Posts tagged with "Los Angeles Times"

Empowering women by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

How Women Can Rethink—And Smash The Myths Holding Them Back

COVID-19 has played havoc with many people’s careers, but it may have been especially detrimental to women.

Research shows that working mothers are dropping out of the workforce much faster than working fathers, at least in part because many schools switched to remote learning and at least one adult needed to be in the home with the children. One study by McKinsey & Company and Lean In also found that one-fourth of women they surveyed at 317 companies are considering downshifting their careers or leaving the workforce entirely.

As a result, the disruptions 2020 brought could have a long-term impact on women’s careers as well as their family’s finances.

But all might not be lost. These difficult times could be an opportunity for women to rethink their personal journeys and decide who and what they want to be going forward, says Andi Simon, a corporate anthropologist, founder of Simon Associates Management Consultants, and author of the upcoming book Rethink: Smashing the Myths of Women in Business.

“I often say if you want to change, have a crisis or create one,” Simon says. “A crisis forces you to rethink what has always been in your life so you can create new opportunities for your future. As we navigate these uncertain times, women can use them to rethink their own stories and to smash any myths that are holding them back from becoming who they want to become.”

Simon suggests a few steps women can get started:

  • Tell a story about who you are today. Draw a picture or create a list to show what you love and don’t love; the joys and challenges of your life now; your interests; and your dreams. “Put that picture or list where you can see it for a while as a reminder of who you are now,” Simon says.
  • Visualize yourself in the future. Think about what will make you become who you believe you can be. “Know what would make you happy and realize how you might be personally fulfilled,” Simon says. “Understand how you can be professionally accomplished, build a happy family, and enjoy the support of your friends and community. Know what matters to you and how you want your story to develop.”
  • Keep a diary. Research shows that people who keep diaries achieve their goals and do so with extraordinary results, far better than those who don’t keep diaries, Simon says. “That might seem strange, but it is easy enough to try,” she says. “Whether you do it online or on paper, keep your story coming, write it, and re-reread it. Let it help you embrace your new focus and belief that ‘yes, you can.’ ”
  • Stop your brain from undermining you. Every time you say, “No, that won’t work,” convert it to a “Yes, that’s a great idea.” “You can manage negative thoughts by simply thinking that you can,” she says.
  • Build up your idea bank. Research also shows that  the more ideas you have, the more likely you will have “big” ones, Simon says. She recommends writing them down in an idea book. “Try to stay focused on the vision you have for yourself as you build your idea bank,” Simon says.

“Remember that you are writing a new story, so don’t let your brain delete great ideas because they don’t fit into your current story,” Simon says. “Keep saying to yourself, ‘Yes, that’s a great idea.’ Pretty soon, you will achieve the goals that you aspire to all through your life’s journey.”

About Andi Simon

Andi Simon, Ph.D., author of the upcoming book Rethink: Smashing the Myths of Women in Business, is a corporate anthropologist and founder of Simon Associates Management Consultants. A trained practitioner in Blue Ocean Strategy®, Simon has conducted several hundred workshops and speeches on the topic as well as consulted with a wide range of clients across the globe. She also is the author of the award-winning book On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights. Simon has a successful podcast, On the Brink with Andi Simon, that has more than 125,000 monthly listeners, and is ranked among the top 20 Futurist podcasts and top 200 business podcasts. In addition, Global Advisory Experts named Simons’ firm the Corporate Anthropology Consultancy Firm of the Year in New York – 2020. She has been on Good Morning, America and Bloomberg, and is widely published in the Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Forbes, Business Week, Becker’s, and American Banker, among others. She has been a guest blogger for Forbes.com, Huffington Post, and Fierce Health.

What Keeps Men From Picking Up Their Household Mess

By Andi Simon, Ph.D.

For many of the women I have been working with during the pandemic crisis, the biggest complaint has been: “Why doesn’t my husband help pick up the mess?” “Don’t men even see the toys all around them, the dishes in the sink, the clothes needing folding?” And when they finally lend a hand, it is hardly neat or “the way I would have done it.”

Well, ladies and gentlemen, the cultural dilemma is upon us, exaggerated during the current stay-at-home, work remotely era caused by COVID-19. What wives, moms and girlfriends might have silently dealt with in the past has become a major issue when both partners are now at home together. Differences are more apparent, irritations closer to the surface.

