Posts tagged with "Healthcare"

Lindsay via David Purdy by 360 Magazine

The Benefits of Medication-at-Home

Taking medication is not without risks, especially for the elderly. Drug interactions can have unexpected and unintended effects. Side effects can lead to complications. Directions can be misunderstood. The recommended dosage can require adjustments. The list goes on and on.

Traditionally, doctors and other medical professionals had close interaction with the elderly patients whom they treated in assisted living or rehabilitation facilities. They were readily available for fielding questions and could quickly address issues related to prescription medications.

Today, however, medical models are changing. Many elderly patients are turning to the “aging in place” concept of medical care. This model empowers those with chronic medical conditions to receive appropriate care in their homes rather than at an assisted living or rehabilitation facility. 

The aging-in-place model offers a host of benefits, including better affordability and the ability for patients to stay more connected to their social circles. However, it also creates a distance between patients and their doctors that is much greater than they experience in care facilities. Because of this distance, patients have less available guidance from doctors when it comes to managing their medication.

Supporting aging-in-place with medication-at-home

To fill the gap created by the aging-in-place model, the world of healthcare is turning to an innovative method of medication management that is referred to as “medication-at-home.” This new model for patient care looks to pharmacists to provide an enhanced level of care for their patients. It looks to the clinical expertise that pharmacists bring to the care continuum as a key resource for patients who are looking to use medication safely and effectively while aging-in-place.

Appreciating the important role that pharmacists play in this new health landscape requires understanding how often pharmaceuticals are prescribed to the elderly. In 2010, studies showed that 87 percent of US adults 65 years-of-age or older used at least one prescription medication. By 2019, that number had grown to 89 percent. Elderly patients who do not use prescription drugs have come to be the rare exception. 

It should also be noted that aging in place may soon be a necessity rather than an option. The aging population in the US is leading to what some are calling an assisted living crisis. Those in the 65 and older category comprise approximately 46 million Americans today. By 2050, that demographic is expected to nearly double. As the number in need of care continues to increase, finding space in assisted living facilities may prove to be an overwhelming challenge, leaving home care as the only available option.

Providing expert medication oversight

For those experiencing aging-in-place, the medication oversight that the medication-at-home model provides is essential. Polypharmacy, which is the term used to describe the use of multiple medications, is a reality for most elderly receiving medical care. Figures on polypharmacy show that among those 65 or older, an estimated 44 percent of men and 57 percent of women take five or more medications.

Pharmacists have the expertise that is necessary to provide medication reconciliation for those who are taking multiple prescription medications. This process involves pharmacists reviewing the entire listing of medications that a patient is taking to determine overlaps or possible adverse reactions that may result from combinations of drugs.

In an assisted living setting, doctors would have access to the full slate of medications that patients were using. With aging-in-place, patients may receive prescriptions from a variety of doctors, including their primary care physician and other specialists. Pharmacists may be the only ones who have the complete picture of the medications that aging-in-place patients are taking.

Pharmacists are also uniquely positioned to provide essential guidance to patients as they begin with new medications, such as those that might be prescribed after a hospital visit. Studies show that 20 percent of hospital readmissions are medication-related. Among those, 70 percent were considered preventable. When pharmacists step in to assess how new medications might interact with what a patient is already taking, as well as to provide clarity on the proper procedure for taking new medications, unnecessary hospitalizations can be avoided.

Medication reconciliation is an ongoing part of the medication-at-home process. It begins during the onboarding process and is assessed on an ongoing basis. Rather than simply filling and billing prescriptions without oversight, medication-at-home elevates the process to the level of clinical pharmacy care. As a result, aging-in-place patients receive the same attention to detail that they would receive from caregivers at an assisted living or rehabilitation facility.

Supporting healthy adherence

To experience the full benefits of their prescriptions, patients must adhere to the prescription guidelines. If they fail to take the right dose at the right time under the right conditions, the medical benefits of the medication can fail to be realized. Lack of adherence is thought to be one of the biggest risks for patients who are taking medications in an aging-in-place setting.

The medication-at-home model can provide significant adherence support to patients. One solution it provides is medications that are synchronized to one fill day and cycled into a continual fill date. This takes the confusion that can result from refills off of patients and the caregivers who support them. By packaging medications in date and time stamped pouches, patients have a much easier time of adhering to their medication schedules.

In addition, the medication-at-home process also facilitates the same type of multi-dose medication packaging that is made available at onsite care facilities. This method, which is proven to increase success rates with medication adherence, places all of the medications that must be taken at the same time in the same packaging, removing the need for patients to institute their own organization methods.

To further support the medication process, pharmacists can coordinate delivery services that ensure patients have what they need when they need it. Throughout the entire process, the medication-at-home team stays in contact with the patient to provide coaching, counseling, and whatever other reassurances are needed.

Reducing healthcare costs

Finally, medication-at-home facilitates a solution that makes effective healthcare much more affordable for elderly patients. By 2028, out-of-pocket costs for facility care are expected to total more than $266 billion. Aging-in-place dramatically reduces those costs. By leaning on the historically underutilized expertise that pharmacists bring to the healthcare puzzle, medication-at-home makes aging-in-place and the benefits it brings to patients a viable healthcare solution.

