Posts tagged with "entrepreneur"

Jessica Alba to Receive Hispanic Heritage Business Award

he Hispanic Heritage Foundation (HHF) announced today that Actor and Entrepreneur Jessica Alba will receive the Business Award during the October 6th PBS broadcast of the 33rd Annual Hispanic Heritage Awards. The Business Award will be presented by Nationwide, who returns as the Broadcast Sponsor of the Hispanic Heritage Awards for the third year. Alba will join music artist and activist Bad Bunny and farmworkers, who are being honored with the Vision and Heroes Awards, respectively. Additional Honorees and performers will be announced over the following weeks.

“The Hispanic Heritage Foundation is thrilled to recognize Jessica Alba with the Business Award,” said Jose Antonio Tijerino, President and CEO of HHF.  “As an international star, Jessica’s talents as an actor are obvious but as an entrepreneur and philanthropist, Jessica has made an even greater impact. She represents the vision and ganas of Latina entrepreneurs through the Honest Company as well as a role model for youth.  We are also energized to announce, for the third year, that our year-round partner Nationwide will be the Broadcast Sponsor. Thanks to Nationwide and PBS and our other sponsors, we look forward to celebrating Hispanic accomplishment, vision, and culture with all of America.”

Jessica Alba, Founder of The Honest Company and Honest Beauty, is a globally recognized business leader, entrepreneur, advocate, Golden Globe Award-nominated actress and New York Times bestselling author. Jessica gained worldwide recognition in James Cameron’s “Dark Angel,” and she has made over 25 feature films that have earned a combined box office total of over $800 million, including “Fantastic Four” and “Sin City.”  She and Gabrielle Union star in and executive produce “L.A.’s Finest,” a one-hour, action-packed drama series which will premiere all 13-episodes of its second season exclusively to Spectrum video subscribers on September 9, followed by its network broadcast premiere of season one on FOX, September 21.

Founded in 2012, The Honest Company is a mission-driven consumer products company dedicated to empowering people to live happy, healthy lives. Thoughtfully formulated, safe and effective baby, personal care and beauty products are available via honest.com, in North America at more than 26,000 retail locations, in Canada through Shoppers Drug Mart and in Europe at select Douglas and Boots retail locations.  In 2013, Jessica released her first book, the New York Times bestseller, The Honest Life, a how-to handbook based on her mission to create a natural, authentic and non-toxic life for her family.  Upcoming projects include “Parents Without Borders,” a docuseries she will host and produce for Disney+.  Jessica’s activism endeavors are extensive, and her passion for social justice, particularly for women and children, has led to several trips to Capitol Hill.  She is on the board of directors of Baby2Baby, which provides low-income children and families with diapers, clothing and basic necessities every child deserves.

“It is always an honor for Nationwide to help showcase this annual celebration of Hispanic culture, accomplishment and leadership,” said Ramon Jones, chief marketing officer at Nationwide. “This year, it will be a pleasure to present the Business Award to Jessica Alba in recognition of her tremendous entrepreneurial achievements and equally meaningful community impact.

Pharrell Williams illustrated by Rita Azar for 360 MAGAZINE

Pharrell Williams – Entrepreneur

Today, Pharrell Williams shares a new single and music video entitled “Entrepreneur” [feat. JAY-Z].

Watch the video HERE.

Get it HERE via Columbia Records.

He makes a powerful statement with the song and the accompanying visual. The video proudly features and spotlights the achievements of over a dozen black entrepreneurs. It includes Issa RaeNipsey HussleTyler, The CreatorRobert HartwellSix SevTyAnthony Davis [Founder of Vox Collegiate Junior High], Vincent Williams [Founder of Honey’s Kettle], Iddris SanduBeatrice Dixon [Founder of Honey’s Pot], Arthell Darnell Isom[Founders of D’ART Shtajio], Neighbors SkateShopAlrick AugustineDenise Woodard [Founder of Partake Cookies],Chace Infinite [Founder of Harun Coffee Shop], Chef Alisa[Founder of My Two Cents], Debbie Allen [Founder of Tribe Midwifery], Angela Richardson [Founder of PUR Home], Miss Bennett FitnessBlack and MobileTrill Paws Dog AccessoriesThird Vault Yarns, and “The First Black Valedictorian of Princeton” Nicholas Johnson. They all make cameos as title cards introduce their accomplishments. Over a slick and soulful bounce, Pharrell carries an uplifting and undeniable affirmation punctuated by his instantly recognizable high register. This anthem arrives at just the right time.

Pharrell also joined forces with TIME for a very special cover project entitled The New American Revolution. He personally curated a series of essays and conversations between Black leaders that explore America’s oppressive past and visions for a more equitable future, with perspectives from Kenya Barris, Imara Jones, Naomi Osaka, Tyler, the Creator, and more. To bring this dialogue to the forefront, he unites the likes of Yara Shahidi and Angela Davis in once-in-a-lifetime interviews. Hank Willis Thomas contributed the cover art.

About the issue, Pharrell wrote, “In assembling this project, I asked some of the most qualified people I know in every field—from Angela Davis to Tyler, the Creator, to Representative ­Barbara Lee—to talk with us, and with one another, about the way forward. I wanted to convey a vision of a future filled with the artists, creators and entrepreneurs who can fulfill the promise of this country’s principles.” 

