Posts tagged with "colorado"

Chloe Moriondo illustration by Heather Skovlund (photo credit: Jimmy Fontaine) for 360 Magazine

Chloe Moriondo × Blood Bunny

CHLOE MORIONDO DEBUTS NEW ALBUM BLOOD BUNNY RECORD CROWNED AS NEW YORK TIMES CRITIC’S PICK

BODYBAG OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO STREAMING NOW

NORTH AMERICAN FALL HEADLINE TOUR ON-SALE TODAY DATES KICK OFF SEPTEMBER 30TH IN CLEVELAND, OH

CHLOE MORIONDO BODYBAG OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO

18-year-old artist Chloe Moriondo has shared her major-label debut album Blood Bunny. The release is accompanied by an official video for track Bodybag, which is streaming now on Moriondo’s official YouTube channelBlood Bunny is available now on all streaming platforms via Public Consumption Recording Co./Fueled By Ramen.

In celebration of the record, Chloe Moriondo will embark on a fall headline tour, kicking off September 30th in Columbus, Ohio. The trek will make stops at The Roxy in Los Angeles, CA and New York City’s Bowery Ballroom before wrapping up with a home-state performance at El Club in Detroit, MI (tour itinerary attached). General on-sale begins today at 12pm local time. For up-to-date ticketing information, please visit the Chloe Moriondo website.

The New York Timescrowned the 13-track Blood Bunny a Critic’s Pick, and exclaimed On the robust and vividly plain-spoken ‘Blood Bunny,’ Moriondo is a pop-punk whiz, deftly hopping between musical approaches from spare to lushly produced, and emphasizing intimate, cut-to-the-bone lyrics. The Line of Best Fit hailed the record as Moriondo’s boldest, brightest and most ambitious project to date, while Dork Magazine raved, it’s obvious that [Blood Bunny] is a big deal in a five-star review. FLOOD Magazine praised the record’s intricate production blending cozy pop and rock riffs and UPROXX declared, Blood Bunny is a departure from the sound on Moriondo’s previous work, employing a full band to create alternative rock songs that sound absolutely massive with excellent songwriting.

Blood Bunny was heralded by the release of April single I Eat Boys, a deceptively breezy track inspired by the queer cult classic film Jennifer’s Body, twisting an instance of street harassment into a cannibalistic daydream. In addition to Éc;I Eat Boys,Éd; the albumfeatures previously released singles Manta Rays, GIRL ON TV, and I Want To Be With You, the latter of which was lauded by The New York Times as acutely observed bedroom pop served with a side of arena-emo triumph. Recently labeled one of 2021’s Artists To Watch by PEOPLE and NME, Chloe has racked up praise from BillboardUPROXXRefinery29them., E!, and more. The artist has also become a sought-after collaborator, recently appearing as a featured artist on tracks with Frances Forever, mxmtoon and Ricky Montgomery.

At age eighteen, Chloe Moriondo professes to be an internet kid, yet she tackles overwhelming infatuation, listless daydreams, and first love with keen empathy that’s unsearchable online. With her relatable, confessional lyrics and idiosyncratic humor, the singer-songwriter has built a devoted fanbase of millions, sharing her authentic self to create a genuine connection with her listeners.

CHLOE MORIONDO 2021 HEADLINE TOUR DATES

Thu, SEP 30 Mahalls Cleveland, OH

Fri, OCT 1 Bottom Lounge Chicago, IL

Sat, OCT 2 7th Street Entry Minneapolis, MN

Tue, OCT 5 Lost Lake Lounge Denver, CO

Thu, OCT 7 Kilby Court Salt Lake City, UT

Sat, OCT 9 Holocene Portland, OR

Sun, OCT 10 The Vera Project Seattle, WA

Tue, OCT 12 Rickshaw Stop San Francisco, CA

Thu, OCT 14 The Roxy Theatre Los Angeles, CA

Sat, OCT 16 House of Blues San Diego San Diego, CA

Sun, OCT 17 The Rebel Lounge Phoenix, AZ

Fri, NOV 12 Antone’s Austin, TX

Sat, NOV 13 The Secret Group Houston, TX

Sun, NOV 14 Dada Dallas Dallas, TX

Tue, NOV 16 The Basement East Nashville, TN

BLOOD BUNNY Tracklisting:

Rly Don’t Care

I Eat Boys

Manta Rays

GIRL ON TV

I Want To Be With You

Slacker

Take Your Time

Bodybag

Favorite Band

Samantha

Strawberry Blonde

Vapor

What If It Doesn’t End Well

Rainbow Dreamland illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Rainbow Dreamland Tour

VALLEY TO JOIN COIN ON RAINBOW DREAMLAND NORTH AMERICAN TOUR IN FALL 2021, TICKETS ON SALE NOW

LISTEN TO LIKE 1999 BY VALLEY HERE

PURCHASE TICKETS HERE

JUNO nominated, Canadian indie-pop band, VALLEY has announced their Fall 2021 North American tour in support of COIN. The 17-date tour run will begin on October 26 in Birmingham, AL, and go through November 21 in Houston, TX. The Rainbow Dreamland tour will be VALLEY’s return to the stage, bringing new music directly to their fans.