Lindsay Dymowski is President of Centennial Pharmacy Services, a leading medication-at-home pharmacy, and co-founder and principal of The Centennial Group, a pharmacy management company supporting community pharmacies and health systems. Combining her over 15 years of pharmacy experience with her entrepreneurial spirit, Lindsay knows exactly what drives successful pharmacies, launches collaborative provider programs, and gets the attention of payers – and it’s not dispensing medications. It’s how well you can support an organization’s goals to better health outcomes with patient-centric pharmacy care.

Pearl Jam by Republic Records Media via 360 Magazine

Pearl Jam: Support for Healthcare

Pearl Jam Calls for September 12th Day of Solidarity to Support Healthcare for Heroes
 
Band Hosted 9/11 First Responders at Madison Square Garden on the 21st Anniversary of Terrorist Attack
. “9/11 was horrific, traumatic, despicable … but in some ways, 9/12 was awesome. 9/12 people came together as one. We were supported by the rest of the planet. And most importantly in our country, we supported each other. There was a time when we supported each other. That’s the part that we cannot forget. We can stay together. We don’t have to wait for another terrorist attack and suffer this thing of being divided.” – Eddie Vedder, sharing a conversation with First Responder Lt. Michael O’Connell, FDNY.

Last night at Madison Square Garden, Pearl Jam honored the first responders of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the 21st anniversary of the tragedy. Frontman Eddie Vedder talked about meeting with a group of first responders before the show and being reminded of the importance of September 12th as a day when everyone came together in solidarity.  He called out the incredible work of John Feal, a retired construction worker who lost part of his foot while working at Ground Zero in the aftermath of the attacks and founded the FealGood Foundation to benefit responders who have suffered from numerous health issues ever since. 
 
That same solidarity is needed now to ensure that the heroes of September 11th continue to receive the treatment they need for the significant injuries and illnesses sustained on and stemming from that horrific day, many caused by the toxic dust generated by the collapse of the World Trade Center towers.
 
After 17 years of hard work from survivors and advocates, Congress finally responded to this crisis by creating the World Trade Center Health Program. Today, it encompasses more than 117,000 responders and survivors, most of whom are being treated for more than one illness. World Trade Center Health Program provides critical care but is facing an impending $3 billion budget shortfall. 
 
Unless Congress acts by the end of the year, the program will be forced to stop accepting new members who are sick and to make additional cuts in services. The Bipartisan 9/11 Responder and Survivor Health Funding and Correction Act would ensure the program gets the funding to meet the medical needs of 9/11 responders and survivors.

For more information and to contact your elected officials, visit Renew911health.org. You can also join Vitalogy Foundation in supporting The FealGood Foundation to benefit 9/11 first responders.
 

“So let those events we got through together all those years ago and that these men and women are still courageously healing from – let those lessons be remembered as our solidarity to come together and keep this country straight … this country that we love.”  – Eddie Vedder

About Republic Records

A division of Universal Music Group, the world’s leading music company, Republic Records is home to an all-star roster of multi-platinum, award-winning legends and superstar artists such as Ariana Grande, Bastille, Billy Porter, Bo Burnham, Clairo, Conan Gray, Daddy Yankee, Drake, Eddie Vedder, G Herbo, Glass Animals, Florence + the Machine, Greta Van Fleet, Hailee Steinfeld, Jack Johnson, James Blake, James Bay, Jessie J, Jimmy Fallon, John Legend, John Mellencamp, Jonas Brothers, Julia Michaels, Kid Cudi, Kim Petras, Lil Wayne, Lorde, Metro Boomin, NAV, Nicki Minaj, Of Monsters and Men, Pearl Jam, Post Malone, Seth MacFarlane, Stevie Wonder, Swedish House Mafia, Taylor Swift, The Weeknd, TOMORROW X TOGETHER, Twice, Victor Victor and more. Founded by brothers and chief executives Monte and Avery Lipman, it is also comprised of innovative business ventures, including American Recordings, Boominati Worldwide, Brushfire, Casablanca Records, Cash Money, HYBE, Imperial, JYP, Lava Records, Universal Arabic Music, Victor Victor, XO, Young Money, among others. In addition, Republic has expanded to release high-profile soundtracks for Universal Pictures (Sing and Sing 2), Sony Pictures (Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse), and NBC TV (The Voice), as well as other notable film and television franchises. Extending further into the worlds of film, television, and content, Republic launched Federal Films in order to produce movies and series powered by the label’s catalog and artists. With projects that align with Republic’s artists and brand, Federal Films is building a diverse slate that will bring compelling stories to audiences around the world. Initial documentary releases include Jonas Brothers’ Chasing Happiness,  Ariana Grande: Excuse Me, I Love You and The Velvet Underground. Upcoming theatrical films include They Cloned Tyrone, The Hating Game and Marlowe.

