Posts tagged with "brooklyn vegan"

Orson Wilds image shot by Calm Elliott-Armstrong for use by 360 Magazine

ORSON WILDS – DEBUT SINGLES, “KYOTO”

ORSON WILDS SHARE COVER OF PHOEBE BRIDGERS’ “KYOTO”

DEBUT SINGLES “STAND UP” & “MOTHERS DAUGHTERS” AVAILABLE NOW

Ahead of last week”s Grammys ceremony, Canadian duo Orson Wilds shared a performance of Phoebe Bridgers’ “Kyoto,” exclusively via Brooklyn Vegan. Today, the cover gets a wider release and is available across all streaming platforms.

“Phoebe Bridgers is the ultimate apocalypse music,” vocalist Eric Reid told Brooklyn Vegan. “It feels deeply personal and introspective but there”s also a level of nihilism and despair, which is frankly, everything I look for in an artist. “Punisher” was such a perfect soundtrack for the last year, and it helped both Brianna and myself get through some weird shit. “Kyoto” feels like the outlier on the album and felt the least voyeuristic to cover in terms of subject matter. It’s like a rock song, but super nuanced and not necessarily mixed the way you’d expect a rock song to be mixed, which is a huge part of what makes it so affecting. We approached it from a different angle and tried to keep it as live feeling as we could. We kept our takes to a minimum and sped it up a bit, I think it took like 4 hours to record.”

Orson Wilds’ debut studio singles, “Mothers Daughters” and “Stand Up,” were both recorded and produced by Will Yip (Panic! At The Disco, Turnstile, Title Fight), and will be included on the band”s forthcoming debut album expected to arrive later this year. Released in December, “Stand Up” is already closing in on one million streams globally. The track was commended by UproxxNorthern Transmissions, and The Alternative upon its release, with Uproxx declaring it “one of the most anthemic indie rock jams since Arcade Fire dropped “Wake Up.”” Both tracks are available now on all streaming platforms. Watch the official video for “Stand Up” here and “Mothers Daughters” here.

Orson Wilds, fronted by Eric Reid and Brianna Bordihn, have only played a handful of shows in the Southern Ontario area, focusing mainly on the honing of their craft and sound. This hard work paid off when Yip, an enthusiastic producer with bustling industry savvy, was so taken by the compositional strength of Orson Wilds’ songs that he took the band under his wing, helped them produce two new singles, and signed them to his imprint. Though Reid and Bordihn represent the core of Orson Wilds, an ever-evolving collective of friends and family round out the live iteration of the band with stomping, uplifting electric guitars, horns and woodwind sections, and thrashing, urgent percussion.

Lord Huron Long Lost Album Cover (By Ben Schneider) of Republic Records for use by 360 Magazine

Lord Huron – Long Lost

LORD HURON ANNOUNCE NEW ALBUM LONG LOST OUT MAY 21ST

NEW SINGLE “MINE FOREVER” OUT NOW WITH OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO

Who is Tubbs Tarbell? (Letter)

After causing a whole lot of chatter amongst audiences and critics alike, Lord Huron have begun to unwind the little riddle they’ve been spinning over the past few months and announce their fourth full-length album, LONG LOST, out May 21st via Whispering Pines Studios Inc./Republic Records, featuring new single “MINE FOREVER.

Pre-orderLong Lost HERE, listen to “Mine Forever HERE, and watch the official music video for Mine Forever (Directed by Anthony Wilson) HERE.

At the same time, the news only raises more questions. What can fans expect? What did the band lose and how long has it been lost? And who the hell is WBUB’s Mr. Tubbs Tarbell? All these questions (and more) have been brewing as easter eggs from the upcoming album have been revealed during Lord Huron’s Alive from Whispering Pines series.

During its first episode, viewers were introduced to Mr. Tubbs Tarbell, fell under the spell of commercials that may very well be lost tapes from the past, and were treated to some incredible performances by Lord Huron. The band played some old songs including “Meet Me In The Woods” (view video here) and provided a sneak peek at some new songs. The episode also featured a hotline where fans could call in and ask Mr. Tarbell questions and request songs from the band. Episode 2 included additional cryptic clues, more beautiful performances from Lord Huron (including  “The World Ender” and  “Frozen Pines”) and even the secret world premiere of “Mine Forever.” Last night on Alive From Whispering Pines, Lord Huron performed their triple-platinum single “The Night We Met,” as well as fan favorites “Ghost on The Shore” and “Never Ever.”

