Posts tagged with "English"

Oh Wonder Illustration by Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

Oh Wonder Surprise Album and Video Release

Oh Wonder, the English alt-pop duo, has today released their beautiful, surprise new album, 22 Break, alongside a stunning short film accompanying the record in full. The album features their newest single, “Rollercoaster Baby,” released yesterday.

The band has also confirmed a now sold-out, global, online broadcast of their recent London show at The Albany, taking place on their YouTube on October 14th at 1pm EST. A 52-date world tour for 2022 is on sale now, following an eventful period for the unique London duo, who just scored back-to-back top 10s with 2020’s No One Else Can Wear Your Crown album, on top of 2.7 billion streams and 1.7 million adjusted album sales.

22 Break is the soundtrack to a band, and couple, almost broken – but ultimately made – by the pandemic. It’s a personal, powerfully honest account of those universal breakup themes like loneliness, inadequacy, resentment, and fears for the future, as heightened by making music from your shed in lockdown. In the pandemic’s early phases, Anthony and Josephine worked hard to fill the void created by 2020. Anthony decided to open a coffee shop in Peckham called Nola, which soon saw round-the-block queues and put many of their touring crew back in work. As they started working on new music, however, all the unspoken tensions between a pair who’d never really known a relationship outside of the band tumbled out. Ultimately, though, the album that almost ended Oh Wonder proved to be the making of them: 22 Break is a cathartic, quietly hopeful project, the light at the end of the tunnel that was Oh Wonder’s quite particular pandemic.

Not many bands can make a break-up album that culminates in them tying the knot – but then again, Oh Wonder have never been like other bands. Coming out of 22 Break and all the soul-searching that it forced them to do, Josephine and Anthony got married in August this year. Whilst their relationship now has its own space to exist outside of Nola and Oh Wonder, the duo’s crossroads period has accidentally resulted in their most profound work to date. Opening up to their fans and each other, the ‘Make or Break?’ poised by 22 Break is not so much a question as an active choice – to be as honest as possible, to move forward, and to begin a brand new chapter in the story of Oh Wonder.

OH WONDER – 2022 NORTH AMERICAN TOUR DATES:
MAY 08 2022 // HISTORY, TORONTO, ON
MAY 10 2022 // MTELUS, MONTREAL, QC
MAY 11 2022 // HOUSE OF BLUES, BOSTON, MA
MAY 13 2022 // 9.30 CLUB, WASHINGTON, D.C.
MAY 14 2022 // THEATRE OF LIVING ARTS (TLA), PHILADELPHIA, PA
MAY 15 2022 // BROOKLYN STEEL, BROOKLYN, NY
MAY 17 2022 // THE VIC THEATRE, CHICAGO, IL
MAY 18 2022 // FIRST THEATRE, MINNEAPOLIS, MN
MAY 20 2022 // OGDEN THEATRE, DENVER, CO
MAY 21 2022 // THE DEPOT, SALT LAKE CITY, UT
MAY 23 2022 // SHOWBOX SODO, SEATTLE, WA
MAY 24 2022 // VOGUE THEATER, VANCOUVER, BC
MAY 25 2022 // ROSELAND THEATER, PORTLAND, OR
MAY 28 2022 // FOX THEATER, OAKLAND, CA
MAY 29 2022 // HOUSE OF BLUES, ANAHEIM, CA
MAY 31 2022 // THE WILTERN, LOS ANGELES, CA

BESITO BIA Album Art for use by 360 magazine

BIA × G HERBO

BIA RELEASES NEW SONG AND MUSIC VIDEO BESITO FEAT. G HERBO

Multi-platinum-certified Boston-born and Los Angeles-based artist BIA released her new song and music video “Besito” featuring Chicago rapper G Herbo.

Besito” is a track that features BIA’s signature sound and distinctive voice, with her usual girl empowerment theme, encouraging her female listeners to think they’re all that because they are, as she exposes her accomplishments to inspire girls and women while motivating them to never settle.

This time around, BIA opted to give us a deeper look into her universe as an Afro-Puerto Rican and Italian artist raised in Massachusetts switching from Spanish to English with sharp and witty verses in a new, contemporary hip-hop style that reflects how global her music is.

Meanwhile, in the music video, directed by Nigerian-born, British director Daps, we see BIA basking in Puerto Rico, the land of her grandparents, interacting with the people, embracing the culture, and enjoying the idyllic beaches, while looking strong and confident, aligned with the message of “Besito.”

“Besito” featuring G Herbo comes after “Whole Lotta Money Remix” featuring Nicki Minaj. The remix, which has garnered 18 million views on YouTube, came to be after Minaj fell in love with BIA’s “fresh” hip-hop and wanted to jump on the track. The original song became a viral sensation thanks to TikTok with over 275,000 streams on the platform and attracting star support from Cardi BKylie JennerKendall JennerLizzoLil Nas X, and many more.

Premiering today is also the Savage X Fenty Show Vol. 3 where BIA is one of Rihanna’s special guests performing at the event. The iconic fashion show was filmed at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel & Suites in downtown Los Angeles, and it’s available exclusively on Amazon Prime Video. BIA will be wearing a very bright set that matches her fun and vibrant personality that will be available for purchase after the show, and her act will not only catch your attention, but leave you wanting more.

Presave For Certain Deluxe Album here.

BIA is currently on tour as Don Toliver’s special guest.

Tour Dates:

Sept. 24 – Milwaukee, WI

Sept. 25 – Chicago, IL

Sept. 28 – Cleveland, OH

Sept. 29 – Detroit, MI

Oct. 2 – New York City, NY

Oct. 3 – Montclair, NJ

Oct. 4 – Boston, MA

Oct. 6 – Wallingford, CT

Oct. 7 – Philadelphia, PA

Oct. 8 –  Brooklyn, NY

Oct. 10 – Washington, D.C.

Oct. 12 –  Raleigh, NC

Oct. 13 – Charlotte, NC

Oct. 15 – Miami, FL

Oct. 17 – Atlanta, GA

Oct. 20 – Houston, TX

Oct. 22 – Dallas, TX

Oct. 24 – Denver, CO

Oct. 25 – Salt Lake City, UT

Oct. 27 – San Francisco, CA

Oct. 28 – Oakland, CA

Oct. 30 – Los Angeles, CA

Oct. 31 – Los Angeles, CA

Festival Performances:

Oct. 29 – Rolling Loud New York

Nov. 12 – Day N Vegas Festival

Dec. 10 – Rolling Loud California Festival

ABOUT BIA

Multi-Platinum Recording Artist BIA is known for music that possesses both biting wit and boldly authentic swag that stems from BIA’s years traveling through the Boston rap scene, later moving over to Miami, Los Angeles, and then taking over the world. With every mixtape, collaboration, and guest appearance, BIA has only amplified her reach. She dominated 2020 with a fresh new perspective: she inked a deal with Epic Records, dropped the hard-hitting “Free BIA (1st Day Out)” and the intoxicating “COVERGIRL”, as well as dove further into the fashion world with a feature in Good American’s Spring 2020 campaign and Missguided x Sean John Fall 2020 capsule collection.