Health clipboard graphic via Rita Azar for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Propel × BDHEA

The Propel Center, the global HBCU innovation and learning hub intended to level the playing field and open greater doors of opportunity for their students, announced the creation and launch of its Propel-BDHEA internships, a national program focused on select HBCU and other African American students interested in pursuing medical and related healthcare careers.

The internship partnership will reimagine health equity and advance the goal of the Black Directors Health Equity Agenda (BDHEA) to foster collaboration among top health systems. BDHEA programs address the social determinants of health, provide best practices, ensure equitable access to care and advocate for long-term, meaningful healthcare policies impacting Black people and other communities of color. BDHEA unites healthcare leaders in efforts to diversify their organizations and achieve long-term health equity. INROADS, Inc. will execute the program.

According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, the U.S. will have up to 122,000 unfilled posts for physicians by 2032. This skills shortage in the medical profession is even more alarming as it relates to future healthcare professionals of color: Only 7.3% of those enrolled in medical schools in 2020 identified as Black or African American. “The Propel-BDHEA internship program addresses the urgent need to recruit and train Black healthcare professionals and to give them pathways to leadership in our nation’s top healthcare organizations,” said Michele Richardson, BDHEA board member and executive sponsor. “HBCU students are an incredible source of talent who can help bring quality care to under-resourced urban and rural areas, improving access to care and patient outcomes. The intensive Propel-BDHEA program cultivates the leadership skills that will magnify their impact on healthcare organizations and communities of color.” 

“We recognize that representation must be more reflective of the populations being served to bring about real, long term systemic change addressing these health disparities,” Propel Chief Development Officer Julie Sills Molock states, adding that “increasing the numbers of Black physicians is not only about diversity and inclusion; it’s also about establishing greater patient access to doctors with whom they can confide in, connect with culturally, trust and build a better overall patient-provider rapport. This ultimately leads to more preventive care and healthier African American communities, but it starts with initiatives like this collaborative internship with our phenomenal partners.”

INROADS has a proven, 50-year history of preparing young people from underrepresented communities for success in business and STEM careers,” shared Forest T. Harper, Jr., president and CEO of INROADS, Inc. “We know well that career disparities start with a lack of internship opportunities for African American students—with only six percent of paid internships going to them. We’re committed to our exciting new collaboration with Propel and BDHEA to address these disparities and are especially pleased to be a channel for providing the resources and expertise to execute this invaluable initiative. Our goal here is clear: To prepare and convert more African American students into healthcare professionals who can excel and make an impact in the communities they serve.”

With the guidance of INROADS, Propel and BDHEA will secure a total of 100 students for the internships, which are open to collegians and will serve as a unique opportunity for immersion, focused clinical study, leadership access and exposure that the partners believe will accelerate early talent development and help advance the nation’s diverse medical pool and workforce of tomorrow.

The selected interns will engage in innovative, work-based learning experiences, research opportunities with R&D-focused institutions, augmented academic coursework and mentoring. These future healthcare professionals will additionally benefit from unprecedented access to Propel, BDHEA and INROADS’ corporate partners and senior advisors, as well as select medical schools in collaboration with the Atlanta University Center Data Science Initiative (AUC) and specific HBCU medical and pre-med programs, while working on emerging medical health technology projects. 

Propel and BDHEA’s joint vision and commitment to health equity will ensure that all HBCU students have the access and ability necessary to achieve their full healthcare career potential. The partners emphasize that the most effective pathway toward eliminating persistent health disparities mandates leveraging data-informed strategies to help create a society where neither race nor poverty determines health or overall life outcomes.

Prime areas of focus for the new national internship program will include infant and maternal health, internal medicine, preventive and health equity, clinical algorithms, data science, telemedicine and remote patient monitoring, app development, cardiovascular disease, infectious diseases and more. To apply or find out more, interested students may click HERE. The application period is currently open, and all applications are due by May 1, 2022. The selected interns will be announced and matched to internships in May of 2022. Employers willing to sponsor interns may contact the BDHEA HERE.

About the Propel Center

Supported by founding partners Apple and Southern Company, the Propel Center is a first-of-its-kind innovation and learning hub for the entire HBCU community that will serve as a catalytic epicenter of learning, providing students with the knowledge, skills, tools and resources necessary to transform the nation’s talent pipeline and workforce. Through a robust virtual platform, on-campus activities at partner institutions and a physical campus located in the Atlanta University Center, Propel will offer innovative curricula and unprecedented leadership opportunities to HBCUs across the nation in an effort to produce the next generation of capable and conscientious Black leaders.

Health clipboard graphic via Rita Azar for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Special Olympics NY × ACA/NY

Special Olympics New York and Advance Care Alliance of New York (ACA/NY) come together to guarantee proper retrieval of healthcare services for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The groups come together to declare their objective of diminishing health inequalities for these groups of people by generating new opportunities.

Stacey Hengsterman, President and CEO of Special Olympics New York spoke on the partnership, stating, “This is one of our most exciting health collaborations yet. Through extensive cross-promotion, support, and more, we plan to improve our already outstanding health care for individuals with disabilities in New York.”

