. Come get some food or throw some money, either way I’ll be very grateful.”

To learn more about Kia, visit her website.

Kia’s EFFEN Rosé Vodka Grapefruit Cocktail

Ingredients: 

  • 2 parts EFFEN Rosé vodka
  • 1 oz of lime juice
  • ½ oz of cane syrup
  • 2 or 3 parts grapefruit juice

Mix the grapefruit juice, lime juice, simple syrup, EFFEN Rosé vodka and a spoonful of ice in a cocktail shaker. Stir and taste. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with grapefruit, and thyme. Drink responsibly + enjoy!

Kia’s Gumbo Recipe 

Ingredients

  • 8 oz andouille sausage
  • 1lb Boneless skinless chicken thighs
  • 2 large yellow onions, diced
  • 4 stalks of celery, diced
  • 2 green bell peppers, diced
  • 2 cups sliced okra, fresh or frozen
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 cup of oil
  • 1 cup AP flour
  • 6 cups chicken stock
  • 4 tbsp Creole seasoning
  • 1 tbsp of fresh thyme
  • 1 tbsp Smoked paprika
  • ½ tbsp Ground sage
  • 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • Hot sauce to taste
  • Black pepper
  • Kosher salt
  • Fresh parsley

Directions

  • Season the chicken thighs with 2 tablespoons of creole seasoning, salt and pepper. Season well on both sides. Heat a skillet or cast iron to medium heat with enough oil to cover the bottom. When the pan is hot, sear the chicken in batches. Brown the chicken on both sides and set aside. The chicken does not have to be cooked through just yet.
  • In a large pot add the oil and heat to a medium high heat. Add the flour and whisk until it begins to cook. Lower the heat to medium low. Keep whisking the roux over a controlled and steady heat until the flour begins to darken into a deep brown. This takes about 30 minutes, so pace yourself.
  • Turn the heat down on the roux and add in your onion, bell pepper and celery. Stir into the roux, season with a few pinches of salt and sauté until fragrant and translucent. Add in your minced garlic and fresh thyme. Stir for another 2 minutes. Slowly pour in the chicken stock while whisking the roux. Do this part slowly because the roux will begin to thicken. Take your time and continue pouring in the stock until it’s completely incorporated.
  • Bring the pot to a boil, meanwhile slice the sausage in ¼ inch rounds on a slight bias. When the pot begins to boil, reduce to a simmer and add the chicken and sausage. Let the gumbo cook on low for an hour. You want time for the flour taste to cook out.
  • After an hour, add the remaining two tablespoons of creole seasoning, smoked paprika, ground sage and Worcestershire sauce to the pot. Stir and add your sliced okra. Cook for another 10 minutes, add salt and pepper and hot sauce to taste then serve with rice and chopped parsley.
  • Enjoy!

Kia's EFFEN Rosé Vodka Grapefruit Cocktail Photo credit: Solène Michel  Recipe credit: Kia Damon, Kia Feeds The People for use by 360 Magazine

Photo credit: Solène Michel Recipe credit: Kia Damon, Kia Feeds The People

Kia Damon image shot by Elina Street for EFFEN Vodka and Queer Foods for use by 360 Magazine

Photo Credit: Solène Michel 

Groceries by Mina Tocalini for 360 Magazine

TASTING HISTORY COOKBOOK

SIMON & SCHUSTER’S TILLER PRESS TO PUBLISH ‘TASTING HISTORY’ CREATOR AND HOST MAX MILLER’S DEBUT COOKBOOK BASED ON MILLER’S HISTORICAL RECIPE YOUTUBE SHOW

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The Food and History Show Celebrates Its One-Year Anniversary with a Special Episode on the Medieval Dish Cockentrice. Watch Here.

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Simon & Schuster’s Tiller Press announced that it will publish a historical cookbook by Max Miller based on his popular YouTube show, ‘Tasting History. The untitled cookbook, slated for publication in 2022, will feature some of the show’s most popular and unusual ancient recipes.

On ‘Tasting History,’ Miller recreates historical recipes from the Medieval and Renaissance Eras, Ancient Greek and Roman times and beyond, and spotlights traditional foods from around the world. The show’s popularity has exploded since the channel’s inception in February 2020. Amid nationwide stay-at-home-orders, ‘Tasting History’ has amassed over 570K+ subscribers and 23M+ total channel views, with viewers tuning in faithfully each Tuesday for their latest culinary history lesson, and perhaps to catch a glimpse of Max’s beloved feline companions, Jaime and Cersei.