Most recently, VALLEY released their charmingly nostalgic single Like 1999 along with a video featuring TikTok star Boman. Fittingly, the track first gained momentum when the band posted a teaser of the song on their own TikTok. Since then, Like 1999 has garnered over 10 million global streams and become a form of escapism to fans waiting out the pandemic. Don’t miss your chance to see VALLEY live when shows return this Fall.

High-profile, high-octane – PAPER

A buoyant pop anthem full of emotion and fun, clever references, Like 1999 taps a sentimental vein Atwood Magazine

Taking the shape of a time capsule, the new track is an ode to the 1990s, shimmering with kaleidoscopic textures, sun-kissed melodies, and lush vocals that create an irresistible and dreamy sound. –  Gig Goer

In a world where, especially for artists, everything has been uncertain- VALLEY has cemented themselves as timeless. –  Unfiltered Zine

Tour Dates

October 26 – Birmingham, AL – Iron City Music Hall

October 27- Nashville, TN – Ryman Auditorium

October 29 – Chicago, IL – House of Blues

October 30 – St. Louis, MO – Del Mar

November 2 – Minneapolis, MN – Varsity Theater

November 3 – Kansas City, MO – The Truman

November 5 – Denver, CO – The Summit

November 6 – Salt Lake City, UT – The Complex

November 8 – Portland, OR – Revolution Hall

November 9 – Vancouver, BC Rio Theatre

November 11 – Seattle, WA – Showbox Sodo

November 13 – Los Angeles, CA – The Wiltern

November 15 – San Diego, CA – Observatory North Park

November 17 – Phoenix, AZ – The Van Buren

November 19 – Dallas, TX – South Side Ballroom

November 20 – Austin, TX – Emo’s

November 21 – Houston, TX – House of Blues

FOLLOW VALLEY

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Spiro illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Spiro Exhibition

Ancient Mysteries Revealed: Groundbreaking Spiro Exhibition to Debut at The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum

The Spiro site contained one of the greatest collections of prehistoric American Indian artifacts ever discovered in the United States.

The Spiro Mounds are one of the United States’ most important ancient Native American sites, as well as an archaeological find unmatched in modern times. Yet, despite creating a sophisticated ancient culture, the Spiro people are nearly forgotten in the pages of history books. How did these incredible works of art and other treasures from all over North America end up hidden for hundreds of years, and why? Opening February 12, 2021 at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, “Spiro and the Art of the Mississippian World” will seek to answer these questions and more in the first major presentation on the Spiro Mounds ever undertaken by a museum, representing the first, and possibly last, time these artifacts will be reunited from various collections across the country.

“We are incredibly pleased to announce this unparalleled exhibition, which will give proper honor and representation to the culture and historical impact of the Spiro people,” said Natalie Shirley, The Cowboy president and CEO. “Our staff has worked for years to create a world-class, exciting and collaborative presentation of a people who have been overlooked for too long.”

This exhibition will share the art, history and culture of the Spiro people through approx. 175 objects, as well as an accompanying publication, website, public symposium and panel discussion. It was created in collaboration with representatives from the Caddo and Wichita Nations, the descendants of the Spiroan people, and with contributions by 17 humanities scholars from nearly a dozen universities and museums from across the United States.

The Spiro Mounds were the location of one of the largest and longest episodes of looting at any American archaeological site in history—comparable to that of Mesa Verde in Colorado and, sadly, several others across the country. Both looting and New Deal/Works Progress Administration (WPA) archaeological excavations came together in a near-perfect storm at Spiro. In 1935, the public’s imagination was peaked when the Kansas City Star called the site’s discovery a “King Tut’s Tomb in the Arkansas Valley,” and identified it as the greatest source of Mississippian iconographic material ever found. Embossed copper plates, wooden sculptures, thousands of pearls and beads, large human effigy pipes and engraved shell gorgets and cups are just some of the items found at Spiro. In fact, nearly 90% of all known engraved shell created during the Mississippian period (900 – 1650 AD) was discovered at this one site. This exhibition will include the reunification of a range of items looted and archaeologically excavated at Spiro that have not been together since the early 1930s and 1940s.

