Posts tagged with "TIME Magazine"

Daddy Yankee illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine.

DADDY YANKEE

Emerging as an inescapable worldwide hit, global superstar, music entrepreneur and Reggaeton icon Daddy Yankee taps none other than Sisqófor the official remix of “Don Don” with Anuel AA and Kendo Kaponi. The song premiered tonight on the Billboard Latin Music Awards with an electric performance from the four artists. The track is now available via Universal Music Group’s Ingrooves Music Group and Republic Records, along with Daddy Yankee’s El Cartel Records.

Listen to “Don Don (Remix)” feat. Sisqó with Anuel AA and Kendo Kaponi: HERE

On the remix, GRAMMY® Award-nominated multiplatinum hip-hop icon Sisqó pulls up with a classic turn-of-the-century verse as quotable as it is nostalgic. Meanwhile, the original “Don Don” has already amassed over 100 million streams and debuted in the Top 10 of the BillboardHot Latin Songs Chart.

Daddy Yankee is widely recognized for leading and elevating Reggaeton into a global cultural and musical phenomenon, which has fueled an explosion in popularity for Latin music around the world. With a career that transcends language, geography and demographics, Daddy Yankee is one of the most popular and followed artists in the world today, with more than 60 million followers across social media and more than 7 billion streams in the last 12 months alone on YouTube, where he is among the Top 20 Global Artists. He has additionally sold more than 17 million albums, charted 50 hit songs on Billboard charts and he is the only Latin Artist with four Spanish-language songs to reach the Top 20 of Billboard’s Hot 100.

Daddy Yankee remains one of the most recognized and influential names in urban music and Latin dance. He was named one of the most influential Hispanics in the world by both CNN and Time Magazine. He has sold over 17 million albums and over 60 million fans combined on his social networks. Daddy Yankee is considered the King of Reggaeton and one of the founders of the global movement. He continues to reign with the global success of “Despacito,” which was named the most streamed song and the most watched video of all time. In 2018, his single “Dura” was the 2nd Most Watched Video in 2018 and in 2019, “Con Calma” marked the number “Most Watched” video globally on YouTube. He was also named Billboard Magazine’s Top Latin Artist of 2017. Other global hits by Daddy Yankee are “Gasolina,” “Rompe,” “Limbo,” and most recently “Que Tire Pa’Lante.”

Yankee’s philanthropic work through “Daddy’s House” has been recognized by Billboard with the Spirit of Hope Award. Among his many accomplishments, Yankee has also received over 100 awards including Latin Music Billboard Awards, Latin GRAMMYs, American Music Awards, Latin American Music Awards, among others. In 2014 Daddy Yankee was also honored with the ASCAP “Voice of Music Award.”

Pharrell Williams illustrated by Rita Azar for 360 MAGAZINE

Pharrell Williams – Entrepreneur

Today, Pharrell Williams shares a new single and music video entitled “Entrepreneur” [feat. JAY-Z].

Watch the video HERE.

Get it HERE via Columbia Records.

He makes a powerful statement with the song and the accompanying visual. The video proudly features and spotlights the achievements of over a dozen black entrepreneurs. It includes Issa RaeNipsey HussleTyler, The CreatorRobert HartwellSix SevTyAnthony Davis [Founder of Vox Collegiate Junior High], Vincent Williams [Founder of Honey’s Kettle], Iddris SanduBeatrice Dixon [Founder of Honey’s Pot], Arthell Darnell Isom[Founders of D’ART Shtajio], Neighbors SkateShopAlrick AugustineDenise Woodard [Founder of Partake Cookies],Chace Infinite [Founder of Harun Coffee Shop], Chef Alisa[Founder of My Two Cents], Debbie Allen [Founder of Tribe Midwifery], Angela Richardson [Founder of PUR Home], Miss Bennett FitnessBlack and MobileTrill Paws Dog AccessoriesThird Vault Yarns, and “The First Black Valedictorian of Princeton” Nicholas Johnson. They all make cameos as title cards introduce their accomplishments. Over a slick and soulful bounce, Pharrell carries an uplifting and undeniable affirmation punctuated by his instantly recognizable high register. This anthem arrives at just the right time.

Pharrell also joined forces with TIME for a very special cover project entitled The New American Revolution. He personally curated a series of essays and conversations between Black leaders that explore America’s oppressive past and visions for a more equitable future, with perspectives from Kenya Barris, Imara Jones, Naomi Osaka, Tyler, the Creator, and more. To bring this dialogue to the forefront, he unites the likes of Yara Shahidi and Angela Davis in once-in-a-lifetime interviews. Hank Willis Thomas contributed the cover art.