By the end of 2020, she dropped her For Certain EP, armed with the hit single “Whole Lotta Money” — a song with a central message that unlimited currency can be both mental and physical. The EP reached the Top 10 of Billboard’s Heatseekers Album Charts, and “Whole Lotta Money” became an undeniable force, due in part to its continuous viral success on TikTok. The track has jumped right off the platform and into streaming stardom, marking its territory in the Spotify Viral 50 Chart as well as the Global Spotify Charts and earning her a nomination for “Best Breakthrough Song” at the 2021 MTV VMAs. In addition, BIA’s reimagined version of her hit song “Skate” was featured in the 2021 Stanley Cup Playoffs tune-in promos on NHLNetwork, NBC and NBCSN in the U.S., Sportsnet and TVA Sports in Canada, and across the NHL’s social and digital platforms.

Image via Dreweatts for 360 Magazine

Dreweatts Auctions Off British Treasures

A TREASURE TROVE OF BRITISH HISTORY

CONTENTS OF WESTON HALL FAMILY SEAT OF THE SITWELLS FOR 300 YEARS TO BE OFFERED AT AUCTION

Dreweatts is delighted to have been appointed to sell the contents of Weston Hall in Northamptonshire, a seat of the illustrious Sitwell family since the early 20th century and their ancestors since the 18th century. This spectacular sale charts the history of an eminent family of esteemed writers, eccentrics, pioneers and creatives through the centuries. Weston Hall was also the family home of journalist and renowned food critic and MasterChef judge William Sitwell. The sale, titled Weston Hall and the Sitwells: A Family Legacy, offers a once in a lifetime’s chance to capture a piece of literary history the like of which has not been seen on the market for some time. It will take place at Dreweatts on Tuesday, November 16, 2021.

Amongst the maze of principle rooms and nine attics at Weston Hall lay untold stories and exciting finds. From a Tiepolo drawing discovered in the safe, to clothes and jewels that adorned the writer Dame Edith Sitwell, known for shocking society with her eccentric behaviour and fashion sense, during the infamous era of the Bright Young Things.

From Weston Hall’s 18th century library are wonderful tomes, comprising works by this unique literary family, amongst primary editions by other great writers, such as Milton, that would satisfy any bibliophile. Art works and photographs by some of the greats, such as Thomas Lawrence and Cecil Beaton offer us a pictorial history of the Sitwell family and their ancestors and transport us through the history of England from the 1700s to modern-day. The Sitwell family were the subject of a critically acclaimed exhibition at The National Portrait Gallery in 1994, titled: The Sitwells and the Arts of the 1920s and 1930s and many of the exhibited works will be offered in the sale.

WESTON HALL – A TREASURE TROVE

As some parts of the house were untouched since various generations of the family left, it has been a treasure trove of exciting discoveries that tell their own story of Weston Hall, alongside the people who occupied it and their passions for collecting, writing and creating. Weston Hall is a veritable time capsule of British history, with its 18th-century library, 19th-century Justice Room and Victorian conservatory. William Sitwell, who continues the family’s literary legacy, relays in his first manuscript of his proposed new book, that gathering the contents of Weston Hall together for this sale, took him on a wonderful journey of discovery, exploring, even, rooms he hadn’t ventured into before.

Commenting on the sale, William Sitwell said, This sale offers countless individuals and collectors the chance to own items and collections that are part of the fabric of English history. It’s extraordinarily diverse, representing the wide interests and experiences of my family and our ancestors. After the sadness of leaving Weston it will be heart-warming to think that works of art and furniture, which are like so many close friends to myself and my family, will find new homes and become part of new, wonderful collections.

Joe Robinson, Head of House Sales at Dreweatts on taking up the mammoth challenge of cataloguing the works, said, Weston Hall was a fascinating encapsulation of not just the Sitwell family history, but also the social history of Britain over the last few centuries. With the extensive collection of works having been preserved in the house for so long, it has been thrilling to go on a journey of discovery with the family, to uncover so many hidden treasures with such wonderful provenance. The stories behind the works truly enrich the pieces and when you purchase a work from this sale, you know you are buying a true piece of history.

DISCOVERIES

One such discovery was of Dame Edith Sitwell’s clothes in the attic, which are included in the sale, alongside some of Edith Sitwell’s jewellery. A large rusty old trunk in one of the house’s attics revealed love letters from several women, to a married soldier in the 1800s, believed to be Colonel Henry Hely-Hutchinson, who had lived at Weston Hall with his wife Harriet Wrightson. The Colonel had a romantic affair with Napoleon’s younger sister Pauline Borghese (1780-1825), who sent love tokens to him, which were found in the house, including a fan and a pair of kid skin gloves in a walnut shell. Having fought at the Battle of Waterloo, it seems strange for the Colonel to consort with ‘the enemy’, but William Sitwell explains that history shows us that this was actually not unusual and that it was even considered appropriate on occasion to dine with the enemy before a battle! Among the Colonel’s other great love affairs was one with a Countess from one of the wealthiest families in Poland. He must have made quite an impact, as on her death she left her entire estate to him.

Amongst other wonderful finds in the house is a series of books from the 17th to the 18th centuries that have their own place in the library at Weston Hall throughout the centuries. It is comprised of recipes for both cooking and ailments, as well as general tips for maintaining a home. Each lady of the house from the 18th century onwards added their own personal tips and recipes to help the next.

While some of the personal items have been saved as keepsakes to pass on to future generations, this unique sale will offer a wonderful opportunity to purchase many spectacular works by important artists that have been in the same family collection for many years, as well as exquisite furniture, ceramics, silver and textiles amongst other objects that have never come to market.

While stories abound, one particular story involves a burr walnut William and Mary style cabinet-on-chest with fitted interiors. William Sitwell and his mother relay the tale of how Susanna Jennens, who was the first of the Sitwell ancestors to occupy the house in the 1740s, had a dream that was so vivid, she wrote it down. In the dream Susanna recounted receiving a note to say that her sister had suddenly died. The note mentioned a secret drawer in the cabinet that had some valuable jewellery hidden in it. Susanna popped the note into a bedside drawer, recounting the strange dream to a friend a few days later, then forgetting about it. Two years later Susanna did indeed receive a note to say that her sister had died. Her friend reminded her of her dream and they immediately set about finding the secret drawer in the cabinet, unsure if it really existed. Eventually they found it and sure enough tucked away inside were some valuable jewels. The cabinet still features Susanna’s note in the drawer and will be offered in the sale with an estimate of £2,000-£3,000.

Also worthy of note is an ebonised oak four-poster bed incorporating decorative George III needle work hangings. The stunning crewel needlework, carried out by Susanna Jennens, was popular in the 17th and 18th centuries and is a technique that is over a thousand years old. This bed comprises a spectacular example of the craft, with detailed floral sprays and a basket of flowers on the headboard. Highly decorative, the bed has ribbon-tied floral drapes and a tester with twin columns, which is joined by a ribbon-tied swag, as well as an ornate pelmet and valance in crewel work needlework. The needlework was carried out by Mrs Jennens in the 18th century and comprised a full suite of furniture for the room. In the 19th century Georgia, Lady Sitwell used the curtains, also in the same crewel work, to cover a set of chairs that adorned the room. The impressive bed was housed in a bedroom particularly favoured by Dame Edith Sitwell on her visits.