“The quality and quantity of material found at Spiro is unprecedented,” said Eric Singleton, Ph.D., Museum Curator of Ethnology. “We are grateful to have the support of the Spiroan descendants, the Caddo Nation and the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes, as we prepare this exhibition. Without them, this exhibition would not be possible.”

The Spiroan people, along with other Mississippian groups across the eastern half of North America, created a world equal to that of the Aztec, Maya or Inca, consisting of trade networks and highly developed social, political and religious centers. The exhibition will explore the archaeology and history of Spiro and its relationship to other contemporaneous Indigenous communities in North and Central America, highlighting community development, religious and ceremonial activities, farming and hunting practices and daily life. It will also illustrate how ecological factors, specifically the occurrence of the “Little Ice Age” beginning in 1350 AD and lasting until 1650 AD may have led to the site’s decline and ultimate abandonment. The exhibition also showcases contemporary Indigenous art pieces that explore the ideas of origin and connect the art and artistry of the Spiro people to their modern descendants.

Following the exhibition, the online component and educational materials will be available on the Museum’s website and in our permanent Native American gallery. In addition, the Museum will give both the Caddo and Wichita Nations all interpretative materials to use at their discretion in their respective tribal museums.

The exhibition will debut at National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum February 12 – May 9, 2021, before traveling to the Birmingham Museum of Art (October 5, 2021 – March 11, 2022) in Birmingham Alabama, and the Dallas Museum of Art (April 15, 2022 – August 5, 2022), in Dallas Texas.

Visit Spiro Mounds for more information, including photos, maps and a calendar of associated programming.

The Spiro and the Art of the Mississippian World has been made possible in part by major grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Henry Luce Foundation, as well as support from the Kirkpatrick Foundation.

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this press release do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

About the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum

The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City is America’s premier institution of Western history, art and culture. Founded in 1955, the Museum collects, preserves and exhibits an internationally renowned collection of Western art and artifacts while sponsoring dynamic educational programs to stimulate interest in the enduring legacy of the American West. For more information, visit the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum.

VIDAS book illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

VIDAS: Deep in Mexico and Spain

ADVENTURE AWAITS IN THIS NEW COMING-OF-AGE TRAVEL MEMOIR 

“VIDAS: Deep in Mexico and Spain”

A Tribute to The Glorious Diversity of Our Worlds

Shortly after the American ministers of hate started demonizing the people of Mexico, New York Times Best-Selling Author Edward Stanton began writing about his own wide experience living in that country, confounding the bigots and their bogeys, showing the real women, men, and children he knew there. When the coronavirus struck Spain last year, he decided to include that country as a homage to it and its people, whom he also knew and loved. 

This is how VIDAS: Deep in Mexico and Spain was born.

A wayward descendant of Mexico’s national hero, a femme fatale who recites poems in cantinas, a Tunisian prostitute in Barcelona, a Spanish psychiatrist who fights brave bulls, the wise owner of the world’s oldest restaurant. They are just a handful of the characters portrayed in VIDAS: Deep in Mexico and Spain, the first memoir to capture Mexico and Spain from the perspective of an American and the knowledge of an insider.

VIDAS explores subjects as diverse as the art of blasphemy, the cult of the Virgin Mary, superstition and witchcraft, the bordellos of Mexico, Spain’s paradise of drink and food, the bullfight, and the running of bulls in Pamplona, the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. Every chapter of this vibrant travel memoir depicts a different person or place, which combined create a cross-section of the most populous Spanish-speaking countries in the New and Old World. VIDAS is a passage from childhood to adolescence and maturity, a tribute to nature and the open road, an exaltation of love, food, and wine, a journey from the tender, mortal flesh to the luminous world of the spirit.

-RELEASE DATE: March 1st, 2021
-PUBLISHING COMPANY: Waterside Publications
-ISBN-13: 978-1-949003-47-5 (print)
-ISBN-13: 978-1-949003-48-2 (eBook)
-GENRE: Nonfiction, travel, memoir, culture, diversity
-PRICE: $17.95 (print) $9.95 (eBook)
-PURCHASING INFO: VIDAS is available for purchase on Amazon here.

Why You Need This Book

Filled with photographs, this engaging and unique memoir provides a sensory travel experience many of us are craving today. VIDAS: Deep in Mexico and Spain offers the opportunity to learn about faraway lands and striking events while never leaving home. This timely “armchair travel” memoir is for anyone searching for an escape during our troubled time.