About the issue, Pharrell wrote, “In assembling this project, I asked some of the most qualified people I know in every field—from Angela Davis to Tyler, the Creator, to Representative ­Barbara Lee—to talk with us, and with one another, about the way forward. I wanted to convey a vision of a future filled with the artists, creators and entrepreneurs who can fulfill the promise of this country’s principles.” 

The issue is on newsstands now.

Rising artist Oliver Malcolm takes a trip back to his home country to shoot a new music video, “The Machine.”

Oliver Malcolm – The Machine

Rising artist Oliver Malcolm takes a trip back to his home country to shoot a new music video, “The Machine.”Continuing his love for the DIY approach, Oliver shot the video first-person style with friends and features his high energy personality and eclectic creative voice — watch it above or here now:

Watch “The Machine” here:

The track first premiered on BBC Radio 1’s Indie Show with Jack Saunders, who delved deep into the meaning behind the track. Oliver tells the radio host that the lyrics revolt against the social institutions that prioritize material and financial gain above all else, transforming their subjects into simple cogs in “The Machine.” The song was a playlisting favorite when it was released earlier this month including being featured on the cover of Amazon Music’s “Breaking Alternative” playlist.

About Oliver Malcolm 

Oliver Malcolm got his start early, teaching himself how to spin records at 12 years old. Shortly after, he downloaded Logic and taught himself how to produce – working with IDK, Aluna George, Joey Bada$$, Jay Rock, Masego Tinashe and more. Now twenty, Oliver has developed his own voice. Touching everything from the production, vocals, songwriting, engineering, mixing, and mastering,  Oliver’s sound is unique and does not fit the mold of one genre. A multidisciplinary at heart, this is just the beginning of music lovers can look forward to from the new artist.

Praise for Oliver Malcolm: 

“Oliver Malcolm is the dynamic rising star ready kick up a storm with his diverse, new punk-indebted EP” — NME

“With its deep bassline and bluesy melodies alchemizing jazz and pop influences, he crafts an almost tangible atmosphere of melancholy [in “Helen”] as pleas to a woman echo throughout” — Pigeons & Planes, Best New Artist

“The drums lurch toward the offbeats, some looped guitar picking tugs against that pulse and Malcolm’s voice is a rattled, quavery moan…Everything stays off-kilter for the two and a half paranoid minutes of “Switched Off” by Oliver Malcolm” — New York Times, Playlist

“Oliver Malcolm’s ‘Switched Up’ Is Intoxicating… new single ‘Switched Up’ is a mesh of influences, a confluence of sounds, a mosaic of techniques.” — CLASH

“A lot of artists claim genre-blending style, but Malcolm’s is altogether impossible to define. Is it alt-blues? Dark electro-pop? Folk-hip-hop? Does it matter?” — TIME Magazine, Best New Song

“The hip-hop producer-turned-twisted musical anarchist is making songs for nobody but himself. You’ll love them anyway.” — i-D Magazine

Playing Piano Illustration by Mina Tocalini

Global Piano Recital

During the pandemic, when people have been stuck at home, the world was offered a free class to learn a song on the piano as a global community and perform it together in a Virtual Piano Recital. Lasting 30 days, the goal of the class was to share the joy and gift of music during a time when the world needed it most. 

The course was offered by #1 rated online and app-based piano instruction software, Playground Sessions; Multi-Grammy Award-winning composer/record producer/humanitarian and co-creator of Playground Sessions Quincy Jones; and the world’s largest source for music publications, Hal Leonard. Playground Sessions released a special video today of the beginner, intermediate and advanced piano players from all over the world, who came together to learn how to play “You Raise Me Up” in what turned out to be the largest virtual piano recital in history.  

The campaign had 52 countries participate, with over 7,000 people learning the iconic song, with 925 video submissions. All levels of piano players learned different sections of “You Raise Me Up,” as participants were invited to post a video of themselves playing their parts to Instagram or Facebook using hashtag #GlobalPianoRecital, or upload to playgroundsessions.com.  At the end of the 30-day period which ended on June 16, all of the parts from the different levels were culminated in the “You Raise Me Up Global Piano Recital” – a video compilation of all of the recital submissions from around the globe, and is now featured on playgroundsessions.com and shared on social media. 

As part of the “You Raise Me Up Global Piano Recital,” Playground Sessions offered free lessons for people to sign up and learn the iconic song, which included instructor-led classes for beginner, intermediate, and advanced players. New lessons were released every day until the full song was learned. The song will continue to be available for new students to learn. Says Jones:  “I want to thank all of the wonderful musicians from around the world that participated in our “You Raise Me Up” recital, and I hope that it brought you as much joy as watching you all brought me. I have no doubt that everyone who watches this global collaboration will be inspired by its beauty and the power of music to bring us all together.” Says Chris Vance, Founder & CEO of Playground Sessions, “The release of the global video with so many participants from around the globe, shows how music overcame the barrier of lockdown to connect people around the world. What’s amazing is how many people are new to the piano, some had not even played a note before. People are willing to work at something when there is meaning.  My hope is that people will take something positive away from the quarantine, and what’s better than learning to play the piano which can last a lifetime.”