As an anthropologist, and a wife, and a mother, I know all too well how difficult it is to change habits in adults. Once we learn our habits, they take over and drive us. My husband is a wonderful teammate but loves to leave his cabinets open, his clothes folded but not so smoothly, and his office … well let’s not discuss that. I do confess, at times my office is as big a mess as his, which is OK as long as each of us stick to our own disorderly worlds.

In a recent Atlantic article, “The Myth That Gets Men Out of Doing Chores,” Joe Pinsker writes about how these male-female differences originate partly from how boys and girls are raised, and partly from how men and women simply see things through different lenses. While some contend that boys are naturally messier than girls, there is little research to support that. If anything, boys and girls (and men and women) can both make a mess in the bedroom, the bathroom and the kitchen — indeed, making messes comes naturally to both sexes. Cleaning them up, less so.

The issue is that boys and girls are taught differently what it means to be “neat” or “messy.” There is nothing inherent in either of those words. We learn what they mean as we grow up, and the ones teaching us play a major role in handing down those cultural values about what we should or should not be doing to create order in our lives.

What matters is how we “believe” that we as humans create and manage our physical and social order, at home and outside of it. Watch boys at a sporting event — lacrosse, soccer or anything — and they learn quickly how to pack their sports bag and keep their equipment in good shape (or be yelled at by the coach). Girls do the same. In the office, men can be very neat, or not. I have had bosses with horrible office order and others who were so immaculate that it was weird. The same has been true of male or female bosses.

The question then becomes: Why do we think women should pick up the toys, fold the laundry and close the cabinets, while the guys watch their ballgame and drink their beer with a mess all around them? Humans are culture-creating and culture-living creatures. As children, we learn from parents, teachers and friends what is valued and for whom. If boys are allowed to have messy rooms because, well, they are just boys, they will quickly learn that boys can be messy, ignore the mess, and not be expected to restore order to it. If girls are told that they must clean up their rooms before they can do something they want, they learn other rules and other norms.

It really is true that what we see our mothers and fathers, and others, doing is what we mimic, in business and in life. It becomes embedded in our psyches, sometimes without our even realizing. If girls and women repeatedly hear that cleanliness is next to godliness, they will learn that making the bed, tidying the kitchen and cleaning up messes are positive reinforcements for how good and acceptable they are. Boys don’t learn this. In fact, if a boy neatly picks up his toys and then is called a sissy, what value judgement is that passing along?

So then, if you have a man in the house who repeatedly ignores the kids’ mess on the floor, think hard about what both of you are teaching your kids about personal responsibility, beyond neatness and messiness. You might during this at-home period be able to change their futures by providing them with unbiased values and beliefs about what men and women see and do. Remember, it is easier to change the kids than the guy. I would advise, though, that in your corrections to the latter, tread carefully but quickly, before the opportunity evaporates.

About Andi Simon

Andi Simon, Ph.D., author of the book Rethink: Smashing the Myths of Women in Business, is a corporate anthropologist and founder of Simon Associates Management Consultants. A trained practitioner in Blue Ocean Strategy®, Simon has conducted several hundred workshops and speeches on the topic as well as consulted with a wide range of clients across the globe. She also is the author of the award-winning book On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights. Simon has a successful podcast, On the Brink with Andi Simon, that has more than 125,000 monthly listeners, and is ranked among the top 20 Futurist podcasts and top 200 business podcasts. In addition, Global Advisory Experts named Simons’ firm the Corporate Anthropology Consultancy Firm of the Year in New York – 2020. She has been on Good Morning, America and Bloomberg, and is widely published in the Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Forbes, Business Week, Becker’s, and American Banker, among others. She has been a guest blogger for Forbes.com, Huffington Post, and Fierce Health.

Carly Rose – Change My Mind

VIDEO OUT ON DECEMBER 16TH

“A rare instance of credibly modern pop… an impressive batch of songs teeming with hooks and personality.” Los Angeles Times

New York-raised, Los Angeles-based rising indie-pop songstress Carly Rose drops her provocative next single, Change My Mind. The upbeat alt-pop anthem balances the complexities of adolescence with a celebratory energy, reminding listeners that life is messy but fun. Click HERE to listen.