The issue is on newsstands now.

360 Magazine, Brian Breach

QxA With Brian Breach

1. How did you first get into the entertainment/performance industry?               My journey into entertainment started off in the world of Hip Hop. I and one of my closest friends, Lex One, formed a group after high school and got the opportunity to open up for a lot of amazing hip hop artists that we looked up to while growing up. I loved being on stage performing. It’s something that’s never left me, so when I stopped doing music in 2017, I found other ways to keep my creative juices flowing. I was given the opportunity to do a TEDx Talk, then months later something I shot went viral and the combination of the two got me back on stages speaking around the country. I think even if I made it to 90 years old, I would still find ways to entertain people in my nursing home.  

 
2. What does it take to be a successful serial entrepreneur and how have you developed this/these skill(s)?
My story was a little bit different than others in the sense that my arrests in 2006 prevented me at that time from getting another 9-5 for a while, so I was in a sense thrown to the wolves and had no choice although I’ve had the entrepreneurial spirit in me long before that time. It takes a ton of discipline. Remember when you decide to become an entrepreneur, you no longer have anyone telling you what to do, what time to be somewhere, or holding you accountable. You have to be that person for yourself. Not everybody has the ability to do that. There are some people in this world that cannot function unless there’s someone micromanaging them. You have to get out of that mindset extremely quickly and get into the independent mindset ASAP! I’ve known from the first time I ever took a business class with my teacher Mr. Evans my senior year that I wanted to become an entrepreneur so I spent a lot of time researching other entrepreneurs to check out the kinda moves they were making. Once you go out on your own and leave the 9-5 world behind you adapt very quickly and start learning the do’s and don’ts. You’re going to fail very often but it’s within those failures where you learn, grow, and adjust to it. 
 
3. Have you always been passionate about comedy, and what makes sketches special in comparison to other visual content?
I’ve always had a funny bone. When I was younger my dad would whip out his video camera and we would shoot skits when I would visit him in New York. It was similar to what you would see on Saturday night live back in the days, but the bootleg version. When I got older, I started making more music. It was rare for a while that you would see me shoot skits. It wasn’t until I decided to step away from music that I felt that shooting comedic content was a natural step for me. I feel like anything that has a comedic element to it is going to draw people’s attention a lot more than If comedy wasn’t added to it. I’m no comedian but I love to make people laugh. There’s something about being able to make people laugh that gets them listening. Those are the kind of videos that people love to share because it spreads positivity around social media. 
 
4. What is/are one/two catalyst(s) that tie all of your different projects, companies, and entertainment ventures together?
If you’re talking in a broad sense, I think I would say it’s the fact that I want to do it all. I’ve never wanted to be known for one thing, so I’m constantly adding new roles to my arsenal of skills. When It’s all said and done, I don’t just want to be known for music, I don’t just want to be known for skits, I don’t just want to be known for my Tedx talk and speaking. I want to be known for everything. I want to be considered a mogul, so it motivates me to keep doing more projects, start new ventures, and get more involved in entertainment. Everything I do now is under my brand’s umbrella of Sikey, which originally started off as a clothing line and evolved into the brand that encapsulates everything. 
 
5. How and why did you decide to transition your career from focusing on performing to focusing on entrepreneurship and innovation?
Entrepreneurship was something that was consistent with me even while I was doing music. Me and my good friend/business partner at the time, Lex One, and I started an independent label called GTPS, as well as a hip hop blog. We also ended up starting GTPS printing and opened a studio in a huge warehouse. I was actually still making music at the time this was all happening so it was a balancing act between the two. My biggest transition was when I decided to quit music late 2016, early 2017 and start shooting skits, pranks, and social experiments. The main reason I moved away from music was because I just felt like I’ve done all I could do in that world. Sometimes they say giving up isn’t always a bad thing. Knowing when you’re defeated is also a victory in itself and allows you to pivot. I adjusted and adapted extremely quickly and thank God it paid off. 
 
6. What was your experience like with serving as a TED speaker and what made you choose the specific topic of “surviving without a job through failure?” 
It was actually one of the most incredible experiences of my life and has sparked so many opportunities ever since. After I was chosen out of 62 people, we spent 6 to 7 weeks rehearsing once a week. It was great to be around other speakers that helped me trim and finesses my talk a bit in order to get it right. I remember my first rehearsal, I think I spoke for well over 20 minutes when it was only supposed to be 12. I’m not going to lie, I was nervous each time even on game day, but I had a blast. On top of that, I had to pull a double duty because they asked me to do a spoken word piece to open up the entire event. I was grateful to be given double the opportunity. When I was thinking about what my topic was going to be, I thought back on all my life experiences I could possibly share with an audience and chose the one I think relates to most people these days. We’re living in this new world where social media is king and you don’t necessarily need a 9 to 5 as much anymore to survive, so I figure I would share my experience on my decade long journey without a job. 
 
