Posts tagged with "facility"

Lindsay via David Purdy by 360 Magazine

The Benefits of Medication-at-Home

Taking medication is not without risks, especially for the elderly. Drug interactions can have unexpected and unintended effects. Side effects can lead to complications. Directions can be misunderstood. The recommended dosage can require adjustments. The list goes on and on.

Traditionally, doctors and other medical professionals had close interaction with the elderly patients whom they treated in assisted living or rehabilitation facilities. They were readily available for fielding questions and could quickly address issues related to prescription medications.

Today, however, medical models are changing. Many elderly patients are turning to the “aging in place” concept of medical care. This model empowers those with chronic medical conditions to receive appropriate care in their homes rather than at an assisted living or rehabilitation facility. 

The aging-in-place model offers a host of benefits, including better affordability and the ability for patients to stay more connected to their social circles. However, it also creates a distance between patients and their doctors that is much greater than they experience in care facilities. Because of this distance, patients have less available guidance from doctors when it comes to managing their medication.

Supporting aging-in-place with medication-at-home

To fill the gap created by the aging-in-place model, the world of healthcare is turning to an innovative method of medication management that is referred to as “medication-at-home.” This new model for patient care looks to pharmacists to provide an enhanced level of care for their patients. It looks to the clinical expertise that pharmacists bring to the care continuum as a key resource for patients who are looking to use medication safely and effectively while aging-in-place.

Appreciating the important role that pharmacists play in this new health landscape requires understanding how often pharmaceuticals are prescribed to the elderly. In 2010, studies showed that 87 percent of US adults 65 years-of-age or older used at least one prescription medication. By 2019, that number had grown to 89 percent. Elderly patients who do not use prescription drugs have come to be the rare exception. 

It should also be noted that aging in place may soon be a necessity rather than an option. The aging population in the US is leading to what some are calling an assisted living crisis. Those in the 65 and older category comprise approximately 46 million Americans today. By 2050, that demographic is expected to nearly double. As the number in need of care continues to increase, finding space in assisted living facilities may prove to be an overwhelming challenge, leaving home care as the only available option.

Providing expert medication oversight

For those experiencing aging-in-place, the medication oversight that the medication-at-home model provides is essential. Polypharmacy, which is the term used to describe the use of multiple medications, is a reality for most elderly receiving medical care. Figures on polypharmacy show that among those 65 or older, an estimated 44 percent of men and 57 percent of women take five or more medications.

Pharmacists have the expertise that is necessary to provide medication reconciliation for those who are taking multiple prescription medications. This process involves pharmacists reviewing the entire listing of medications that a patient is taking to determine overlaps or possible adverse reactions that may result from combinations of drugs.

In an assisted living setting, doctors would have access to the full slate of medications that patients were using. With aging-in-place, patients may receive prescriptions from a variety of doctors, including their primary care physician and other specialists. Pharmacists may be the only ones who have the complete picture of the medications that aging-in-place patients are taking.

Pharmacists are also uniquely positioned to provide essential guidance to patients as they begin with new medications, such as those that might be prescribed after a hospital visit. Studies show that 20 percent of hospital readmissions are medication-related. Among those, 70 percent were considered preventable. When pharmacists step in to assess how new medications might interact with what a patient is already taking, as well as to provide clarity on the proper procedure for taking new medications, unnecessary hospitalizations can be avoided.

Medication reconciliation is an ongoing part of the medication-at-home process. It begins during the onboarding process and is assessed on an ongoing basis. Rather than simply filling and billing prescriptions without oversight, medication-at-home elevates the process to the level of clinical pharmacy care. As a result, aging-in-place patients receive the same attention to detail that they would receive from caregivers at an assisted living or rehabilitation facility.

Supporting healthy adherence

To experience the full benefits of their prescriptions, patients must adhere to the prescription guidelines. If they fail to take the right dose at the right time under the right conditions, the medical benefits of the medication can fail to be realized. Lack of adherence is thought to be one of the biggest risks for patients who are taking medications in an aging-in-place setting.