“Lyrical…Iconic…Elegant…” –KIRKUS REVIEWS

“A love letter to the Mexican and Spanish peoples, a pure affirmation of life in countries with radical cultures of death.” –ANA MERINO, WINNER 2020 PREMIO NADAL

About the Author, Edward Stanton:

Born in Colorado and raised in California, Edward Stanton has lived in Mexico, Argentina, Uruguay, and Spain. He’s the author of twelve books, some of them translated and published in Spanish, Arabic, and Chinese. Road of Stars to Santiago, the story of his 500-mile walk on the ancient pilgrimage route to Compostela, was called one of the best books on the subject by the New York Times; Stanton’s environmental novel Wide as the Wind, the first to treat the tragic history of Easter Island, won the Next Generation Indie Book Award for Young Adult Fiction and three other international prizes. 

Marijuana illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Honest Marijuana Company

In the old days of illegal weed, the price you paid for your weekend toke depended mostly on who was selling it to you. These were behind-the-scenes transactions, with no recourse for a deal gone bad and no way to price compare with a competitor. You paid the price asked or you went without.

Now, as state legalization grows and the chatter about federal legalization becomes less talk and more reality, the game has changed forever for the buyer. So, it’s a good time to be clear on what you’re paying for before you go to your local cannabis boutique, or even the corner store, if you should be so lucky to have marijuana available for sale there!

First off, price comparing starts with quantity

If you want to look at what your weed is going to cost you, and even compare different strains, it’s best to pick a quantity. From state to state, the price of quantity X will vary, based on factors we’ll discuss later, but for now, it’s important to understand what quantities you can order in. 

The most common quantities you can buy cannabis in are a gram, eighth of an ounce, quarter of an ounce, half an ounce, and a full ounce. Notice how the common quantities mix metric and Imperial measuring units? A gram is 1/1000th of a kilogram and an ounce is 1/16th of a pound. Typically, you’ll find that dispensaries will use ounces for larger quantities, and grams for a smaller purchase.

What does a gram look like? It’s about the size of a bottle cap, which gives you a visual point of reference to figure out what you’re getting for what price. The average joint is about 0.7 grams of weed so a gram will give you about 1.5 joints. Here are the other measurements, to give you a rough idea of what you’re getting:

  • An eighth of an ounce (which is roughly 3.5 grams) will give you just about 5 joints.
  • A quarter of an ounce (7 grams) will net about 10 joints.
  • A half an ounce (14 grams) will give you about 20 joints.
  • A full ounce (28 grams) is just about equal to 40 joints.

From Alaska to West Virginia, that price per ounce of medium quality weed can run anywhere from $6 to $12.

Quality is the next factor

If you look at average prices of weed across the country, they’re pretty stable and typically refer to medium quality cannabis. When you want to compare a gram of cannabis from one shop to another, a major increase in price could be because of the quality of the product. 

For example, an organic and locally indoor grown variety might be more expensive than a mass produced, imported one. You really do have to compare apples to apples, if you want to be sure you’re getting the right picture.

Other factors that will influence the price of weed

Your state’s legal stance toward cannabis

If you live in a state where cannabis isn’t legal in any form, obviously you’re still operating in the old ways of quiet deals made with people who don’t really care to negotiate the prices they feel like charging. After all, they risk going to jail for providing you with your ‘chill’ so there’s a premium attached to that.

In the states that have legalized recreational marijuana (Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington), you’ll find competition higher and prices that reflect that.

The remaining twenty-one states that have legalized medical marijuana require a doctor’s note to obtain it, which isn’t a particularly challenging hurdle in most places, so this doesn’t affect the prices too significantly.

One place where cannabis is particularly expensive? Washington D.C. Despite legalization of medical and recreational use, they didn’t legalize the purchase of cannabis. That little detail is reflected in prices that are almost twice the national average for legalized / decriminalized states!

The physical geography of where you live

Cannabis isn’t an overly fussy plant to cultivate but it does prefer warm, stable temperatures, averaging in the daytime around 80 degrees. Places that have daytime temperatures that run hotter than 88 degrees or colder than 60 degrees have a harder time growing—it’s a slower process—and can end up with plants that have lower THC content and therefore lower overall quality.

So, if you live in Alaska or New Hampshire, for example, your weed has most likely been brought in from elsewhere, which means added costs in transportation and labor, to package and ship.

How your weed is grown

How your preferred brand is grown makes a difference on quality. 

  • Are they grown outdoors where light, water, soil, and ambient daytime temperatures are all free for the asking and therefore don’t add to the cost of production? 
  • Are they grown indoors, where special electrical lighting, watering and feed systems, and climate control are all required and add to the cost of production? 