Carly added about the track, “Change My Mind is about when you make the hard realization that there are certain things about yourself that you just cannot seem to shake as hard as you might try. Nobody is perfect, and this song explores the most dysfunctional and destructive parts of who I am in the best way I know how–bitter sarcasm and self-deprecation.”

Change My Mind follows the release of Carly’s successful debut EP WILD, which was hailed as “empowering” and “a compelling EP with strong emotions and Lana Del Rey vibes,” and was featured on playlists such as Spotify’s New Music Friday and Fresh & Chill.

At just 13 years old, Carly rose to fame on the X Factor’s second season, placing 2nd on the show…the youngest finalist in the show’s history. With a recording contract at her fingertips, she chose to take a step back from the industry, not wanting to become the typical reality TV-manufactured instant pop star.

The years of incubation have paid off as Carly emerges as one of the most refreshing and fully formed young artists – wise beyond her years, with an unexpected soul in her voice that cuts right through an oversaturated insta-pop music industry. Writing all of her own songs, Carly offers commentary on weighty topics such as drug addiction and lost youth yet packages it in a way that is accessible to a wide range of listeners. Listen once and you might hear a fun song to jam to. Listen deeper and you could find yourself contemplating some of life’s most topical and challenging issues.

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Kaelen Felix illustrates Chadwick Boseman of Black Panther for 360 magazine article

Chadwick Boseman

Although Chadwick Boseman passed earlier this year, his 44th birthday would be coming up on November 29. To commemorate Boseman, National Today has created Chadwick Boseman Day in his honor.

Boseman accomplished many things over his 44 years of life and has inspired people everywhere. He always encompassed black excellence and this shines through in each role he portrayed throughout his career.

As T’CHalla in Black Panther, Boseman gave young people of color a hero to look up to in the Marvel universe. This was a monumental role as the first black superhero for Marvel. He also represented the first African American Supreme Court Justice in the movie Marshall. In the famous film 42, Boseman took on the lead as Jackie Robinson, the first black MLB player. These roles only highlight Boseman’s wildly successful career. He took on powerful roles that gave representation to the African American community and will be remembered for these roles and many others.

Chadwick Boseman passed after a four year battle with colon cancer on Friday, August 28, 2020. In 2016, Boseman was diagnosed with stage three cancer which had progressed to stage four. Boseman was able to pass at home surrounded by family.

Boseman’s passing, whose struggle with cancer was not often in the public eye, came as a shock to a majority. Even Sarah Halley Finn, who casted Boseman for the role of King T’Challa in “Black Panther” did not know he was battling cancer.
According to Vulture, “Finn had no idea the actor had been diagnosed with stage three cancer when cameras rolled on Black Panther in 2017.”

Chadwick Boseman not only was an actor, but a pillar in the black community often playing roles of historical black men, such as Jackie Robinison in “42”. His latest role as King T’Challa in “Black Panther” and the Avengers series was a historical role itself.

The black community had never seen a super hero represent them before and Chadwick Boseman’s adaptation of T’Challa provided many young boys and girls a super hero that looked just like them.

Boseman’s humble spirit was always felt throughout Hollywood. CNN entertainment shared the story of Boseman praising fellow actor, Denzel Washington, for his charity that allowed Boseman to pursue acting.

From pulled quotes from Boseman’s speech at the American Film Institute’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2019, the story of how Washington paid for Boseman’s tuition at the British American Drama Academy’s Midsummer program after Boseman was accepted but could not attend because he could not afford it. Washington not only helped pay for this program, but helped pay for Boseman to attend Howard University.

 Boseman recounted how the sponsorship was “an offering from a sage and a king is more than silver and gold. It is a seed of hope, a bud of faith.”

“There is no Black Panther without Denzel Washington,” Boseman said. “And not just because of me, but my whole cast — that generation — stands on your shoulders.”

Boseman’s role as T’Challa was much more than that, a role. This role became a national symbol of black power and strength. The “Wakanda Forever” gesture of arms crossed over the chest, became a symbol itself of perseverance and pride. 

CBS New York spoke to people in New York about how Blank Panther made them feel. “Thirteen-year-old Brehima Gueye says watching Boseman in the 2018 Marvel film “Black Panther” gave him purpose and a sense of pride.”