New efforts have begun commencement, while members from ACA/NY assisted at the Special Olympics New York’s floor hockey tournament, the Winter Classic. The tournament took place at the Jacob K. Javits Center in Manhattan which cultivated an energetic event for all those involved.

Jaime Madden, Chief Administrative Officer of ACA/NY recalls attending the Winter Classic, declaring, “It was a tremendous opportunity for ACA/NY to be a part of Special Olympics New York’s Winter Classic. What a sight it was to watch the extraordinary examples of teamwork and athleticism displayed by the athletes and coaches.”

While the joint partnership continues, Special Olympics NY promises to publicize crucial health info through ACA/NY’s Family Forum program, urging education of individuals throughout the region. ACA/NY has announced their commitment to many Downstate Special Olympics NY events during the course of the course of 2022. Moreover, ACA/NY has announced they will supply volunteers for Special Olympic NY’s Healthy Athletes projects, which aim to provide free health screenings and education.

“As we continue to grow our relationship with one another, ACA/NY looks forward to many more events of inclusion with Special Olympics New York,” says Madden. The groups co-hosted a Family Forum conference to discuss Special Olympics NY curriculum opportunities to ACA/NY families.

Marita Kelly for use by 360 MAGAZINE

PANAMA RANKS AS NO.1 RETIREMENT DESTINATION

In accordance with International Living’s 31st Annual Global Retirement Index, Panama has been named the world’s #1 destination for 2022. This Index, produced in accordance with numerous statistics and on-the-ground input from in-country correspondents, ranks and rates the world’s leading retirement locations. The index surveys 10 major categories that include cost of living, retiree benefits, healthcare and more.

Panama snatches the top spot in InternationalLiving.com’s 2022 Annual Global Retirement Index. Panama capped the categories of opportunity, visa/ residency and benefits/ discounts, while scoring at the top amongst the fitting in and healthcare categories.

For such a small country, Panama is truly emerging – this marks the 11th time that Panama has dominated in International Living’s Annual Global Retirement Index, for all the right reasons.

In 2022, Panama ranks as one of the simplest retirement destinations for travel from the United States or Canada. Panama City, the capital of Panama, is the one true First World city in Central America. Easy access to Panama from all over the U.S. increases the flexibility for travel, with several one-way flights available across the U.S., and cities in Canada and Europe. The modernity of Panama is only a short three hours from Miami, and five hours from New York. Not to mention, the currency is also the U.S. dollar!

Jessica Ramesch, the International Living Panama editor reflects on her experience in the country, stating, “as a single woman I feel safe and free to live my life here, whether I’m going out to dinner and Ubering home late at night or driving cross-country to visit friends. Perhaps that’s because this is truly a land of opportunity, home to thousands of hard-working, upwardly mobile locals and immigrants.”

Ramsech continues her advocation for Panama, touching on the accessibility, indulgences, and credibility of the country. She states, “My favorite spot right now is Coronado, a happening beach town just an hour’s drive from the capital. In fact, I like it so much I bought an apartment there, and am packing up to move. Coronado is home to one of Panama’s most active and welcoming expat communities. I’m not even there yet, and I’m already getting invites to potlucks and happy hours.”

No matter where retirees choose to live in Panama, Ramesch says, they’re likely to be only an hour away from hospitals. In Coronado there’s access to the San Fernando facility. It’s a satellite of the San Fernando in Panama City—a JCI-accredited hospital affiliated with the Miami Children’s Hospital, Baptist Health International of Miami, and Tulane University Health Services Center and Hospital Clinic.

“Panamanian doctors make patients feel truly cared for,” says Ramesch. “They don’t rush through appointments, and they’ll often give you their cell phone number so you have direct access to them while you’re going through treatment or recovery.

“In fact, I’d say Panamanians in general are the best part of living in Panama. I have made so many wonderful friends here. People who are welcoming and fun and have a wide range of interests, so the conversation is always engaging.”

According to International Living, one of the most attractive features of living in Panama stems from the Pensionado program suitable for retirees.

Ramesch declares her support for the program, declaring, “the Pensionado program is, hands down, the best retirement visa program in the world. It’s a big reason Panama has taken the number one spot on International Living’s Annual Global Retirement Index so many times.”

Part of the reason for why Panama continues to steal those number one spots is due to the discounts that retirees with this visa have access to. The program makes it exceptionally simple – and inexpensive – to become a permanent legal resident. All of Panama’s legal residents are permitted to 20% off prescription medications if they’re of “pensioner” age. The base age is remarkably low, too – just 55 for women, 60 for men.

The Pensionado advantages expand to other discounts on dental care and transportation. Other leisure’s such as entertainment and hotel stays are available at low-cost rates, too.

Applicants with income of at least $1,000 a month qualify for the Pensionado program, and once you’re approved, you can appreciate all of the reductions.

