Posts tagged with "new York times"

Wet Leg- Chaise Longue illustration by Anh Hoang use by 360 Magazine

Wet Leg-Chaise Longue

New UK band WET LEG is receiving a *huge* response to their debut single “  from the New York TimesNPR, etc., and is currently enjoying an enormous surge in radio play here in their native UK, Europe, and down under! If you haven’t heard it yet, here it is: “Chaise Longue”.  It is the sneakiest, most fun-loving, earworm of the summer. The song is being added at radio stations all around the country.

The band –  Rhian Teasdale and Hester Chambers – come from the Isle Of Wight, a sparsely populated island off the south coast of England accessible only by boat. They are old friends who share a penchant for French disco, effervescent imaginations, and a shared love of The Ronettes and Jane Birkin, through to Ty Segall and Bjork. Their recent UK live debut shows went with a huge bang and we’re hoping to have some information on their first US shows VERY SOON INDEED!

“They’re one of those new bands whose sound and aesthetic seem to have arrived fully formed, promising exciting if totally unpredictable things to come.” – New York Times   

“Immensely charming…The end result lands somewhere between Dry Cleaning’s wry, sardonic post-punk and Sports Team’s Pavement-obsessed alt-rock crowd-pleasers — though you can certainly hear stated influences such as the Ronettes, Jane Birkin, Ty Segall, and Björk in there too if you squint” – Stereogum

“The debut single from U.K. rock duo Wet Leg is a doozy…the ear-grabbing track is an undeniable introduction to Wet Leg.” – Paste

“by the time they double down on the earworm hook “on the chaise longue all day long,” you feel about ready to collapse onto titular seat and unload all your stresses.” – Beats Per Minute

“a real corker…There’s a coy wit here and, when the guitars kick in, the song recalls the heyday of Franz Ferdinand, The Futureheads and The Rakes. “Chaise Lounge” is even better when watched with its video that features excellent dancing from Chambers, as well as some high kicks.” Brooklyn Vegan

“Fueled by chugging drums and a boisterous guitar riff, the tongue-in-cheek track is whimsical and blithe, channeling the unfettered radiance of an island’s sun. It just might be your poolside song of the summer.” – Consequence Of Sound

Illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo Resignation

By: Emily Bunn

Amidst searing scandal, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo has resigned. Many have supported this decision after Cuomo’s many scandals came to light. First there were sexual harassment allegations, then a report exposed the Governor’s use of state resources to aid in the writing of his memoir. Cuomo was also pinned for undercounted nursing home related deaths during the COVID-19 pandemic. After that, tragically, even more sexual harassment charges against Cuomo were reported. The investigation in these charges has now been concluded to determine that he did sexual harass multiple women, violating state and federal law. Politically ostracized and facing the grim reality of impeachment, Gov. Cuomo decided to resign on Tuesday.

Also on Tuesday, Mayor Bill de Blasio remarked on Cuomo’s circumstance in a statement: “It is beyond clear that Andrew Cuomo is not fit to hold office and can no longer serve as Governor. He must resign, and if he continues to resist and attack the investigators who did their jobs, he should be impeached immediately.” Many politicos in New York have also agreed with Cuomo’s departure. Hakeem Jeffries, Gregory Meeks and Tom Suozzi issued a joint statement saying, “the time is right” for Cuomo to resign.

After this statement was issues, each of New York’s 19 congressional Democrats called for their governor to resign. A lawyer for two of Cuomo’s sexual harassment accusers, Alyssa McGrath and Virginia Limmiatis, added: “My clients feel both vindicated and relieved that Cuomo will no longer be in a position of power over anyone. Taking things a step further, some Democratic lawmakers are requesting for Cuomo to be impeached. The governor is currently the subject of an impeach inquiry in the state assembly, reports The Hill.

Taking this place is current lieutenant governor and Buffalo native, Dem. Kathy Hochul. In 2011, Hochul ran for a congressional seat in a special election, in a Republican leaning district between Buffalo and Rochester, NY. Hochul ran against Rep. Jane Corwin at the time and won by 47% of the vote. She held the seat until 2012. In 2015, she became the lieutenant governor and before that, spent more than a decade on the Hamburgh Town Board. Now, Hochul looks to set up into the political arena. Hochul, 62,  is set to become the first female governor of the state of New York.

Illustration by Alex Bogdan for use of 360 Magazine

PA SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL ANNOUNCES ARTISTIC LEADERSHIP TRANSITION

Today, Patrick Mulcahy who has served as Producing Artistic Director of Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival (PSF) since 2003, announced that he will step down from his role at the Festival at the end of the summer 2022 season.

Mulcahy will work with the Festival’s Board of Directors, staff, and the Festival’s parent company DeSales University to support a seamless transition to its next artistic leader, determined through a national search in the coming year. PSF is the professional Equity theatre at DeSales University.

“While my professional roots are in Shakespeare and the theatre industry, I shifted in the 1990s to pursue a career in academia,” said Mulcahy, who joined the DeSales faculty as Head of Acting in 1996. “When PSF came knocking in 2001 and then again in 2003, I was reluctant because I was happy living my passion for education as faculty.”  Mulcahy eventually accepted the leadership position at PSF, reducing his faculty role, and has led the Festival for longer than any previous leader, including the founder Rev. Gerard J. Schubert, OSFS.