William Sitwell tells us that according to the family, It was on the grand bed that Edith Sitwell could be found, while visiting the family at Weston Hall. She would sit regally in bed propped up by so many pillows, her head adorned by some sort of turban and on a blue tray (still in the family), she would write her poetry. The bed will be offered in the sale and carries an estimate of £8,000-£12,000. The set of six George III side chairs with fluted legs are estimated to fetch £5,000-£8,000.

As well as being quite an eccentric character, Edith Sitwell was known for her bohemian dress sense. Described by her brother Sacheverell Sitwell as an altar on the move, she often wore flowing gowns and hats, feathers and multiple rings. William Sitwell tells us about an entry in Noel Coward’s diary describing an incident where, while on a visit to Weston Hall, Edith went missing after lunch. A search party was set up to look for her and she was eventually found amongst the cabbages! Noel Coward commented, she couldn’t see where she was going on account of her hat! One of her favourite hats is being offered in the sale, this is the famous hat she wore during a sitting with Cecil Beaton. A statement feather trimmed hat in Christian Dior style, which dates from the 1960s and is estimated to fetch £30-£50.

There are several pieces of Dame Edith’s clothing and jewellery in the sale, including a plush gown that she wore to the premiere of the musical My Fair Lady in 1965. She attended the event with her nephew, Francis Sitwell and Francis recounted that her outfit and demeanour made such an impression that the press spent more time gawping at her than they did at the cast of the film! The silk brocade dress in black, pink and green carries a conservative estimate of £80-£100.

Among Edith’s jewellery in the sale is a carved fluorite dress ring featuring two mythical beasts, described by The National Portrait Gallery in the 1994 exhibition titled, The Sitwells and the Arts of the 1920s and 1930s, as of 19th century Chinese workmanship and is believed to have been in Edith’s possession by 1950. It is estimated to fetch £800-£1,200. A selection of eight 19th century Chinese gilt-copper mounted semi-precious stone and jadeite brooches, converted from buckles are believed to have been brought back from China as a gift, by Edith’s brother Osbert Sitwell in 1934. The group is estimated to fetch £3,000-£4,000.

Among important art works in the sale is an important old master drawing by one of the greatest decorative painters of eighteenth-century Europe, the Italian artist Giovanni Batista Tiepolo (1696-1770). The work features Punchinello, the hook-nosed, humpbacked clowns who were one of the stock characters taken from the Commedia dell’ Arte, an early form of professional theatre, which began in Italy in the 16th century and became popular across Europe. The character fascinated Tiepolo and he returned to the subject throughout his long career, depicting them gluttonous, preparing food, overeating, drinking, passing out from inebriation and suffering the digestive consequences of excessive consumption. They were inspired by the Venerdì Gnocolar, a tradition in Verona on the last Friday of Carnival, where gnocchi, wine and polenta is given out to the crowds in the main square by Papà del Gnoco.

The drawing was purchased by the Sitwell’s at the Henry Oppenheimer sale of Old Master Drawings at Christie’s in 1936 and has remained in the family collection ever since. It was recently rediscovered in one of the safes at Weston Hall. It is estimated to fetch £150,000-£200,000.

Amongst other works, is Nativity Scene in a Mountainous Landscape, after Poussin. The work is in oil on canvas and is estimated to fetch £3,000-£4,000. The sale includes several works by the Italian painter Gino Severini (1883-1996), including the design for a dust jacket for the book Cyder Feast, published in 1927 and one of over 50 volumes of poetry and 50 works on art, music, architecture and travel, written by Sacheverell Sitwell. In pen and wash and signed lower centre, the design has an estimate of £6,000-£8,000.

FAMILY PERSONALITIES CAPTURED IN PORTRAITS

The sale will also feature an array of portraits of the Sitwell family’s ancestors through the centuries, by important artists. These include an oil portrait of Anne, Lady Blencowe (1656-1718) seated and holding a spray of orange blossom. From the circle of Sir Godfrey Kneller (1646-1723), it is estimated to fetch £2,000-£3,000. Lady Blencowe was Susanna Jennens’ mother and it was she who wrote the first recipe book, which would remain in the library at Weston Hall for centuries. The book was rediscovered by Georgia Sitwell on her move to Weston Hall and it was published in 1925, 200 years after Lady Blencowe ‘s death.

A portrait of Colonel Hely-Hutchinson in a brown suit, in oil on canvas, is by the British Pre-Raphaelite painter Valentine Prinsep (1838-1904). A close friend of John Everett Millais and Burne-Jones Valentine Prinsep’s work was much admired and he exhibited annually at the Royal Academy. The portrait has an estimate of £300-£500. A portrait of Richard Jennens (1709-1773), Susanna Jennens’ son is by important English portrait painter John Vanderbank (1694-1739) and is estimated to fetch £4,000-£6,000.

A portrait of Arthur Barnardiston (1685-1737) from the Jennens side of the family and formerly in the family estate of Brightwell, is by English portrait painter John Vanderbank (1694-1739). In oil on canvas, it is inscribed with the name and date of death of the sitter and is estimated to fetch £2,000-£3,000. Vanderbank was known for using rich pigmentation in the skin of his subjects, where pink tones were painted thinly over the cooler greys of the ground layer, to suggest light on the skin. His colour transitions are reminiscent of Rubens and very distinctive.

A painting of the Princess of Wales (1683-1737) and her daughter in the sale, was given as a gift to Lady Glenbervie, the mother-in-law of Harriet Wrightson (who inherited Weston Hall). Lady Glenbervie was lady-in-waiting to the Princess of Wales, who later became Queen Caroline, as the wife of King George IV. The portrait, painted by an Italian-English artist Maria Cosway (1760-1838) was not well-received by Caroline and she reportedly asked her lover, the painter Thomas Lawrence (1769-1830), to repaint her face.

Thomas Lawrence was very popular at the time, for creating colourful portraits in vivid colours against landscape backdrops. The painting was given as a parting gift from the Queen, to Lady Glenbervie, when Lord Glenbervie was leaving to become Governor of Cape Town, a post he eventually declined. The work is estimated to fetch £2,000-£3,000. Another portrait by Lawrence in the sale is of Harriet Wrightson’s father-in-law, the Rt. Hon. Sylvester Douglas, later Baron Glenbervie of Kincardine (1743-1823). He was a British lawyer, politician and Chief Secretary for Ireland between 1793 and 1794. He was also a famous diarist, recording everything from travel notes, to political gossip and anecdotes full of scandal and intrigue. Lord and Lady Glenbervie lost their son Frederick Sylvester North Douglas (1791-1819) at aged 28, only a few months after he married Harriet Wrightson. The portrait is estimated to fetch £60,000-£100,000.

There are many portraits of Sacheverell Sitwell by a range of artists in the sale, including a work by Percy Wyndham Lewis (1882-1957), which is estimated to fetch £6,000-£8,000. Lewis was close to the Sitwells for some time, until his hopes of being sponsored by them were dashed, which caused him to criticise their artistic abilities in public. Before this happened, he produced several works of family members, some of which are included in this sale and one of Edith Sitwell, which is on exhibition at the Tate, London.

