Posts tagged with "nonprofit"

Book illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Jewish Community Foundation

JEWISH COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF LOS ANGELES AWARDS $1 MILLION IN GRANTS TO ADVANCE EDUCATION EQUITY

Seven Local Nonprofits in Communities of Color Receive Support for Programs to Address Education Equity, Provide Resources for Success

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­The Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles (The Foundation) today announced it has awarded a record $1 million to seven local nonprofits that address issues related to education equity.

The funding supports community-led organizations that connect students with strong mentors, focus on the specific needs of young people of color, increase access to health services for students of color and their families, and empower students to advocate for their educational needs.

The distributions are part of the institution’s General Community Grants which focus on high-priority social issues locally. In recent years, these grants have addressed homelessness, overcoming barriers to employment, human trafficking, as well as sexual and domestic violence.  This new round of awards also builds upon The Foundation’s Racial Equity Grants given last year.

The recipients of this year’s awards – a new record-high for General Community Grants and a 66 percent increase from 2019 – are Antelope Valley Boys & Girls Club; Bridge Builders Foundation; EmpowHer Institute; Girls Club of Los Angeles; Heart of Los Angeles Youth Inc.; Social Justice Learning Institute; and Special Needs Network.

Foundation President and Chief Executive Officer Marvin I. Schotland stated: “The pandemic has exacerbated existing inequities in our education system that disproportionately affect students of color who lack the resources to successfully learn remotely. This only widens an already-existing education gap which will result in a significant learning loss that will take years to address.”

He continued: “The Foundation selected these outstanding programs recognizing that those closest to the communities they serve are best able to understand and respond to their needs.  All of these recipient organizations are based in communities of color with demonstrated track records of service, and strong, impressive leadership.”

Beyond grant funding, The Foundation works closely with grant recipients to offer additional support including professional development, technical support, and referrals to other funders in its network. “We believe that money alone will not solve the pressing issues facing our communities,” said Mr. Schotland. “That’s why we proudly invest much time and energy engaging with our grant recipients and providing resources to help them strengthen their organizations and reach their goals.”

As part of its process to identify the recipients, The Foundation consulted with leading funders and experts in the field.  This included the participation of Kaci Patterson, who leads the Black Equity Collective and who helped guide the review of prospective organizations.

About the Grant Recipients

  • Antelope Valley Boys & Girls Club helps young people ages 6-18 years old to reach their full potential through youth development programs that emphasize career and academic preparedness, healthy lifestyles, character, and good citizenship. Grant funds will expand Project Learn – the Club’s education and enrichment programming – increasing program hours and reducing staff-to-youth ratios at its two main program sites.
  • Bridge Builders Foundation (South Los Angeles) is a primarily volunteer-led nonprofit that provides educational and socio-emotional support to youth of color, particularly Black young men and boys, through its strong mentoring network, tutoring, scholarships, and focus on STEM education. Grant funding will support the growth of its Thriving Under the Influence mentoring program from three to five school site partners, expand staffing, and provide for mentor training, program supplies, and field trips.
  • EmpowHer Institute (Westchester) provides academic support, training, and mentorship to enable marginalized girls and young women to become confident, to break the cycle of poverty, and to be prepared for college and careers. Grant funding will support the expansion of EmpowHer Girls Academy and EmpowHer Leaders Academy, doubling its reach.
  • Girls Club of Los Angeles is an established community center that enriches the lives of underserved, at-risk boys and girls, youth and families through early education, youth development, and community outreach. Grant funds will expand the number of children served, support developing and implementing trauma-informed practices into its curriculum and, in turn, train educators at 14 early childcare centers in its Early Learning Alliance Network who serve about 3,000 children.
  • Heart of Los Angeles Youth Inc. is one of the premier community centers providing underserved youth in the MacArthur Park/Rampart District with high quality afterschool programs in academics, arts, athletics, and family resources. Grant funds will support program growth at a new Lafayette Park location with the capacity to nearly double the number of youth and families served each year.
  • Social Justice Learning Institute (SJLI) is dedicated to improving the education, health, and well-being of youth and communities of color. SJLI works with schools to offer its evidence-based Urban Scholars program, which supports and empowers young men of color to succeed in school and advocate for change in their communities. Grant funds will be used to support the expansion of the Urban Scholars to new sites across Los Angeles.
  • Special Needs Network addresses the needs of underserved youth and families of color in South Los Angeles struggling to raise a child with developmental disabilities. Grant funds will support expanded outreach, engagement, early intervention, and parent/caretaker training as it launches its new Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities (on the Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Hospital campus) and, through a partnership with the L.A. Unified School District, improve access to disability services for South L.A. children, students, and families of color.

Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles

COVID-19 Response Grant Recipient Remarks for Attribution

“EmpowHer Institute is committed to addressing the systemic barriers that often hinder BIPOC girls in marginalized communities from reaching their highest potential. The grant funding from the Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles will be used to triple our program-service sites and double the annual number of girls who participate in our education and economic justice programs across Los Angeles County.” – Dawn L. Brown, CEO, EmpowHer Institute

“Heart of Los Angeles (HOLA) is so grateful to the Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles for enabling us to offer youth academic support services, enrichment classes, and holistic support for students’ families. Through this grant, HOLA aims to expand its in-depth academic and whole-child support which are needed now more than ever to reach even more youth in our community. Despite the challenges raised by the pandemic, HOLA is committed to ensuring equitable recovery for Los Angeles youth so that our students can come back even stronger in the coming months.” – Tony Brown, CEO, Heart of Los Angeles

“The generous support of The Foundation enables the Bridge Builders Foundation to expand our Mentoring, Coaching and Leadership program and inspire, encourage and support young people to become more resilient, raise aspirations, and increase life trajectories. For many, this exposure is a ‘game changer.’” – James Breedlove, President, Bridge Builders Foundation

About The Jewish Community Foundation

Established in 1954, the Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles manages charitable assets of more than $1.4 billion entrusted to it by over 1,300 families and ranks among the 10 largest Los Angeles foundations. It partners with donors to shape meaningful philanthropic strategies, magnify the impact of their giving, and build enduring charitable legacies. In 2020, The Foundation and its donors distributed $116 million to 2,700 nonprofits with programs that span the range of philanthropic giving. Over the past 12 years, it has distributed more than $1 billion to thousands of nonprofits across a diverse spectrum.

Fireworks by Mina Tocalini for 360 Magazine

Jersey City Night Market Fireworks Festival

The heart of Jersey City was illuminated with sparkling flares as its residents gathered to watch the captivating light show on July 4th. On the banks of the Hudson River, Jersey City Night Market hosted their Food & Fireworks Festival on Montgomery St, overlooking the Jersey City Waterfront. From noon to 10pm, this family-friendly and pet-friendly celebration invited all to the free festivities.

Offering the patriotic backdrop of Lady Liberty, local JC craft beers, and the catchy sounds of Meghan Thee Stallion, Jersey City Night Market offered the ultimate way to enjoy Independence Day weekend. With ten hours of Chilltown Collective’s DJ entertainment, the party truly never stopped.

Over twenty food vendors were involved in the event, with tantalizing tastes from Eemas Cuisine, Spoonable Spirits, The Law of Doughnut Engineering, and Mozzarepas. There is truly something for everyone- even Woof Bowl for hungry dogs and Simply Done Production’s food truck for plant-based foodies. Flavors from around the world, including Korean corndogs at Oh K-Dog, invites guests to come together for the tantalizing tastes of the Jersey Shore Night Market.

If guests became thirsty after indulging in the mouthwatering bites, they could stroll down to the waterfront’s 21+ biergarten. The biergarten was sponsored by GP’s Bar and Restaurant, which provided guests with chilled, refreshing brews during the holiday’s heat wave.

The fourth of July festival highlighted a variety of local retail vendors. Participants included Woof Bowl, Hudson Houndstooth, Flor y Café, Jupiter Knights Hemp Co, The Hemp Social, Ten Dollar Books, Naz Jewelry, and Polished Concrete. St. Anne Catholic Church also reveled in the merrymaking, splitting their profits 50/50 with the Italian Festival.