Adds Larry Morton, CEO of Hal Leonard, “Music has the power to heal and to bring joy into our lives. We are proud to have partnered with Quincy and Playground Sessions on this uplifting and inspiring project.”

Brendan Graham, composer of “You Raise Me Up” says:  “In these times of great affliction for people everywhere, the ‘you’ can be each of us through what we do to help each other, to keep each other safe…to raise each other up. ‘I am strong when I am on your shoulders, You Raise Me Up…to more than I can be.'”

While people are mandated to stay at home and kids can’t go to school, online education is currently a top way to make productive use of time. People are turning now more than ever to learn music in a time of need for joy, stress relief, and creative self-expression as evidenced by a recent surge in the popularity of Playground Sessions. Visit www.playgroundsessions.com for more info.

Co-created by music legend Quincy Jones, Playground Sessions is the #1 rated app-based piano/keyboard learning program. The company pioneered a sophisticated but easy-to-use learning platform combining video tutorials, gamification and real-time feedback. Fun and easy-to-follow video lessons from world-class and celebrity musicians guide users through the process, from one lesson to another, so anyone can seamlessly discover the joy of music.” Aspiring piano players can learn from iconic artist Harry Connick, Jr. who shares his love for music and the piano in lessons.

Named by Time Magazine as one of the most influential jazz musicians of the 20th century, Quincy Jones is an impresario in the broadest and most creative sense of the word. His career has encompassed the roles of composer, record producer, artist, film producer, arranger, conductor, instrumentalist, TV producer, record company executive, television station owner, magazine founder, multi-media entrepreneur, and humanitarian. Jones is also the all-time most Grammy nominated artist with a total of 80 nominations.

Hal Leonard is the world’s largest publisher and distributor of music performance and instructional materials, with a catalog of over one million products in both physical and digital form. Hal Leonard represents many of the world’s best known and most respected publishers, artists, songwriters, and arrangers.

Follow Playground Sessions: FacebookTwitter | YouTube

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, COVID-19

Gates – COVID-19 Vaccine

By Jason Tayer

As the Black Lives Matter movement joined the COVID-19 pandemic in serving as two of the world’s most pressing current crises, they have undoubtedly merged in terms of their effects and implications on each other. The core issue driving the BLM movement deals with inequity and disproportionate treatment of black people compared to other populations in the U.S. In light of this notion, the coronavirus has been disproportionately affecting black populations across the country, and resembles a clear example of how we need mass social change.

Bill and Melinda Gates spoke out about how to better treat black communities in terms of handling the spread of COVID-19. According to Reuters, there have been several posts claiming that Melinda wants to test the vaccine on black communities. However, deeper analysis has shown that this was a misinterpretation and that she meant to communicate that once the vaccine is safe to distribute, healthcare workers and black populations should be first priority recipients of the vaccine since they have both been unequally affected by COVID-19 cases. For instance, the state of Illinois recorded that 30% of its COVID-19 cases were held by black people when they only make up 14.6% of the population.

TIME Magazine states that since there has been a lack of ties to international health agencies within this country, Bill Gates announced that the Gates Foundation will give $1.6 to the Vaccine Alliance. This effort to bring forth an appropriate vaccine as soon as possible compliments the intentions to equitably distribute the vaccine to particularly impacted communities once it is made available.

The Weeknd, 360 MAGAZINE

The Weeknd × MusiCares

The Weeknd has donated $500,000 to Musicares®. The multi-platinum selling artist brought back popular XO facemasks and matched every dollar to raise money to aid those afflicted because of COVID-19.
The Weeknd has given back to the members of the music community with a $500k donation to MusiCares® to aid those afflicted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Recording Academy and MusiCares established the COVID-19 Relief Fund to help people in the music industry affected by the coronavirus disease outbreak and subsequent cancellation of multiple music events. From hotel and bar gigs to major music festivals, COVID-19 is deeply impacting live music events and the creative community behind it all. To date, the MusiCares COVID-19 Relief Fund has raised more than $20 million and provided thousands of music creators and industry professionals with emergency assistance.