7. Which topics have you chosen to discuss at conferences around the country, and why?
What was funny about this is that outside of my Tedx Talk, the first time I was asked to speak was in the Hampton’s in New York, to which I’ve never been. My boy, who asked me If I wanted to speak, also asked me what I would talk about. Most of the people that were going to be in the audience were young adults mostly in their 20’s, and I remembered that a few of my past videos had gone viral, so it popped into my head. Why not speak about “how to go viral’ and teach them some strategies to increase your video views and get more engagement. So I ended up putting together a 30-45 minute talk on how to go viral. The funny part about it is after I actually went viral I never in my life thought I would ever be speaking about how to go viral. 
 
8. How have you positively influenced your fans on social media outlets like Instagram?
First of all, I hate the term influencer because most influencers aren’t influencing anyone the right way or at all. I made a conscious decision to do my best to incorporate positivity in most of the things I do to help and motivate people. When my time is up on this earth I want to be remembered for trying my best to change people’s lives for the better. I spent a lot of time on Instagram answering questions people have in my DM’s and giving young people guidance in their own lives, so I make myself extremely accessible so they can reach out. 
 
9. What have been some of the best parts of working with multiple different radio platforms?
This last year especially has been crazy. I’ve been given the opportunity to be on a plethora of radio stations and tons of podcasts. The best part is being able to use your voice to spread positivity and make people laugh just like I do on my social media platforms. Every single time I have the chance to be on the radio, I make sure I gear it towards inspiring and motivating others. 
 
10. How and where do you plan to direct your career or influence in the near future?                                                     My main goal at the moment is to work on shooting the show I created, “America’s Gone Viral.” We were in the beginning stages of getting everything in order and then BOOM, the pandemic hit. So the concept is basically a viral competition show for up and coming comedic content creators with not so many followers. The show would also cater to content creators that want to make a career out of it and love shooting content. We’re going to select 3 or so content creator teams such as a brother and sister team, boyfriend girlfriend team, etc. We’re going to issue them viral challenges such as skits, pranks, or social experiments and allow them to shoot and edit the content themselves while showing the behind the scenes on how viral content is made. After they shoot their viral challenge, they’re going to present it to our 3 influencer judges. With everyone shooting content right now, this is the perfect time for a show like “America’s Gone Viral.” I can’t wait! Although I plan on shooting this show I’m thinking even beyond it. I want to use this show as more of a launching pad and move onto other things in entertainment. Like I said before, I’m in mogul mode and I want to do it all!
360 Magazine, Brian Breach

Baron Davis Virtual Conversation

Baron Davis Enterprises and Business Inside The Game (B.I.G.) are bringing the conversation online to continue its function as an educational and engaging platform for investors and industry experts to connect and collaborate with the mission to enrich our communities. As the world around us is quickly changing,insightful leaders look to invest in the next generation of trailblazers and create wealth and opportunity in young entrepreneurs as well as minority businesses and communities. B.I.G. has been curating thought-provoking conversations around innovation, diversity, and entrepreneurship for years and now NBA All-Star and Serial Entrepreneur Baron Davis has drafted an impressive line-up to discuss investment, education, and activism.

The four-part virtual conversation series will be moderated by Baron and will bring together successful business executives, athletes and civic leaders to engage in intimate conversations around taking the next step to invest in the future of this country and create opportunities in all communities.

June 8 at 6:30 p.m. PST▪ Part One – Put Money Where Your Mouth Is: Investing in the Future of Minority Entrepreneurso

June 15 at 6:30 p.m. PST ▪ Part Two – Sports & Culture: Athletes For Justice: A Conversation with Athletes about Prison Reform, Laws and Activismo

June 22 at 6:30 p.m. PST▪ Part Three – Education: Each One Teach One: A Discussion with Teachers, Philanthropists and Community Leaders on the Future of EdTecho

June 29 at 6:30 p.m. PST▪ Part Four – Where Is Our Hollywood: Exploring how People of Color are Portrayed in Media & How to Break Barriers to Tell Our Stories

“I believe we have a responsibility to use our voice and platform to not only encourage change but to invest in change, said Baron Davis. “Together we need to revolutionize the mindset of our communities, while leveling the playing field for entrepreneurs and leaders from all backgrounds and walks of life.”

The virtual panel will be hosted by B.I.G in collaboration with ALL Def Digital. The series will stream on our LinkedIn, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube,and Twitch channels every Monday in June at 6:30 p.m. PST.

About BUSINESS INSIDE THE GAME (B.I.G.)

B.I.G. is a series of highly curated summits, panels and immersive experiences that explore how to create an impact in social enterprise and solve real business problems. B.I.G. assembles a network of thought-leaders, industry experts, athletes, and entrepreneurs from diverse backgrounds to connect, learn, and engage in dynamic environments.

B.I.G. is a platform for entrepreneurs, investors and disruptors in sports, media, technology, business, and culture to create opportunities, connections and collaborate in a professional setting.  The summit provides accessibility and resources to experts in these fields.  The ideas that are sparked at Business Inside the Game strives to affect industries and enrich our communities.

B.I.G. was founded by two-time NBA All-Star, Serial Entrepreneur and Master Connector, Baron Davis. His vision is to create a traveling power summit that connects experts, visionaries, and entrepreneurs across multiple platforms in sports, media, technology, and finance.