“Here at Tiller Press, we love to discover emerging voices. Max’s voice has exploded with his ‘Tasting History’ show and we are thrilled to translate that voice to the written page, complete with his recreated recipes and the history behind each one,” said Anja Schmidt, Executive Editor, who acquired the title.

As today marks the channel’s one-year anniversary, Max will celebrate in true ‘Tasting History’ fashion with a special episode that will focus on the history behind the legendary medieval dish called Cockentrice, which consists of a suckling pig’s upper body sewn onto the bottom half of a capon. The full episode can be viewed here. 

For more information visit his Youtube and follow Max on Instagram.

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ABOUT SIMON & SCHUSTER

Simon & Schuster, a ViacomCBS Company, is a global leader in general interest publishing, dedicated to providing the best in fiction and nonfiction for readers of all ages, and in all printed, digital and audio formats. Its distinguished roster of authors includes many of the world’s most popular and widely recognized writers, and winners of the most prestigious literary honors and awards. It is home to numerous well-known imprints and divisions such as Simon & Schuster, Scribner, Atria Books, Gallery Books, Tiller Press, Adams Media, Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing and Simon & Schuster Audio and international companies in Australia, Canada, India and the United Kingdom, and proudly brings the works of its authors to readers in more than 200 countries and territories. For more information visit our website.

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ABOUT ‘TASTING HISTORY’ 

‘Tasting History’ is a food and history show hosted by Max Miller on YouTube that explores the recreation of culinary delights from the Medieval and Renaissance Eras, to Ancient Greek and Roman times, and spotlights traditional foods from around the world. Since the channel’s inception in February 2020, ‘Tasting History’ has garnered over 570K+ channel subscribers, and over 23M+ total views. For more information, visit his Youtube, and follow Max on Instagram and on Twitter. Miller is represented by Jeremy Katz at The Katz Company and Innovative Artists.

apron, food, vegetables, veggies, illustration, cooking, cookwear

Your Guide to BBQ Smokers for the Best Barbeque Cooking

Section 1: Introduction

Do you want to take your barbeque to the next level? You can do that with the right BBQ smoker. Though you can always cook a flesh on a standard grill, your meat may lack the texture and flavor that comes with smoking.

Getting a BBQ smoker can be a bit stressful for some people because of the numerous brands to consider. All of them come with a wide range of features making it difficult to make a pick. This short guide examines the main types of smokers on the market today, their advantages and disadvantages, and how to maintain them.

Section 2: Basics

Section 2.1: Meaning of smoking?

When you surround the flesh in a flavor-filled chamber over a period while keeping the temperature low, then you’re smoking the meat. This act will cause the beef to have the same flavor as the smoke and, in turn, removes traces of moisture, helping the meat to last longer.

Section 2.2: What is a smoker?

A smoker is an appliance for cooking in a controlled, smoky environment for making barbeque. It produces smoke and holds it around the meat for absorption. 

There are various ways to smoke under slow heat using many smoker/grill types available today. You can purchase charcoal smokers, gas smokers, wood smokers, pellet smokers, and electric smokers. Each of them has advantages and disadvantages, but the most crucial factor is the type of meat you’re smoking.

Section 2.3: Types of Barbeque smokers

Vertical water smokers

This type is otherwise called a bullet smoker, and most beginners start with it, typically the Weber Smokey Mountain. They’re cute and compact with a small footprint to fit onto the most insignificant of patios. 

  • Advantages

They’re one of the most inexpensive types of smokers and are easy to use. It can be easily transported in a truck and does not take up much space on the patio.

  • Disadvantages

It has a small cooking capacity. The water pan can get greasy and will have to be cleaned after every cook.

Offset smokers

An offset smoker has both a firebox and a cooking chamber. The two-part design makes lighting and heating less stressful.

  • Advantages

They’re cheap and straightforward with lots of space for food.

  • Disadvantages

The temperature is hard to control and requires skill.

Box smokers

This is cabinet or vault with a heat source at the base and a rack on the top. It conserves more heat because of the unique position of the heat source.

  • Advantages

Though good ones cost a lot more, they do produce large amounts of great barbeque in a highly controllable environment. These smokers can be the most dependable and easiest-to-use smokers on the market.

  • Disadvantages

Most box smokers on sale are less efficient, lack insulation, loses heat quickly, though they’re more expensive than vertical types.

Drum smoker

These types of smokers are now being used in barbeque competitions. This vertical-style smoker is effective and efficient. The cylindrical design does an excellent job by trapping heat and radiating it evenly throughout the entire inside of the barrel.