At the end of the festivities, festivalgoers stared at the sky in awe of New Jersey’s largest fireworks show. The bursting explosions of color and light illuminated the waterfront and made the Hudson River glow with joyous revelry.

The Jersey City Night Market is a community initiate led by the creators of the Midnight Market and the Mise En Place Project. The Mise En Place Project is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization. To read more about the market, please visit HERE.

Jersey City Night Market July 4th Food and Fireworks Festival image by Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine

Book illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Toys for Tots x Good360

On April 19, 2021, Toys for Tots announced the expansion of their year-round efforts to provide hope to those less fortunate with plans for ANOTHER special gift distribution to children in need. This summer we will be providing ONE MILLION educational toys, books, and games to the children of COVID-19 impacted families. While we all hope this pandemic will be in our rearview mirrors soon, we also recognize that the emotional and educational impact it’s had on children will be long lasting. Less fortunate children likely suffered the greatest learning loss by not being able to attend in-person classroom instruction, so Toys for Tots will be providing toys and books that teach to help them overcome a growing educational gap and stimulate their young minds.

The support we provided last year, at the height of the pandemic, provided great comfort and emotional relief to struggling families. Toys for Toys is determined to send a year-round message of hope to less fortunate families and continue to DoGoodNow! We are more than a children’s Christmastime charity!

Because we recognize the importance of reminding children that there is still joy to be found in simple gifts every day, we are once again partnering with our friends at Good360, the global leader in product philanthropy and purposeful giving.  We are providing them with ONE MILLION toys, books, and games to distribute via their network of nonprofit organizations across the United States.

“Toys for Tots is more than a Christmas charity—that is why we want to DoGoodNOW and continue to expand our partnership with Good360,” said Lieutenant General Jim Laster, USMC (Retired), President and CEO of the Marine Toys for Tots Foundation.  “With the assistance  of Good360 and their vast network of non-profits throughout the country, Toys for Tots has the ability to extend our reach and provide support to families who are facing tremendous year-round challenges.”

“Toys and games are highly requested items among Good360’s nonprofit network, and our partnership with Toys for Tots allows us to meet this need and bring joy to children and families that are going through difficult times,” said Matt Connelly, CEO of Good360.  “The feedback we’ve received from the nonprofits receiving toys has been tremendous, and we look forward to our continued collaboration with Toys for Tots.”

Toys for Tots and Good360 have complementary strengths, and this partnership generates greater impact. Together we are more than just the sum of our parts—together we can DoGoodNOW.  The two organizations launched their collaboration in April of 2020 and since  then have distributed three million toys, games, and books together outside of the holidays.

For additional information, visit www.ToysForTots.org and/or www.Good360.org

Women's Month illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Where Women Made History campaign

National Trust and Benjamin Moore Honor Women’s Impact on American History

This month, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, in partnership with Benjamin Moore, announced plans to restore two buildings that honor the significant contributions of diverse women to American progress.  Azurest South in Petersburg, VA, was designed in 1939 by Amaza Lee Meredith, one of the country’s first Black female architects; and the McDonogh 19 Elementary School in 9th Ward of New Orleans, LA, was one of the first schools integrated in New Orleans after the landmark 1954 Supreme Court case, Brown v. Board of Education.

Both projects are part of the National Trust’s Where Women Made History campaign and a continuation of the collaboration between the National Trust and Benjamin Moore launched in 2020 with the interior restoration of the Women’s Building in San Francisco, CA, and the exterior transformation of the Odd Fellows Building in Astoria, OR.  Support from the National Trust and Benjamin Moore for these sites of women’s achievement and empowerment comes during a critical time of global pandemic and economic uncertainty in which women across the country are in crisis.

Christina Morris, manager of the Where Women Made History campaign for the National Trust, said, “The women whose stories are preserved in these places embody the spirit of the Where Women Made History campaign.  These are women who pushed beyond the boundaries of what they were told was acceptable or even possible.  We owe them an enormous debt for establishing the essential—but often unseen—foundation that lifts up women and girls today and gives them the freedom to pursue their own dreams.”