The medication-at-home model can provide significant adherence support to patients. One solution it provides is medications that are synchronized to one fill day and cycled into a continual fill date. This takes the confusion that can result from refills off of patients and the caregivers who support them. By packaging medications in date and time stamped pouches, patients have a much easier time of adhering to their medication schedules.

In addition, the medication-at-home process also facilitates the same type of multi-dose medication packaging that is made available at onsite care facilities. This method, which is proven to increase success rates with medication adherence, places all of the medications that must be taken at the same time in the same packaging, removing the need for patients to institute their own organization methods.

To further support the medication process, pharmacists can coordinate delivery services that ensure patients have what they need when they need it. Throughout the entire process, the medication-at-home team stays in contact with the patient to provide coaching, counseling, and whatever other reassurances are needed.

Reducing healthcare costs

Finally, medication-at-home facilitates a solution that makes effective healthcare much more affordable for elderly patients. By 2028, out-of-pocket costs for facility care are expected to total more than $266 billion. Aging-in-place dramatically reduces those costs. By leaning on the historically underutilized expertise that pharmacists bring to the healthcare puzzle, medication-at-home makes aging-in-place and the benefits it brings to patients a viable healthcare solution.

Lindsay Dymowski is President of Centennial Pharmacy Services, a leading medication-at-home pharmacy, and co-founder and principal of The Centennial Group, a pharmacy management company supporting community pharmacies and health systems. Combining her over 15 years of pharmacy experience with her entrepreneurial spirit, Lindsay knows exactly what drives successful pharmacies, launches collaborative provider programs, and gets the attention of payers – and it’s not dispensing medications. It’s how well you can support an organization’s goals to better health outcomes with patient-centric pharmacy care.

Nursing Home Staff Shortages

Amidst the perseverance of the COVID-19 pandemic, the healthcare industry has taken a massive blow. There are intense staffing shortages in the field, and the public is suffering from these scarcities. The Washington Post gave a detailed report on these worsening staff deficiencies, more specifically in long term care facilities.

Nursing homes tend to lessen the stress on hospitals as recovered patients typically move there after being released. Without proper staffing, though, facilities have not been able to take in patients from hospitals. A specific example of this misfortune stems from the Terrace View nursing home in Buffalo, New York. The home is currently not running at full capacity, and there are up to 22 beds not being used due to lack of staff.

The Washington Post article elaborates on this disaster, highlighting another facility affected. “That means some fully recovered patients in the adjacent Erie County Medical Center must stay in their hospital rooms, waiting for a bed in the nursing home. Which means some patients in the emergency department, who should be admitted to the hospital, must stay there until a hospital bed opens up. The emergency department becomes stretched so thin that 10 to 20 percent of arrivals leave without seeing a caregiver — after an average wait of six to eight hours, according to the hospital’s data.”

Many long-term care facilities across the country are facing these same troubles. The American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL) found 58% of nursing homes are cutting down on arrivals, again, because of the shortage of staff members.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) found that 425,000 long term care workers left the industry since February 2020. Though other industries have seen economic growth since the onset of the pandemic, nursing homes have not had the same luck. “Remarkably, despite the horrific incidents of death and illness in nursing homes at the outset of the pandemic, more staff departures have come during the economic recovery. As restaurants and shops reopened and hiring set records, nursing homes continued to bleed workers, even as residents returned.”

These troubles are heightened in more rural areas. The article, too, depicts the story of Diakonos Group in Medford, Oklahoma, that had to shut down since there was simply not enough staff. The facility provided care for patients with mental health needs, but after the pandemic started, they found that their staff had endured too much. Diakonos Group CEO Scott Pilgrim explained that although the business offered a raise in hourly wages, bonuses and overtime, employees continued to leave, and they could not withstand these absences.

AHCA/NCAL urges lawmakers to work with the long term care division of healthcare to fix this staffing crisis and devote resources to employ caregivers. As hospitals continue to be directly affected by this catastrophe, change must be made as soon as possible. AHCA/NCAL encourages Congress to take action and ease these tensions placed on both hospitals and long term care facilities.

Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine

92nd Street Y

92nd Street Y (92Y) is a nonprofit civic and cultural facility that aims to bring people together through the performing and visual arts, education, health, fitness and Jewish life. 92Y has a wide assortment of programs, classes and events open for the community that nurture creativity. Such curricula includes online and in-person live concerts, parenting workshops, master, fitness and art classes.

The mission of 92Y is to house resources that promote the physical, mental and spiritual health of individuals throughout their lives. Founded 147 years ago, all the programming generated at the 92Y center is built on the foundation of Jewish values. While curated to serve Jewish people, 92Y follows the Jewish value of welcoming all differing ages, races, religions and ethnicities of people.

The Knights Ensemble in Residence

As a collective of musicians seeking to renovate the orchestral experience, The Knights are artistically directed by the Jacobsen brothers, with Eric Jacobsen as conductor. The Brooklyn-based orchestral cooperative The Knights showcased the first of three concerts during this fall and spring at their residency at 92Y.

The heart of the concert stages two classical works – Schubert’s bright “Unfinished” Symphony and Vaughn Williams’ superb The Lark Ascending, featuring Knights Artistic Director Colin Jacobsen as violin soloist. The programming of The Knights navigates Manhattan’s Lower East Side in the 1990s and Vienna in the 1820s, highlighting subjects of revitalization and renewal, while echoing Schubert in work of a Creole-influenced composer.

360 Magazine was invited to attend The Knights concert on Saturday December 11. We stood by, bearing the recent loss of love. Our heads were heavy, entering this season, but be that as it may, we gathered the courage. And, what the audience witnessed was nothing short of astonishing – suspensive string clips, haunting flute sounds coupled with intermittent triangular percussion rings penetrated the auditorium.

Eric (conductor) and Colin’s limitless love for one another was the vitality of this whole series. Their playlist literally tickled our souls, watered our desires while our vellum hairs danced with deception. Each section took us on a mental roller coaster – sitting in the forward car, enjoying the initial fall with our hands toward the sky. This meticulously blended set is like good wine and possesses all the sweet and refreshing notes of Napa.

Eric ran into sweat directing while we were all mesmerized at his art of bending the air. Colin dominated the audience with his vulnerability, eerie arrangement and tremendous talent. To sum up, The Knights adopt an unorthodox approach to music, exposing their joie de vivre to whomever is willing to embrace their truth.

Eric Jacobsen

Conductor of The Knights Eric Jacobson has gained the reputation of leading revolutionary projects. Jacobsen has conducted The Knights at New York venues including Carnegie Hall and Central Park, as well as internationally at the Vienna Musikverein, Cologne Philharmonie and Hamburg Elbphilharmonie. Serving as Music Director of the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Jacobsen was recently appointed Music Director of the Virginia Symphony. With much call as a guest conductor, he too just led the Camerata Bern, Detroit Symphony, Alabama Symphony, ProMuscia Chamber Orchestra, Deutsche Philharmonie Merck and Yo-Yo Ma’s Silkroad.

Colin Jacobsen

Known as a violinist and composer, Colin Jacobsen is a captivating figure serving the classical music scene. Jacobsen was named one of the top 100 composures under 40 by NPR listeners. Operating as an active Avery Fisher Career Grant-winning soloist, he has toured with Silkroad since it was established in 2000. For his landmark work in the string quartet Brooklyn Rider and orchestra The Knights, Jacobsen was chosen amongst the nation’s leading visual and performing artists to obtain an esteemed United States Artists Fellowship.

Wed, Jan 19, 2022, 7:30 pm ET

The Knights collaborate with pianist Aaron Diehl for a blend of jazz and classical music. The ensemble welcomes Diehl as they explore Gershwin’s iconic Rhapsody in Blue and trailblazer Mary Lou WilliamsZodiac Suite. Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 is also featured with varieties from Ravel’s Baroque-inspired Le Tombeau de Couperin. Closing out the show is Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite, arranged by Michael P. Atkinson.