“If you’d like to apply with your spouse, you can qualify with less than $1,000 each. You can even include dependents if you need to,” says Ramesch. “You just need a pension of at least $1,000 plus $250 for each additional person on your application.

“The $1,000 pension requirement reflects the low cost of living here in Panama. While it’s true that most of the North Americans who’ve chosen to retire here spend upwards of $2,000 a month, there are expats living here on far less.”

There are great areas in Panama that have rent prices as low as $300 to $500 a month, leaving extra money for retirees to spend elsewhere.

For those not 100% ready to make the permanent move just yet, Panama has a variety of alternatives for legal residency.

“The country has just unveiled a new extended-stay visa for digital-nomad types: The Temporary Telework Visa,” Ramesch says. “It allows you to come down and stay here—not for three months or even six, but for nine months. And you can extend for an additional nine months. That’s a generous total of 18 months, and the main requirements are simple: you must have medical insurance and an external source of income (at least $3,000 a month).”

Panama, too, has a “Foreign Professionals” Visa that has been available for over eight years. It allows foreign nationals to work in Panama, with easy requirements; you need a university education and a job arranged in Panama.

Though Panama ranks at the top in this year’s Annual Global Retirement Index, there are 25 other countries that were evaluated in the 10 categories used for judging, including; housing, benefits/ discounts, visa/residence, cost of living, fitting in/ entertainment, healthcare, development, climate, opportunity and governance. The full index country rankings for the year of 2022 can be found HERE.

Nursing Home Staff Shortages

Amidst the perseverance of the COVID-19 pandemic, the healthcare industry has taken a massive blow. There are intense staffing shortages in the field, and the public is suffering from these scarcities. The Washington Post gave a detailed report on these worsening staff deficiencies, more specifically in long term care facilities.

Nursing homes tend to lessen the stress on hospitals as recovered patients typically move there after being released. Without proper staffing, though, facilities have not been able to take in patients from hospitals. A specific example of this misfortune stems from the Terrace View nursing home in Buffalo, New York. The home is currently not running at full capacity, and there are up to 22 beds not being used due to lack of staff.

The Washington Post article elaborates on this disaster, highlighting another facility affected. “That means some fully recovered patients in the adjacent Erie County Medical Center must stay in their hospital rooms, waiting for a bed in the nursing home. Which means some patients in the emergency department, who should be admitted to the hospital, must stay there until a hospital bed opens up. The emergency department becomes stretched so thin that 10 to 20 percent of arrivals leave without seeing a caregiver — after an average wait of six to eight hours, according to the hospital’s data.”

Many long-term care facilities across the country are facing these same troubles. The American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL) found 58% of nursing homes are cutting down on arrivals, again, because of the shortage of staff members.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) found that 425,000 long term care workers left the industry since February 2020. Though other industries have seen economic growth since the onset of the pandemic, nursing homes have not had the same luck. “Remarkably, despite the horrific incidents of death and illness in nursing homes at the outset of the pandemic, more staff departures have come during the economic recovery. As restaurants and shops reopened and hiring set records, nursing homes continued to bleed workers, even as residents returned.”

These troubles are heightened in more rural areas. The article, too, depicts the story of Diakonos Group in Medford, Oklahoma, that had to shut down since there was simply not enough staff. The facility provided care for patients with mental health needs, but after the pandemic started, they found that their staff had endured too much. Diakonos Group CEO Scott Pilgrim explained that although the business offered a raise in hourly wages, bonuses and overtime, employees continued to leave, and they could not withstand these absences.

AHCA/NCAL urges lawmakers to work with the long term care division of healthcare to fix this staffing crisis and devote resources to employ caregivers. As hospitals continue to be directly affected by this catastrophe, change must be made as soon as possible. AHCA/NCAL encourages Congress to take action and ease these tensions placed on both hospitals and long term care facilities.

Doctor illustration

Dr. Jerome Adams × Purdue

Dr. Jerome Adams, former Indiana state health commissioner and the 20th U.S. surgeon general, will join Purdue University on Friday (Oct. 1) as a Presidential Fellow and the university’s first executive director of health equity initiatives, professor of practice in the departments of Pharmacy Practice and Public Health and a faculty member of the Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering at Purdue.

The appointment was announced Thursday (Sept. 30) by Purdue President Mitch Daniels.

“Dr. Adams represents the highest level of excellence through decades of caring for patients and service to the nation in public health,” Daniels said. “He has consistently demonstrated commitment for health equity prior to, during and subsequent to his time as surgeon general. We are thrilled to have him provide leadership at Purdue and represent Purdue globally in this important strategic area.”

Eric Barker, dean of the Purdue College of Pharmacy, and Marion Underwood, dean of Purdue’s College of Health and Human Sciences, said Adams’ leadership will bolster Purdue’s efforts to be a leader in public health and health equity as he works alongside colleagues across multiple colleges and units at Purdue, around the state of Indiana and beyond to elevate the awareness and impact of Purdue’s science-based public health programs, research and engagement.