Outdoor grown weed can be lower quality in that there aren’t many ways to control Mother Nature. Being able to control elements through technology can yield a higher quality product. From pest and humidity control to very specific watering schedules, as well as the use of light waves to maximize growth and intensity, indoor growers have the keys to control quality in ways that outdoor growers really cannot.

Factor in also whether the grower is using organic production methods, as this will definitely yield a higher quality product. No toxins from pesticides means a cleaner experience for you.

Where you buy your marijuana

Are you buying from a boutique dispensary or a corner store? Are you buying from a chain of cannabis stores or from a one-man dealer? Which way you go will affect the price you pay.

Dispensaries have overhead and staff to pay, which adds to the cost. However, they also have guidelines to follow in terms of packaging and labeling, as well as a vested interest in pleasing their customer, so they’re a good bet. You will know exactly what you’re getting, including the sourcing, THC content, whether it’s organic or not and so on. If you buy from a dealer, who is claiming to sell high quality products, you have no guarantees whatsoever that they are telling the truth.

Competitors drive the price down

Supply and demand is an easy equation. If there are several dispensaries with similar offerings in your area, the price per gram will be lower than in an area with no competition for your one dispensary. There is less supply for potentially similar demand, which can easily affect the price. The key as a consumer is to know your average pricing so you can tell whether or not you are getting a good deal.

Taxation and legalization go hand in hand

The states that have legalized marijuana have also clued in that it is an important revenue source. Sales tax, if the state has one, is applied to cannabis too. The rate can be higher for weed than for other products, as it is in Colorado. They have a state sales tax rate of 2.9% but the rate for weed? 10%.

In addition to sales tax, legal sellers are faced with taxes in production, purchasing, packing and transportation, costs that are typically downloaded to the end consumer.

The timing of your purchases

Time of year can impact the price of weed. Like most cultivated crops, the largest amounts are harvested in and around the month of September. Result? The supply is up, and prices should go down a little. 

As legalization continues to expand, state to state and even federally, the pricing will become more standard and easier to predict. At that point, the quality of the weed will be the big differentiator and as the end consumer, that’s not a small factor to consider. Buy with care and enjoy yourself!

Bio:

Anthony Franciosi, also known as Ant, is an honest to goodness farmer whose fingers are as green as the organic cannabis he grows. He is the proud founder of Honest Marijuana– an all-natural, completely organic marijuana growery in Colorado.

End Gun Violence illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Boulder Shooter Kills Ten People

Colorado Supermarket Mass Shooting:

Gunman kills 10, including police officer

The series of mass shootings have continued within the United States, this time in Boulder Colorado at 3600 Table Mesa Drive. A gunman killed 10 people at a King Soopers supermarket on Monday afternoon. One of the victims included police officer Eric Talley who was first on the scene. Officer Talley was first to respond to report of gunfire at the grocery store. The workers and shoppers that survived were able to flee the scene and others were able to take shelter within the store – enduring the horrific violence that echoed throughout the store.

The shooting started shortly after 2:30 p.m. in the parking lot of King Soopers. Videographer Dean Schiller provided a livestream video showing what appears to be victims and an employee saying the shooter was inside of the store. Two roommates commented that “he just came in and started shooting” without saying a word. They went on to note that the gunman “let off a couple of shots, then was silent, and then he let off a couple more – He wasn’t spraying.”.

Survivor Ryan Borowski commented to CNN’s Don Lemon that he was still processing what happened. Borowski had just gone to buy some ice cream at the grocery store. He had changed his mind at the last minute and went down a different aisle. Borowski then heard the first gunshots, which he then started running to the back of the store. Borowski and several others rushed out of the store through the back, telling employees “Gun, gun, gun. Run, run, run.” Borowski went on to comment “I don’t remember anybody screaming. It was just go, go, go, get out of here… I knew I had to move.”.

Steven McHugh commented that his son-in-law and his two granddaughters were in the store as their dad got the vaccination for Covid-19. McHugh was told that his family watched people get shot and managed to run to a staff area to hide in a coat closet until police were able to intervene.

The 21-year-old suspect, Ahmad Al Issa, was taken into custody and treated for injuries, however, there are not many answers as to why the violent crime was carried out. Issa is facing 10 counts of first-degree murder and will be taken to Boulder County Jail. Officials say it will take days to investigate the crime scene thoroughly and notify families of the loss of their loved ones. Local, state, and federal agencies responded to the scene to aid in the investigation.