Sat, Apr 30, 2022, 8 pm ET

Edgar Meyer, critically acclaimed double bass virtuoso and composer, unites with The Knights for the New York premiere of his second concerto. The show unfolds with a showing of Jamaican-born British composer Eleanor Alberga’s Shining Gates of Morpheus featuring Knights hornist David Byrd-Marrow. The closing of the show continues the American spirit of Meyer’s work is Coplands’ Appalachian Spring.

Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine

illustration by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

Scuderia Ferrari × Dynisma – New Simulator

Scuderia Ferrari Mission Winnow’s new simulator is completed

The new Scuderia Ferrari simulator is in its new home. The fitting out of the facility and the commissioning of the simulator was completed this week in a new building that sits between the main office of the Gestione Sportiva and the Fiorano Track. In the coming weeks, the calibration work will be carried out and then, at some point in September, after the summer break required by the sporting regulations, the real work will begin, supporting the design phase of the 2022 car.

The new simulator is absolutely at the cutting edge in the field of vehicle dynamics simulation and reproduces in a 360° environment, the lowest latency, and the highest bandwidth motion cueing of any motion simulator available on the market. It is based on a completely new concept– the result of a collaboration between Scuderia Ferrari and Dynisma, a UK-based independent company headed up by former Ferrari engineer Ash Warne. It has been developed exclusively for the Maranello team.

“Simulation and digital technology are going to play an ever more important role in the development of a Formula 1 car and we believe we have made the best possible choice, focusing on creating a tool that will enable us to make a generational leap in this sector,” commented Gianmaria Fulgenzi, Scuderia Ferrari‘s Head of Supply Chain. “To produce it, we chose Dynisma, a young and dynamic company. It has taken two years to complete this project and now we are ready to start using it on the 674 project, which is the name given to the car that will be produced based on the new technical regulations that come into force in 2022.”

Ash Warne, Dynisma CEO said: “All my experience in Formula 1 informed me that motion simulators were just not realistic or responsive enough. We set up Dynisma to change that and with the mission to create the world’s most immersive simulator and widen access to the best high fidelity, responsive motion generators that drivers and engineers could want.

“We are proud that our first commission is for the world’s most famous and respected motorsport team and it’s proof that Dynisma has created world-leading technologies. We have broken convention and redefined the sector by looking at the problem in an entirely new way.”

About Dynisma

Dynisma, an independent company, was founded in 2017 by experienced F1 driving simulator engineer Ashley Warne, who previously led the simulator development efforts of both Ferrari and McLaren. Dynisma has developed a unique approach to high performance motion generation. Dynisma’s range of Motion Generators (DMG’s), feature high bandwidth, low latency, and large excursion motion simulation, delivering class leading driving simulation capabilities.

For more information and to register your interest visit here.

Read the full Scuderia Ferrari statement here.

Kaelen Felix Illustrates a Harley-Davidson Museum Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Harley-Davidson Museum

The Harley-Davidson Museum is celebrating October with more than just its one-of-a-kind collection of motorcycles and memorabilia, as Milwaukee’s own musicians and artists will be on-campus to provide extra entertainment.

De La Buena, Lex Allen and Trapper Schoepp will take the stage Oct. 11 as part of a Rock the Green event. Tickets cost $10 and benefit Jazz Gallery Center for the Arts, Danceworks and Schlitz Audubon Nature Center.

Artists are also invited to participate in “Drawing in the H-D Museum” as part of Gallery Night and Day. Philip Salamone will take participants through the creative process in the event which will take place Oct. 16.

New all-electric LiveWire motorcycles will be available for demo rides Oct. 17 and 18. In promotion of the new Apple TV+ series “Long Way Up,” everyone who rides one of the motorcycles will receive a limited-edition LiveWire poster.

While guests are welcomed back to the museum, the first priority is safety. To see how the Harley-Davidson Museum is protecting guests, you can click right here.