About MusiCares
A friend and ally of the music community, MusiCares was established by the Recording Academy to safeguard the health and well-being of all music people. A four-star charity and safety net in times of need, MusiCares offers confidential preventive, recovery, and emergency programs to address financial, medical, and personal health issues. Through the generosity of our donors and volunteer professionals, our dedicated team works across the country to ensure the music community has the resources and support it needs. For more information, visit these pages: Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

About The Weeknd
Filtering R&B and pop through an ambitious widescreen lens, The Weeknd took over popular music and culture on his own terms. The multi-platinum three-time GRAMMY Award winner is the #1 most listened artist in the world on Spotify and is a top 10 artist of all time for RIAA singles. His 2020 album After Hours is the #1 most streamed R&B album of all time, followed by his 2016 album Starboy at #2. Alongside his gilded musical career, he’s graced the covers of Time Magazine, Forbes, Rolling Stone, Harper’s Bazaar, and GQ along with the late-night stages with heralded performances with the likes of Saturday Night Live, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon and Jimmy Kimmel Live.
In recent times he has made acting appearances in TV and film with 2019’s film Uncut Gems as well as starring in and co-writing an episode of the hit show American Dad in 2020.
He generously shares with donations in 2020 already near $1.5 million dollars to various charities.
The continuous record-breaking of charts, sales, and streams, headlining the biggest festivals and stadiums in the world, and his ever-mysterious public persona combined solidify The Weeknd as one of the most compelling and significant artists of the 21st century.

Follow The Weeknd: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Youtube | Spotify | Website | Wikipedia

(Photo: Pari Dukovic)

book, reading, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine

Jini Reddy New Book

On Tuesday, June 30th, Bloomsbury Wildlife (US) is releasing Wanderland: A Search for Magic in the Landscape by award-winning BIPOC author and journalist Jini Reddy, who was just long-listed for the 2020 Wainwright Prize.

In pursuit of the Other and a connection to Britain’s captivating natural world, Jini Reddy searches for the magical in the landscape. Alone on a remote mountaintop one dark night, she hears a mysterious voice.

Propelled by the memory and after years of dreaming about it, Jini Reddy dares to delve into the “wanderlands” of Britain, heading off in search of the magical in the landscape.

A London journalist with multicultural roots and a perennial outsider, she determinedly sets off on this unorthodox path. Serendipity and her inner compass guide her around the country in pursuit of the Other and a connection to Britain’s captivating natural world. Where might this lead? And if you know what it is to be Othered yourself, how might this color your experiences? And what if, in invoking the spirit of the land, ‘it’ decides to make its presence felt?

Whether following a ‘cult’ map to a hidden well that refuses to reveal itself, attempting to persuade a labyrinth to spill its secrets, embarking on a coast-to-coast pilgrimage or searching for a mystical land temple, Jini depicts a whimsical, natural Britain. Along the way, she tracks down ephemeral wild art, encounters women who worship The Goddess, falls deeper in love with her birth land and struggles – but mostly fails – to get to grips with its lore. Throughout, she rejoices in the wildness we cannot see and celebrates the natural beauty we can, while offering glimpses of her Canadian childhood and her Indian parents’ struggles in apartheid-era South Africa.

Wanderland is a book in which the heart leads, all things are possible and the Other, both wild and human, comes in from the cold. It is a paean to the joy of roaming, both figuratively and imaginatively, and to the joy of finding your place in the world.

“A joyous celebration of the beauty we can see and the magic we can’t.” – Tay Aziz, BBC Wildlife

“…doesn’t just open your eyes to the Isles’ mystical history, but also your mind to the possibilities of what spirits may be lurking there.” – Wanderlust Magazine

“[Jini Reddy] rejects the stereotypes placed on people of color, and crafts a beautiful story of self-discovery and exploration of the natural world. – Brown Girl Magazine

Wanderland: A Search for Magic in the Landscape by Jini Reddy goes on-sale 6/30/20

About Jini Reddy:

Jini Reddy is an award-winning author and journalist. She was born in London to Indian parents who grew up in apartheid-era South Africa, and was raised in Montreal, Canada. Jini has a degree in Geography, an M.A. in English Literature and a passion for writing on travel, nature and spirituality. Her byline has appeared in The Guardian, Time magazine, The Metro, The Times, Sunday Times Style, The Sunday Telegraph, National Geographic Traveler, BBC Wildlife, Resurgence & The Ecologist and other publications. Her first book, Wild Times, was published in 2016 and she is a contributor to the forthcoming Women on Nature anthology.

Follow Jini Reddy: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Website 

Minority Report

A comprehensive report of the continuation and influx of unjustified treatment towards minorities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

February 23: 25-year-old Georgia resident Ahmaud Arbery was fatally shot while running unarmed. No arrests were made immediately, but Gregory and Travis McMichael, who claim to have been making a citizen’s arrest, have since been apprehended more than 2 months after the shooting and charged with murder and aggravated assault. The murder and its delayed action have sparked nationwide protests and calls for justice. The lawyer, hired by Ahmaud’s family, was also hired by another African American victim – Breonna Taylor.