“It is a privilege to be able to preserve several historic sites with significant roots in women’s history,” said Jeannie West, Benjamin Moore Senior Vice President of Human Resources.  “Together with the National Trust, we’ll pay homage to these female trailblazers who helped shape us into the nation we are today.”

The National Trust’s Where Women Made History campaign is designed to address the centuries of gender inequality that have led to the erasure of many pivotal stories of women’s history, creating an inaccurate perception of their fundamental role in shaping American identity.  These inequalities have been laid bare over the last year of the COVID-19 pandemic, with its disproportionate and devastating effects on women, particularly women of color, who were forced to shutter their businesses and who became unemployed at a rate four times higher than their male counterparts.  Through the Where Women Made History campaign, the National Trust plans to raise and invest $10 million in philanthropic support to elevate and preserve 100 places across the country where women of all backgrounds, ages, beliefs, and identities have made history.

In addition to the four Benjamin Moore projects, the campaign is active on many other fronts, conducting a nationwide crowdsourcing effort that garnered over 1,200 formerly unrecognized places where women made history from across all 50 states; adding new sites related to women artists to expand the diversity and representation in the National Trust’s Historic Artists Homes and Studios program; providing grants to directly support dozens of projects and places of women’s history around the country; creating the first all-female HOPE (Hands-On Preservation Experience) Crew projects to empower the next generation of female preservationists and craftspeople through the restoration of women’s history sites; sharing the stories of groundbreaking female leaders in Preservation magazine; and taking action to save nationally-significant places of women’s history, such as the San Francisco, CA, home of LGBTQ+ civil rights pioneers and activists Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon, Natalie de Blois’s spectacular Terrace Plaza Hotel in Cincinnati, OH, and the National Historic Landmark Harada House in Riverside, CA, where Sumi Harada played a critical role in a lawsuit that allowed Japanese Americans to own property in California and later provided a safe haven for Japanese Americans who had been forcibly relocated to incarceration camps during World War II.

In partnership with Benjamin Moore, the two new sites announced this month highlight the impact African American women have had on American history.

Architect, educator, and artist Amaza Lee Meredith designed Azurest South in 1938 as the lifetime residence and personal studio for herself and her partner, Dr. Edna Meade Colson. Ms. Meredith also is credited with establishing and running the Fine Art Department at Virginia State University (VSU) for over two decades.  The home is now owned by the VSU Alumni Association. Benjamin Moore will provide approximately 150 gallons of paint to help with restoration work on both the interior and exterior of the small but stunning Moderne property, and we hope to include students in the VSU Fine Art Department in the project to carry Amaza Lee’s legacy forward to the next generation.

McDonogh 19 Elementary is one of two historic sites in the 9th Ward of New Orleans, LA, where school desegregation first took place. On November 14, 1960, three six-year-old girls – Leona Tate, Gail Etienne, and Tessie Prevost – made history when they climbed the 18 stairs to enter the then all-white school. On the same morning, Ruby Bridges integrated William Frantz Elementary. These four girls became the first African Americans to integrate formerly all-white schools in the Jim Crow Deep South and have since been known as the “New Orleans Four.”

Closed in 2004, the McDonogh 19 Elementary School is currently being transformed by the Leona Tate Foundation for Change, Inc. as a mixed-use facility, that, in addition to senior housing, will feature education and exhibition space dedicated to the history of New Orleans public school desegregation, civil rights, and restorative justice.  The building is being renamed the Tate Etienne & Prevost Interpretive Center.

Both sites are expected to be completed by summer 2021, and their progress and transformation will be documented with photos and videos that will be released later this year.

About the National Trust for Historic Preservation
The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded nonprofit organization, works to save America’s historic places.

 

Piggy Bank illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Future Fax Filing Tips

Tips for Tax Filing in the Future

Tax time is near, and soon everyone will be rushing to get their taxes filed. Last year, Americans were met with quite a few delays in getting their refunds with the onset of the pandemic.

If you have a refund coming, the sooner you file, the sooner that refund will make its way into your bank account.