Entrepreneur Of The Year

Dr. Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw is named EY World Entrepreneur Of The Year™ 2020 

Dr. Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw, Executive Chairperson of India-based Biocon Limited, was this evening named EY World Entrepreneur Of The Year™ 2020 at a ground-breaking, virtual award ceremony. Kiran was picked from among 46 award winners from 41 countries and territories vying for the world title. In the award’s 20-year history, Kiran becomes the third EY World Entrepreneur Of The Year Award winner from India. She follows former Indian world title winners Uday Kotak of Kotak Mahindra Bank (2014) and Narayana Murthy of Infosys Technologies Limited (2005). She also becomes the second woman to hold the title, following Olivia Lum of Hyflux Limited from Singapore in 2011.

Kiran, 67, founded Biocon, a bio-enzymes company, in 1978 with just two employees and $500. Since its inception, Biocon has grown to employ more than 11,000 people and become one of the strongest innovation-driven biotechnology companies in Asia with revenues of $800m for FY19. Biocon and its subsidiaries are making a lasting impact on global health care. Millions of people living with diabetes now have access to affordable insulin, while millions more who are battling cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and other debilitating diseases now have access to affordable biosimilars.

Manny Stul, Chairman and Co-CEO of Moose Toys and Chair of the EY World Entrepreneur Of The Year judging panel, says, “Kiran is an inspirational entrepreneur who demonstrates that determination, perseverance and a willingness to innovate can create long-term value. The judging panel were impressed by her ability to build and sustain growth over the past 30 years and by her integrity and passion for philanthropy that has delivered huge global impact. She has built India’s largest biopharmaceutical company on a foundation of compassionate capitalism and putting patient needs before profits.”

Dr. Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw, Executive Chairperson of Biocon Limited, says, “At its core, entrepreneurship is about solving problems. The greatest opportunities often arise at the toughest times, and that’s been my experience throughout my entrepreneurial journey. My business focus is global health care and the provision of universal access to life saving medicine; however, my responsibility as an entrepreneur is greater than simply delivering value to shareholders. Wealth creation can be a catalyst for change, and all entrepreneurs have a responsibility to the world around them and the communities in which they operate. Women also play a hugely important role in economic development, and for too long their contribution has been ignored. It’s important that we use the platform of EY World Entrepreneur Of The Year to encourage more women to participate in entrepreneurial pursuits. I’m truly honored to receive this prestigious award.”

Carmine Di Sibio, EY Global Chairman and CEO, says, “Entrepreneurs are the unstoppable visionaries who inspire innovation and fuel growth and prosperity by building remarkable companies and services. Kiran’s passion to develop low-cost, cutting-edge pharmaceutical alternatives has brought affordable health care to patient communities all around the world. Her drive to innovate has created huge growth for Biocon Limited and helped diversify the company’s portfolio of therapies for chronic diseases. Kiran is a truly inspiring EY World Entrepreneur Of The Year winner.”

Stasia Mitchell, EY Global Entrepreneurship Leader, says, “With an exceptional record in creating long-term value, Kiran’s clear vision of making a difference to the lives of millions of people around the world make her a worthy EY World Entrepreneur Of The Year winner. Her impact on improving global health access and affordability will endure for decades to come. She is a beacon for other entrepreneurs to follow.”

About Dr. Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw and Biocon Limited
A first-generation entrepreneur, Kiran graduated as a Master Brewer from a brewing school in Australia and returned to her native India in 1975 to find work as a brew master. After two years of unsuccessfully trying to overcome the hurdles of entering a male-dominated brewing industry, Kiran started Biocon Limited, producing bio-industrial enzymes in the garage of her rented house in Bengaluru, India. A year later, Biocon became the first Indian company to export enzymes to the US and Europe.

Now, Biocon and its subsidiaries are the pioneers in areas less frequented by Indian pharmaceuticals companies, including fermentation-based small molecules, human insulin and insulin analogs, biosimilars for key antibody drugs, novel therapies, and high-end contract research services. With customers in over 120 countries, the company is a world leader in biosimilars and APIs for statins, immunosuppressants and other specialty molecules. In 2014, Biocon was India’s first biotech company to go public and only the second Indian company to pass the US$1b mark on its first day of listing. The company’s market capitalization is currently over US$4b.

Biocon is also leading the way on universal access to affordable life-saving medicine. For example, in September 2019, the company announced that it would supply rh-insulin at less than US$0.10 per day (for the average 40 units of insulin required per patient per day) to low- and middle-income countries — less than a third of current rh-insulin prices. The company has supplied more than 2 billion affordable doses of biosimilar insulins to patients globally in the last 15 years.