March 13Breonna Taylor was shot and killed in her Louisville home after police entered the house on a search warrant. Taylor and her boyfriend believed they were burglars and began firing at the police. The shootout left 26-year-old Taylor dead and her boyfriend, 27, arrested and charged with assault and attempted murder of a police officer. Neither Taylor nor her boyfriend Walker had a criminal record, but Walker had a firearm license.

March 23: A newly released video shows a 68-year-old black Missouri woman by the name of Marvia Gray and her son Derek being forcefully arrested on the floor of a department store on March 23rd. The two were accused falsely of trying to steal a television and were injured when thrown on the floor by police, according to Gray. They were however, arrested for assault on a police officer and resisting arrest.

April 18Steven Taylor, 33, was shot to death by police in a California Walmart while attempting to steal from the store and threatening violent acts with a baseball bat. Taylor was fatally shot, however, after becoming a non-threat, it prompted the family to call for charges against the officers. Taylor was also allegedly in a mental health crisis and has a history of disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Taylor leaves behind three children and three siblings.

April 24: Austin Police murdered 42-year old Michael Ramos after a nearby 911 call about a possible drug deal. The police shot Ramos when he was out of his car, with his hands above his head. When Ramos re-entered his vehicle and began driving away, he was shot again and soon after, died. A later investigation found no sign of a firearm in the car.

April 28: A shootout with police in Florida killed 26-year-old Jonas Joseph after his car was pulled over. Joseph began firing at police, who returned fire and killed the young man.

May 6: 21-year-old Sean Reed was killed by police following a vehicle pursuit on the evening of May 6, 2020. The police pursued Reed after being seen driving erratically on the highway. The pursuit terminated, but when Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Assistant Chief Chris Bailey spotted the car parked, he approached. Reed tried to flee, but the confrontation left the young man dead. A crowd of protestors at the scene demanded the reasoning for the officer’s use of force.

May 9: 48-year-old Adrian Medearis was killed after being pulled over under suspicion of driving while intoxicated in Houston. The officer conducted a sobriety test, and attempted to arrest Medearis, a well-known local Gospel singer and choir director, but he resisted arrest and was fatally shot  in the ensuing altercation. His family and community are demanding the release of the video.

May 18: A Sarasota police officer was filmed using excessive force and kneeling on Patrick Carroll’s neck during an arrest. The video was put on social media and the officer in question has been put on administrative leave weeks after the event.

May 25: A woman named Amy Cooper called the cops on Christian Cooper, a Harvard alumnus and former Marvel Comics editor. The 57-year-old man was bird watching in Central Park when she approached him without her dog on the leash. After he asked her to put the dog on a leash, she called the police and claimed to be threatened. The altercation went viral after Christian Cooper posted a video of the event on social media, recording the woman aggressively restraining her dog and her saying, “I’m going to tell them [the police] there’s an African American man threatening my life.” Amy Cooper has since publicly apologized. But, Cooper has faced repercussions beyond negative comments on Twitter. She has been fired from her job at Franklin Templeton Investments, where she was vice president, and her dog has been rescued by a pet shelter.

Also on Monday May 25th, a Minneapolis man named George Floyd was murdered by police after an officer knelt on his neck despite his cries for help. Floyd was taken to a hospital where he died, and four officers were fired soon after the incident. A police statement says that Floyd was being investigated for a “forgery in progress” and resisted arrest. But, surveillance video of the arrest shows Floyd complying with the officers. On May 29th, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was charged with murder and manslaughter, four days after George Floyd’s death. On June 3rd, the other three officers involved in George Floyd’s murder, J.A. Keung, Thomas Lane, and Tou Thao, were arrested and charged with Aiding and Abetting Second Degree Murder and Aiding and Abetting Second Degree Manslaughter. Floyd’s murder sparked protests around the country with citizens looting and setting fire to buildings. The protestors have been met with tear gas and rubber bullets from police officers.

Allison Christensen, 360 Magazine, Vaughn Lowery

May 28: At a protest in Minneapolis, 43-year-old Calvin L. Horton Jr. was fatally shot and a suspect is in custody.

A Mississippi cop is on leave after a video is released of him choking a young suspect.

May 29: CNN reporter Omar Jimenez and his crew were arrested while reporting on the protest in Minneapolis. Meanwhile, another CNN reporter, Josh Campbell, says he was treated very differently by police and allowed to stay and report. Jimenez is black and Latino whereas Campbell is white. All three CNN workers were released from custody an hour later.