If you’re like most tax filers, you probably want to do everything you can to reduce your overall tax bill. We know that taxes are needed to run the government, but there’s no need for you as an individual to pay more than you need to.

Here are a few areas to consider or understand for future tax filing years:

  • Funding tax-preferenced accounts. One way to save on taxes is by putting money in various tax-preferenced savings accounts such as an IRA, a 401(k), and others. Depending on the account type, you can deduct your contribution each year, defer paying taxes on growth or take withdrawals tax-free. In health savings accounts (HSA), you can do all three. There are eligibility requirements you need to meet. An HSA can only be used for medical expenses.  With a traditional IRA, you don’t pay taxes on your contributions, and you defer taxes on the account’s growth. You do pay taxes on withdrawals you make in retirement. A Roth IRA has different advantages. You can’t deduct your contributions now, but your money grows tax-free, and you aren’t taxed when you make withdrawals.
  • Using a 529 for K-12 private or college education. Many people are familiar with 529 plans, but they often think of these solely to save for a college education fund. But a 529 can also be used to pay for a private school in elementary and high school. The significant tax advantage with a 529 is that you don’t pay federal income taxes on the account’s growth. However, you must spend the money on qualified educational expenses and nothing else. This is essential to remember and understand because if you use the money for other reasons, you will pay taxes on that withdrawal, and you will also pay the penalty. A 529 account is something to consider if you have children or grandchildren and want a tax-efficient way to save for K-12 or college education.
  • Making charitable donations. Charitable donations are a great tool for reducing your tax bill. They come with the bonus of allowing you to make a positive impact in your community. Through charitable donations, you can reduce your income tax, capital gains tax, and estate tax. Some people view this most straightforwardly – you choose an organization that qualifies under the tax rules to donate to. There are other ways to contribute as well: You can establish a donor-advised fund, which is a personal charitable account opened in the name of the donors and held by a nonprofit organization. For example, let’s say you sell a stock and, instead of paying the capital gains tax, you choose to place the proceeds in a donor-advised fund. You can claim the total amount as a charitable deduction, although you don’t have to donate the money in one lump sum. The money remains in the fund and can be donated in small amounts over a period of years while drawing interest.

These are just a few things you can consider as you look for ways to reduce your tax bill. Your financial professional will be able to help you work your way through the process and find what works best for you and your situation.

Award illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

NYC Scholastic Art × Writing Awards

New York City Scholastic Art & Writing Awards Exhibition

Now on View at The Met

Art and Writing by 2021 Gold Key Winners on Display in The Met’s Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education

The nonprofit Alliance for Young Artists & Writers and The Metropolitan Museum of Art have announced the opening of the seventh annual Scholastic Art & Writing Awards: New York City Regional Exhibition at The Met’s Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education. This special exhibition is now on view and is free to the public through May 21, 2021.

The exhibition features more than 200 works of art and writing by New York City based Gold Key recipients participating in the 2021 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, the country’s longest-running and most prestigious award and recognition program for creative teens. This year, students from all five boroughs in grades 7-12 submitted more than 10,000 works in 28 categories to the New York City regional program of the Awards, representing more than 300 schools.

Education has been at the heart of The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s mission since our founding in 1870, said Heidi Holder, the Frederick P. and Sandra P. Rose Chair of Education at The Met. Now, more than ever, we are committed to investing in education and supporting the creativity of New York City’s young people. It is an honor to present the 2021 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards: New York City Regional Exhibition in partnership with the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers. This annual exhibition demonstrates the power of art to transform, uplift, and challenge us.

All works were blindly adjudicated by accomplished creative and literary professionals based on originality, technical skill, and the emergence of a personal vision or voice. This year, the exhibition will present framed prints of students’ work, due to ongoing restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic and to ensure equitable access for all the student artists.

The artworks on display at The Met received top regional awards and were eligible to receive national honors through a second round of judging, which can open further opportunities for exhibition and publication, as well as access to scholarships. The Awards have honored distinguished artists since 1923, including Andy Warhol, Cy Twombly, Kay WalkingStick, John Baldessari, Luis Jimenez, and Catherine Murphy, whose works are in The Met collection.