“Leading the Festival has been the honor of my life and has provided me with countless opportunities to continue to learn.  A few years back, my wife and I began to talk about my returning to the faculty full-time. The timing is right for us, and we will continue to champion PSF to ‘ascend the brightest heaven of invention’ as patrons and fans.” He added: “PSF has never been in a stronger position. In the arts, we’re in the ‘humanity business’ and I’m proud of all we’ve accomplished at PSF – artistically, institutionally, and in our communities — and am confident our stakeholders and staff will continue to ensure the Festival’s ongoing success. I look forward to continuing to lead PSF through the 2022 season and then bringing what I’ve learned in these nearly two decades back to our students at DeSales.”

Under Mulcahy’s leadership, PSF attracted its first Tony Award-winning artists to its summer seasons, expanded its offerings to include musicals, productions in repertory, and as many as three Shakespeare plays per summer season. The Festival doubled its attendance, served its one-millionth patron, quintupled its endowment, eliminated its debt, created a modest cash reserve, grew and diversified its Board of Directors and company, and secured its first and subsequent grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and other major arts grant makers. In the last decade, PSF has become just one of a handful of professional theatres on the continent offering this range of programming to destination patrons in a single summer season. He also supported added accessibility programming, championed PSF’s education programs, increased the reach of its school tours, and created a Shakespeare for Kids production each season. Recently, PSF successfully pivoted in the pandemic to offer a broad range of indoor, outdoor, and virtual programming for the 2021 season.

 “Patrick’s leadership of PSF is a fitting testament to his talents as a Renaissance man – – a courageous strategist, thoughtful visionary, attentive fundraiser, effective manager, artist, motivator, and friend. Rarely have I witnessed so many successes of a leader during his or her tenure of any organization, be it a diversified for-profit business or a nonprofit arts organization,” says PSF Board President Judy Harris. “We hold enormous gratitude for all that Patrick has built and nurtured while leading PSF to the brightest of futures. We bear equal gratitude to DeSales University for having fostered the creation and growth of PSF, and for ensuring that Patrick return full-time to its esteemed faculty.”

Mulcahy led the 2009 strategic planning process that resulted in PSF’s Vision 2030, a commitment to world-class professional theatre, and a body of work that garnered coverage in The New York Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer, Playbill magazine, and The Washington Post. He led The Campaign for PSF in 2013-2015, which raised more than $4 million, primarily for endowment growth to support PSF artistic and education programming. Mulcahy also stewards PSF’s Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, and Anti-Racism Working Group and, with the support of the entire PSF team, has achieved increasingly diverse programming and summer staffing of artists and artisans.

In addition to having worked closely with Festival founder Fr. Schubert, and having acted and directed at the Festival in the late 1990s, Mulcahy’s tenure as leader of the Festival represents nearly two-thirds of the company’s 30-year history. In his dual role as producing artistic director of PSF and head of acting for DeSales University, Mulcahy has supported the career progression of both emerging leaders and developing artists, including many alumni who are now enjoying successful performing careers or leadership positions at other theatres. 

“It’s truly been an honor to work so closely with so many great artists, Board members, and staff. I will continue to support the Festival in any way I can,” says Mulcahy, “once I shift the focus of my attention to serving the students and the DeSales University Theatre Department. It will be a joy to come back full time to this Department, which is rich with distinctive offerings, and to working more closely once again with my gifted colleagues there.”

DeSales University President Rev. James A. Greenfield, OSFS, shared, “on behalf of DeSales University, I thank Patrick for his visionary and transformative leadership of PSF.  Its founder, Fr. Jerry Schubert, was famous for his exhortation: ‘Give beauty back.’ Patrick’s work at PSF’s helm has ensured that we will be giving beauty back to countless people for generations to come.  I am confident that Patrick’s creative collaboration with the PSF board has fortified the Festival for a transition that will greatly strengthen our future.”

 

Lil Tecca_Money on Me_Artwork from Amaiya Davis, Republic Media Records, for use by 360 Magazine

LIL TECCA RELEASES SINGLE – MONEY ON ME

Multiplatinum rapper Lil Tecca drops his new track “Money On Me” via Galactic Records/Republic Records.

Listen to “Money On Me” here.

Once again, he pulls up with rich wordplay highlighted by incisive bars and another head-nodding hook. As always, Tecca delivers nothing short of verbal excellence with a wealth of quotable lines.

It arrives on the heels of his last single “Never Left,” which has gathered over 93 million streams to date and serves as his ninth Hot 100 hit. Lyrical Lemonade hailed it as “an absolute banger in every sense of the word,” and Rap Radar raved, “Lil Tecca’s back like he’s ‘Never Left’.” The Musical Hype praised the flows as “compelling, energetic, and rhythmic,” while HotNewHipHop added it “proves that his melodic instincts are still sharp.”

Next up, he takes the stage at Lyrical Lemonade – Summer Smash August 20 and Rolling Loud – Los Angeles December 14-15.

Be on the lookout for more from Lil Tecca very soon.

Posting up over 3 billion streams and claiming multiple platinum certifications, Lil Tecca has quietly cemented himself as one of rap’s most vital rising superstars. In 2020, his full-length debut album, Virgo World, bowed in the Top 10 of the Billboard Top 200 and yielded two Hot 100 entries—namely “Dolly” with Lil Uzi Vert and “When You Down” feat. Lil Durk with Polo G. Thus far, the record has clocked over 300 million streams and counting. HotNewHipHop praised it as “a great starting point for the 18-year-old.” Tecca first exploded with his platinum-certified mixtape, We Love You Tecca, and his breakout quadruple-platinum single “Ransom” in 2019. He reeled in acclaim from New York Times, Billboard, HYPEBEAST, Complex, and many others in addition to selling out shows on his first headline run, the We Love You Tecca World Tour. He launches into his next chapter with lots of new music in 2021.