  • Advantages

These types of smokers are usually cheap. It gives the meat a unique flavor and holds consistent temperature for long periods.

  • Disadvantages

They require some skill and practice and also run hot.

Smoker ovens

They are like ovens in the home such that you might want them indoors, but it’s best to use them outside.

  • Advantages

This one can smoke more meat at a time, making it ideal for commercial applications.

  • Disadvantages

It is not suitable for indoor use because of carbon (II) oxide poisoning.

Kamado Grill

Looking for a slow cooker, Kamado Grill is an ideal choice. It has high-quality insulation and functional vents.

  • Advantages

They are durable, attractive, and can heat up to 750 degrees Fahrenheit and over.

  • Disadvantages

They are comparatively expensive and have space limitations also.

Pellet grill

Wood is the primary fuel for the pellet grill. High-quality wood generates light and cleaner smoke with a significant amount of energy.

  • Advantages

You can use it as a grill or smoker. The smoke is more suitable for smoking though you can still use it for grills.

  • Disadvantages

Pellet grills come at a relatively higher cost. They sometimes have several moving parts, making them difficult to maintain.

Section 3: Techniques/Tips to improve

Section 3.1: Tips on how to maintain your smoker

  • Ashes can form a byproduct that promotes rusting. You can let ashes cool before you sweep and dispose them in the airtight metal container.
  • Meathead Goldwyn mentioned that grill grates and influx of carbon on the lid doesn’t improve food flavor.

Section 4: Correcting Common Problems

Section 4.1: Common meat smoking mistakes to avoid

Smoking meat is a great way to enhance, but there are some common pitfalls beginners should try to avoid.

  • Incomplete preheating of the smoker

Whatever recipe you use; it will tell you how long it takes to smoke a particular piece of meat. You’ll also be given a simple preheat temperature so you’ll have to warm up the smoker first. Though it makes the process longer, it will provide you with the ideal cook and smoke temperature to get the perfect flavor.

  • Opt for a lighter fluid

The most convenient way of doing this is to use a chemical to initiate the fire.

  • Using high density or much wood

If the wood is much, vast clouds of smoke will be produced, but a single stream of smoke can effectively flavor the meat. A considerable amount of smoke can overpower the flavor of the flesh and even render the meat inedible.

  • Starting too fast

The best way to smoke meat is to start slowly and gradually increase the temperature.

  • Wood quality is poor

Don’t use non-seasonal wood, green, or wet wood. Greenwood is reserved for seasoned professionals who know precisely how to use it. If you’re a beginner, greenwood can cause the meat to become bitter.

Section 5: Analysis of Best Practices in the Industry

  • Smokers come in a range of different sizes
  • An offset smoker is the most traditional type of smoker and is completely wood-fired. The firebox is by the side where you build your smoke.
  • There are pellet smokers too. Fill it in with compressed wood pellets. They’re available in a different range of flavors. An electronic spark ignites them, moves in through the unit, and you can set the temperatures.
  • For the Kamado smokers, the ceramic provides excellent induction of heat.
  • The water or bullet smoker has a charcoal pan at the bottom. There is also a water pan to regulate moisture within the chamber.
  • For vertical smokers, the charcoal is placed at the bottom with a water pan in the middle. You can control your airflow on both sides.

https://youtu.be/6Gk2e9BUDpc

In the above video, Jess Pryles, the original hardcore Carnivore, tried to explain many of the different types of smokers out there.

Section 6: Tools you can use

  • A good smoker
  • Thermometer
  • Digital meat thermometer
  • Tongs
  • Spatula
  • Meat Claws
  • Gloves 
Ocaso Festival, Costa Rica, Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

OCASO 2020

“Be prepared to be teleported into a quantum realm of whimsicality.”360 MAGAZINE

By Vaughn Lowery × Sam Berman

At the peak of the year, music, beats and dancing brought together a crowd of 10,000 attendees to Costa Rica for 2020’s Ocaso Underground Music Festival – the world’s largest rave in the jungle. Even the leatherback turtles, howling monkeys and crocodiles were head bobbing.

The Ocaso Underground Music Festival, which engaged on January 9th – 13th, united travelers, ticos and seasoned ravers alike to Tamarindo, Costa Rica, off the coast of the Pacific Ocean for five days of electronic music bliss. The jubilee was established by founder Devin Ellis in 2018; and it just culminated its fourth semester, with plans to return in January 2021, proving a successful run for one of the most emerging EDM festivals on the planet. 