As well as a superb selection of fine art, this extensive sale, which is described as a living museum of British history, also includes Chinese works from several periods, decorative arts, furniture, ceramics, silver, militaria, period clothes and textiles, jewellery, toys, including a charming rocking horse and an extensive collection of books from Weston Hall’s 18th century library. However, perhaps one of the most unusual items, is a Victorian Brougham carriage painted in blue and black, with a cream trimming to its interior. Built in 1857 and having been carefully restored by the family, it is estimated to fetch £10,000-£15,000.

The current generation of the Sitwell family tried hard to keep Weston Hall going, however after many initiatives, such as supper clubs, AirBnB hosting and guided tours, it wasn’t to be and it was finally sold last year after being a family seat for more than 300 years.

Find out more articles on car maintenance, such as classic car maintenance, car buying tips, and easy ways to maintain your car

Heavenly Reyna photograph by Jeanne Dee from James Steers, Press Here Publicity for use by 360 Magazine

Heavenly Reyna Releases Acoustic Version of Upcoming Single “EXIT”

Pop prodigy Heavenly Reyna has released the stripped-down, piano-driven version of her anticipated upcoming single “EXIT.” Press here to listen to the acoustic track, a quirky, pop-infused ballad which compares the pain of heartbreak to the agony of LA traffic. The accompanying video finds Heavenly with nothing but a piano as she reflects on the anguish left behind in the wake of a breakup. Press here to watch the “EXIT” acoustic video.

“As a trilingual artist, I love global stories that we can all relate to,” says Heavenly. “I’ve grown really fast on Twitch and ‘EXIT’ has always been one of my most popular songs there because everyone can relate to heartbreak and agonizing traffic. I like the juxtaposition of comparing a breakup to traffic as it adds a twist to the song.”

Heavenly celebrated the release of the acoustic version of “EXIT” with a special Twitch livestreamed release party which Twitch promoted on their front page. In addition to performances during the livestream, Heavenly partnered with Røde Microphone to host a giveaway for viewers that tuned in. Press here to view their Twitch channel.

Readying to step into her own, and previously releasing music under the moniker Mozart, “EXIT” marks Heavenly’s first release under her birth name. A prolific singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist, Heavenly has brought together her love of music and her diverse experiences into her songs including her previous single “Push You Harder,” an inspiring, female empowerment anthem about succeeding in the face of adversity which received acclaim from LA Weekly, Celeb Secrets, and Pasadena WeeklyPress here to watch the music video for the track which was written shortly after Heavenly’s 17th birthday and draws inspiration from strong women throughout history.

Raised in 48 countries as her family travelled the globe and documented their adventures as travel bloggers, Heavenly shared her experiences of how these ventures played an influential role in her life in a 2016 TED Talk. Using her music as a cultural bridge to bring people together through relatable storytelling that transcends individual cultures, Heavenly is fluent and crafts songs in English, Mandarin Chinese, and Spanish. She has gone viral on TikTok for performing covers of popular songs in a multitude of different languages, recently catapulted to over two million channel views on Twitch after becoming a partner, and headlined shows on her European solo tour.

Since kicking off her musical career as a teenager, Heavenly featured next to Ariana Grande in her “God is a Woman” music video, appeared on MTV songwriting with Bebe Rexha, was a featured singer in both Halsey’s and Lindsey Stirling’s documentaries, starred in in the Brat series The Talent Show, and was crowned the winner of the International Songwriting and Unsigned Artist competitions. Taking her talents into the world of acting, Heavenly also won a Best Actress Award for her dramatic lead in the film Rose, and recently starred in two new thrillers, Fame at a Deadly Cost and Glass Darkly.

Follow Heavenly Reyna

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Photo via Lucas Jones of Polity Press for use by 360 Magazine

Q&A WITH AUTHOR DAVID THEO GOLDBERG

A pervasive sense has taken hold that any and all of us are under suspicion and surveillance, walking on a tightrope, a step away from erasure of rights or security. Nothing new for many long-targeted populations, it is now surfacing as a broad social sensibility, ramped up by environmental crisis and pandemic wreckage. We have come to live in proliferating dread, even of dread itself.

In this brilliant analysis of the nature, origins, and implications of this gnawing feeling, author David Theo Goldberg exposes tracking capitalism as the operating system at the root of dread. In contrast to surveillance, which requires labor-intensive analysis of people’s actions and communications, tracking strips back to the fundamental mapping of our movements, networks, and all traces of our digitally mediated lives. A simultaneous tearing of the social fabric – festering culture wars, the erosion of truth, even “civil war” itself – frays the seams of the sociality and solidarity needed to counter this transformation of people into harvestable, expendable data.

This searing commentary offers a critical apparatus for interrogating the politics of our time, arguing that we need not just a politics of refusal and resistance, but a creative politics to counter the social life of dread.

David Theo Goldberg is Director of the University of California Humanities Research Institute.

Interview by: Heather Skovlund-Reibsamen

To begin, when did you realize that you first wanted to be a writer?

Quite young. I liked to write as a teenager, fifteen or sixteen, won a prize at high school for English writing. Looking back, I was not nearly as compelling as I fantasized. In training to be an academic I started attending closely to my technical writing. While at graduate school in New York I was involved in making independent films and music videos. I co-wrote the outline and voice-over text for an experimental film on apartheid South Africa which I also co-directed. The film won some international film festival awards. My early published academic writing was dense. I worked hard at getting myself to be clearer, cleaner, more concise. Like all art, writing requires endless attention to its detail, rhythm, flow.

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

I have a couple. I lap swim quite seriously early every morning. When I am struggling with an idea, or even to articulate a sentence, the quiet solitude of pulling through water on one’s own unbothered by anything around often leads one, or even a whole sentence or two. The challenge, of course, is to recall accurately   enough what I thought so great to be able to write it down at swim’s end. Until injuries caught up with me a few years ago I surfed extensively, and for many decades. I would travel to some surf spots further afield as much to be able, between surfs, to write uninterrupted by day-work at home as to enjoy the great surf and culture at hand.

When I have things pouring out of me and I am writing fast I tend to plug into fast jazz. The likes of the great Cuban jazz pianist Gonzalo Rubalcaba or Japanese pianist Hiromi. Or the big band Snarky Puppy, with Hammond organist Cory Henry, who are fun. Writing has rhythms and I hope some of the music has rubbed off in my writing. There are times, nevertheless, when I like to write in silence, completely alone with my own thoughts.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

It depends on the book: I usually read extensively regarding the subject matter until I feel saturated and an argument thread for the book is mostly in place. Jacques Derrida, the great French philosopher, was once asked by the documentary filmmaker, Amy Ziering, if he had read all the books in his enormous personal library. “I have read only four,” Derrida responded. He then added, the crease of a smile at the corners of his mouth, “But I have read them very well.” The challenge is to read whatever one is engaging to find insights and ideas with which one can think.

I also find it thought-provoking to observe cultural, technological, political and economic trends and changes at work around us. My writing itself is as much an unfolding of the argument line, often enough surprising me in the writing, through where the writing takes me.