“We know there are many societal determinants of health that transcend a person’s biology,” Underwood said. “Our efforts both in terms of urban and rural health can address many of these factors. Culture, family backgrounds, socio-economic status, and education all influence health and wellness. The College of Health and Human Sciences is dedicated to improving the health and well-being of individuals, families and communities. We are eager to work alongside Dr. Adams to expand HHS research and outreach in the areas of public health, HHS Extension and beyond.”

Barker added, “Through the extensive learning, research and engagement missions of our College of Pharmacy and, broadly, across the Purdue system and our extensive networks, we have a chance to really study these issues and continue our vital work on initiatives that will improve the health of populations of our state and our nation.”

Pavlos Vlachos, director of the Regenstrief Center, said he expects Adams to be a catalyst to translate Purdue’s research to the health care systems and communities and to ultimately and positively impact population health.

“Often, some of the best health care technologies, scientific contributions or interventions fail to impact society because they are disconnected from the exact needs of the communities and what is needed for their successful implementation,” Vlachos said.  “Jerome’s long experience and deep understanding of the complex U.S. health care landscape and the current population health challenges will help us best navigate these challenges, and position Purdue as a national and global health care innovation leader.”

Adams, who comes to Purdue after having served as the 20th U.S. surgeon general from September 2017 through January 2021, said he intends to help amplify the efforts of the Purdue Extension program to promote health equity through Indiana and particularly in rural communities, as well as work specifically with the business community to make the case for health equity as workforce and economic issues.

“Purdue is a storied institution that has the legacy, the talent and thanks to President Daniels, the commitment to being a national leader in the promotion of health equity,” Adams said. “Never before in American history has the need been greater or the community been more desirous of such an effort. I’m excited to combine my experiences in public health and public policy with the resources and opportunities afforded by Purdue to help coordinate, amplify and innovate in the health equity space.”

Before his service to the nation, Adams served as Indiana state health commissioner from 2014 through 2017. In that role he oversaw the state’s response to Ebola and Zika, as well as an unprecedented HIV outbreak in southern Indiana and a lead contamination crisis in northern Indiana. Dr. Adams also has served as an associate professor of anesthesia at Eskenazi Health in Indianapolis, where he still sees patients and helps train residents and medical students.

Adams received his Master of Public Health with a focus on chronic disease prevention from the University of California, Berkeley, and his medical doctorate from Indiana University School of Medicine. His postgraduate internship was at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Indianapolis and he completed his anesthesiology residency at the Indiana University Department of Anesthesia in 2006.

Allison Christensen for use by 360 Magazine

ROSELAND COMMUNITY HOSPITAL SERVES CHICAGO’S SOUTH SIDE

With a rich and storied history in the Greater Roseland Area, Roseland Community Hospital demonstrates a stellar example of a community hospital that is both owned and operated by the people that it serves  

Since opening in 1924, the Roseland Community Hospital, or RCH for short, has been offering comprehensive healthcare services to residents of Chicago’s far South Side neighborhoods, including outpatient services, a well-known Obstetrics Unit, behavioral health services, and most recently plays host to a COVID-19 clinic. The Hospital, which is located in the Greater Roseland Area at 45 W. 111th St., is open 24-hours, and strives to satisfy the community and offer quality resources to each individual, a mission it has maintained since its inception. At the forefront, professional caregivers provide valuable services to patient’s recovery and overall wellness. Throughout the myriad of social, economic and political changes that have dramatically affected the neighborhoods, the Hospital has maintained a strategic focus to help those they serve. Throughout the calendar year, the team at the Roseland Hospital has created special programming as a way to give back to its surrounding community, with various activations scheduled including a Back to School celebration, an annual coat drive, a Giving Tuesday and Toy Drive initiative and much more.

“Our vision has been, and continues to be, to develop quality hospital programs and services that enable our community residents to grow and live healthy lifestyles,” said Tim Egan, President and CEO of the Roseland Community Hospital. “We see ourselves as a major lifeline to many in the surrounding communities, and will continue to strive and satisfy this community we call home.”

Due to the rich history in the Greater Roseland Area, the neighborhood surrounding the hospital has continually evolved beginning with a Dutch settlement in 1840. Since then, most importantly, “The Great Migration” played a major role in immigrants and thousands of African Americans pouring into the community in search of employment opportunities. Today, African Americans comprise of ninety-nine percent of Roseland Community Hospital’s patients; and seventy-five percent of RCH’s administrators, doctors, nurses and staff. Increasingly, the community has also been seeing a rising percentage of Latino residents to the area.

The Hospital provides a wide range of services including an Obstetrics Unit, Behavioral Health Services, a Medical Stabilization Unit, Outpatient Services, a Mobile Dental Clinic, a COVID-19 Clinic and a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children. Roseland Community Hospital has experienced the privilege of providing healthcare services for the people who currently call Roseland their home.

To learn more about Roseland Community Hospital and all the services they have to offer, please click HERE.

Town & Country’s 8th Philanthropy Summit – Pharrell Williams × José Andrés

The 8th annual Town & Country Philanthropy Summit kicked off today with an amazing conversation between Pharrell Williams and José Andrés, moderated by Soledad O’Brien.