What makes this carnival so sui generis, aside from a stellar bill of DJs including Maceo Plex, Äme, Doc Martin, Justin Martin, Magdalena, Shiba San, Seth Troxler and Artba, might just be the visually striking and lushful setting of CR. The grounds, known as the Lesenda Retreat, centers around a trilithic stage composed of metal trusses for performers, complete with a towering geometric visual screen synchronized to the music, pulsating lasers, fog machines, pyrotechnics and go-go dancers. Apart from hypnotizing technical components conjured up by architectural wizards, the surrounding landscape and warm weather provided a tranquil atmosphere to enjoy the fiesta in, enhanced by art installations sprinkled throughout, providing a truly remarkable habitat. 

Let’s talk about the sound! Imagine being at the On The Run II tour with Beyoncé and Jay-Z, state-of-the-art subwoofers and tweeters pinging throughout the venue, delivering clean and crisp vibrant instrumentation. Of course, this added fan excitement to every set.

Viewers were able to use tokens for transportation, food and drinks, providing added security from petty theft and loose cash. Overall safety was key with tons of guards at every entrance alongside of roaming escorts. We all wore sparkly color-coded wristbands to identify our level of participation – GA vs VIP. Staff members wore official reflective tanks and shirts to be easily accessible.

A short 15 minute-bus drive on a vintage yellow school bus brought participants to the festivities. Guests were offered an assortment of carte du jour options to replenish their prance-exhausted bodies with a number of locally and globally known chefs preparing flatbread pizzas, gyros, keto bowls, tacos as well as protein shakes.

Saturday was the most distinctive night of the event, with people from all over the globe, dressed in their most eye-catching ensembles, echoing the avant-garde fashion of other fairs such as EDC, Ultra, Tomorrowland, Lollapalooza, Bonnaroo and Coachella. Ocaso brought a parade of colors infused with futuristic and organic elements blended seamlessly into garbs straight out of an alien planet, welcoming and embracing all. 

The festival wrapped with a pool party at base camp, the Best Western Tamarindo Vista Villas. After a five-day outer body experience of infectious dance music, a sort of culinary delights, cozy lodging options, and the beautiful backdrop of the rugged rainforested, Central America, this is one masquerade which many should add to their list. 

Missed out on the fun this year? Don’t fret, as the festival plans to return the weekend of January 7-11, 2021. Ticketing packages from this past year ranged from $19.00 to $59.00 for single day passes, a two-day Friday and Saturday pass for $89.00 and a 5-day-full-weekend pass for $119.00, a great deal for those who can’t get enough from just one night. So ravers, start planning your next vacation, because this is an experience any party animal should dive into. 

For additional information visit Ocaso Festival.

Local Guide

Besides the #RaveInTheJungle, The city of Tamarindo itself possesses a plethora of thrilling activities: ziplining, horseback rides on volcanic trails; ATV tours; surfing and dolphin-watching sailing tours.

If you are seeking additional dining/nightlife options outside of the fête, be sure to check out the following:

Pacifico Club (http://www.pacifico-costarica.com/beach-club/), Sharky’s Bar (http://sharkysbars.com/), Long Board BBQ, Chinese Food (directly across from Vista Villas) and Bamboo Sushi Club.

Just down the road was the luxurious Tamarindo Diria hotel, which features a lobby side pool/hot tub, an array of cabanas with an outside bar/dining deck as well as private beach access to make any jovial attendants experience an unforgettable rave-cation.

Nick DiGiovanni, MasterChef, 360 MAGAZINE

Nick DiGiovanni

Nick DiGiovanni is a 23-year-old recent grad of Harvard, who was the youngest contestant to ever compete in the finale of MasterChef. He started cooking when he was only eight years old, and started working in restaurants in high school, including an internship at Benu, a Michelin three-star restaurant in San Francisco. He ultimately decided to forego culinary school for Harvard, before deciding to leave for a semester to compete on MasterChef and ultimately make it to the finale.

During his time at Harvard, Nick created the first-ever food concentration called Food & Climate, to figure out ways to address the environmental crisis through food. That then led to the start of a new business venture called Voodles that would help revolutionize the way kids eat vegetables. The veggie based pasta is organic certified, kosher, gluten free, vegan & non-GMO and will be available online by 2020. 