According to CBS, “Family members say Boseman was a true fighter who continued to work while undergoing surgeries and chemotherapy for colon cancer that progressed to stage four.” 

On August 29, 2020 fans in Los Angeles attended a vigil at Leimert Park where they remembered the impact Boseman had within the black community. The Los Angeles Times stated, “Boseman’s death in the midst of so much racial tension in the country serves as reminder to keep fighting for racial justice like he did.”

Fans of the franchise worry about how it will continue on without Boseman but are hopeful that Wakanda and King T’Challa’s legacy will live on.

Boseman’s role in not only Hollywood, but within the black community and as a symbol of black strength will not be forgotten. While his role for the Avengers franchise brought monetary achievements, it brought much more than that. It brought a symbol of power, endurance and hope that will forever be immortalized on screen.

Morgan Wallen – 7 Summers

Big Loud/Republic Records’ Morgan Wallen has released the highly-anticipated official music video for his “dreamy, melancholy and unabashedly wistful” (Billboard) Top 30 single “7 Summers.”

Directed by Justin Clough and shot in Nashville, TN, the cinematic, eight-minute short film marks Wallen’s acting debut and depicts the song’s “nostalgic look back at a lost love” (Rolling Stone), reviving what happened “seven summers ago” on-screen.

WATCH “7 SUMMERS” HERE

This Wednesday (11/11), Wallen will perform his chart-racing Top 3 single “More Than My Hometown” while vying for New Artist of the Year on the 54th Annual CMA Awards airing on ABC.

KEEP UP WITH MORGAN WALLEN
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ABOUT MORGAN WALLEN:
Morgan Wallen has staked his claim as Country music’s next superstar with nearly 3 BILLION+ on-demand streams, MULTI-PLATINUM certifications, and three consecutive chart-toppers. “Unapologetically fresh and modern” (The Tennessean), the dynamic Tennessee native has been riding a red hot streak since 2017, collecting accolades including Best New Country Artist at the 2020 iHeartRadio Music Awards, Billboard’s #1 song of 2019 on both the Hot Country Songs and Country Airplay charts (multi-week #1 “Whiskey Glasses”), ACM, CMA and CMT Music Awards nominations, recognized on PEOPLE’s Ones to Watch and MusicRow’s 2019 Next Big Thing lists, plus high-profile features in the Los Angeles TimesAssociated PressThe Washington PostGenius, and more. Wallen proved his crossover appeal with 2X PLATINUM Diplo collaboration “Heartless,” and previewed his highly anticipated sophomore album with New Year’s surprise drop “This Bar,” current Top 3 single “More Than My Hometown,” and record-breaking hit “7 Summers,” which debuted at #1 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart and inside the Billboard Hot 100’s Top 10 while shattering first-day streaming records at Apple Music and Spotify.

Lewis Capaldi – Before You Go

Lewis Capaldi‘s hit song “Before You Go” finally hit No. 1 Monday on Mediabase‘s Top 40 and Billboard‘s Pop Songs and All Format Radio Songs charts.

Its 36-week climb to the top of Mediabase’s Top 40 and 37-week climb to the top of Billboard’s Pop Songs chart are the longest of both respective lists. The previous record was a 31-week climb up the Billboard Pop Chart set by “Eastside,” the 2018 hit from Benny Blanco, Halsey and Khalid.

Capaldi also joins Mariah Carey, Beyonce and Bruno Mars as the only artists to reach No. 1 with each of their first two entries, as “Someone You Loved” reached No. 1 in Dec. 2019.

“Before You Go” was first released Nov. 2019 on the extended version of Capaldi’s album “Divinely Uninspired to a Hellish Extent.” Since then it has done nothing but grow and spread, even cracking a billion streams.

Capaldi said “Before You Go” is about his aunt who died of suicide, also calling it the most honest and personal song he has ever written.

“It’s about loss, regrets and the fear that we sometimes never understand what someone is going through despite our best want to be everything that person needs,” Capaldi said.

Capaldi picked up a GRAMMY nomination for his song “Someone You Loved” and performed “Before You Go” at the 2020 MTV Video Music Awards where he was nominated for PUSH Best New Artist.