Officer Eric Talley had been with the department since 2010 and was very passionate about his job according to Officer Mark Bliley, head of the Boulder Police Department’s union. Bliley continued to say that Talley had a unique ability to connect with people; that he was a highly respected, well-loved person and officer – a solid person that everyone loved.

Kelli McGannon, King Soopers spokeswoman, said the company is working with investigators and will be deferring to law enforcement on all inquiries about the shooting. “Our hearts are broken over this senseless act of violence,” she said.

Former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords commented “It’s beyond time for our leaders to take action” on gun control. Giffords is a gun control advocate and mass shooting survivor. She went on to comment that “This is not normal, and it doesn’t have to be this way. This is an especially personal tragedy for me. I survived a shooting at a grocery store, in a tragedy that devastated my beloved community of Tucson. It’s been 10 years, and countless American communities have had to face something similar. Today it’s a tragedy in Boulder, Colorado. This past weekend it was a house party in Philadelphia. And last week it was an armed attack on Asian American women in the Atlanta area.”

The supermarket shooting occurred just seven days after the violent mass shooting in Atlanta where eight innocent people, including six Asian women, were killed when a gunman terrorized three spas. On March 17, five people were gunned down in a drive-by shooting while preparing a vigil in Stockton, California. Just a day later, four victims were shot in Gresham, Oregon. In Houston, five people were shot within a club during a disturbance on March 20. In Philadelphia, five people were injured and one murdered during a shooting at a party on the same day.

The Colorado Healing Fund is collecting donations for victims of the Boulder shooting. The Colorado Healing Fund is a non-profit organization created to support victims of mass tragedies.

Victims of the King Sooper’s Mass Shooting:

  • Denny Strong, 20 years old
  • Neven Stoanisic, 23 years old
  • Rikki Olds, 25 years old
  • Tralona Bartkowiak, 49 years old
  • Suzanne Fountain, 59 years old
  • Teri Leiker, 51 years old
  • Officer Eric Talley, 51 years old
  • Kevin Mahoney, 61 years old
  • Lynn Murray, 62 years old
  • Jody Waters, 65 years old

“Nature Vacations” Surge During Pandemic

Public lands saw a record number of visits in 2020 and interest in “nature vacations” surged.

TripAdvisor says more than 50% of its consumers are more likely to take a nature trip than they were before the pandemic. Booking.com‘s data shows that 56% of its travelers are searching for “off-the-beaten-track escapes”. Pitchup.com, a lodges, cabins, and campsites booking engine, reports that reservations for 2021 are more than six times higher than last year. RVshare says 73% of millennials indicated they are likely to rent an RV in 2021.

In the race to lure back travelers, vacations in nature are leading the pack. We have assembled a list of nature-focused vacations, ranging from touring Canyonlands National Park by mountain bike to wrangling cattle on a remote ranch in Wyoming.

1. Ride the Rockies and More

With maps and other resources from Adventure Cycling Association, plan a ride on the remote Great Divide Mountain Bike Route crisscrossing the crest of the Rocky Mountains through the U.S. and Canada. Or visit Yellowstone National Park, Devils Tower National Monument, the Black Hills, Mount Rushmore National Memorial and Badlands National Park on the Parks, Peaks, and Prairies route between Montana and Minneapolis. https://www.adventurecycling.org/

2. Channel Your Inner Cowboy

Red Reflet Ranch is a 28,000-acre luxury resort and working ranch on the west slope of the Bighorn Mountains, just three hours from Yellowstone National Park. Guests stay in private chalets and enjoy family-friendly activities like horseback riding, cattle wrangling, ATVing, ziplining, swimming, hiking, fishing, shooting and feasting on farm-to-table cuisine. http://redrefletranch.com/

3. Explore National Parks by RV

Blacksford is a new recreational vehicle rental business with an all-inclusive pricing model that includes unlimited miles, no generator fees, bedding, bath, and kitchen supplies, free Wi-Fi, a free annual national parks pass, and 24-hour roadside assistance. Blacksford also curates road trip experiences by connecting travelers with vetted campsites, guides, and other hand-picked attractions. https://www.blacksford.com

4. Teton Tiny House Retreat 

Just minutes from Jackson Hole, WY, Fireside Resort offers 25 pint-size, luxuriously outfitted tiny house rental units designed by Wheelhaus. Each has its own outdoor fire pit and deck. And the resort is located just a stone’s throw from Grand Teton National Park. https://www.firesidejacksonhole.com