Edward Said, the great intellectual of the late twentieth century, wrote a book, Beginnings, which is about how challenging it can be to open a book, to write the first sentences. But also how to end, to bring it to a close in ways that will linger with the reader. Whether creative or analytic writing, not that it is always easy to distinguish the two. Said’s book has stuck with me through much of my writing career.

How many books have you written? Which is your favorite?

Ten sole or co-authored monographs; another ten edited or co-edited books. Naming a favorite, especially publicly, is like saying who among your children are your best ones. Tough to do. There are two books that stick out because they have both expressed key developments in my thinking and have been impactful in scholarly debates around these questions.

The first is The Racial State (2002), about how the modern state since the 17th century was founded on racial structures, structuring into its very formation the elevation of Europeans/those of European descent at the expense of all others. Obviously these structures transformed over time, and from one place to another,  but the driving principle has largely remained in place. The key argument is that modern states become modern by taking on the technologies of race as structuring mechanisms.

The second is The Threat of Race: Reflections on Racial Neoliberalism (2009). This book traces the ways the neoliberalizing of polities globally—the financialization of everything; the divorcing of contemporary social, economic, and political conditions from the historical forces that produced them; the complete personalizing of responsibility for one’s standing and experience in society, no matter the social structures and challenges one has faced–has sought to empty the concept of racism and its affiliated racial conceptions of any critical charge or meaning.  The conservative attacks we are currently witnessing on critical race theory have their foundations in this neoliberalizing turn starting in the 1980s. Conservatives of this stripe find discussions, analysis, and engagement of racial issues threatening precisely because they challenge their view of the world.

What inspired you to write Dread: Facing Futureless Futures?

In 2016 family, friends, and colleagues were waking up each day with a sense of anxiety, some calling it a sense of doom. The rise in authoritarianism here in the U.S. but also across a widening range of societies was in part fueling this sense. I was feeling it too. I started by trying to put my finger on what this feeling was, what it amounted to, to name it. “Dread” was the concept I came up with to best express this sense. When I mentioned it aloud, others would exclaim, “That’s it!” What followed was the urge to write a book exploring the underlying conditions prompting this generalized sense, and the implications.

What is the significance of the title?

Dread is a socially produced pervasive anxiety the basic cause(s) of which it is difficult fully to identify. Like Kierkegaard in the 19th century, I contrast dread with fear. Fear is a feeling the object of which one can usually identify, name concretely. The object of dread is a feeling of anxiety and unsettlement the sources of which I cannot concretely or precisely articulate.

“Facing Futureless Futures,” the subtitle, speaks to the ways in which we have created or collectively allowed to be created social conditions that threaten our very wellbeing, if not existence. That some are talking about “the sixth extinction” exactly expresses this heightening anxiety about the survival not just of lifestyle but of life, of the world that supports life itself.

Can you tell us about the book?

I wanted to account for the conditions prompting this pervasive sense of dread, of uncontainable anxiety. The authoritarianisms that seemed to be taking hold, the unhinged statements and expressions struck me as symptomatic of something deeper, structurally more pervasive and difficult to address. So I was concerned to string together an analysis of those conditions, to offer a language of analysis for what is happening to us, what we are doing to ourselves and over which we think we have little if any control.

These include the pervasive emergence of algorithmic culture, the ways algorithms are structured increasingly into and order our everyday activities, the overwhelmingly instrumentalist mode of thinking it insists upon, often in increasingly intrusive ways (the “internet of everything”). This pervades not just how we order consumer goods, how we invest, how we learn at school and college but how we run our homes and businesses, increasingly how cars drive, how and with whom we interact, how we relate to each other, indeed, the quickening pace of worker and work function replacement by robots. Everything we do when electronically connected is now being tracked—where we go, who we interact with, what we consume, how we vote, our medical conditions, our work habits, everything! And that in turn becomes the basis for shaping and reshaping our desires but also the (narrowing of) possibilities presented to each of us.

Increasingly, chips are being inserted into human beings, for a variety of purposes, from medical reasons to consumption accessibility (we are in the early process of being turned into walking credit cards), to tracking productivity, and government control. The digital is transforming the very nature of the human into the techno-human.

The anxiety all this is producing, consciously or not, includes the sense of lost privacy and transparency, depersonalized desire, and undermined self-control. This is readily exacerbated by events and even structures over which we take ourselves to have little or any control, like the pandemic and the impacts of climate change, the conditions for the production of both of which have been dramatically over-politicized. And all of this has laced through it structurally produced differentiations of class, race, and gender, further intensifying the concerns. The outcome of all of this, I suggest, is the ramping up of “civil war,” less conventionally understood than as more or less violent contestations over how we should all be living in the world.

Did you learn anything while writing the book?

One cannot address a dominant set of social concerns without first understanding it. The given is not indelibly cemented into place. What looks like natural conditions is often, at the very least, socially arranged. That means what we have made with debilitating effect we can unmake.

Above all, this invites a relational mode of analysis. It involves seeing—in the sense of looking at the world—in its deeply relational constitution. What we do in one place both affects and is affected by what others are doing elsewhere. Like the weather, environmental impacts and pandemics know no national boundaries or borders. Tracking is at once individually isolating and, less visibly, deeply relational. Racial ideas circulate globally, even if taken up and expressed differently in one place from another, just as racisms in one place are shored up and sustained by racisms elsewhere. For example, critical race theory was originally formulated and fashioned in American law schools but both its application and of late its facile condemnation have been taken up as far afield as Britain, France, and Australia.

And second, I found myself reaching a more hopeful conclusion, if not ending. I suggest that those societies that have taken seriously infrastructures of care for members of the society at large are far better able to address collective challenges such as pandemics and the impacts of climate change, or indeed racisms, at least in principle. Societies that fared better in quickly addressing the pandemic and saving their populations from rampant infection and death have been those that have invested more readily and enduringly in social infrastructures of care.

What is the purpose of the book?

To elaborate an analysis and vocabulary for understanding the debilitating social and ecological conditions we have created and face, and how we might address the challenges in creatively relational ways.

What are you wanting your readers to take away from the material?

Three insights: that we have created a world that in all it gives us is undermining the very conditions of possibility for sustaining those affordances; that the technological apparatuses so completely transforming our worlds and who we are in them,    especially tracking technologies, enable possibilities not previously available. But at the very same time they have proved debilitating, socially, ecologically, and increasingly politically; that a completely self-regarding disposition to the world, individually and nationally, is in stark contrast with one that recognizes our deeply relational condition socio-ecologically; the deeply relational ways in which socio-ecological worlds are constituted become key to addressing the challenges we are facing interactively.

What were the key challenges you faced when writing this book?

The conditions unfolding across the world were transforming remarkably quickly. The pandemic took hold in the middle of writing the book, shutting down much of what we had taken for granted. It revealed deep socio-economic  disparities, racially indexed, exacerbating the impacts.  These were further ramified by the George Floyd murder, among others, and the protests that followed. While I was already lacing racial analysis into the analytic contours of the book, the series of police killings and protests as well as the attacks on Asians, especially women, needed to be referenced. Nor could one write a book about dread without addressing the pandemic. So I added a chapter devoted to Covid and its social impacts and implications pretty much in situ.