LIL TECCA RELEASES ANTICIPATED NEW TRACK “REPEAT IT” FEAT. GUNNA

NEW ALBUM WE LOVE YOU TECCA 2 COMING SOON

LISTEN HERE

Back with more heat, multiplatinum rapper Lil Tecca unleashes his new track “Repeat It” feat. Gunna today via Galactic Records/Republic Records.

Listen to “Repeat It”: HERE

Hyping anticipation for the official release, Tecca initially previewed the track on Instagram, and it impressively has generated over 1.5 million views. On the official version, he lights up a piano-driven beat with his nimbly spun wordplay. Meanwhile, multiplatinum superstar Gunna rolls through with his signature drip, igniting the production.

It follows up his anthemic “Money On Me,” which has already amassed over 5 million streams and counting. In addition to plugs from Revolt TV and more, HotNewHipHop observed, “Tecca floats as he sing-raps tales of paradise and the benefits of the lavish lifestyle.

Everything just sets the stage for his anxiously awaited new album and one of the year’s most-anticipated sequels, We Love You Tecca 2, coming soon.

Watch Tecca repeat his dominance in 2021…

His single “Never Left” has gathered over 116 million streams to date and serves as his ninth Hot 100 hit. Lyrical Lemonade hailed it as “an absolute banger in every sense of the word,” and Rap Radar raved, “Lil Tecca’s back like he’s ‘Never Left’.” The Musical Hype praised the flows as “compelling, energetic, and rhythmic, while HotNewHipHop added it “proves that his melodic instincts are still sharp.

Following a standout set at Rolling Loud – Miami, he takes the stage at Lyrical Lemonade – Summer Smash August 20 and Rolling Loud – Los Angeles December 14-15.

Posting up over 7 billion streams and claiming multiple platinum certifications, Lil Tecca has quietly cemented himself as one of rap’s most vital rising superstars. In 2020, his full-length debut album, Virgo World, bowed in the Top 10 of the Billboard Top 200 and yielded two Hot 100 entries—namely “Dolly” with Lil Uzi Vert and “When You Down” feat. Lil Durk with Polo G. Thus far, the record has clocked over 300 million streams and counting. HotNewHipHop praised it as “a great starting point for the 18-year-old. Tecca first exploded with his platinum-certified mixtape, We Love You Tecca, and his breakout quadruple-platinum single “Ransom” in 2019. He reeled in acclaim from New York Times, Billboard, HYPEBEAST, Complex, and many others in addition to selling out shows on his first headline run, the We Love You Tecca World Tour. He launches into his next chapter with lots of new music in 2021.

About Republic Records

A division of Universal Music Group, the world’s leading music company, Republic Records is home to an all-star roster of multi-platinum, award-winning legends and superstar artists such as Ariana Grande, Black Thought, Drake, Florence + the Machine, Greta Van Fleet, Hailee Steinfeld, Jack Johnson, James Blake, James Bay, Jessie J, John Mellencamp, Jonas Brothers, Julia Michaels, Kid Cudi, Lil Wayne, Lorde, Metro Boomin, NAV, Nicki Minaj, Of Monsters and Men, Pearl Jam, Post Malone, Seth MacFarlane, Stevie Wonder, Taylor Swift, The Weeknd and more. Founded by brothers and chief executives Monte and Avery Lipman, it is also comprised of innovative business ventures, including American Recordings, Boominati Worldwide, Brushfire, Casablanca Records, Cash Money, Lava Records, XO, Young Money, among others. Republic also maintains a long-standing strategic alliance with Universal Music Latin Entertainment (J Balvin and Karol G).  In addition, Republic has expanded to release high-profile soundtracks for Universal Pictures (Fifty Shades of Grey), Sony Pictures (Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse) and NBC TV (The Voice), as well as other notable film and television franchises. Extending further into the worlds of film, television, and content, Republic launched Federal Films in order to produce movies and series powered by the label’s catalog and artists. Its first production was the Jonas Brothers documentary Chasing Happiness for Amazon Prime Video.

illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

LOLLAPALOOZA × DELTA VARIANT

By: Clara Guthrie

Public health experts are warning that the crowded Lollapalooza music festival in downtown Chicago this past weekend may lead to a dramatic surge in Covid-19 cases, especially given the increasing risk of the Delta variant. Festival organizers estimate 100,000 people attended the event each of the four days, and neither social distancing nor mask wearing (for vaccinated attendees) was enforced.

Despite concerns from medical professionals and a steady rise in Delta variant cases leading up the festival, both the Chicago Department of Public Health and Lollapalooza’s health experts approved the production of the festival as planned ahead of time.

Although operating at full capacity, the festival did have certain security measures in place in order to protect its guests; to enter, people had to show either their Covid-19 vaccination card or proof of a negative Covid-19 test from the preceding 72 hours. According to the festival’s website, they also required those who are unvaccinated to wear a mask.

In a statement released Monday by festival organizers, it was revealed that 91% of the attendees showed proof of vaccination, and 8% showed negative Covid-19 tests. The last 1% were denied entry due to a lack of proper documentation.

These statistics are complicated, however, by a claim from a Chicago Tribune photo intern, Vashon Jordan Jr., that fake vaccination cards were being used at the event. On August 1st, he tweeted, “Fake Covid-19 vaccination cards are 100% a thing at Lollapalooza in Chicago. You can get it with a single-day wristband for $50. I have confirmed that it does work.” In a separate tweet he clarified, “And by ‘fake’ I mean it doesn’t belong to the holder.” Jordan Jr. also recorded maskless concert goers dancing in large crowds and boarding public transportation—where masks are explicitly required—after the day’s events.