To help answer all these lingering questions, Tubbs has put out an official letter into the multi-verse from Whispering Pines Studios describing the mythical tale of recording Long Lost with Lord Huron and the origins of its cosmic music. Read the full letter HERE and below.

Long Lostwill also include previously released track “Not Dead Yet.” The single has already racked up 1.5 million Spotify streams and 500K video views. Additionally, the guys hit the stage at Jimmy Kimmel LIVE! for a show-stopping television debut performance of “Not Dead Yet.” Watch it HERE. Spin claimed, “they sharpened their teeth, while UPROXX described the track as “driving. In addition to plugs from Stereogum and more, Brooklyn Vegan touted it among “Our Favorite Songs of the Week.” See full track list for Long Lost below.

The last episode of Alive From Whispering Pines will broadcast in April, with more surprises to come. Fans can purchase tickets to each episode, a season pass to all four shows, and exclusive merch at Lord Huron’s website.

What could be in store for the band next? Only time will tell…As Tubbs says: “As ever, friends, may you live until you die”

Long Lost Track List:

  1. The Moon Doesn’t Mind
  2. Mine Forever
  3. (One Helluva Performer)
  4. Love Me Like You Used To
  5. Meet Me in The City
  6. (Sing For Us Tonight)
  7. Long Lost
  8. Twenty Long Years
  9. Drops in the Lake
  10. Where Did the Time Go
  11. Not Dead Yet
  12. (Deep Down Inside Ya)
  13. I Lied
  14. At Sea
  15. What Do It Mean
  16. Time’s Blur

About Lord Huron
Lord Huron first made a name for themselves with their debut album Lonesome Dreams and shortly after released Strange Taleswhich featured the triple-platinum single “The Night We Met.” In 2018, Lord Huron earned widespread critical acclaim with their first Top 5 debut on the Billboard Top 2—with their third album, Vide Noir. A cinematic collection of pensive, provocative and powerful rock, the record garnered praise from NPRTimeLos Angeles TimesSpinStereogumRefinery29UPROXX, and more as singles such as Wait by the River (which the band performed on “Late Night with Seth Meyers”) and When the Night is Over generated tens of millions of streams. The band’s extensive touring includes headline shows at some of the most storied venues in the country (including the Hollywood Bowl, Red Rocks, and the Ryman Auditorium) and prime slots at festivals ranging from Coachella to Lollapalooza to Bonnaroo.

Tune Prism Cover Artist Spotlight: Lord Huron and the Long Lost Sounds of Yore Words and Memories by Tubbs Tarbell

Friends,

I been thinkin’ a lot about the past again. I guess if you know me, that’s nothin’ new. Yeah, I smell what you’re sniffin’ at: “Oh boy, here goes ol’ Tubbs again, ramblin’ about those good ol’ bygone days of yore.” Well, sure, I’ll allow you that’n. Maybe I do tend to take a good hard glance into the rearview before I step my boot on the gas. But don’t we all? Or shouldn’t we, in any case?

It just seems to me that, these days, the past is everywhere you look. Hell, take another peek at that sentence again. The first time you read it is already in the past. Funny how time just keeps clickin’ along. These days, anyway.

So, sometime in what’s now the not-too distant past, I was sittin’ in my usual seat inside Whispering Pines, cozied up to a glass of something cozy, when, from outta nowhere, this particular tune crept into my ear. It was a funny thing, because it immediately felt familiar to me, as a song that creeps into your ear usually has to be—’specially for somebody like me who don’t write ’em…I just roll ’em. (You’ve heard me say that one more than a few times, no doubt.) But then the more I thought about it, and the more I listened to this little tune janglin’ around upstairs, I realized that I couldn’t place it as somethin’ I’d ever heard before. (And take my word for it: the ol’ upstairs is a titanium steel trap for tunes, even now.) It was a conundrum.

That little number stuck with me for more than a few days. I’d be doing something mindless— scrubbin’ my cup, combin’ my hat—when all of a sudden, here it came again: It’s hard to make friends when you’re half in the grave, but I ain’t dead yet and I’ve got something to say. It was the loveliest thing, and dang me if it didn’t keep sounding chummier and chummier. It was sublime—that drivin’ jangle of the guitar, the steady thump of the drums, those breezy, liltin’ voices—but I just couldn’t place it. Could it have been that ol’ Tubbs here had somehow tapped into that cosmic eternal and unwittingly written his first tune without even knowin’ it?