What was the highlight of writing this book?

Being in sustained conversation with close intellectual friends and colleagues about the range of conditions I address in the book. This was especially productive and meaningful given our extended collective remoteness as a pandemic consequence. But also, because I was thinking and writing in the midst of an unfolding of the very conditions which I was addressing.

Is there anything that you would like to add for the readers?

The world we have inherited and from which we make ourselves today has furnished us with extraordinary possibility. But in being less mindful of the cumulative impacts of the many generations of this making we have just begun to understand that our world also is in advanced process of radically undermining the conditions making its enduring sustainability possible. The book is about our present circumstances with a view to understanding some of what it will take to have futures to which to look forward. I very much hope it is read in this spirit.

Filmstrip illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Best Places to Live × Work

The Best Places to Live and Work Abroad in 2021—InternationalLiving.com

While just about every country is willing to provide a tourist visa that lets visitors hang around for a few months, most will not grant permission to live and work within their borders without a job offer from a local employer. Some offer long-term residence visas that let expats legally live in the country, but they don’t typically allow for work. A new report from the editors at International Living highlights four countries where it’s possible to find easy access to a residence visa—and the permits that allow for work as well.

Source: International Living

It’s clear that an increasing number of Americans want a different life and are looking for countries where they can live and work legally. But the options are limited without a local employer willing to provide a job.

Expats able to earn from anywhere do have a few good options, however, according to International Living’s report. While a small collection of countries welcomes outsiders, who can qualify for the necessary visas, four in Latin America and Europe stand out as the best options in terms of cost, ease, and timing.

Panama

If your goal is to live and work remotely overseas, but remain close to U.S. borders, Panama is your best bet. Direct flights land in Panama City from at least nine U.S. cities and take between three and seven hours, depending on where you’re coming from.

Beyond proximity, Panama offers what it calls the Panama Friendly Nations Visa, a special program whereby nationals of certain countries (including the U.S. and Canada) can apply for permanent residence, which comes with a Panamanian cédula, the local ID card. That cédula is permanent, allowing holders to come and go as they please, as would a born-and-bred Panamanian. Separately, the program also allows holders to request a work permit through the Ministry of Labor, though that’s part of a different process.

Obtaining a temporary cédula takes about eight days. It will take another two days to obtain a multiple-entry visa that’s necessary so an individual can come and go as they wait out the roughly five-month process for the government to issue a permanent cédula. Once a cédula has been obtained, a person can then apply for a work permit from the Ministry of Labor, which will take about a month.

To start the cédula process, you’ll need basic documents—passport, proof from the FBI that there is no criminal record—and $5,000 in a Panamanian bank account, plus $2,000 for each dependent. And to obtain a work permit, then you’ll need to set up a Panamanian corporation (which can be disbanded after a year).

Uruguay

If speed is more important, then Uruguay is a great choice. Here, expats can land at the airport with the correct collection of documents, and if they already have a pre-scheduled filing date with the immigration office that day, they can file their paperwork and have a temporary cédula that afternoon or the next day. All that’s required is a birth certificate and an apostilled police record (meaning it has been authenticated and is acceptable across international borders). They will also need to show that they have the financial means to support themselves with a provable stream of income from anywhere in the world.

With a temporary cédula, they will also have immediate access to the state healthcare system, or they can immediately buy access with a local, private healthcare plan, which will cost about $70 to $350 a month, depending on the bell and whistles they want.

To manage the process themselves, expect to pay about $600 to $700. But they will also need to have a proficient level of Spanish, as none of the paperwork is in English. Otherwise, hire an attorney. It will be quicker and more efficient and will cost between $1,000 and $2,000.

­Portugal

Portugal has two visas that would apply to someone wanting to live and work on the Iberian Peninsula: D2 and D7. Technically, the D2 is for independent workers and entrepreneurs, while the D7 is for those who are retired or earning passive income. In practical terms, the D7 will make sense for most people, even if they’re not retired, because it’s based on income. The D2 requires proof that an expat can support themselves as a freelancer and can begin issuing Portuguese invoices on which the business will be taxed, though the tax rate is fixed at 20% for 10 years.

With the D7, instead, a person will need only to show that they have €8,000 (about $9,700) per person in a Portuguese bank account and that they have the equivalent of €30,000 ($36,400) in a bank account back in their home country.

To apply for either a D2 or D7 visa, an expat must enroll in the Portuguese tax system and become a tax resident. That requires obtaining a Portuguese tax number before they can even apply for a visa. And for that, they will need a sponsor, which can be a law office, accounting office, or migration office.

For that reason, they’ll need to hire a pro to walk them through the process and be their sponsor for the tax number. All in, that will cost you between €1,000 and €2,500 (about $1,200 to $3,000). The process will require two to four months to complete.

As a freelancer, an expat will also want to apply for Non-Habitual Resident status, or NHR, which is issued to people who’ve never lived in Portugal before and move to the country. With NHR status, income earned outside the country is exempt from taxes. They will have to file a Portuguese tax return and declare the income, though they’ll owe no taxes on it. The other benefit of this is that it shows Uncle Sam they’re a tax resident of another country, which then helps trigger their eligibility for the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion.

A person is eligible to apply for Portuguese citizenship and a passport after five years of residence, though they have to demonstrate sufficient knowledge of the Portuguese language.

Czech Republic

It’s a two-step process in Czech Republic. First step: apply to join the živnostensky (zivno) list. This isn’t specifically for foreigners. It’s a trade license for any Czech resident who works independently, be that a plumber, masseuse, artist, or whoever. That will take a week at most. Zivno in hand, they can then apply for a one-year, temporary residence visa.

They must apply for a residence visa at a Czech embassy outside of the Czech Republic, show they have housing (a notarized lease agreement) for the full-length of the visa they seek, up to one year. That means they’ll need to visit the Czech Republic to arrange that. Some expats will move to Prague, obtain their housing and zivno, then take the train to nearby embassies in Berlin, Vienna, or Bratislava and complete their application.

They will need a signed letter from their bank stating that they have the equivalent of 125,000 Czech crowns on deposit (about $5,700). That will need to be translated into Czech, which a visa agency can handle. Be sure the account has a debit card, which must be presented at the application meeting at the Czech embassy, because officials will want to see it—it’s proof that a person can access the account.

An FBI criminal background check is required, though as an American an expat can also go to the U.S. embassy in Prague and sign an affidavit attesting to their criminal-free background. Along with a passport and an application form, that’s pretty much all the documents an applicant needs.

To hire a local agency to help with the process, it should cost less than 15,000 crowns (about $685) for everything. The embassy fee is a separate 5,000 crowns (about $230).

Once the temporary visa expires after a year, it can easily be traded in for a renewable, two-year long-term residence visa. After five years as a legal resident, a person is eligible to apply for Czech citizenship and a Czech passport, which like the Portuguese passport, is an EU passport and thus gives them free rein to live and work anywhere in the EU.

The full report on the best places to live and work in 2021, including more information for immigration experts in each of the countries mentioned, can be found at: The Best Places to Live and Work Abroad in 2021.