Compassionate capitalism that addresses inequality is at the center of Kiran’s business and leadership philosophy. Founded in 2004, the Biocon Foundation provides basic health care, sanitation and early diagnosis and treatment of common cancers and non-communicable diseases to marginalized communities. Kiran has also been an angel investor for numerous successful health care startups in areas such as affordable breast cancer screening, chemotherapy determination, and low-cost warming devices for premature and low-birth-weight babies. The Mazumdar Shaw Center for Translational Research, a nonprofit research institute established by Kiran and dedicated to developing scientific breakthroughs for treating a wide range of human diseases, has also developed several advanced yet affordable cancer diagnostics. In 2016, Kiran signed The Giving Pledge, committing 75% of her wealth to philanthropy and giving back.

teyana Taylor, K.T.S.E, MSNBC, woman, black, artist, r&b, singer, woman,

Teyana Taylor on MSNBC

The coronavirus has affected many aspects of everyday life, which has prohibited many families, friends and loved ones from gathering to celebrate the millions of graduates across the country. Singer, dancer and entrepreneur Teyana Taylor released a new video entitled ‘Made It,’ which celebrates the class of 2020. Teyana Taylor joins MSNBC’s Ari Melber to discuss her motivation behind releasing the video. Taylor recounts not having a high school graduation, telling Melber “I didn’t get a chance to graduate” as she “was home schooled,” adding “I knew how it felt to not feel celebrated.” Taylor’s daughter, Junie interrupts the interview mid-way through, making her debut on MSNBC.

THE ALBUM is the long-awaited successor to K.T.S.E. (June 2018), Teyana’s second album, one of the five G.O.O.D. Music/Def Jam albums produced by Kanye West during his 2018 sojourn in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. K.T.S.E. (acronym for Keep That Same Energy) set off an 18-month chain reaction for Teyana, starting with its summertime Top 10 R&B smash “Gonna Love Me.” She performed “Gonna Love Me” (in a medley with “Rose In Harlem,” another K.T.S.E. track) on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon. Hip-hop audiences embraced the “Gonna Love Me” remix featuring Wu-Tang Clan’s Ghostface Killah, Method Man and Raekwon, whose video was directed by Teyana.

About TEYANA TAYLOR:

Being a jack of trades has allowed Teyana Taylor to become a master of all. From her smoky melodic vocals to her dynamic dance moves, the entertainer dips in dives between her talents that also include producing, songwriting, acting, directing and everything in between. When it comes to describing herself, the Harlem native can only think of one word: Everything.

“I literally can do everything. I never look at anything as being impossible,” she explains. “I exhaust all options to make what happen when I need to make happen.” Her mantra made her an early favorite to artists like Pharrell, who she signed her first deal with, and later choreographed videos for artists like Beyoncé and Jay-Z. In 2014, Teyana’s love for the arts and R&B earned her the title of the first woman signed to Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music imprint.

Between R&B’s identity crisis in the 2010s, Teyana dropped her debut album VII, with tracks like “Maybe” (featuring Yo Gotti and Pusha T) and the sultry “Just Different” shaping her musical persona. The critically acclaimed album debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart in 2014, cementing her position in today’s modern R&B field. “I fought for that raw, hood necessary R&B and now I feel like it’s better than ever,” she says.

After spicing up the R&B charts, Teyana was blessed with the arrival of her daughter Junie with husband and NBA star Iman Shumpert in 2015. “I do all of this for my baby. She’s who I do it for,” she says about Iman “Junie” Tayla Shumpert Jr., her main source of inspiration. “I always show her how to be a leader and a businesswoman. I want her to believe that she can be anything she wants to be and it not be a shocker that she’s a female doing it all.” Soon after, Teyana went on to star in the internet-breaking video for Kanye West’s “Fade,” and scored her first MTV Moonman for “Best Choreography” at the 2017 MTV Video Music Awards.

But it wasn’t until the release of her second album project K.T.S.E (released June 2018) that the world caught up with Teyana’s talents. With her all-female production company The Aunties, Teyana self-directed videos for “WTP,” the RIAA gold-selling single “Gonna Love Me,” (whose remix features Wu-Tang Clan’s Ghostface Killah, Method Man and Raekwon), and recently, “Issues/Hold On.” Teyana has also directed videos for her peers like T.I. (“You”), Monica (“Commitment”), and Lil Duval (“Pull Up” featuring Ty Dolla $ign) with fans like Ms. Lauryn Hill and Elton John praising her boss moves.

Part of what makes Teyana stand out from the rest is her ability to move with precision and poise in everything she does. From the studio to the stage, every idea is a project with the singer front and center with a vision all her own. With her musical inspirations like Aaliyah, Teena Marie, Mint Condition and Janet Jackson speaking to her soul, Teyana is aware her mission is larger than life. “I’m working on me every day and I think that’s my purpose,” she says, comparing her life to a never-ending book.

“I’m still going, still mastering and being a better me.”

Good Vibe Gliders, 360 magazine

MEET THE MASTERMIND of Good Vibe Gliders – Gabe Majalca

  1. What is your main source of passion that led to creating custom-designed artistic scooters?

I’ve always had a creative spirit that most likely stems from my mom, who was an event and party decorator. In my late teens, I worked for the costume shop at the Gaslight Theatre in Tucson, AZ. Around that same time, my dad gifted me with his 1977 El Camino Classic. I loved TV shows like Overhaulin’ and Pimp My Ride. Naturally, I started spending time customizing my El Camino with my Dad, creating custom upholstery at the costume shop. I rocked blue-tinted glasses all the time and wore my hair all funky. It was cool that I had parents who let me figure myself out in that way. I never felt impeded. But then I went to college and life changed from muscle cars to academia. While in college, my design eye flourished. My frat room was a pretty ridiculous sight to see. The room and loft resembled all the colors featured on a Buzz Lightyear. My room was Star Command, complete with black and white checkered tile, cosmic blue walls, bright orange curtains, red trimming, clouds on the roof, and of course, glow-in-the-dark stars. It was just cool.