Instead of taking time to sit back and enjoy praise from outlets like Rolling Stone, The New York Times, Los Angeles Times and Entertainment Weekly, the Glasgow-born singer-songwriter is now working on his second album.

Instrument illustration by Ivory Rowen for 360 Magazine

Bob Dylan – “Rough and Rowdy Ways”

Bob Dylan’s new album, Rough and Rowdy Ways has debuted in the Top Ten in 13 countries, including #1 chart entries in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Norway, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Germany and Switzerland, #2 positions in The United States, Australia and Belgium, #3 in Sweden, and #4 in France and Italy. The album’s #2 entry in the U.S. on Billboard’s Top 200 is Dylan’s highest chart debut in this country since 2009 and marks the artist’s 18th studio album to debut in the U.S. Top 10. Rough And Rowdy Ways has also debuted at #1 on Billboard’s Top Album Sales Chart.

The 10-track Rough and Rowdy Ways is Bob Dylan’s first album of new songs since becoming the only songwriter to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2016; an award bestowed upon him by the Swedish Academy “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.” Critical response to Rough and Rowdy Ways has been rapturous, with many calling the album a masterpiece and one of the strongest works in Dylan’s canon.

Bob Dylan has released seven studio albums within the past 23-years; a creative span that also included the recording of an Oscar- and Golden Globe-winning composition, “Things Have Changed,” from the film Wonder Boys, in 2001; a worldwide best-selling memoir, Chronicles Vol. 1, which spent 19 weeks on the New York Times Best Seller List, in 2004 and was recently named the greatest rock memoir of all time by Rolling Stone. He is the recipient of the Officier de la Legion d’honneur in 2013, Sweden’s Polar Music Award in 2000, a Doctorate from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, and numerous other honors.

Bob Dylan has sold more than 125 million records around the world. Rough and Rowdy Ways is the artist’s 39th studio album.

Stream Rough and Rowdy Ways: Apple Music, Spotify, YouTube

The Critics Have Listened:

“A testament to his eternal greatness…. Rough and Rowdy Ways might well be Bob Dylan’s most consistently brilliant set of songs in years: the die-hards can spend months unravelling the knottier lyrics, but you don’t need a PhD in Dylanology to appreciate its singular quality and power.” — Alexis Petridis, The Guardian

“True to form, Dylan surprises yet again by delivering a late-career masterpiece with Rough and Rowdy Ways.  It’s a moody, reflective, meditative, befuddling, funny and awe-inspiring turn for the Nobel Prize winner. Rich with biblical and pop culture references, at its core Rough and Rowdy Ways is a record on the borderline of this world and the next, wherever or whatever that may be….The wait was worth it.” — Scott Bauer, AP

“It’s not merely the novelty of new Bob songs that offers comfort in this black swan moment, it’s a set of songs that provides inspiration when it’s in short supply. Call it a vaccine against culture’s shrinking expectations and the subsequent sapping of spirit. or just call it great music….Contradiction has always lived comfortably in Bob Dylan’s work – more evidence of the vast scope of his artistic vision. What’s extraordinary is how it continues to expand, containing multitudes no one else thought of.” — Michael Simmons, Mojo

“A savage pulp-noir masterpiece….A word of advice: Don’t mess with Bob Dylan, who, at 79, rips, snorts and cackles through his new album like a man with something — or absolutely nothing — to prove….Rough and Rowdy Ways rolls out one marvel after another.” — Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times

“When Dylan embarked on his musical journey as a young man in the Sixties, he forged an almost completely new type of song, open and multifarious, that became a new kind of standard…songs that defiantly inhabit his own myth, shifting perspective between his idiosyncratic views on the world and the world’s views on him.  Almost 60 years since we first heard from him, the old protest singer is still composing extraordinary anthems for our changing times.” — Neil McCormick, The Telegraph

Rough and Rowdy Ways is his first batch of new songs in 8 years, and it’s an absolute classic—it has the bleak majesty of latter-day Dylan albums like Modern Times and Tempest, yet it goes beyond them, tapping even deeper into cosmic American mysteries….his creative vitality remains startling—and a little frightening….But he refuses to rest on his legend. While the world keeps trying to celebrate him as an institution, pin him down, cast him in the Nobel Prize canon, embalm his past, this drifter always keeps on making his next escape. On Rough and Rowdy Ways, Dylan is exploring terrain nobody else has reached before—yet he just keeps pushing on into the future.” — Rob Sheffield, Rolling Stone