Chris Wisniewski, Executive Director, Alliance for Young Artists & Writers, said: The creativity of our city’s teens has continued to flourish despite a year of unprecedented challenges. It has never been more important to celebrate diverse student voices and encourage the artistic expression of a generation of rising leaders. The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers is thrilled to partner with The Met to showcase the exceptional young winners of the 2021 New York City Scholastic Awards.

The Alliance partners with Parsons School of Design at The New School and Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts at The New School to present the regional New York City Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. The 2021 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards: New York City Regional Exhibition at The Met is presented with generous support from The New York Times, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, The Maurice R. Robinson Fund, and Scholastic Inc.

To learn more about the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, visit the Scholastic Media Room online.

About the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, identifies teenagers with exceptional creative talent and brings their remarkable work to a national audience through the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. Founded in 1923, the Awards program is the longest-running, most prestigious initiative of its kind, having fostered the creativity and talent of millions of students through recognition, exhibition, publication, and scholarships.

About The Met

The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870 by a group of American citizens, businessmen and financiers as well as leading artists and thinkers of the day, who wanted to create a museum to bring art and art education to the American people. Today, The Met displays tens of thousands of objects covering 5,000 years of art from around the world for everyone to experience and enjoy. The Museum lives in two iconic sites in New York City: The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters. Millions of people also take part in The Met experience online. Since its founding, The Met has always aspired to be more than a treasury of rare and beautiful objects. Every day, art comes alive in the Museum’s galleries and through its exhibitions and events, revealing both new ideas and unexpected connections across time and across cultures.

Healthy Eating illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Food Insecurity

Michelle Obama‘s New Show Addresses Food Insecurity,

Recent Survey Findings Validate the Crisis Behind it

Six in 10 Americans have faced “food insecurity” at some point in their lives, and of those, 73% experienced it for the first time since the start of the pandemic, according to this new research. The ongoing issue of food insecuritycontinues to receive more attention from celebrities and programming, like Michelle Obama’s new Waffles and Mochi show, which is directed at children to learn how to eat and prepare healthy meals. 

To understand the true impact and severity of the food insecurity crisis, recent findings from a new study launched yesterday from Feed the Children, a nonprofit dedicated to ending child hunger around the world, and Herbalife Nutrition, not only validate the crisis that’s happening today, but also shows how the U.S. compares to the rest of the world

The global survey of 9,000 respondents in 21 countries touches on families experiencing food insecurity for the first time, how they are managing to keep their families fed, along with some of their biggest concerns.


Below are a few of the U.S. stats that have come out of the survey: 

  • 73% of Americans surveyed experience food insecurity for the first time during the pandemic.
  • 31% of which have said their family has had to skip meals
  • 59% of parents are concerned their children will have lasting health effects as a result of food insecurity
  • 78% of parents rely on their child’s school meals to ensure their kids receive healthy meals
  • 63% of parents feel the government should promote flexible working hours to parents, so they can ensure their kids are eating balanced meals

Celebrities team up for philanthropic single – “PINK”

Five musical superstars have joined forces in the fight against breast cancer, releasing a new song – “PINK.” The new single features Dolly Parton, Monica, Jordin Sparks, Sara Evans and Rita Wilson – who herself is a breast cancer survivor.

This special collaboration benefits Susan G. Komen®, the world’s leading breast cancer organization. The song was produced by Victoria Shaw and co-written with Erin Kinsey and Jodi Marr. Victoria Shaw is a singer/songwriter/producer known for iconic hits like Garth Brooks’ “The River,” Ricky Martin and Christina Aguilera’s “Nobody Wants to be Lonely,” among a multitude of others with recorded songs for artists such as Faith Hill, Billy Ray Cyrus, Reba McEntire, LeAnn Rimes, Trisha Yearwood, Olivia Newton-John, and many more artists.

The song is distributed by Brighter Day Records and available digitally everywhere. PINK features legendary artists from country, pop and R&B. The moving lyrics and vocals provide listeners with hope for a future when no one loses someone they love to breast cancer and “PINK is just another color.”