5. Camp & MTB Canyonlands

Utah’s 100-mile White Rim Trail loops in and out of a multi-colored array of spires, arches, buttes, and mesas carved by the Green and Colorado Rivers. On this tour with Escape Adventures, guests ride the famous off-road route, while detouring to admire secret passages, hidden slot canyons, natural rock arches, and ancient Puebloan ruins. https://escapeadventures.com/tour/utah-white-rim-mountain-bike-tour/ 

6. Hike, Bike or Ski Big Sky

Find active adventures on the trails around Big Sky, Montana, when staying at The Wilson Hotel. On the edge of town, hike to the glacial cirque surrounding Beehive Basin or through the forest to Ousel Falls, or trek to natural wonders and wildlife in nearby Yellowstone National Park. Mountain biking abounds as well, with over 20 miles of lift-served riding. And in winter, 5,850 acres of ski terrain spreads out from the summit of 11,166-foot Lone Peak. https://thewilsonhotel.com/

New Snow Collections From Oakley

With temperatures dropping, travel restrictions being lifted, and cooler destinations preparing for an influx of visitors while being COVID-19 safe, many snowboarders and ski junkies are looking for new pieces to invest in. With frightful temperatures and the need for gear to support intense athletic performances, investing in the right collection is paramount. For the most dedicated winter athletes, Oakley is an excellent choice for cold-weather attire.

Today, Oakley launches two all-new snow collections to get snowboards and skiers ready for the upcoming season. The Thermonuclear Protection Collection draws inspiration from the brand’s heritage in motorsports, while the Team Collection garners influence from professional Norwegian Olympic snowboarder Stale Sandbech and his life of travel and adventure. Both collections strive to combine style and performance.

About the Thermonuclear Protection Collection: 

The TNP Collection fuses provocative colors, bold designs, and daring styles for those looking to make a statement on the mountain. All of the looks are sure to grab attention, especially in context of the stark winter surroundings. The collection includes a variety of outerwear and accessories designed with reflective properties, hi-tech fabrics and modern silhouettes, available for both men and women. Full TNP

About the Team Collection:

Inspired by Stale’s adventures all over the world, the Team Collection features men’s pieces that can easily transition from mountain gear to streetwear. The range can be adapted for the “on-the-go” lifestyle through modular layering and includes outerwear with premium stretch fabrics, goggles, a helmet and two pieces made from 100% recycled material. Overall, the collection strives to be dedicated to a more eco-friendly approach.

Stale Sandbech is a famed Norwegian snowboarder. He participated in the 2010, 2014, and 2018 Winter Olympics and won a silver medal in Men’s slopestyle in 2014 at the Sochi Olympics. With his Olympics debut in 2010, Sandbech became the youngest Norwegian Olympian in 82 years. His partnership with Oakley reflects his on the go lifestyle as he adventures and trains.

Oakley, Inc. based in California is a subsidiary of the Italian corporate giant Luxottica based in Milan. Found in 1975, it began in the garage of James Jannard with an initial investment of just $300. The company designs, develops, and manufactures sports performance equipment as well as lifestyle pieces, with the new snow collections falling into the former category. Yet, typical to Oakley the pieces retain a stylish flare.

Most famous for their sunglasses, Oakley also counts sports visors, ski/snowboard goggles, watches, apparel, backpacks, shoes, optical frames, and other accessories. A vast majority of the designs are completed in house, with Oakley currently holding an impressive number of patents, over 850.

Coffee illustration for 360 Magazine

Coffee Capitals of America

By Hannah DiPilato

With National Coffee Day on September 29 followed by International Coffee Day on October first, Wren Kitchen delved into the nation’s coffee-drinking habits to see which states have the greatest consumption of everyone’s favorite hot beverage. 

Their research revealed that The United States drinks 48 billion cups of coffee each year, they have discovered the number one coffee capital of the United States, and the data shows which region has the highest demand for the caffeinated favorite. 

Coffee represents much more than just a drink. It’s a wakeup call bright and early in the morning, a chance to catch up with old friends or a moment for yourself in the middle of a chaotic workday. Pouring yourself a cup of coffee in your kitchen sets you up for the busy day ahead.

There’s no doubt The United States is a coffee-loving nation and a new report by Wren Kitchens has revealed which state craves coffee the most. They have also illustrated which iconic landmarks each state could build with coffee cups based on the coffee consumption of citizens. Grab a cup of joe and read on to find out how your state ranks.

Oregon has been crowned the ultimate coffee capital drinking over 113 Empire State buildings worth of coffee every year. The Beaver State shows that it’s citizens drink the most coffee based on the demand for coffee and population size.

The state consumes more than 624 million cups of coffee per year and if you were to stack up this number of coffee cups in real life, Oregon would drink enough coffee to create 113 Empire State buildings each year. 