See below for highlights from the panel as well as a link to view the interview in its entirety:

Pharrell Williams on how he thinks about philanthropy and what his goals are: 

“When we think about the African diaspora and people of color and what people who are deemed ‘minorities’ – which we are actually not—but that’s just the saying. There are three pillars that affect us the most—disproportionate access to education, disproportionate access to healthcare, and also disproportionate access to legislation. I think the first two are the ones that I want to focus on because they’re the ones that I feel like I can, through my resources and even my likenesses whenever needed, that I can actually make a difference in education and healthcare. These are the things that hurt us the most.”

José Andrés on why he focuses on food insecurity:

“I am one more cook in the universe of people that feed people in America or around the world. But people like me, we only feed the few. I am in the power, when you began thinking, we can also be a part of feeding the many. And where we can join forces to the many around America, and around many places in the world, in the most difficult moments, to be able to bring solutions. For me, food is my way of doing it, but what we do is only a drop of water in an ocean of empathy. It requires a lot of props of empathy to make things happen. Obviously what I do is more focused on emergencies, I don’t like to see people in mayhem; people who, already in the good times forgotten, that are voiceless, that nobody takes care of. It’s even worse when a hurricane, an earthquake, an explosion of fire, a pandemic, hits their communities even further. That’s the moment that I feel the urgency of now being yesterday, and I love to bring my community and try to be nice to as many people as we can in these moments of mayhem. At the end of the day, one plate of food at a time won’t solve every problem but at least you buy time. And you give hope to people who need it the most.”

Pharrell on how he and Jose met and joined forces: 

“Catherine Kimmel – the great connector – took me to an event. Here’s a guy that you really need to meet because, like you, he takes what it is he does and puts it to better usage and thinks about others… [at an event in New York] I was so impressed because there were so many chefs there but this guy – it was different. Yes, he’s a chef and he’s all about his ingredients and recipes, but his greatest meal was his operation and people and his ability to galvanize. It was really apparent that everyone was centered around him and all he wanted to do was feed people and bring people together and help people see that through our differences and our challenges are actually a lot of solutions and we can make the world a better place and I was really blown away… Then we met and we realized there were a lot of things he was doing that I could be instrumental in helping him.”

José on meeting Pharrell and what attracted him to Pharrell:

“I go and meet Pharrell and he’s even better, he’s the better half. What you get is a good vibe – it’s very difficult to describe. You know, you read about people, NBA players, amazing musicians and I’m not only looking for the amazing things they do, which I love, but what’s behind. When you see that behind is something very powerful that they’re putting at the service of others – their power, their money, their contacts but something even more powerful is their brain connecting with their empathy within their hearts… We wouldn’t be able to do what we do without people like them. Pharrell knows and more importantly loves his community. We were able to do it in Virginia Beach and be there because Pharrell opened to us the doors of being that community without being foreigners. We were able to partner with local people, with local restaurants.”

José on how his family impacted his values and his metaphor on life:

“My mom and dad always believed in longer tables, not higher ones. The table will always be ready for whoever showed up… My father would put me in charge of making the fire. I did that since I was young, and I would become very good at making the fire. But my father was very particular, and he would never let me near the chicken… [he would say] ‘My son I know you wanted to do the cooking, but actually doing the fire and controlling the fire is the most important thing, everyone wants to do the cooking without understand the fire. My son you already have the biggest gift. Control the fire, master the fire, and then you can do any cooking you want.’ (I don’t know if my father told me that story with that idea or I’m making it more romantic along the way as the years pass by). My father was giving me a mantra for life itself: find your fire, control your fire, master your fire, and then you can do any cooking you want in your life.”

Pharrell on his foundation YELLOW:

“For us, we want to even the odds. I know that I was a very lucky person who benefitted from my teachers seeing something in me. They didn’t know what they were telling me or which way the way to go but they kept telling me to keep going. I think that had a profound effect on me because essentially education is the toolbox that every human being is going to need out in the world just to function… What we wanted to do is look at a curriculum that could assess these children and figure out how they comprehend information best. Then eventually make a curriculum that is sensory based and not sensory biased. If you learn differently than how the curriculum is being taught, then automatically you’re deemed as remedial… with the YELLOW hub, it’s the space where kids can learn based on their way they process their information.”

Pharrell on the education system:

“I love public school teachers and you know, love the unions as well, but the education the educational system is antiquated. I mean just ask your favorite Fortune 500 CEO – they might not be the best, they might not be well read, but that does not stop their genius. And this is what we want. We want to make sure that we reach every child by properly assessing their learning potential and comprehension preferences, and making sure that they have a curriculum that is based for them. Sensory bias is an issue, but sensory based learning special educational systems is the future. That’s how every child slip through the cracks and we get to eventually even the odds.”