Each year breast cancer kills more than 42,000 women and men in the U.S. alone. Since 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed at some point in her lifetime, nearly everyone has or will be touched by this disease, whether personally or by someone they love.

“This is such a beautiful song of hope,” said Dolly Parton. “I’m honored to join with these powerful women to help support Susan G. Komen’s life-saving work.”

“Breast cancer is a leading cause of death among African American women! My goal is to change that,” added Monica. “My life and loved ones have been directly impacted by this disease and I want us all to live in a world without breast cancer. Let’s make pink just another color.”

“As a younger woman, I know that breast cancer can still be a possibility,” said Jordin Sparks. “Through all of us working together, we can change the future so that younger generations never have to face breast cancer. This song paints a vision of when that day comes.”

“The song is not just for someone who is a survivor or going through breast cancer treatment, it is for anyone who loves someone who has been impacted by breast cancer,” added Rita Wilson. “That’s what I love about the song.”

“After performing at the Opry Goes Pink last year, I’m thrilled to be supporting Susan G. Komen again this year in a very big way,” said Sara Evans. “There is something magical that happens when women band together to have a positive impact on the world for our sisters and our daughters.”

The song is written by Erin Kinsey, Jodi Marr and Victoria Shaw, produced by Victoria Shaw, distributed by Brighter Day Records and available digitally everywhere. Listen and learn more now.

Komen noted that due to disruptions in health care services and the financial impact caused by the pandemic, Komen’s help is needed now more than ever. As breast cancer patients’ trusted partner, Komen provides support through services such as a free Breast Care Helpline, which provides emotional support in addition to guidance to national and local resources. Komen’s Treatment Assistance Program helps pay for expenses that may serve as a financial barrier to receiving the care patients need to live longer, better lives. And through a combination of research, community health programs and advocacy, Komen is working to support those affected by breast cancer today, while tirelessly searching for tomorrow’s cures.

“In a single moment, a person’s life changes forever – there is life before breast cancer, and life after,” noted Paula Schneider, CEO of Susan G. Komen and a breast cancer survivor. “We are extremely honored that these powerful women have leant their time and talents to help us advance our mission and give a moment of hope to everyone impacted by breast cancer. Together, we will save lives and get closer to a world without breast cancer.”

PINK is distributed by Brighter Day Records. Dolly Parton appears courtesy of Butterfly Records. Monica appears courtesy of MonDeenise Music. Jordin Sparks appears courtesy of Disrupt Group. Sara Evans appears courtesy of Born To Fly Records. Rita Wilson appears courtesy of Sing It Loud Records.

About Susan G. Komen®
Susan G. Komen is the world’s leading nonprofit breast cancer organization, working to save lives and end breast cancer forever. Komen has an unmatched, comprehensive 360-degree approach to fighting this disease and supporting millions of people in the U.S. and in countries worldwide. Komen advocates for patients, drives research breakthroughs, improves access to high-quality care, offers direct patient support and empowers people with trustworthy information. Founded by Nancy G. Brinker, who promised her sister, Susan G. Komen, that she would end the disease that claimed Suzy’s life, Komen remains committed to supporting those affected by breast cancer today, while tirelessly searching for tomorrow’s cures.

Visit komen.org or call 1-877 GO KOMEN. Connect with us on social at ww5.komen.org/social.

Venice Family Clinic

Venice Family Clinic will celebrate its 50th anniversary Oct. 11 with Health, Justice, Action: The Kickoff Party, which will feature some of the entertainment industry’s biggest stars.

The nonprofit community health center will host performances by Blake Shelton and Jennifer Hudson. Jason Alexander, Billy Crystal, Whoopi Goldberg, Jon Huertas, Anjelica Huston, Mandy Moore, Ray Romano, Chris Sullivan and Molly Shannon will also make appearances.

Fritz Chesnut, Frank Gehry and Norman Lear will also participate, and South Bay Children’s Choir will perform.

Elizabeth Benson Forer, the CEO of Venice Family Clinic, said the 50th anniversary will be “dazzling.”