I was always out there with the things I wanted to do, and it was cool that I found a way to do them.

  1. What motivated you to focus on scooter products rather than another form of transportation?

The reason for the electric scooter is a direct result of my experience at camping festivals. At the first-ever Good Vibe Getdown (the company name is a forever homage to this festival), I set up my camp way too far from everybody else. Although it was the most beautiful spot onsite (right on the banks of Apache Lake) it took FOREVER to walk back and forth. A bicycle wouldn’t work because you still have to exert energy and I was not about that life. So, I thought of the most effective form of transportation at a camping festival: an electric scooter. I bought an e-scooter and decorated it entirely in jewels. When we got to Good Vibe 2 that next year, I didn’t even get to ride it. It was a smashing success. I remember seeing grown men fight over the chance to ride it next. That’s when I realized, “Wow, people are loving this. No one has ever really seen anything like this before.” My Gliders are fun, exaggerated, over-the-top, extra in every way, shape, & form, and instantaneously make you the center of attention. That’s crazy. You honestly can’t help but be the center of attention when a scooter looks like that. Put a Good Vibe Glider next to a regular scooter, and the answer is simple.

Lastly, there’s an element of luck to which I give credit. It turned out to be perfect timing to start decorating scooters because no more than a year later, rideshare scooters started popping up all over my city. I didn’t start GVG because of the scooter trend. I started GVG because it helped direct my creative energy in a positive way, and soon I had a fleet and started helping my friends run their festivals more efficiently.

  1. What was the first festival where you chose to implement the gliders and why did you choose that specific one?

Good Vibe 2 is where I had my ah-ha moment, but Good Vibe 3 was full-on intentional. I designed and created one Glider for the festival coordinator and made two more Gliders for the festival attendees to glide around on. I even built a charging station in the middle of the desert so that when the batteries got low, riders would pull up and plug in their scooters. It was very cool to see my vision come to life: homies helping homies hold it down, faster, stronger, and more efficiently.

  1. How did your past design experience help you succeed in producing these Good Vibe Gliders?

As you know, I’ve always had it in me. My early work at the Gaslight Costume Shop, helping produce costumes and props was pivotal. I had great direction and instruction from two of the best designers in the business, MaryAnne and Renee. Most of my designer confidence came out of working with them.

  1. How have Festival Event staff and Coordinators reacted to their use of gliders?

Simple: they lose their freakin‘ minds. They can’t get enough of it. If they didn’t understand it before they definitely understood it after. It’s cool being the guy with the electric scooters because there are so many instances at a festival where you need to get somewhere quickly. So many situations – medical assistance, needing to find somebody or lost equipment. Other times, equipment needs to be transported long distances without access to a truck. I’ve been able to directly help those folks just by having a scooter present. There was this one stagehand at Juniper Jam who said, “Seriously, I don’t ever want to do another festival without one of these things. Can you go talk with my boss please?”

  1. Do you have any plans to expand your market for these scooters? And if so, how will you do so?

If you’d asked me this about five months ago, my answer would have been much more different. Because of the virus, the hospitality industry took a huge hit and people are definitely not riding electric scooters like they used to. These days GVG has naturally expanded into accessories. Not long after I made my first Glider did people start asking me to bedazzle and theme other stuff, as well. By no means are we leaving the bedazzled PEV market, that’s our bread and butter. However, I also consider us lucky to have an alternative direction to pivot. I’ve been pleasantly surprised at how well-received my Good Vibe Shine Goggles have been. Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award Winner George Clinton even rocks a pair.

  1. Do you work with or have any plans to work with any non-profit, community service, or charity organizations?

More than ever, we are willing to work with community and charity organizations to help make an impact on the lives of others. Last month, we sponsored a 24-hour Virtual Festival fundraiser featuring 24 DJs, 8 live artists, and 4 workshops. Our fundraiser achieved over $1,500.00.

Earlier this year, Sprinkles (the 360 Glider made by Good Vibe Gliders) lent a helping hand at the AIDS Walk Arizona 2020. My neighbor Nancy is one of the event coordinators and was amazed by Sprinkles! Right before the event, Nancy sprained her knee and was scheduled to undergo surgery the following week. She was depressed about the situation and bummed to think she wouldn’t be of much use at the event. However, once we offered her the Glider, her frown turned upside down and she killed it. She still thanks me to this day.

  1. What would you say is the greater purpose of selling these glider products?

Generating pure happiness. What’s most amazing to me is that we have a product that genuinely creates happiness in the minds of the rider. It’s something I see every time, whether the scooter belongs to you or not. The first time you sit on a Glider, the next 15 seconds of your life is bliss. You forget about absolutely everything. The rider smiles uncontrollably, scootin’ and zippin’ around, like, “oh my gosh, I totally forgot how awesome scooters are!” They are childlike once again, if only for a few moments, and that’s unbelievable to me. In every project, our goal is to produce something the customer won’t just like, but something they will love.