José on how the pandemic affected and influenced his philanthropy:

“I think this year has changed all of us profoundly… Fundamentally has changed me. First, obviously take care of your family. I tried to be a father who took care of his daughters and my wife and trying to keep them safe. Every mother and father tried to do that. But then I began thinking that to take care of my daughters, it’s not putting them behind walls, to take care of my daughters, is bringing down those walls and trying to work as hard to provide for the other daughters and sons of other people I don’t know that they are trying to achieve the same for their children. The way I’m going to keep my daughters safer is not behind walls but with longer tables, where I work as hard to provide for my daughters as I’m going to work to provide for the daughters I don’t know. Fundamentally this is what changed me.”

José on what people get wrong about philanthropy:

“Robert Egger, my favorite food fighter, he said that it seems philanthropy is usually about the redemption of the giver, when philanthropy essentially needs to be about the liberation of the receiver. It’s nothing wrong to give and donate time or money or your brain and feel good about it, but fundamentally in this pandemic, I learned that to give, it’s not good enough, that we must do good, yes, but we must do smart good.”

Pharrell on the changes he has noticed this year:

“Empathy is at an all-time low. It’s not where it needs to be. There’s a lot of sympathy and pity, but there’s not empathy. And we need more of that, we need more empathy, we need more humility, we need more gratitude. I think the pandemic, for me, has taken me to that place where that’s the only thing I can think about.”

View the summit here.

The T&C Summit continues tomorrow (June 22, 2021 @ 12:30-1:30 PM EDT) with a panel between the power media couple Marlo Thomas and Phil Donahue. Register directly here.

by CODAworx for use by 360 Magazine

California Artwork Up For International Design CODAawards

2021 People’s Choice CODAawards Vote On Favorite Community Artwork, A Global Competition

The general public has the opportunity to vote, June 18-30, on 100 large-scale community artworks from around the world, nominated for a People’s Choice CODAaward. Hundreds of commissioned art projects were submitted for the CODAawards, which are given annually to the remarkable works that successfully integrate art into interior, architectural, and public spaces. The two projects that collect the most online votes will receive a coveted People’s Choice CODAaward and be announced, alongside all of this year’s CODAaward winners (one in each of ten categories), in the August issue of Interior Design magazine.

Voters are encouraged to rally behind the work they like in the CODAawards categories of Landscape, Residential, Healthcare, Commercial, Institutional, Liturgical, Public Spaces, Transportation, Hospitality, and Education.

This year the 374 CODAawards entries represent $477 million in commission fees, and projects from 30 countries. The diversity of artwork includes “Please Be Seated,” a public art installation touring across Chinese Mainland; “Sea Change,” an interactive light-based artwork that activates the pedestrian experience within a bus exchange transit tunnel in North Vancouver, Canada; and “Eon,” a 30 x 9-foot digital installation commissioned for Welch Hall, the largest academic facility at The University of Texas.

Cindy Allen (EIC, Interior Design), Malene Barnett (Founder, Black Artists + Designers Guild), and Frances Bronet (President, Pratt Institute in New York City), are among the eighteen jurors, all leaders in the design and art worlds, who have spent weeks reviewing and scoring all entries. These jurors will agree on one winner in each category to create the 2021 CODAawards winners circle (plus the two People’s Choice CODAawardees that the general public will select).

“When artists, designers, industry resources, and clients work together, places are transformed into spectacular spaces. CODAworx is the hub of the commissioned art economy. Our CODAawards is a way to celebrate these works. The 12-day People’s Choice voting sprint (June 18 – 30) becomes quite heated and the heavy traffic occasionally brings the website down! It is an exciting race to the finish line – the art world’s equivalent of the Tour de France!” states avid biker and CODAworx CEO Toni Sikes.

About CODAworx

CODAworx, the hub of the commissioned art economy, is the place where architects, real estate developers, and public art agencies creative go to discover and hire talent for large-scale commission projects. They accomplish this by searching the vast treasure trove of over 8,000 projects that CODAworx members have published on the website. It is here that one can find and connect with artists who create amazing sculptures and wall work, as well as atrium and kinetic artwork, light and digital media, and structural designs such as bridges and buildings. The CODAawards are the industry’s prestigious awards program that celebrates the projects that most successfully integrate commissioned art into interior, architectural, or public spaces. CODAworx produces this nine-year-old recognition program, along with their National Media Partner Interior Design magazine, to honor the designers, architects and artists whose collective imaginations create the public and private spaces that inspire us every day.

California Nominees:

The Lader (San Francisco)

The Chronicles of San Francisco (San Francisco)

The Avery Dining Room (San Francisco)

Chase Center Seeing Spheres (San Francisco)
Chase Center Chandelier (San Francisco)

Retu(r)ned Oak (Oakland)

The Spring (Hollywood)

Reflecting Within Us (Los Angeles)

Material Girl (Los Angeles)

Launch Intention (Los Angeles)

Getting There (Los Angeles)

Flower Trail (Union City)

Cosmos (Sunnyvale)

Connecting Flights (Pasadena)

Better Place Forest (Point Arena)

Approach (Palo Alto)

 

Vote for your favorite starting June 18 here.