A week (or was it a month?) went by and the tune never went too far from my head. There’s a stranger in my eyes again… It almost got to where I was more used to the tune bein’ there under my hat than my own face. …I swear to God I don’t know him. But then it happened, somethin’ I’ll never forget for as long as I live: My little tune came to life before my very eyes.

Now, be patient. I’ll tell you how.

That day, one of my all-time favorite acts happened to be booked in Whispering Pines for a recordin’ spell, those good-time bootscooters and rhythm rascals known as the Lord Huron. As always, the boys showed up early—but not earlier than ol’ Tubbs here—and made haste toward the studio’s live room.

“Howdy, fellers,” says I. “Headed for the big room, I see.” (If Whispering Pines was a church—it ain’t, mind you, but iffin’ it were—the live room would be the holy pulpit, I reckon.)

Ben (he’s the singer) just looked at me, touched the brim of his hat, and nodded. “Thought we might try somethin’ different this time, good buddy,” says he.

So I just gave him my grandest grand welcome and stepped aside, happy to have them back. Those boys know what they’re doin’, havin’ made quite a few of their records with us. But the live room, this was gonna be a first, and a real treat. I tried my best to keep my grin to a simmer, sat down at the board, and watched as Mark, Miguel, Tom, and Ben started tunin’ her up

If you’ve ever had the pleasure of recordin’ at the Pines, then you know that nothin’ in the place is off limits. Guitars, cymbals, pianos, pedal steel, mandolins, microphones, saxophones—what’s ours is ours, that’s my motto. And as the Huron boys are basically my own brothers by now— well, nephews, maybe, but who’s countin’—I was glad to see their hands on all of it. I even heard ’em talk about recordin’ a gigantic string and woodwind orchestra in some dang place like Sweden or somewhat…those fellers really shoot the moon, I tell ya.

I’d barely had time to pour my coffee and hit the big red button when they settled into a dusky groove so quick I could hardly believe it. Must have been all that time playin’ out on the road together—even headlined that dang Bowl they got out in Hollywood since last I laid eyes. Hell, they’ve known each other since grade school so it don’t surprise…that’s the rumor, anyway.

Now, I’ve loved all their hits—“The Night We Met,” “Time to Run,” “When the Night is Over”—but this new stuff they started in on just sounded…well, it just sounded like somethin’ eerily familiar, as it were. Like somethin’ from a past life I’d heard before, but brand new, all at once. Like a note plucked long ago that had moseyed through time to finally belly up to my bar once and for all. It was a conundrum.

The first number they called “The Moon Doesn’t Mind,” and I say it reminded me of one of those cowboy pictures where the lone horseman is singin’ his heart out to the audience from atop his brave steed. But somethin’ about the pang in Ben’s voice made it seem like that feelin’ was more lonesome than just simply lone—or maybe it was just my view from the sidestage, as it were. Maybe the light catches a singer a little different when you’re not starin’ at him head-on, or even through a lens. I always did wonder if those cowboys were really as rootin’ and tootin’ as they looked on TV. I gave the boys a good round of applause before they launched into a real sunset of a song they called “Mine Forever,” a swingin’, full-on heart-renderer with a bubbly sound. All of a sudden I heard handclaps and female voices—I swear those ladies must have risen up outta the floorboards! Never saw ’em come in, and didn’t see ’em leave. That’s just the magic of the Pines, I suppose. Door knockin’s for strangers.

The next one, “Love Me Like You Used To,” brought to ear of one of those classic lovelorn country ballads, like one sung by Handsome Scott or even ol’ Roy Casey himself. “Long Lost” and “I Lied” both slowed the tempo down a notch or two, but sounded no less grand. The boys were really firin’ on all cylinders that day, I tell ya, fillin’ the air of that grand live room—and my own soul—with those tales of hard luck, heartbreak, and redemption. It was as if the boys had become conduits for the spirits of the room and were usin’ them to tap into that same cosmic eternal I’ve always felt—known—was hoverin’ around inside Whispering Pines.

I was feelin’ pretty fine. Our old pine clock on the wall had long stopped tickin’ and the boys surely didn’t need any help from little ol’ me, so I helped myself to a little somethin’ cozy and kicked my boots up on the board. And it was then, in that instant, that I heard it…my tune.