According to Dr. Tina Tan, a professor at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine who specializes in infectious diseases, the precautions taken by Lollapalooza were simply insufficient given the prevalence of the Delta variant. Tan said that a safer event would have maintained smaller crowds, enforced social distancing and masks, and only allowed vaccinated individuals to attend. “When you have 100,000 or more people who are in a fairly enclosed space and there’s no social distancing, the vast majority are not wearing masks, you are going to get some transmission of the Covid-19 Delta variant,” she said.

As of August 2nd, Chicago was reporting an average of 206 new cases each day, and many of those who are being hospitalized for Covid-19 are not vaccinated. These data reflect a recent and definite uptick in cases as the Delta variant poses a serious threat across the globe. Given the roughly two to 14 day incubation period for Covid-19, it is currently unclear just how Lollapalooza will affect these numbers in Chicago and its surrounding areas. According to Dr. Robert Citronberg, an infectious disease physician with Advocate Aurora Health, “The next couple of days you could potentially see cases. I think by next weekend we’re probably going to be having a good idea about how much transmission occurred because of Lollapalooza.”

What experts already know with certainty is that any transmission from Lollapalooza will not only affect Chicago and its suburbs but also the areas that people return home to after the festival, seeing as thousands of people travelled to Chicago just for the weekend. “The real problem is not so much that a bunch of young people who come into Chicago getting COVID at this event. The real problem is them taking it back to places that have very low vaccination rates,” Dr. Emily Landon, executive director for infection prevention and control at the University of Chicago Medical Center, said.

According to the New York Times, roughly 70% of American adults have received at least one shot: a goal that President Biden set for the country to hit by July 4th but that took almost an extra month to achieve. And many individual states are struggling to vaccinate their population and thus are grappling with new Covid-19 cases and Covid-related hospitalizations. Alabama and Mississippi have the lowest vaccination rates in the country, at 43.2% and 44% respectively. Illinois falls somewhere in the middle with 59% of its adults being fully vaccinated.

Lollapalooza’s controversy did not stop at Covid-19 concerns. On Sunday, the final day of performances, rapper DaBaby was pulled from his headlining spot after festival organizer caught wind of his previous homophobic comments. While performing at the Rolling Loud festival in Miami on July 25, DaBaby made discriminatory and incorrect comments about gay men and HIV, which he later defended in a series of 19 videos on his Instagram stories. “What I do at a live show is for the audience at the live show,” he said. “It’ll never translate correctly to somebody looking at a little five, six-second clip from their goddamn crib on their phone. […] Me and all my fans at the show, the gay ones and the straight ones, we turned the fuck up.”

Lollapalooza officials tweeted to announce DaBaby’s removal, saying, “Lollapalooza was founded on diversity, inclusivity, respect, and love. With that in mind, DaBaby will no longer be performing at Grant Park tonight.” Fellow rappers Young Thug and G Herbo took his place. On Monday, DaBaby took to Instagram to apologize “for my misinformed comments about HIV/AIDS and I know education on this is important.”

Looking beyond the festival’s drama, Rolling Stone took a moment to celebrate the most positive and powerful moments from Lollapalooza, saying, “it was full of life-affirming musical moments.”

Trey Anastasio Band tour image via Ken Weinstein for use by 360 Magazine

Trey Anastasio Band Announces US Tour Dates

Trey Anastasio Band released fall tour dates, including a two-night-stand at Radio City Music Hall.

Trey Anastasio Band (TAB) announces its long-awaited return to the road with an upcoming series of live dates. The tour begins September 17 at Thompson’s Point in Portland, ME and then travels through a two-night-stand at New York City’s Radio City Music Hall on October 2 and 3. The upcoming run marks the first TAB tour for new bassist Dezron Douglas, who joins the band following the recent passing of original member Tony Markellis. Presales begin Wednesday, July 14 at noon ET. Tickets will go on sale to the general public on Friday, July 16. 

Last year saw Trey Anastasio Band release a new live album, Burn It Down, a three-dimensional sonic time capsule that captures the explosive eight-piece band on their January 2020 tour. Produced and mixed by Vance Powell (Phish, Chris Stapleton, Jack White), the 15-song collection shows TAB at the peak of its powers, combining their trademark tight musicianship with unbounded performances. Burn It Down is available now at all digital outlets and vinyl will be available on August 20. 

TOUR DATES

Sep 17 – Portland, ME @ Thompson’s Point

Sep 18 – Boston, MA @ Leader Bank Pavilion

Sep 19 – New Haven, CT @ Westville Music Bowl

Sep 21 – Philadelphia, PA @ The Met

Sep 22 – Charlottesville, VA @ Ting Pavilion

Sep 24 – Wilmington, NC @ Riverfront Park Amphitheater

Sep 25 – Charlotte, NC @ Metro Credit Union Amphitheatre

Sep 26 – Asheville, NC @ Rabbit Rabbit

Sep 28 – Columbus, OH @ Express Live Outdoors

Sep 29 – Pittsburgh, PA @ Stage AE Outdoors

Oct 1 – Washington, DC @ Anthem

Oct 2 – New York, NY @ Radio City Music Hall

Oct 3 – New York, NY @ Radio City Music Hall

TREY ANASTASIO BAND

Trey Anastasio – Guitars / Vocals

Cyro Baptista – Percussion

James Casey – Saxophone / Keyboards / Percussion / Vocals

Natalie Cressman – Trombone / Vocals

Jennifer Hartswick – Trumpet / Vocals

Russ Lawton – Drums

Dezron Douglas – Bass Guitar

Ray Paczowski – Keyboards

ABOUT TREY ANASTASIO

Over the past three decades, composer/guitarist/vocalist Trey Anastasio has forged a multi-faceted career, winning acclaim in rock, classical and theatrical circles. He is a founding member of Phish, one of today’s most successful and innovative rock bands. In the summer of 2017, Phish completed a residency at the world-renowned Madison Square Garden in New York – an unprecedented 13-night run known as The Baker’s Dozen. Phish’s total number of performances at the famed arena currently sits at 64.