21-year-old Javar Harrell was not protesting but was fatally shot near protests in Detroit. It is unclear if his death is tied to protests.

May 30: The “Rally To End Modern Day Lynching” took place in Harlem in honor of George Floyd. The rally emphasizes that participants should still practice social distancing and wear a mask. Also on May 30th, participants will honor Floyd at the site of Eric Garner‘s murder in 2014. These New York protests became progressively more violent into the evening. Governor Brian Kemp issued a state of emergency and curfew for Atlanta in preparation for planned protests on May 31st. After four days of protests, Governor Newsom declares a state of emergency in Los Angeles. The courthouse and city hall were set on fire in Nashville.

A 21-year old unnamed man was fatally shot at a protest in Detroit.

In Dallas, a machete-yielding storeowner confronted protesters and was then violently beaten by the crowd; the man is now in stable condition.

Chris Beaty, 38, was killed from multiple gunshot wounds and was pronounced dead at the scene in Indianapolis.

May 31: After setting fires and looting in Santa Monica, the city declared a curfew. Curfews have since been set all around the country.

Italia Kelly, 22, and another victim were fatally shot while leaving a protest in Davenport, Iowa.

In Victorville, CA, Malcolm Harsch, 38, was found hanging from a tree and authorities are investigating the event as a potential homicide. Harsch’s family says they are very skeptical of his death being by suicide.

June 1: In Minneapolis, a group of men attacked Iyanna Dior, a black transgender woman; Dior is okay and in stable condition now.

53-year-old David McAtee was shot as national Guard troops and Louisville police broke up a protest; some footage shows McAtee shooting at police but it is unclear who fired their guns first because the officers involved did not activate their body cameras. The Louisville Metro Police Chief, Steve Conrad, was immediately fired because of the officers’ unactivated cameras.

16-year-old Jahmel Leach was tased in the face by NYPD and could be permanently disfigured from the attack. It is unclear why the police officers used force to arrest Leach.

June 2: Six Atlanta police officers have been fired and arrested for using excessive force towards Messiah Young and Taniyah Pilgrim, two young black people leaving the protests.

77-year-old David Dorn, a retired St. Louis police captain, was fatally shot by looters of a pawnshop after responding to an alarm.

June 4: At 3:45pm, NAACP holds a moment of silence for 8 minutes and 46 seconds in honor of George Floyd live on their Twitter.

June 5: All 57 members of the Buffalo Police Department’s emergency response team resigned in protest for police brutality – particularly seen in a video of Buffalo police pushing an unarmed man.

Reddit Co-founder Alexis Ohanian resigns from the company’s board and urges the company to replace his spot with a black candidate.

In a YouTube video, Robert L. Johnson, the first black American billionaire and co-founder of BET, talks to The Breakfast Club about racism and reparations.

20-year-old Dounya Zayer was violently shoved by a police officer at a protest in Brooklyn, NY. 

June 6: Michael Jordan and Jordan Brand pledge $100 million donation over the next 10 years to organizations promoting social justice and racial equality.

A video shows protestors creating a human shield to protect NYPD officers fro rioters throwing objects at the policemen. 

June 7: Virginia governor plans to remove Robert E. Lee statue later this week.

CEO of CrossFit Greg Glassman’s insensitive tweet about George Floyd has caused Glassman to face serious backlash. Partners of CrossFit, like Reebok or Rogue Fitness, and athletes, including Brooke Wells and Richard Froning, released statements that they will cut ties with CrossFit.

BLM protestors in Bristol pull down statue of Edward Colton, a slave trader who transported nearly 100,000 slaves in the 17th century. 

Harry H. Rogers drove into a group of protestors near Richmond, Virginia. Rogers identifies as the leader of the Ku Klux Klan and prosecutors are investigating the assault as a potential hate crime.

June 8: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announces police reform legislation called The Justice in Policing Act of 2020 which would ban chokeholds, establish a national database to track police misconduct, and more.

Minneapolis City Council announce plans to defund the Minneapolis police department.

GoFundMe suspends Candace Owens’ account saying that Owens, “spread hate, discrimination, intolerance and falsehoods against the black community.”

June 9: Greg Glassman, the CEO and founder of CrossFit, retires after his inappropriate tweet about George Floyd’s murder.

New York Police Chief Mike O’Meara shames the press for vilifying police officers in a video here.

June 10: In Palmdale, CA, 24-year-old black man named Robert Fuller,  was found hanging from a tree in what was originally described as an apparent suicide. Citizens are demanding that Fuller’s death is investigated as a homicide.

June 11:  After Trump’s comments about Seattle protestors being “domestic terrorists” and that law enforcement must “dominate the streets” to “take back Seattle,” Seattle mayor Jenny Durkan clarifies that the protestors are not threatening and that the president’s claims are unconstitutional.