Lokal Eatery & Bar, Vaughn Lowery, Jersey City, New Jersey, 360 MAGAZINE, Abraham John ARCHITECTS, Mona Panjwani, Walter Donadio

Lokal Eatery & Bar

By Vaughn Lowery

Jersey City officially opened up one of the swankiest restaurants on their waterfront with magnificent views of Manhattan. Mona Panjwani is the proprietor and visionary of this establishment. After 12 days of having their doors opened, they have built a team of individuals who are personable, approachable and possess a strong sense of ownership. Literally a recipe for prosperity.

With sufficient space, Lokal Eatery & Bar can comfortably sit up to 200 customers and is the perfect destination for a rehearsal dinner, trunk show, celebratory engagement and/or corporate gathering. Towards the rear, there’s a semi-private area with its own seating, lounge and sound system to drown out the clutter of what’s taken place in the main arena. “Lokal” murals, perfect for social engagement, are sprinkled throughout the spot which were constructed by a local commissioned artist. Adding an element of youth and elegance similar to its milieu. Overall the architecture and intent of this eclectic eatery have an industrial yet modern feel. Iron gates frame the bar and above the 30-foot island hangs a custom lighting installation.

Nestled in the heart of a rising luxury neighborhood within JC, this venue is destined to become one of the area’s most popular draws. Executive Chef, Walter Donadio, has managed to fabricate a tantalizing menu of appetizers, small plates and entrees which are certain to keep you coming back. Some of his best infused tapas and items include succulent scallops, rock shrimp, sauteed mushroom bowls as well as a vegan surf and turf packed with savory lentils. Most of their components are locally sourced and fresh from the Garden State – right down to the blueberries featured in some of their signature drinks.

Often times, you inflict a new place and the waitstaff is uncertain on what to recommend. That’s not the case for Lokal. Many of their squad members were well-informed on what they offer and even had ample recommendations for their handcrafted cocktails. Our favorites were their Elliott Stubb (reminiscent of an old fashioned) and Jerry Thomas – cucumber water iced cubes make this drink refreshing.

The future is bright for Lokal Eatery & Bar. And, with a strong location, menu and bar, it’s set to be one of the most prestigious brunch/dinner spots for global foodies, making it a firm contender for three Michelin stars and a James Beard Award. Subsequently, it’s extremely apparent that Mona and her crew are meticulous and pay close attention to details.

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

*Brunch is Saturday & Sunday from 11am-3pm. A perfect place to relax and kick back with friends as well as family before the week starts. If you eat meat, be sure to try the lamb burger. The Bloody Mary and Margarita are sure to get almost any party started.

**Happy Hour is daily from 5-7pm.

ABOUT TEAM LOKAL:

CHEF: Walter Donadio will serve as Lokal’s Executive Chef.

Donadio is a Michelin star kitchen trained chef with over 17 years of versatile culinary professional experience managing the provisions of fine dining for hotels, restaurants and country clubs. His experience spans the globe from various chef positions at Richy’s DMCC and Café Habana in Dubai to The Smith, Nobu Fifty Seven, Le Circ and Brasserie in New York, along with supervising kitchens at Hilton and Marriott in New Jersey. Passionate about food since growing up in his grandmother’s own restaurant, he loves combinations of flavors from different cuisines and is always searching for the perfect balance. He is a graduate from the French Culinary Institute (now International Culinary Center).

OWNER: Mona Panjwani

Panjwani opens Lokal as an events industry vet in the Northern New Jersey region. She launched an events production company in 2014 and came across the idea to create Lokal more recently while seeking a venue for her own company. The gorgeous waterfront eatery in Jersey City – which will primarily serve as a full service restaurant and bar is also complete with event and private dining spaces – combines all of Panjwani’s skills, passion, experience and goals into one. Panjwani is a member of the Hudson County Chamber of Commerce, Hudson County Women Rising and LadyDrinks South Asian Women Entrepreneurs Networking Professionals. She has been a Jersey City resident for a decade.

ARCHITECT: Abraham John ARCHITECTS

A multidisciplinary architecture, interior design, landscaping and urban planning firm founded in 1967. Abraham John & Alan Abraham are the Joint Principal Architects of Abraham John Architects. Abraham John Architects’ design approach is to re-connect architecture with nature, make optimum use of space, natural materials, lighting & landscape to reinvent and transform living environments and urban spaces. The firm works at multiple scales and with various organizations right from private clients to corporates & NGOs allowing itself to experiment and diversify its work.

LOCATION: Crystal Point Condos

2 2nd St, Jersey City, New Jersey, 07302

PHONE: +1 201-222-6800