Anastasio has received GRAMMY® nominations for his recordings with Phish and for his solo work. He has collaborated with such artists as Dave Matthews, Herbie Hancock, Carlos Santana, Toots and the Maytals, B.B. King and The Roots, and – as part of the trio Oysterhead – Les Claypool (Primus) and Stewart Copeland (The Police). He co-wrote the music for the Broadway musical Hands on a Hardbody, which received a Tony nomination for Best Original Score in 2013. In the summer of 2015, Anastasio joined the surviving four members of the Grateful Dead for five stadium shows, which celebrated the band’s 50th anniversary and served as their farewell shows.

Anastasio has performed his original compositions with numerous symphonies. The New York Times hailed his Carnegie Hall performance with the New York Philharmonic as “that rarest of rarities, a classical-rock hybrid that might please partisans from both constituencies.” In 2014, he debuted a new piece for guitar and orchestra, entitled Petrichor, on a West Coast orchestral tour that concluded with a performance at the Hollywood Bowl, marking his second performance with the Los Angeles Philharmonic. In April 2019, Anastasio released his 14th solo album, Ghosts of the Forest, which Rolling Stone said was “built around psychedelic guitar liftoffs, ambitious arrangements, and extremely personal lyrics.” Between Me and My Mind, a film documenting Trey’s creative process debuted at the Tribeca Film Festival and played a sold-out limited-run engagement in theaters this past summer.

Lauren Jenkins MILES ON ME PART 1 EP cover from Emily Ginsberg, Big Hassle Media for use by 360 Magazine

LAUREN JENKINS EP – MILES ON ME PART 1

“I will always be proud of my first record,” says Lauren Jenkins, “but MILES ON ME is what I hoped NO SAINT could be from start to finish.” MILES ON ME (told in three parts) picks up where NO SAINT left off, telling the unapologetic, brutally honest next chapter of Jenkins’ story.

In 2020 Jenkins and her then-record label parted ways, giving her an independence that she hadn’t had in nearly seven years. “I finally had the freedom to write, record, produce and tell my story exactly the way I wanted to,” she says. “It’s strange to hear your own voice and realize you’ve been whispering for a long time. With this realization, the sparks ignited. I called on my friends and collaborators to make this record with me, and it’s been one of the most beautiful processes of my life.”

Jenkins has been a touring artist since she was 15 years old. The Texas-born, Carolina-raised artist chose a life that would fit perfectly in the songs she writes: across countless smoky bars, fake IDs, and endless miles on the road, music has been her one constant companion. Named an “Artist to Watch” by the New York Times, Billboard, Rolling Stone, Pandora, and many more, she was also chosen as a member of the “Class of 2019” by influential radio DJ Bobby Bones, and made her TODAY Show debut as Elvis Duran’s Artist of the Month. An accomplished actress and filmmaker, Lauren wrote, produced, and starred in an original short film titled Running Out of Road that accompanied the release of her critically-acclaimed debut album, NO SAINT, on Big Machine Records. In May of 2020, she released “Ain’t That Hard,” her first song as a fully independent artist.

MILES ON ME, PART 1

Track Listing

  1. LIKE YOU FOUND ME
  2. SHE’S A STAR
  3. MILES ON ME (FEAT. DAVID RAMIREZ)
  4. MY OWN ADVICE
by Dirty Hit for use by 360 Magazine

BOYBAND – NEVER KNOWS BEST

Boyband never knows best Out Now Via Dirty Hit, Reveals Newest Focus Track please don’t waste my time (ft. No Rome)

“[boyband] suggests the third wave of the emo-rap revival is here” – New York Times

“a vision of the future of alternative” – AFROPUNK

“boyband’s music is meant to be cathartic – both for himself and his listeners” – Hollywood Life

“boyband mixes Midwestern emo and contemporary rap in his genre-defying release” – Alternative Press

“the perfect fusion of nostalgia and hip-hop’s growing penchant for late-stage emo” – Ones To Watch

Grammy nominated producer/creator boyband has released never knows best, his sophomore project which zooms in on the complicated feelings associated with growing up. Accompanying the project’s release is please don’t waste my time (ft. No Rome), the newest focus track for boyband.

“please don’t waste my time” joins “birth by sleep” and “by myself,” – both previously released from never knows best – to form a trilogy tucked within boyband’s emotionally-charged project that magnifies how quickly dependency can send a blossoming relationship into a toxic and destructive spiral. “birth by sleep” and “by myself” create a captivating one-two punch of pop and punk, highlighting boyband’s dynamic ability to entangle the intricacies of hip hop, power-pop, and indie. Balancing a melancholy message – the struggle to overcome hopelessness borne from the fear of rejection – with mischievously catchy summer-pop songwriting, “birth by sleep” is juxtaposed by the frenzied and frantic atmosphere of second chapter, “by myself,” which parallels the apprehension, anxiety, and fear of being alone that the narrator experiences following an unexpected breakup. Meanwhile, “please don’t waste my time” makes it clear that hope is not lost.