“With Rough and Rowdy Ways, he’s produced arguably his grandest poetic statement yet, a sweeping panorama of culture, history and philosophy peering back through assassinations, world wars, the births of nations, crusades and Biblical myths in order to plot his place in the great eternal scheme…. It would be foolish indeed to assume that Rough and Rowdy Ways is Dylan’s last word, but it’s certainly a historic address.” — Mark Beaumont, NME

“Truth is the talisman, tell it like it is. And that is what Dylan does….Rough and Rowdy Ways is exceptional.  If it were a painting, I’d call it a masterpiece.” — Will Gompertz, BBC

Rough and Rowdy Ways, an album that somehow manages to sound like nothing [Dylan] has ever done before, and that looks back across a long and hard-fought life while still insisting on always looking forward….The songs reveal an astonishing intensity and hunger, and a consistency that marks the album as one of Dylan’s major works….What leaps off of Rough and Rowdy Ways is Dylan’s blazing sense of purpose and focus. The man is not bullshitting. It comes through, full of humor and rage and heartbreak, in every word as they are written and sung.” — Alan Light, Esquire

Rough and Rowdy Ways hits hard.  [It’s] a gruesome, crowded, marauding album that feels unusually attuned to its moment….Dylan’s vast and intersectional understanding of the American mythos feels so plainly and uniquely relevant to the grimness and magnitude of these past few months. As the country attempts to metabolize the murder of George Floyd, it is also attempting to reckon with every crooked, brutal, odious, or unjust murder of a black person—to understand a cycle that began centuries ago and somehow continues apace. What is American racism? It’s everything, Dylan insists. Indiana Jones and J.F.K. and Elvis Presley and Jimmy Reed—nothing exists without the rest of it. None of us are absolved, and none of us are spared. Amanda Petrusich – New Yorker  Bob Dylan is a heavyweight champion. Five stars aren’t enough for his new album, Rough and Rowdy Ways. The album is a masterpiece, and a masterclass in lyric-writing in league with Dylan’s – and therefore anyone’s – best….Dylan is on fire lyrically throughout Rough and Rowdy Ways, offering up ten songs as dense in imagery and flawless in craftsmanship and quality as any of his long career….Perhaps the lesson in Rough and Rowdy Ways is that inestimable light can come from the dark places, once again making Dylan the voice we need to hear, just when we need it most.” — Jeff Slate, The Daily Beast

Follow Bob Dylan: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Youtube

Justice illustration

Justice For 2015 LAPD Shooting

Los Angeles finally agrees to settle excessive force claim for the 2015 LAPD shooting of unarmed teenagers

On February 10, 2015, Jamar Nicholson and friends were rapping in an alley on the way to school when LAPD opened fire. The City of Los Angeles agreed to settle a lawsuit for excessive force against the Los Angeles Police Department for $985, 000 for the wrongful shooting a black high school student in the back while he was on the way to school. Jamar Nicholson, Jason Huerta and their schoolmates were rapping in an alley a block from school when an LAPD officer, Miguel Guitterez, recklessly assumed there was a robbery in progress. The officer shot at the four students, striking Nicholson in the back and nearly hitting Jason Huerta. According to the Los Angeles Times, the officers did not identify themselves as police offers.

Despite having been shot for no reason, Nicholson remained handcuffed when transported by ambulance to the hospital and while in the emergency room. Both of the minors remained handcuffed and in custody for approximately five hours even though the police immediately learned at the scene that they had shot into a group of innocent minority children on their way to school.

“The officer falsely claimed a crime was being committed by Blacks and a Latino as they filmed themselves rapping with a bright orange-tipped replica gun as a prop,” stated John Harris of Harris & Associates who represented the plaintiffs. “This shooting wouldn’t have occurred if the kids were white, or on the way to school in a Westside neighborhood. This was a classic example of the mistreatment, racial prejudice and injustice against blacks, including black children. They regularly and routinely suffer at the hands of police. After waging a long and rigorous five-year battle against the City of LA for Guitterez’s blatant and egregious misconduct, we finally convinced them to do the right thing and compensate our clients for their physical injuries and emotional distress suffered.”