They also have a few must-see exhibits available for only a little while longer.

Taming the Road in Style shows Harley-Davidson from the beginning. At a time in which motorcycles were nothing more than chunks of dirt, stone and other debris, designers struggled to build a comfortable bike. Many improvements to suspension, seats and frames later, Harley-Davidsons looked nothing like they did at their inception. Taming the Road in Style traces the history of Harley-Davidson motorcycles all the way until the most modern models. This exhibit closes Nov. 8.

“Tex’s Motorcycle” is a painting by Stevan Dohanos, who frequently contributed to the “Saturday Evening Post.” On the streets of Georgetown, Conn. was “Tex” Keller’s personalized motorcycle. He used nickel spots to decorate his saddle bag and put fur on his saddle. While prints of the painting are available all over the country, the original can only be seen at the Harley-Davidson Museum.

Building a Milwaukee Icon: Harley-Davidson’s Juneau Avenue Factory” is a collection of architectural drawings, including plans for the original facility on Juneau Avenue. Pencil drawings and archival photos show how Harley-Davidson grew from producing 1,000 motorcycles in 1909 to 27,000 in 1920. The Milwaukee factory continued to expand and is still the home of Harley-Davidson 100 years later.

“Building a Milwaukee Icon” shows Harley-Davidson in the middle of the period during which Milwaukee was known as the “Machine Shop to the World.” The Harley-Davidson Museum social channels will be providing behind-the-scenes looks at this exhibit.

They also offer tours. Engines 101 is a class taking visitors inside the engine. How does a powertrain work, and what’s so special about the 4-stroke engine? It’s all available to learn in a classroom setting. Ticket are available right here.

The H-D Museum Campus Walking Tour is the best way to absorb Harley-Davidson history and culture in the great outdoors. You can download a PDF of the campus map by clicking right here.

To learn more about the museum and to purchase tickets, you can click right here.

How To Operate A Successful Medical Facility

Running a medical facility is incredibly important and noble work, and it can feel fantastic to make a difference to and save people’s lives every single day. On top of this, this will always be an industry that is in demand, which means it can be secure and lucrative work too. Running a successful medical facility is certainly not an easy task. You need to run the facility like a business while also providing the best possible care for your patients, which can be a tricky tightrope to walk. Below are a few points for running a successful medical facility.

1. Create A Strong Brand

Branding is the best way to differentiate yourself from the competition and show people your practice. In addition to the company logo, slogan, color scheme, and other branding factors, this will also involve how you welcome people through the door, how phones are answered and the general atmosphere that you want to create inside.

2. Recruit Carefully

In order to succeed in this industry, you need to provide an excellent level of care, which will mean having highly skilled employees at every level of the organization. In addition to attracting top talent, you will also need to look after your staff and keep them happy and motivated. It can be challenging in this industry because it is highly demanding, stressful and time-consuming work.

3. Purchase The Best Equipment

In addition to staff, being able to provide the best level of care will also involve having the latest and best medical equipment. Medical device engineering firms like DeviceLab provide prototypes of medical equipment which can help you to find the best products for your particular facility and stay ahead of the curve. In addition to medical equipment, utilizing the right software will help you to streamline the operation, reduce the workload of your staff and cut down on errors.

4. Invest In Marketing

As with any type of online business, online marketing is hugely important, along with having a high-quality website and being active on social media channels. It can increase brand awareness and allow you to directly communicate with the world and show why they should choose your facility over the competition. In addition to online marketing, you should also be looking at offline marketing as you will mainly be targeting people in the local area. This will involve traditional marketing such as adverts in the local paper but also by getting involved with the local community, holding local events and anything to get the face of the company out there.

Running a successful medical facility is a unique challenge as it is not like any other type of business. The key to success is providing the best level of care for your patients so that you can develop a good track record and show why people should choose your company over the competition. You can do this with the above tips, and when you start to find success, you will also find that this is incredibly rewarding work too.