June 12: Atlanta police fatally shot Rayshard Brooks, 27, at a Wendy’s drive-thru. Brooks’ murder caused Atlanta police chief Erika Shields to resign.

June 13: Patrick Hutchinson, a black personal trainer from London, rescued ‘far-right’ protester who was badly beaten during protest clashes in London.

A young, black FedEx driver named Brandon Brackins turned to social media to tell his followers how he was called racial slurs while working. 

June 16: A story resurfaces from 2006 when black, Buffalo, NY cop Cariol Horne was fired for stopping her white colleague from choking a handcuffed suspect.

Philadelphia court supervisor Michael Henkel is fired after video shows him tearing down BLM signs.

June 17: Quaker Oats plans to retire their Aunt Jemima branding and logo after acknowledging the racial stereotyping.

June 18: A Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department deputy fatally shot 18-year-old Andres Guardado.

June 20: Rioters storm the streets of Tulsa, Oklahoma during President Trump’s rally. 

June 21: A NYPD officer is on unpaid suspension after a chokehold incident in Queens.

June 22: Department of Justice is investigating a noose found in Bubba Wallace‘s NASCAR garage. Wallace is the only black driver in NASCAR’s top circuit. On June 23, the FBI determines that Wallace was not the target of a hate crime.

August 23: Jacob Blake is shot by Kenosha police officers after breaking up a nearby fight that two other women were having. Blake was unarmed and shot seven times in the back. He is currently hospitalized for his injuries.

 

 

Looking for ways to help? Here are some places to donate to:

George Floyd Memorial Fund

Minnesota Freedom Fund

Louisville Community Bail Fund

National Bail Out

Transgender Law Center In Memory of Tony McDade

Brooklyn Community Bail Fund

Dream Defenders

North Star Health Collective

The Louisville Community Bail Fund

The Freedom Fund

Northwest Community Bail Fund


NICKELODEON × TIME

Nickelodeon, TIME and TIME for Kids today announced that submissions have opened for the first-ever Kid of the Year honor, a multiplatform initiative recognizing extraordinary young leaders who are making a positive impact in their communities.  Now through Aug. 1, parents, teachers, friends and more, can nominate a kid (aged 8-16) who is doing incredible and inspiring things to make the world a better place.  Five honorees will be featured in a TV special—hosted by Trevor Noah (The Daily Show with Trevor Noah) and simulcast on Nick and the CBS Television Network in December–with one kid ultimately being recognized as TIME Kid of the Year and featured on a cover of TIME with a companion story in TIME For Kids.
 
The Kid of the Year TV special will also feature stars from entertainment, sports and pop culture surprising the honorees, as well as musical performances.  Each of the finalists will receive funds to further their respective causes and have the opportunity to serve as a Kid Reporter for TIME for Kids with exclusive access to a Nickelodeon event.  For official submission rules and additional information about the initiative, visit KidoftheYear2020.com.  
 
Said Noah, “In the unprecedented times that we are living in today, it has been inspiring to see humanity come together to help one another, and I’ve been especially drawn to the stories of kids using their creativity to bring resources to their communities.  After all, the person who’s going to bring us a better tomorrow is a kid who’s out there doing it today!”
 
Nickelodeon’s Kid of the Year TV special is a co-production of TIME Studios, Day Zero Productions, Mainstay Entertainment and Nickelodeon. Executive Producers include Andrea Delbanco (TIME for Kids), Ian Orefice and Mike Beck (TIME Studios), Trevor Noah and Haroon Saleem (Day Zero Productions), Norm Aladjem, Derek Van Pelt and Sanaz Yamin (Mainstay Entertainment) and Rob Bagshaw, Paul J. Medford and Stacey Carr (Nickelodeon). Production of Nickelodeon’s Kid of the Year is overseen by Rob Bagshaw, Executive Vice President, Unscripted Content.
 
About TIME

TIME is a global media brand that reaches a combined audience of more than 90 million around the world, including over 40 million digital visitors each month and 44 million social followers. A trusted destination for reporting and insight, TIME’s mission is to tell the stories that matter most, to lead conversations that change the world and to deepen understanding of the ideas and events that define our time. With unparalleled access to the world’s most influential people, the immeasurable trust of consumers globally, an unrivaled power to convene, TIME is one of the world’s most recognizable media brands with renowned franchises that include the TIME 100 Most Influential People, Person of the Year, Firsts, Best Inventions, World’s Greatest Places and premium events including the TIME 100 Summit and Gala, TIME 100 Health Summit, TIME 100 Next and more. 
 