As we mourn the lives of wrongfully attacked Black people in our country, it is uplifting to see justice in this 5-year-old case.

LA Times, 360 MAGAZINE

LA Times The Taste – Costa Mesa Lineup

The Los Angeles Times announced the lineup for its Costa Mesa edition of The TasteFollowing its 10th anniversary on the Paramount Pictures Studios backlot, one of the most popular food and drink festivals is returning to Orange County for its second year to spotlight the vibrant cuisine and award-winning restaurants in the heart of Southern California.

Hosted by The Times’ Food staff, The Taste in Costa Mesa will take place at The MET over three sessions: one on Friday, Oct. 18 and two on Saturday, Oct. 19. Admission to each event includes unlimited samplings from dozens of local restaurants, premium cocktail tastings, plus demonstrations from renowned chefs and wine experts.

Friday, Oct. 18, 7 to 10 p.m.

L.A. Times Cooking Editor Genevieve Ko will host the opening event featuring Syrian pastry chef Maher Nakhal (Le Mirage Pastry) as he reveals the handcrafted artistry behind his authentic Middle Eastern desserts and French pastries. Critically acclaimed chef Ross Pangilinan (Terrace by Mix Mix) will showcase his eclectic style and Euro-Filipino flavors through a demo of one of his signature dishes, hosted by Times Features Writer Gustavo Arellano. Restaurants include: Filomena’s Italian Kitchen, Outpost Kitchen, Puesto, Tackle Box, The Ranch at Laguna Beach and WAVE Gourmet Burgers.

Saturday, Oct. 19, noon to 3 p.m.

Chef Carlos Salgado of Michelin-starred Taco María, will provide a glimpse into his contemporary, Mexican-influenced cooking with L.A. Times Cooking Columnist Ben Mims. Taking the crowd on a wine tour through Monterey County, Rob Baker (Southern Glazer’s) will lead a presentation on Bordeaux-style wine from Carmel Valley’s Bernardus Winery. Restaurants include: Karl Strauss Brewing Company, Mayors Table Pacific Pub & Kitchen, Mesa and Roba Noodle.

 Saturday, Oct. 19, 7 to 10 p.m.

The Taste festivities continue on Saturday night as chef Wing Lam (Wahoo’s Fish Tacos) will cook up his legendary Baja-style fish tacos, while Michelin-starred chef Tony Esnault (Knife Pleat) will demonstrate modern, seasonal interpretations of classic French techniques with Times Senior Food Writer Jenn Harris. Restaurants include: Bluegold, Bosscat Kitchen & Libations, CUCINA enoteca, Georgia’s Restaurant, Silver Trumpet Restaurant and Bar and Toast Kitchen + Bakery.

Travel Costa Mesa has partnered with nearby hotels to offer special packages that include a pair of tickets to The Taste with each night’s stay for a weekend “Eatcation” to explore more of the area’s diverse food and cultural scene.

Photo Courtesy of LA Times The Taste

LA Times, The Taste 2019, The Taste LA, Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

LA Times The Taste

By Vaughn Lowery × Krish Narsinghani

The Taste LA‘s 10th anniversary didn’t disappoint. Held at the legendary Paramount Studios on Gower and Melrose in Hollywood. Opening night was nothing short of whimsical. Canopy lights draped the movie lot as people pranced throughout the evening with sips and bite-sized dishes in tow. The soon-to-be iconic event is hosted by the LA Times. If you’re seeking a savory night out with influential foodies, then this is your place.

Throughout the three day experience, various restaurants rotated booths to serve small bites and spirits. 360 Magazine favorites included Castaway, McConnel’s Fine Ice Creams and RiceBox. VIP ticket holders had access to an additional plethora of wines, lounge area and a personalized wine glass crafted by Signature Hand Engraving.

Ticket prices ranged from $115 to $200 USD for a VIP experience. Passes are all-inclusive and good for unlimited food, beer, wine and spirits tastings, plus all stage activities (including cooking demonstrations). The Taste 2019 left foodies satisfied and dreaming of LA’s hottest restaurants.