With Oregonians having such an appetite for their cup of Joe, search data shows that 2.1% of the states 4.2 million goes online to search for their caffeine fix each month

The second-largest coffee-loving state is Colorado. With a population of 5.7 million, the state of Colorado drinks 852 million cups of coffee every year. The search data reveals that 1.9% of Coloradans head online to look up their nearest coffee spot.

Washington state follows on the list with the third-most online coffee searches, 1.8% of the state’s population searching for java each month, and more than 1.1 billion coffees consumed each year. This is no surprise coming from the state that founded Starbucks. 

When searching to find the region that drinks the most coffee, the west coast takes the prize. With three of the top five states having the greatest demand for coffee based on the Pacific, the West Coast is the place they pay homage to the barista. Nowhere more can this be seen than California with the state sipping more than 5.8 billion cups of the steaming beans.

The data was gathered by looking at search volumes against the population and the average amount of coffee consumed per person. Data for this research was collected from worldatlas.com, statista.com, ncausa.org and The United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 

To work out the coffee capitals, volumes per state surrounding coffee were researched and were calculated as a percent of the state’s population. Then the height, area, and dimensions of landmarks in the US were looked at; before working out the number of 12oz coffee cups it would take to fill each landmark. Finally, how many times each state could cover each landmark with the number of cups of coffee they consume each year was worked out.

COVID Mask Care illustration by Mina Tocalini

Study Shows State-By-State Reopenings Exacerbate COVID

As Summer vacations end in Europe and in the United States and students return to college campuses and primary schools worldwide, fresh waves of COVID infections are causing renewed restrictions after loosening in the Spring and Summer. However, a new study shows that this uncoordinated opening, closing, and reopening of states and counties, is making the COVID problem worse in the U.S., according to the authors of a new study released today. Using methods from their previous work, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, MIT PhD student Michael Zhao and Sinan Aral, Director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy and author of the upcoming book The Hype Machine, have released the first comprehensive study of the impact of state-by-state re-openings on the COVID pandemic, spanning January to July, 2020 with surprising and troubling results.

After studying combined data on the mobility of over 22 million mobile devices, daily data on state-level closure and reopening policies and social media connections among 220 million Facebook users, the team found that reimposing local social distancing or shelter-in-place orders after reopening may be far less effective than policy makers would hope.

In fact, such closures may actually be counterproductive as they encourage those in locked down regions to flee to reopened regions, potentially causing new hotspots to emerge. This analysis demonstrates that travel spillovers are not only systematic and predictable, but also large and meaningful.

Arizona was one of the first states to open businesses, but in late June, bars, gyms, movie theaters, and water parks were shut down for 30 days as the state became one of the virus’s new hot spots. One month after dine-in restaurants, bars, and gyms were allowed to reopen in California, Governor Gavin Newsom made the country’s most aggressive reopening reversal amid his state’s spike in COVID-19 cases, shuttering all indoor dining, bars, zoos, and museums in the state. Similar reversals have occurred in Colorado, Florida, Louisiana, Michigan, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas, West Virginia among other states.

“We’ve seen a patchwork of flip-flopping state policies across the country,” says Sinan Aral, the senior author of the study. “The problem is that, when they are uncoordinated, state re-openings and even closures create massive travel spillovers that are spreading the virus across state borders. If we continue to pursue ad hoc policies across state and regional borders, we’re going to have a difficult time controlling this virus, reopening our economy or even sending our kids back to school.”

The new study showed that while closures directly reduced mobility by 5-6%, re-openings returned mobility to pre-pandemic levels. Once all of a state’s peer states (in travel or social media influence) locked down, focal county mobility in that state dropped by an additional 15-20% but increased by 19-32% once peer states reopened. “State policies have effects far beyond their borders,” says Aral. “We desperately need coordination if we are to control this virus.”

When an origin county was subject to a statewide shelter-in-place order, travel to counties yet to impose lockdowns increased by 52-65%. If the origin had reopened, but the destination was still closed, travel to destination counties was suppressed by 9-17% for nearby counties and 21-27% for distant counties. But when a destination reopened while an origin was still closed, people from the closed origins flooded into the destination by 11-12% from nearby counties and 24% from distant counties. “People flee closures and flood into newly reopened states,” says Aral, “we can’t avoid the travel spillovers caused by our ad hoc policies.”

These findings highlight the urgent need to coordinate COVID-19 reopenings across regions and the risks created by ad hoc local shutdowns and reopenings. In addition, the results highlight the importance of taking spillover effects seriously when formulating national policy and for national and local policies to coordinate across regions where spillovers are strong.