All messed up with nowhere to go, I stare at myself in the mirror alone… It’s hard to make friends when you’re half in the grave…

That drivin’ guitar jangle, the steady drum thump, those breezy, liltin’ voices…it was all unmistakable. My tune! It had somehow crept out from that titanium trap I keep under my hat and sneaked into the live room to serenade me from behind the glass studio wall. Time seemed to stand still, even more than it usually does around here. It was like some long, lost dream come to life, a forgotten classic from a parallel dimension, the echo of a memory that wasn’t mine. But the feelin’ was real.

“Say, boys, what’s that one called?” I hollered into the talkback, trying to seem casual.

They looked at one another, laughed. “Well, I’m not sure,” Ben replied. “What does it feel like it’s called to you?”

As he spoke, I caught a glimpse of myself in the unpolished studio glass, and somethin’ hit me, somethin’ I’ve never been able to explain. “Well, I reckon it’s called ‘Not Dead Yet,’” I reckoned. And wouldn’t you know it? Turned out, it was.

The Huron kept at it for a little while longer that day, but I must have drifted off peaceful-like in somethin’ of a cosmic slumber, with my tune—all of the tunes, in fact, as all of them were now mine—janglin’ heavy and happy in my heart. When I woke, the light from the next day was just startin’ to ease into the Pines, and I was alone. I stood up, stretched my creaky back, scratched a little stubble. As I turned to grab my leavin’ hat off its peg, somethin’ caught my eye: A hand- scratched note bound to a faded vinyl record sleeve was layin’ on the floor.

I bent down to snatch it up. The record was called “Long Lost,” and it looked as if it had been layin’ there on the floor since before Whispering Pines was even a whisper itself. I brushed the dust off the cover and saw that the artist was none other than the boys themselves—Lord Huron.

“Say, Tubbs,” the note read. “Time washes aways what man creates, but ‘Long Lost’ might convince you that a note can live on. Be good now. The Boys.”

And just like that, they were gone.

As ever, friends, may you live until you die, Tubbs

ABOUT REPUBLIC RECORDS

A division of Universal Music Group, the world’s leading music company, Republic Records is home to an all-star roster of multi-platinum, award-winning legends and superstar artists such as Ariana Grande, Black Thought, Drake, Florence + the Machine, Greta Van Fleet, Hailee Steinfeld, Jack Johnson, James Blake, James Bay, Jessie J, John Mellencamp, Jonas Brothers, Julia Michaels, Kid Cudi, Lil Wayne, Lorde, Metro Boomin, NAV, Nicki Minaj, Of Monsters and Men, Pearl Jam, Post Malone, Seth MacFarlane, Stevie Wonder, Taylor Swift, The Weeknd and more. Founded by brothers and chief executives Monte and Avery Lipman, it is also comprised of innovative business ventures, including American Recordings, Boominati Worldwide, Brushfire, Casablanca Records, Cash Money, Lava Records, XO, Young Money, among others. Republic also maintains a long-standing strategic alliance with Universal Music Latin Entertainment (J Balvin and Karol G).  In addition, Republic has expanded to release high-profile soundtracks for Universal Pictures (Fifty Shades of Grey), Sony Pictures (Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse) and NBC TV (The Voice), as well as other notable film and television franchises. Extending further into the worlds of film, television, and content, Republic launched Federal Films in order to produce movies and series powered by the label’s catalog and artists. Its first production was the Jonas Brothers documentary Chasing Happiness for Amazon Prime Video.

Duckwrth Coming Closer visual

Duckwrth – Coming Closer

Critically acclaimed Los Angeles rapper Duckwrth releases his new track “Coming Closer” feat. G.L.A.M. and Juliana Romana today.

Listen to “Coming Closer” feat. G.L.A.M. and Juliana Romana HERE.

On the track, which is produced by LA based twins Two Fresh and G.L.A.M., Duckwrth once again instigates unpredictable and unprecedented genre alchemy. He threads together bouncy rhymes while G.L.A.M. fires back with a seductive counterpoint as their bars come together before the dancefloor-ready hook sung by Juliana Romana. This anthem glides between hip-hop and electronic only to border on unexpected pop bliss.

“Coming Closer” arrives hot on the heels of his buzzing feel-good anthem “Find A Way” feat. Alex Mali, Radio Ahlee, & Bayli. HipHopDX praised its “melodic message of perseverance,” and Brooklyn Vegan described it as “powerful.” HYPEBEAST wrote, “The single serves as an uplifting anthem during these troubling times, featuring lyrics that showcase the artist’s ability to reminisce about the past and see a way forward.” Earmilk put it best, “The single plays as a welcome beam of light during a dark time.”