International Living has launched its new “Work From Anywhere” resource, devoted to coverage of innovative money-making strategies, ways to build a portable income, tips for boosting health and well-being, methods to maximize Social Security, and so much more. More information can be found, here.

TRI.BE illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

TRI.BE × CONMIGO

UNIVERSAL MUSIC GROUP KOREA’S FIRST K-POP IDOL GROUP TRI.BE RELEASE SECOND SINGLE ALBUM CONMIGO TODAY
 
FEATURING SINGLES “RUB-A-DUM” AND “LORO”
 
LISTEN HERE

WATCH THE VIDEO FOR “RUB-A-DUM” HERE

Accelerating a rapid rise to the forefront of international culture, Universal Music Group Korea’s first K-POP idol group TRI.BE unveil their second single album, CONMIGO, today via Republic Records. It features the title track “RUB-A-DUM” and accompanying anthem “LORO.

Listen to CONMIGO HERE and watch the video for “RUB-A-DUM” HERE.

With CONMIGO, these fiery and fierce women only amplify their signature Girl Swag, radiating contagious levels of self-confidence in the process. As a high-energy call-to-arms, “RUB-A-DUM” nods to the timeless tale of the Pied Piper and invites fans to follow with the clarion call, “Everybody come play with TRI.BE, making it irresistible not to. On “LORO” –– Spanish for “Parrot” –– the girls preach about finding confidence in your true self. They might just urge you to mirror TRI.BE’s magnetic moves, much like a parrot. Musically, the multinational group fuses a young and refreshing mix of Dancehall and Reggaeton beats like never before.

Reflective of the title, CONMIGOor “With Me” in Spanish—the group welcomes an alliance from all who want to come and dance. “RUB-A-DUM” and “LORO” elevate TRI.BE’s eclectic charisma as they continue their boundary-breaking rise.

The first-of-its-kind quadrilingual group, TRI.BE consists of seven members—SONGSUN, JINHA, HYUNBIN, and SOEUN hailing from Seoul, KELLY and JIA from Taipei, and MIRE from Tokyo—and speaks and sings in English, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. Earlier this year, they teamed up with two of the most famous K-POP producers in the world, S.Tiger [BEAST, IU, 4Minute, MOMOLAND, EXID, T-ARA, Apink, HyunA] and none other than TRI.BE’s supportive big sister EXID’s ELLY, for the two tracks on TRI.BE Da Loca, generating 5 million-plus streams right out of the gate. The two have come together yet again with TRI.BE to create another masterpiece, CONMIGO.

TRI.BE’s name comes from the combination of the words “triangle,” which signifies the most perfect shape, and “being,” leading to the slogan, “We are perfect as we are. The group conveys the message of self-love and confidence by unapologetically flaunting their key concept of Girl Swag.

Girl Swag goes global in 2021 thanks to TRI.BE.

TRI.BE SOCIALS

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Children illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

The Oxford Method

The Oxford Method Puts Emphasis on Diversity and Inclusion

The Oxford Method, a tutoring community, is on a mission to help underprivileged students around the country

The pandemic changed how education was delivered for millions of students. While just about everyone was impacted, it has been especially difficult on minority students. According to McKinsey & Company, the disparities among student groups grew over the last year. It reports that when it comes to learning, the pandemic took a heavy toll on Black, Hispanic, and Indigenous communities around the country. It found that students of color had fallen 3-5 months behind, while white students were 1-3 months behind. One company, The Oxford Method, is out to help bridge that gap and bring those students up to speed.

“There must be a spotlight put on diversity and inclusion because the achievement gap has widened in the last year,” explains David Florence, professor and founder of The Oxford Method, a community that offers tutoring services around the country. “We are taking steps to help those students so they can get caught up and have the foundation they need to succeed.”

The Oxford Method is an online learning community made up of educators who help to provide tutoring to those in need. It provides a full range of tutoring services, covering all types of subjects, and has experienced educators who can work with all levels of students. They help students who are gifted, special needs, traditional, and from rural and urban areas around the nation.

The educational community helps underprivileged students in a variety of ways, including by:

  • Providing free computers and high-speed internet. With that, it provides free instruction to the students, including those who are special needs and gifted. 
  • Working with students who are in urban and rural areas. These are areas often overlooked and that fall short in the technology category.
  • Having instructors from all socio-economic, psychographics, demographics, and geographic areas. The community of educators not only has a mission of helping those who are in diverse categories, but they are a group that is diverse.

“We have helped many students who would otherwise have a difficult time getting assistance,” added Florence. “We look forward to helping even more to finish this school year strong, get caught up over summer break, and be able to go into the new school year feeling confident.”

The Oxford Method has over 100 tutors around the country, covering all subject areas. It offers online tutoring, as well as in-person and in-classroom options. Its tutoring services are available 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. The Oxford Method works with its nonprofit, Social Actualization, Inc., by giving it 10% of all profits. The funds are used to provide free computers, high-speed internet, and instruction to underprivileged families in urban and rural America. Plus, 40% of the instructors are PhDs, 40% have a master’s degree, and 20% have only a bachelor’s degree.

The Oxford Method believes that education is the great equalizer and the best gift you can give the next generation. Subject areas include science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), as well as business, social studies, psychology, English, history, public speaking, study methods, test-taking, and more. To get more information about The Oxford Method, visit the Oxford Method website.

Yung Raja illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Rising Singaporean Artist Yung Raja

RISING SINGAPOREAN ARTIST YUNG RAJA RELEASES NEW FREESTYLE MIXING ENGLISH AND TAMIL — LISTEN NOW

NEW SONG “MAMI” IS YASSER’S TRACK OF THE WEEK ON BBC ASIAN NETWORK — LISTEN HERE

INCLUDED ON ‘NME 100’ LIST — FIRST SINGAPOREAN ARTIST TO APPEAR ON THE LIST

LYRICS + TRANSLATIONS HERE

Praise for Yung Raja:

“Singaporean hip-hop star sparks joy with dizzying Tamil and English raps” — NME

“Yung Raja has flown onto the hip-hop scene over the past year, commanding a riotous audience across South East Asia” — HYPEBEAST

“Within a year, [Yung Raja] has grown to become one of South East Asia’s popular hip-hop artists” — Rolling Stone

Yung Raja has been dubbed as Southeast Asia’s next avant-garde bilingual hip hop artist known for his tasteful unification of English and Tamil lyricism. Over the weekend Yung Raja released another installment of a freestyle that showcases just this. Raja is a master wordsmith and elegantly switches between the languages backed against a trap beat that begs hitting the replay button. The dizzying freestyle comes off the back of his recently released single “Mami” which is also the Track of The Week by Yasser for BBC Asian Network. The video for the song has already surpassed over 100,000 views on YouTube and rising. Check out the song and technicolor video, here.