Elsewhere on never knows best is “fooly cooly,” which navigates the personality, mentality, and psyche of troubled FLCL character Mamimi Samejima. The philosophical title of the project was inspired by Mamimi who scribbles the words never knows best on her cigarette. Throughout the project’s 10 tracks, boyband uses his lyrics to speak candidly about depression and the intense experiences of indifference, despondency, and social fatigue often felt by young adults in an effort to normalize these conversations. never knows best has garnered support from the likes of Hollywood Life, All Things Go, AFROPUNK, and Alternative Press who included boyband in their 40 New Artists You Need To Know feature.

The exploration of Mamimi’s character arc isn’t the first time that anime has stirred boyband to create. “death note” (feat. Billy Martin of Good Charlotte) – which appeared on his emotionally charged, 10-track project, alone in a boyband – was influenced by the 37-episode anime series and manga series of the same name.

Like the art that inspired them, “fooly cooly” and “death note” use deeply profound storytelling to expand and normalize the conversation surrounding the trouble spots in society experienced by teens today. The intimate and unique connections between boyband and his fans has allowed him to create a community-like platform through his songs, like “by myself,” “birth by sleep,” “tattoo,” “realtree” and “big face” (ft. Mike Kinsella), where fans can bond as they transition from teenagers into independent adults.

never knows best Track Listing

stitches

irl

close

fooly cooly

how 2 say ur in love

by myself

birth by sleep

please don’t waste my time ft. No Rome

hold me over

Jordan year

Boy in a Billion album art via Republic Records for use by 360 Magazine

Claire Rosinkranz × Boy in a Billion

Gen Z pop phenomenon Claire Rosinkranz dropped her new single Boy in a Billion.

Gearing up for a big summer, Gen Z singer-songwriter Claire Rosinkranz is back with a brand-new single entitled Boy In A Billion today via slowplay/Republic Records. It paves the way for her anxiously awaited sophomore EP, 6 Of A Billion, set for release on July 9. Be on the lookout for the music video soon!

Even before the song officially dropped, it had already stirred up widespread buzz online. A TikTok of Claire writing Boy In A Billion raked in over 4 million views. She didn’t stop there though. Welcoming her followers into the creative process, countless fans witnessed the recording of the song on Claire’s social media accounts.

On the track, the bass thumps as her vocals glide over finger-snaps and slick guitar wrapped in warbling synths. She details a priceless love with clever verses and a hummable hook carried by her dynamic vocal delivery.

Claire’s most recent single, Frankenstein, has already been streamed more than 5 million times in less than a month. Additionally, she attracted acclaim from various outlets, including Dork and The Honey Pop who raved, “Our jaws are on the floor at the growing potential and stardom of Claire!”

“Frankenstein” marked Claire’s first collaboration – with M-phases, Chelsea Lena, & artist Lexi Jayde.  Another quirky and catchy bop, cowbell holds down the guitar-laden beat as Claire adds her own 21st-century spin to the song inspired by The Cardigans’ classic 90’s hit “Lovefool.”  She immediately shocks pop back to life with the hook, “Guess, I gotta build my Frankenstein.

Claire continues to receive rave reviews from tastemakers in the media. Billboard says, “Remi Wolf and Benee fans, take note of TikTok breakout Claire Rosinkranz, who will surely be your next favorite.” American Songwriter remarked, “2020 may have been a banner year for Rosinkranz, but it’s a culmination of the work she’s put into her craft.” 

The recent releases lead up to Claire’s anxiously awaited second EP, 6 Of A Billion, coming July 9. The EP features tracks “Boy In A Billion” and “Frankenstein” 

6 Of A Billion Tracklist

  1. Hotel
  2. Pretty Little Things
  3. Boy In A Billion
  4. Fall Apart
  5. Frankenstein
  6. LAX

ABOUT CLAIRE ROSINKRANZ 

Southern California singer, songwriter, ballerina, and multi-instrumentalist Claire Rosinkranz grafts the Gen-Z coming-of-age experience onto quirky D.I.Y. soundscapes often cooked up by her dad in the garage. Within a year, the 17-year-old phenomenon has eclipsed over half a billion total streams and received widespread acclaim courtesy of Rolling Stone, Variety, Coup de Main, Buzzfeed, Genius, and more. OnesToWatch championed her as one of its “Top Artists To Watch in 2021,” while New York Times and Billboard named her breakout anthem Backyard Boy among “The Best Songs of 2020.” Backyard Boy inspired over 3 million TikTok videos and fueled the trailer for Amazon’s The Map of Tiny Perfect Things. Along the way, she collaborated with the likes of Jeremy Zucker, Role Model, and Clinton Kane and earned the support of Olivia Rodrigo, Tai Verdes, Lexi Jayde, and 347aidan. Now, she presents an unfiltered perspective on being a teen through her 2021 sophomore EP introduced by the lead single Frankenstein.

Joel Peterson photo via Deseret News for use by 360 Magazine

Joel Peterson x My Road to Cancellation

Joel Peterson, Stanford Professor and former JetBlue Chairman, writes about his experience navigating the minefield of woke hostility in his piece My Road to Cancellation:

“Wokeism,” America’s new civil religion, draws on elements of neo-Marxism, critical race theory, social justice and identity politics. Its adherents believe it will lead to a more just society. Its detractors, on the other hand, believe its “cancel culture” will push civil society to the brink. And, for the “woke,” either will do.

The roots of my own unlikely cancelation go as far back as 1987, when Jesse Jackson marched Stanford students up Palm Drive to a rhythmic chant of “Hey, hey, ho, ho! Western Civ has got to go!” The next year, I joined the advisory council of its Graduate School of Business where I was soon invited to fill a one-year faculty vacancy. To everyone’s surprise (including my own), I returned every fall for the next three decades to teach four courses to a generation of exceptional MBA candidates.