Over the last five years, LA-based wunderkind Duckwrth has quickly risen up the ranks as a promising star of the future of music. His collection of critically acclaimed projects including Nowhere (2015,) I’m Uugly (2016), Xtra Uugly (2017) and The Falling Man EP (2019), have transcended streaming platforms and landed in films, TV series, and brand ad campaigns and have received critical acclaim from a vast amount of outlets including NPR, The FADER, Complex, XXL and more. This cumulation has led the rapper to become an international touring staple, headlining shows globally and performing at Austin City Limits and opening for superstars Billie Eilish and Anderson .Paak. Duckwrth’s music has appeared on shows like CW’s All American, HBO’s Insecure and Real Time with Bill Maher and his song “Start A Riot” was featured on the Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse soundtrack. His music has appeared in campaigns for the likes of Cadillac, Microsoft, Peloton, Amazon and Apple Music, and he’s worked with fashion legacies like Levi’s, Vans and Fila, as well as high fashion men’s suit designer Paul Smith.

Follow Duckwrth: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

About Republic Records

A division of Universal Music Group, the world’s leading music company, Republic Records is home to an all-star roster of multi-platinum, award-winning legends and superstar artists such as Ariana Grande, Drake, Florence + the Machine, Greta Van Fleet, Hailee Steinfeld, Jack Johnson, James Blake, James Bay, Jessie J, John Mellencamp, Jonas Brothers, Julia Michaels, Kid Cudi, Liam Payne, Lil Wayne, Lorde, Metro Boomin, NAV, Nicki Minaj, Of Monsters and Men, Pearl Jam, Post Malone, Seth MacFarlane, Taylor Swift, The Weeknd and more. Founded by brothers and chief executives Monte and Avery Lipman, it is also comprised of innovative business ventures, including American Recordings, Boominati Worldwide, Brushfire, Casablanca Records, Cash Money, Lava Records, Monkeywrench, XO, Young Money, among others. Republic also maintains long-standing strategic alliances with Universal Music Latin Entertainment (Karol G) and Hollywood Records (Zendaya).

In addition, Republic has expanded to release high-profile soundtracks for Universal Pictures (Fifty Shades of Grey), Sony Pictures (Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse), Lionsgate (Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist) and NBC TV (The Voice), as well as other notable film and television franchises. Extending further into the worlds of film, television, and content, Republic launched Federal Films during 2017 in order to produce movies and series powered by the label’s catalog and artists. Its first production is the Jonas Brothers documentary Chasing Happiness for Amazon Prime Video.

Maxo Releases New Album

“GRITTY, STYLISH, AND LOW-KEY COOL”: MAXO RELEASES HIS CRITICALLY HERALDED NEW ALBUM LIL BIG MAN

LISTEN HERE

WATCH THE VIDEO FOR “IN MY PENNY’s” HERE

WATCH THE VIDEO FOR “TIME” HERE

TRACKLIST

  1. Time
  2. Strongside
  3. Kinfolk
  4. No Love (feat. Lojii)
  5. In My Penny’s
  6. Lucky
  7. Headphones
  8. 605
  9. Crown Heights
  10. Quiktoldme

“The rising LA rapper started his rap career just a few short years ago, but he already raps with the kind of wise, world-weary delivery that some artists don’t develop until they’ve been at it for twice as long….He raps his ass off, he tells introspective stories and tackles some heavy topics, and his words and delivery are both sharp.” – Brooklyn Vegan

“Maxo’s music showcases an underlying grittiness that effortlessly matches his stylish sound: a balance of low-key cool with a weariness that only comes from having to grow up too soon.” – Pitchfork

“The video suits the textured track wonderfully, complimenting its inviting sounds. With the swirling camera and gentle color pallette, it’s the perfect introduction to Maxo’s music.” – Complex

ABOUT MAXO

Maxo, 23, started recording his musings just a few years ago, inspired by his older brother’s struggles in coping with the world around him.  

“That was around the time of Mike Brown and Trayvon Martin,” Maxo recalls clearly. “Just being a Black man will take a toll on you, whether you recognize it or not. That, in combination with trying to find yourself. It will drive you crazy. He lost his shit.” A middle child (he has a younger brother), it was tough to see his older bro—who loved to rap—hit a rough patch. When society stressed him out of his love of music, Maxo picked it up for him.

WWW.SMILEFORMAXO.COM

FOLLOW MAXO

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