Alongside the freestyle, Yung Raja also uploaded an informational video “Shtambi Shterminology” where breaks down his everyday slang and Tamil phrases— one of the world’s oldest surviving languages

About Yung Raja:

Named one of NME’s 100 artist of 2021, breakthrough rapper Yung Raja has been dubbed as Southeast Asia’s next avant-garde bilingual hip hop artist. Known for his tasteful unification of English and Tamil culture in his lyrics. He found viral success in Asia after releasing a string of singles including “Poori Gang,” “Mustafa” and “Mad Blessings”  — the latter of which received cosigns by the likes of Lupe Fiasco and M.I.A.. Raja went on to amass over 11 million plays, a record deal with Def Jam SEA and a whirlwind run that saw him play shows across the continent and a stint in India recording for the famous Kollywood industry. His blend of references combined with natural lyrical ability garnered him critical praise with the likes of NME, Hypebeast, ELLE (Singapore), VICE/Noisey, Rolling Stone (India). While his fashion sensibilities and unwavering experimentation with style has landed him the covers of Esquire and ELLE Singapore as well as brand partnerships with BVLGARI, Gucci, Louis Vuitton, and Adidas. Born and raised in Singapore, Yung Raja aims to reinvent societal views in and out of his homeland, inspire the next generation of cultural conservators, and elevate Southeast Asian hip hop to world class stages through his music. Last year, Yung Raja signed to Alamo Records in hopes to continue confronting the industry with his addictive bilingual delivery and amalgamation of cultural references.

Discover more Yung Raja via:

INSTAGRAM | TWITTER | YOUTUBE

Vaccine illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Small Businesses Sign Vaccine Plan

­­SURVEY OF SMALL EMPLOYERS; 400+ SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS AND NATIONAL ADVOCATES LAUNCH INITIATIVE ON VACCINE LEADERSHIP TO GET U.S. ECONOMY BACK ON TRACK 

New National Survey of More than 3,300 Small Business Owners: Survey of small employers found that 64 percent of business owners say it is very important that their employees get vaccinated

Over 400 Small Business Owners and Leaders — Sign pledge to commit to becoming a small business vaccine leader 

Small employers want employees to get vaccinated and are willing to help to make it happen. The majority (63 percent) of small businesses are willing to encourage and incentivize employees to get vaccinated.

 Reimagine Main Street (RMS), a project of Public Private Strategies (PPS), has launched a public awareness campaign that will support small business owners in being leaders on the Covid-19 vaccines with their employees and in their community. The campaign was announced during a webinar that also included findings from a survey of more than 3,300 small employers on their perspectives on the vaccines conducted by Reimagine Main Street, in partnership with the National Asian/Pacific Islander American Chamber of Commerce and Entrepreneurship (National ACE), the US Black Chambers, Inc. (USBC), and the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC). The survey results provide insights into how small business owners view the vaccines and their plans for themselves and their workers. 

Other business organizations including the National LGBT Chamber of Commerce (NLGCC), the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO), and Women Impacting Public Policy (WIPP) are stepping up to engage their members. 

“Small businesses like mine have struggled during this pandemic, but the vaccine shows us that the end is in sight,” said Shaundell Newsome, Founder of Sumnu Marketing and Chairman of the Board of the Urban Chamber of Commerce in Las Vegas, who moderated the webinar. “I have implemented a vaccine plan for my employees and all business owners should do the same so we can make it through Covid-19 as quickly as possible.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that between 70-85% of Americans need to receive the vaccine to achieve herd immunity. Once that happens, small businesses will be able to get back to business at full capacity and the economy and communities can completely reopen.

“The survey findings demonstrate that small business owners recognize the importance of the vaccines in reopening Main Street,” said PPS Founder and Principal Rhett Buttle. “By championing the vaccine with the employees and in their communities, small employers can help fully reopen the economy as quickly as possible.”

NEW SURVEY: 

The survey of more than 3,300 small employers shows strong support for ensuring workers get vaccinated. View the full survey. Key findings include: 

  • 63% of small employers intend to encourage their employees to get vaccinated. 
  • Nearly half (45%) of small employers’ plan to give workers paid time off (PTO) to get vaccinated.
     
  • More than 80% of small employers report having conversations with employees about vaccines and a majority (55%) say they would use free or low-cost resources to provide guidance and information about Covid-19 vaccines.

PLEDGE FROM SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS: 

The campaign also calls on employers to sign a pledge to be a SMALL BUSINESS VACCINE LEADER, which more than 400 small business owners have already signed. In signing it, small business owners are pledging to do at least one of the following things:

  • Commit to getting the vaccine when it is their turn and let their employees know why they are choosing to get the vaccine
  • Create a vaccine plan for their employees
  • Provide incentives to employees who receive the vaccine, such as PTO to receive the vaccine
  • Continue to follow state and federal guidance on social distancing and wearing masks after all employees are vaccinated
  • Assist with vaccine promotion and distribution in their community (examples include volunteering to help at COVID-19 vaccination sites, donating supplies or services to vaccination sites, and being vocal in their community on the business case for getting vaccinated)

NEW TIP SHEETS: 

Reimagine Main Street is also giving small business owners the resources they need to play a critical role in championing the vaccine with their employees and in their communities. In addition to general tools and resources, the campaign includes tip sheets in multiple languages for small business specifically targeted to demographics, including:

QUOTES FROM BUSINESS OWNERS AND LEADERS: 

Ron Busby, Sr., President/CEO of the U.S. Black Chambers, Inc.

“When our country faces a crisis, the most vulnerable are hit the hardest, especially in the Black community. This was the case with Covid-19, but business owners can help put us on the path to recovery by embracing the vaccine.”

Ramiro Cavazos, President and CEO of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

“It is going to take years for the Hispanic small business community to recover from the Covid-19 pandemic, but the vaccine can get us started down that path. Business owners can help speed the recovery by championing the vaccine with their employees and community.”

Justin G. Nelson, Co-Founder and President, NGLCC

“COVID-19 has forced business owners in the LGBTQ community to look out for each other as we try to make it through this pandemic. Small business owners should protect themselves, their employees, and their communities by championing the vaccine.”

Cindy Ramos-Davidson, CEO of the El Paso Hispanic Chamber of Commerce 

“Hispanic businesses have closed at a disproportionate rate because of Covid-19 and the path to recovery begins with the vaccine. If small business owners champion the Covid-19 vaccines, businesses and communities will be able to fully reopen much faster.” 

Chiling Tong President/CEO of the National Asian/Pacific Islander American Chamber of Commerce and Entrepreneurship

“The Covid-19 pandemic has been tough on Asian American and Pacific Islander businesses both financially and through the rise in anti-Asian violence. It is critical that we get through this pandemic as quickly as possible, and the vaccine is key to doing so.”

Mas Torito, owner of Kokoro Restaurant in Denver

“My family restaurant has been in business for over 30 years and this past one was the toughest we have ever weathered. To come back stronger than ever, we have championed the vaccine, but it is critical that more small businesses do so as well.”

Ginger Torres, co-founder of PPE for Navajo First Responders in Phoenix

“Hesitancy to take the Covid-19 vaccine is prevalent among many Native Americans, but small business owners can play a huge role in changing that. I urge all small business owners to be leaders on the vaccine with their employees and in their communities.”

Patty Gentry Young, co-owner of Young Hair Inc., Spring Field, Ohio

“We all take steps to be proactive about our health and getting the Covid-19 vaccine should be one of them. Small business owners can play an important role in encouraging their employees and others in their community to get the vaccine.”