Then, last year, before a student-politician boldly posted that “White people need to be eradicated,” I was summoned to respond to an equally disturbing complaint over having “triggered” woke students. Because I didn’t think I’d done anything worthy of the summons and because I had received the distinguished teaching award from students, a “Silver Apple Award” from alumni and been appointed to a faculty chair, I wasn’t worried. Alas, I’d misjudged my peril.

Years after Jackson’s campaign to eliminate Stanford’s requirement to study Western civilization, an Iowa-born, New York Times reporter, Nikole Hannah-Jones, developed what she titled “The 1619 Project.” In it, she presented America as founded on slavery and stained by perpetual bigotry.

With boosts from the Pulitzer Foundation and from George Floyd’s tragic death, her social justice message struck a nerve. However, when a number of historians debunked the pseudo-history, Hannah-Jones repositioned her essay as “a work of journalism that explicitly seeks to challenge the national narrative.” She followed up with a New York Times Magazine article headlined “What is Owed” making a case for reparations, consistent with her 1995 letter to the editor in Notre Dame’s “The Observer,” in which she likened Christopher Columbus to Hitler.

With police departments defunded, monuments vandalized and cities torched, Dr. Seuss was soon condemned as racist, Mr. Potato Head scheduled for gender reassignment, and free speech restricted by social media oligarchs. So, it wasn’t a surprise to see social justice warriors on the previously welcoming Graduate School of Business campus.

Content of character vs. color of skin

In a class I teach, students objected when guest CEOs claimed to have been “color blind.” When I volunteered that I, too, had resisted hiring based on skin color, gender or quotas, and had relied, instead, on character, competence and commitment, some students were offended. To understand why those “triggered” would object to standards of character and competence being added to the emergent holy grail of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI), I turned to one of my own daughters.

Sensing my bafflement at the outrage, she immediately wrote back:

“I have known you my entire life, and I know by your words and deeds that you value all people of all races, ethnicities, and genders. I know you are constantly impressed and inspired by immigrants and their amazing stories of courage and perseverance. I’m proud of the work you’ve done. If this younger, ‘triggered’ generation pushes out of their lives all who seek to improve their understanding, teach them, and open their minds to broader ways of thinking, it will be to their detriment.”

I’d taught my kids – and, until now, my students — that talent, character, and competence are evenly distributed across every demographic. In response to my determination to be on the lookout for leaders without regard to identity, an offended gender-studies major wrote that she’d not known “whether to scream or throw up.” After all, it had been nearly 60 years since Martin Luther King had dreamt of the day when the content of one’s character mattered more than the color of one’s skin. But, by the time that day happily arrived, “wokeism” had hijacked his dream, re-elevating skin color over character.

As demands for skin-color diversity were broadened to include gender and sexual orientation, a student notified me that I’d called on more men than women in two (of four) classes. Knowing that I was no respecter of persons — whether by gender, race, sexual orientation, or anything else — I moved ahead with the course, suddenly aware that my interactions with students were being catalogued by identity.

Soon, a Black Lives Matter advocate asked, of all things, whether I would stand for the American flag. To provide context for my decision, I shared a story. As a toddler, I’d seen my mother take a call from the Department of Defense announcing that her fighter-pilot brother had been killed. Honoring her grief, I’d chosen to stand for the flag under which my only uncle had offered the ultimate sacrifice. The student’s response was presented as an irrefutable argument; my choice was “racist.”

Furthermore, in this woke new world, my professional experience was no longer relevant because of the race and gender I’d been assigned at birth. Despite having created tens of thousands of jobs, promoted women and minorities, and coached scores of entrepreneurs, I was deemed an “oppressor” in the catechism of “wokeism.” Furthermore, the penance for being raised in a “systemically racist” society — founded on millennia of Greek, Roman and Judeo-Christian antecedents, no less — was submission, and, if resisted, cancelation.

The reason behind such tyranny came into focus for me when Condolezza Rice, former secretary of state and current director of the Hoover Institution at Stanford, told me she’d shared with her students that the capture of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (9/11’s architect) had felt like “having Erwin Rommel under lock and key.” The blank looks on the faces of her very bright students revealed that they had never heard of WWII’s famous Desert Fox.

Until then, I’d traced the enmity to activists like Jackson and Hannah-Jones. Now, I could see that it also stemmed from students having swapped an education for indoctrination. Those enlisted as social justice warriors had avoided the lessons of history, missed out on refining skills that might have allowed them to judge assertions, and denied themselves the insights required to make wise trade-offs.

Because such uninformed activism brought with it a minefield of woke hostility, I kept to myself any reservations I harbored about critical race theory, gender fluidity, and climate alarm. And, when Stanford’s math department proposed achieving “racial equity” by eliminating AP math (as racist, no less), I also kept quiet. Instead, I hoped my hardscrabble climb to CEO might inspire those who saw themselves as victims of inequity. Ironically, those who strained to label my uphill journey a product of “white supremacy” were often the very beneficiaries of woke preferences.

Oppressor-victim

To understand this recipe for canceling predecessor generations, I spoke next with Stanford military historian Victor Davis Hanson. Because Hanson had written the following, I wanted his help in gracefully handling the oppressor-victim theme:

“We should not… allow a current affluent, leisure, and pampered generation to hijack the past, and damn it to perdition. (They have) not earned the right to… cancel… those of the past who won Gettysburg, or built the Hoover Dam, or produced a Liberty ship every week.”

While Stanford had long nurtured a remarkably diverse and admirably inclusive community, it nonetheless rejected Hanson’s counsel in favor of a now fashionable “institutional racism.”