About TIME For Kids

Since 1995, TIME for Kids has delivered current events from TIME news bureaus around the world to millions of students in elementary and middle school classrooms across the U.S. Each week, TIME for Kids presents news in a format that teaches young readers to become critical thinkers and informed citizens. As an educational publication, the mission of TIME for Kids is to help teachers engage students with the world around them and inspire kids to join the conversation about current events. 

About Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon, now in its 41st year, is the number-one entertainment brand for kids. It has built a diverse, global business by putting kids first in everything it does. The brand includes television programming and production in the United States and around the world, plus consumer products, digital, location based experiences, publishing and feature films.

Hot Girl Summer, Megan Thee Stallion, Nicki Minaj, Ty Dolla $ign, 360 MAGAZINE

Hot Girl Summer

“Megan Thee Stallion is at the forefront of the ‘Women’s Rap Renaissance!'”360 MAGAZINE

“This is the year of the ‘hot girl summer’ ”  NBC NEWS


“The lifestyle choice of summer 2019: Hot Girl Summer.” –HUFFINGTON POST


“If you’ve logged onto Twitter or swiped through your Instagram at any point this summer, you’ve definitely seen a post declaring it’s a hot girl summer. The now-ubiquitous phrase, a call to live your most confident and unapologetic life, was coined in the early months of the season by Houston rapper Megan Thee Stallion.” – TIME MAGAZINE


“Houston rapper Megan Thee Stallion, and her definitive tweet that this season is made for hot girls, made the phrase the season’s most ubiquitous meme, an internet-wide catchphrase.” – WIRED


“Her power lies directly in her self-confidence, honesty, and unmitigated desire to dominate-and not just when it comes to life itself; these qualities pour through her music.” – COMPLEX


“[Megan Thee Stallion] exudes a confidence of an artist that has been mastering the game for at least a decade.” –BILLBOARD


“Her music is unapologetically Southern, with her thick Houston accent bouncing effortlessly over sensual and bare trap beats, allowing her lyricism and delivery to shine through.” –ROLLING STONE


“If you don’t know the name Megan Thee Stallion, you will soon: she’s one of the fastest rising rappers and finds herself rooted in a pop culture moment that’s all about the yeehaw agenda, country-trap and sex-positive messaging.” – PASTE

If one thing is clear, Megan Thee Stallion owns Summer 2019! The Houston based MC and cultural icon, Megan Thee Stallion, continues her hot girl hot streak today with the release of new single, “Hot Girl Summer” feat. Nicki Minaj and Ty Dolla $ign. The single boasts production from hip-hop icon Juicy J and features a sample from the hit City Girls’ song “Act Up.” The track is named after the biggest cultural phenomenon of 2019, established by Megan, known as #HOTGIRLSUMMER. The phrase and viral meme not only encompasses everything Megan stands for but has also become a rallying cry for men and women around the world and is catapulting Megan into a household name.

When explaining #HOTGIRLSUMMER Megan states, “it’s just about women and men being unapologetically them, just having a good-ass time, hyping up your friends, doing you, not giving a damn about what nobody gotta say about it.”

Megan has had a monumental year that includes this week’s digital cover of PAPER Magazine, a print cover of The FADER’s Summer issue, being named as one of XXL Magazine’s 2019 Freshman, a late-night TV debut on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, and multiple radio hits such as “Cash Shit” and “Big Ole Freak.” Her critically-acclaimed project Fever has been praised by the likes of Rolling Stone, The Fader, XXL, Billboard, Pitchfork, Paper, and more.

Beyond being a successful rapper, Megan is currently a college student, environmental activist, philanthropist, Chance the Rapper’s occasional dietary consultant, and life coach for the world at large. Megan has hosted beauty pageants that award scholarships to “hotties” who also happen to be students, organized the first “Hottie Beach Clean Up” in Los Angeles, and still has time to regularly spread the word of hot girl summer on social media. With each move she makes she continues to set herself apart as the most unique, inspirational, and driven artist out right now, so it’s no wonder she can count Kylie Jenner, Drake, Jada Pinkett Smith, Nicki Minaj, etc. as some of her fans.

Due to climate change, hot girl summer will be continuing well into the Fall when Megan joins Meek Mill and Future for their North American Legendary Nights Tour with YG and Mustard (select tour dates below)., but for now she shows no signs of slowing down. Stay tuned for more news as #HOTGIRLSUMMER is far from over!

READ THE PAPER DIGITAL COVER STORY FEATURING MEGAN THEE STALLION: http://www.papermag.com/megan-thee-stallion-2639723905.html

NEW SINGLE FEATURING NICKI MINAJ AND TY DOLLA $IGN OUT NOW; LISTEN HERE
FALL TOUR WITH FUTURE, MEEK MILL, YG AND MUSTARD; PURCHASE TICKETS HERE