  1. How did you assemble your team of glider creators together?

Most of my co-creators stem from the amazing group of artists I met during the Good Vibe Getdown years. These guys & gals are creative juggernauts, powerhouses at their trade, and a driving force that can’t be stopped. I quickly realized the more I worked with other artists, the better my final product would be. Soon, other artists started taking interest. I would bring a Glider with me almost everywhere I went. Artists saw what I was doing and often would say, “Oh – you’re weird and unique; Here’s what I do, I bet we can collaborate together.” And just like that, I create friends. My products are generating work for local artists with tangible, green-in-their-pocket work. So as sales began to pick up and people started trusting the GVG brand, I could keep my artists happy based on the rate I charge my clients. Collaboration is now baked right into our business model. More so, I really like showcasing other artists. I want to show people what they can do – and if you like their work, you can work with them specifically to design yourself a custom Glider.

  1. Are these scooters just meant for festivals or are any other parties interested in buying them?

Our Gliders are made for any reason at all. We cater to large events because of our festival roots, but your Glider can be absolutely anything you want it to be. We love getting wild, so go wild! Scooters are no longer fringe transportation; people use them all the time so it’s much easier to pitch a decorated scooter to just about any industry and event. Gliders are perfect for expos, conventions, street fairs, tailgates, food trucks, personal use, business marketing, festivals & production, sports & teams, schools & clubs, weddings & gifts, restaurant & service industry, festivals & production, fairgrounds, business retreats, birthdays, schools & church, parties, etc.

On a personal note, back in November, I was married to my best friend, Addie. Our wedding was three days long, hosted at the base of the Bulldog Buttes at Saguaro Lake Guest Ranch. That place is gorgeous, and sprawling. Hands down, the most incredible weekend of my life! But I can tell you this: without a doubt, if we didn’t have the Gliders there, many things would not have worked out. The unexpected need to get from one side of the property to the other was anticipated, but little did I know these Gliders would play such a major role in getting us out of some tight situations.

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Gabe Majalca caught on our custom ebike during his wedding reception in Arizona.

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Regaining Control in Uncertain Times: Advice from a Doctor/Cancer Survivor

As a doctor and entrepreneur, I spent most of my life seeking control – obsessively studying, planning, and working to guarantee my success. That’s why I wanted to be an entrepreneur in the first place – I wanted to be my own boss, in charge of my own fate. Despite my success, in 2013, I would lose every semblance of control in my life. In 2013, I was diagnosed with cancer.

My cancer diagnosis came with many emotions: anger, anxiety, uncertainty, depression. I felt alone and hopeless, like everything I had worked so hard for suddenly didn’t matter. I just had to “wait and see” if the chemotherapy worked; how sick I would be; if I could have a family one day; if I would ever have my regular life back.

In many ways, I see similarities between the way my cancer diagnosis impacted my life and how the current Coronavirus pandemic is affecting us all. Life as you know it has suddenly stopped. You don’t know when it will return to normal, and you may feel like you have completely lost control of your life.

Even though the unknowns of cancer treatment terrified me, certain strategies gave me a “sense” of control – and often times, that was enough. I hope that you can employ these strategies in the coming days and weeks to regain control in these uncertain times.

Exercise

Although chemotherapy prevented intense workouts, simply walking regularly released feel-good endorphins in my brain, and it’s something I had control over. Similarly, a self-imposed routine may help you cope with the uncertainty of the Coronavirus pandemic. Even though gyms are closed, consider doing body-weight workouts at home, YouTube fitness tutorials, or walking/running outside.

Breathe

You can also change your breathing patterns voluntarily, resulting in various powerful effects. For example, if you feel a wave of panic approaching, try taking deeper breaths using your diaphragm, which will cause your heart rate to slow and your body to relax.

Journal

Exercise and focused breathing are two techniques that worked for me, but it’s also important to remember what activities made you feel the best. Try journaling how different activities make you feel – more/less anxious, more/less in control, etc. This way, you can continue doing things that make you feel good, even when the Coronavirus is a distant memory.

Sometimes, challenging times are the kickstart you need to pursue a better life. After my cancer diagnosis, I completely transformed my stress-filled, unhealthy lifestyle. I overcame cancer, and I owe it all to positive lifestyle changes. If you are ready to start your journey to better health, check out my book “From Doctor to Patient.”

About Dr. Diva Nagula

Dr. Diva Nagula is a board-certified osteopathic physician with extensive knowledge and training in Integrative and Functional Medicine. He was diagnosed and treated for Stage 4 non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. After several years of treatment, he remains in complete remission.
You can purchase his book here.

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New Year Resolutions for Your Small Business 

It’s that time of year again. The start of a new quarter and a new fiscal year for most companies. There is no time like now to sit down and assess what went right in 2019 and how you can improve in 2020.

Here are some common New Year’s resolutions that business owners like you can make in the coming year.

Operations

As 2020 gets underway, you should also take a closer look at your operations. Efficiency is a cost saver. Something as simple as entering receipts may be better left to your accountant or a bookkeeper. Similarly, look at what you could delegate to workers with less responsibilities. For example, you might want to leave responding to social media for your receptionist while you focus on money-making activities.