When Graduate School of Business faculty were further instructed to avoid “racist and xenophobic rhetoric and actions against the Asian American and Pacific Islander community,” I found myself wondering if the addendum were a virtue-signaling accusation, or if it were based on something I’d simply never encountered in all my years at Stanford. And, when the facts behind subsequent murders (of a Capitol police officer and 10 Colorado shoppers) contradicted de rigueur narratives, I wondered if the time had come to move beyond racial memes.

Apparently not. With free markets also labeled “racist,” those of us with responsibilities outside the ivory tower began to feel our “diversity of optic” (based on long experience) had been dismissed in favor of a “diversity of identity” (rooted in ideology). So, while I care deeply about Stanford University, and like and admire its president, provost, and business school dean, I was beginning to feel isolated.

Their deference to selective diversity led me to reflect upon a meeting I’d conducted in Berlin as chairman of JetBlue Airways. After the meeting, I’d taken a stroll down Unter den Linden to the Bebelplatz, 500 yards to the east of Berlin’s famous Brandenburg Gate. It was at that plaza, on May 10, 1933, that newly empowered Nazi officials had orchestrated the burning of “objectionable” books. Later dubbed “The Night of Shame,” the conflagration eventually contributed to Germany’s liberal democracy turning a blind eye to Kristallnacht, the Holocaust and an appalling rationale for war.

While loath to compare such a long-ago shame with how I was currently feeling in Palo Alto, of all places, I remembered being impressed that, in Berlin, the survivors of that era’s cancelation had later inserted “stumbling stones” between pavers to ensure that all who followed neither forget, nor repeat, that calamity.

As I traversed the once-riven capital city, the ground-level reminders had provoked in me a surge of optimism. Surely, the world would avoid the sort of conflict for which my own father had gone to war. Surely, everyone realized by now that banning books, restricting free speech and stoking fear would lead to tragedy. And, just as surely, America would eventually reject totalitarianism, even in its “wokest” form.

Yet, here I was, only three years later, 6,000 miles to the west of Berlin, sensing I was perilously connected to a prior generation’s intolerance. Adding to my anxiety was a discovery that my grandchildren’s generation were being scheduled to view an honorable heritage through a lens cleverly manufactured to provoke shame.

Forced to consider moving to a less hostile teaching environment, I heard from former students. One female “of color” offered that, of all her professors, I’d been the most supportive of women and minorities. Another confirmed that the majority of his classmates felt silenced by the threats of a racist label. One student even scolded me for having allowed “the slings and arrows” of the woke to achieve their hoped-for effect.

I smiled wanly to see that Prince Hamlet had somehow survived Jesse Jackson. I, on the other hand, had failed utterly to anticipate the distorting polemics of identity politics. The script advanced during America’s annus horribilis had pitted race against race, gender against gender, and generation against generation, all risking a degradation of spirit worse than any virus.

As a former CEO, it seemed to me that the narrative had gone well beyond gaining political or market advantage. It had even exceeded antifa’s hope for French-Revolution-style anarchy. In fact, by 2021, it looked like a bold attempt at a hostile takeover of mankind’s best hope for peace and prosperity.

This conclusion led me to contrast two Americans best known for their connections to societal breakdown — a mid-19th-century Abraham Lincoln and a mid-20th-century Saul Alinsky. I selected Lincoln because he’d guided America through a civil war, and Alinsky because his dream had been to provoke civil unrest by inciting those he called the “have-nots” against those whom he called the “haves.”

President Lincoln’s observation of America’s vulnerability mirrored community organizer Alinsky’s precondition for a successful revolution. Thus, the warning attributed to Lincoln that “America will never be destroyed from the outside; if we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves” was the basis for the race and class warfare Alinsky welcomed by rewriting history, inciting envy and “canceling” a large portion of the population.

Whereas Martin Luther King had called upon our “better angels” to subordinate our differences to shared values and, thus, to overcome what Condi Rice called our nation’s “birth defect,” Alinsky chose to repudiate King’s redemptive dream. If he could get people to ignore e pluribus unum (America’s motto since 1782), he might be able to overcome the spirit under which the nation had thrived.

By 2020, the pandemic had offered activists a unique opportunity to cleave the nation along identity and tribal lines, skirting the 238-year-old aspiration that had been Alinsky’s steepest obstacle. Using a fear of cancellation to silence half the population, SJWs dismissed the steady social progress that was the trademark of the world’s most successful multicultural society. Instead of celebrating the progress flowing from our commonalities, they fomented division by pointing to historical injustices.

Between a pandemic, racial tensions and the absence of a Lincolnesque figure to bind up our wounds and bring us together, America was, indeed, vulnerable. As its citizens awakened to the soft tyranny promoted during the pandemic, many felt betrayed by institutions they’d once admired and leaders they’d once trusted. And, for my part, I discovered that the experience I’d had with cancellation in the academy was being repeated all across the nation.

While I may well survive, America will not survive the rewriting of its history, the violation of its Constitution and the abandonment of the freedoms it has promised to citizens of all political persuasions, ethnicities, genders and orientations. No matter our differences, unless we preserve free speech, secure our Constitution and re-enthrone individual responsibility over victimhood, all the king’s horses and all the king’s men will be unable to put Humpty Dumpty back together again.

And Alinsky’s vision will have canceled Lincoln’s.

Joel Peterson Bio

Joel Peterson is the Robert L. Joss Professor of Management at Stanford University, the former managing partner of the Trammell Crow Company, the former chairman of the board of Overseers of the Hoover Institution, the former chairman of JetBlue Airways and the founder and chairman of Peterson Partners, a sponsor for a quarter century of more than a dozen funds covering private equity, venture and real estate investments in hundreds of companies and real estate projects across the nation and throughout the world.