Cut Costs

Likewise, look at other ways to reduce your costs. This could involve paying down debt, an overstaffing correction, choosing a different supplier, offering your customers a discount when they pick up their orders instead of choosing free delivery or transferring certain actions to other people. Pay attention to how long each task takes and how much you are paying your staff to complete those actions. You may find that it is actually cheaper to outsource certain activities.

Marketing

Thanks to technology, the way companies market their products and services is changing. Even if your business is largely local, having a strong social media presence will help you capture and keep the attention of your customers. You may even attract new business. Look at what worked about your social media strategy in 2019 and what didn’t, as well as popular trends, such as shopping via Instagram.

Customer Service

If providing top-notch customer service has not been at the forefront of your business strategy, 2020 is the year to change that. Modern consumers expect to receive support 24 hours a day. They expect access to someone who can help at all times. Chatbots can help you provide answers or escalate issues when the office is closed, but don’t leave those tools to your website alone. Social media chatbots are just as necessary.

Focus on Retention

According to the Harvard Business Review, it costs as much as 25 times as much to attract a new customer as it does to wow existing clients into coming back. In fact, simply improving your rate of customer retention by 5 percent could increase your profitability by up to 95 percent. Start by tracking your customer churn rate so you can see how well you are doing, but remember that figure has a lag time of six to eight months.

Security

New year, new security issues. Take the time to make sure that your company, its computer systems, its customer information and its data systems are protected. Best practices are a good start. Back up your data regularly and change passwords frequently. You might also want to use data encryption, install security software or install a firewall — but these are really just scratching the surface. Adding a digital IP business security solution with features like 4K Ultra HD Resolution, Color Night Vision, PTZ dome cameras and vandal-proof cameras will help you keep eyes on your company and your property so you can prevent theft.

Small Business Resolutions for 2020

Make 2020 your company’s most successful year yet. Take the time to look at your operations and identify ways to cut costs. You may be able to increase your margins by reducing your expenses. Take a look at your marketing efforts as well. Make sure that you reach your customers where they are. Customer service and retention are important, too. Finally, take time to prevent security issues with best practices, the right software and security camera solutions. Your business will thank you.

Jessica Minh Anh
× DHL

 On February 6, 2020, Jessica Minh Anh will transform the DHL Express Gateway at John F. Kennedy airport into the world’s first ever fashion show centered around the globally sustainable supply chain. With an iconic backdrop featuring energy-efficiency fleet of aircraft, helicopter and electric cars, J Winter Fashion Show 2020 will premiere the creative fashion collections from different continents.  The highly-anticipated production follows the international successes of Jessica’s previous Fashion x Sustainability phenomena atop Hoover Dam, at the gemaSOLAR Power Plant, and aboard the Race For Water solar-wind-hydro powered vessel.

“Through this project, I want to bring an innovative mindset to sustainability initiatives,” said Jessica Minh Anh, who recently promoted upcycling in the Maldives. “Since shipping and logistics are such a critical part of the fashion industry, the show will highlight green logistics solutions, which help minimize environmental damages and reduce transport related emissions. It is very important for me to partner with a company who prioritizes the health of our planet, and I have certainly found that confidence in DHL”. 

Similar to Jessica’s history-making catwalks atop the Eiffel Tower, Grand Canyon Skywalk, and One World Trade Center, the visually impressive J Winter Fashion Show 2020 will celebrate diversity, unity, and innovation alongside fashion and sustainability. Japanese powerhouse Yumi Katsura, Peruvian celebrity artist Ani Alvarez Calderon, Vietnamese luxury brand VUNGOC&SON, and New York’s jewelry designer Cristina Sabatini alongside other participating designers focus on advanced tailoring techniques that incorporate sustainable materials and practices. The show will also include other sustainable elements such as SFI beech wood hangers by Arch & Hook and state-of-the-art Glammfire electric heaters.

“We are very excited to join forces with Jessica Minh Anh in this historic project,” said Reiner Wolfs, Vice President and General Manager, Northeast Area, DHL Express U.S. “Her original vision and powerful message of motivating the younger generation to take action for a better future align perfectly with our vision for zero emission logistics.” Other official partners, who also prioritize sustainability, include IWG’s brand Spaces, Sofitel New York, Dermalogica, Warren Tricomi, Veestro, AOFM, scheimpflüg, Cream Ridgewood, Gotham New York, Jiffy Steamer, Radisson JFK Airport, Yukie Natori, and ECHOD. 

TEDx keynote speaker and a representative of the environmentally engaged generation, Jessica Minh Anh’s passion cuts to the heart of the global challenge, making sustainable living a lifestyle choice. She is currently training like an Olympic athlete to prepare for the grand catwalk at New York’s finest Tone House, while also riding her bike to the office every morning. 

Jessica will join DHL Express U.S. top executives for the final run-through and rehearsals on January 31 and February 2, 2020 at JFK airport. A hands-on producer, Jessica will oversee both front and backstage operations, including inside aircraft setup and the process of models descending from the airplane directly onto the runway. 

J Winter Fashion Show 2020 will welcome the most influential business and government leaders, fashion designers, and national and international media. More than a modern fashion statement, Jessica’s winter spectacular with DHL will stimulate a global conversation about sustainability triggered by a unique and visually impressive experience.

Watch trailer HERE.