“We have an incredible cast of gifted and generous singers, songwriters, actors and artists donating their time and talents to our Kickoff Party,” she said, adding that Billy Crystal, Whoopi Goldberg and Frank Gehry have personally helped Venice Family Clinic in the past. “We’re proud to welcome them and so many other celebrities who have contributed to our mission over the years.”

After the celebration, Venice Family Clinic asks volunteers to help in a Week of Action. The Clinic helps 28,000 low-income men, women and children, and volunteers can help in a multitude of ways.

For those practicing social distancing, donations are accepted. Volunteers can also order toys and other gifts online for the Clinic to deliver to people facing financial hardship this upcoming holiday season. The Clinic’s pediatric patients are also in need of school supplies, so a backpack filled with notebooks, folders, pencils and other items is a great idea to help students get through the year. Finally, soap, shampoo and hygiene items are perfect to help individuals experiencing homelessness.

The drop-off site for donations is Venice Family Clinic’s Santa Monica location. Donations will be accepted there from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 15. It is located at 2509 Pico Blvd., Santa Monica, CA 90405.

Presenting sponsors for Health, Justice, Action: The Kickoff Party are UCLA Health and Cedars-Sinai. Other sponsors include L.A. Care Health Plan, Blue Shield of California Promise Health Plan and Kaiser Permanente.

You can register for both the party and to volunteer by clicking right here.

Community illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Renewal Award Winners 

A global pandemic. Racial injustice. Extreme political polarization. In an incredibly challenged moment for the country, extraordinary people in communities across America are working tirelessly to light the way forward. Community-based organizations have become essential lifelines, which is why five nonprofits that represent the brightest lights were chosen as recipients of this year’s Renewal Awards.

The Renewal Awards, presented by The Atlantic and Allstate, is a national competition recognizing organizations that use innovative solutions to create lasting change in their communities. This year’s winners are the 5th class of award recipients and were selected from more than 13,000 nominations. Each winner receives a $40,000 grant to amplify their mission of helping others, along with national recognition that elevates their profile and awareness for their work.

Despite facing significant funding and staffing challenges in this unprecedented year, the winning organizations continue to stay relentlessly focused on the most pervasive and systemic challenges affecting society—homelessness, educational equity, skills and job training, and children and families in need. Each organization serves different needs, but all are united by a core belief that defines our times—no matter who we are, we can lift each other up in times of need.

2020 WINNERS

  • Choose 180 (Burien, WA): Engages youth in critical moments and empowers them to make positive changes in their lives, especially when facing jail time or school expulsion. *Allstate Youth Empowerment Award Winner.
  • College to Congress (Washington, D.C.): Levels the playing field and fosters bipartisanship for congressional interns, providing both financial support and mentorship across the aisle.
  • Facing Homelessness (The BLOCK Project) (Seattle, WA): Integrates 125-square-foot detached accessory dwelling units in residential backyards to reduce homelessness.
  • Hello Neighbor (Pittsburgh, PA): Supports recently resettled refugees with mentorship, educational training, and community events.
  • More Than Words (Waltham, MA): Empowers youth who are in foster care, court-involved, homeless, or out of school by helping to run a bookstore.

The Atlantic’s Ron Brownstein writes about the work of this year’s winners, and the larger story they tell about the country, in a piece published today: “Real Reform Comes From Civic Stamina”. “We are proud to continue this critical partnership with Allstate, especially during the unprecedented events dramatically affecting all communities across the country,” said Hayley Romer, The Atlantic’s Publisher and CRO. “The generous spirit and relentless work modeled by these community leaders is inspiring and driving the progress we need.”

“2020 has changed our way of life, yet these five organizations continue to find ways to serve others despite the enormous challenges they face,” explained Stacy Sharpe, Allstate’s Senior Vice President of Corporate Brand. “These amazing community leaders should remind us all that anything is possible when you know your purpose and have the passion to create a lasting impact.”

Finalists were selected by The Atlantic’s editors and writers. Winners were evaluated by a panel of judges who include former Mayors Rahm Emanuel (Chicago) and Karen Freeman-Wilson (Gary, IN); Anne Marie Burgoyne, managing director of social innovation at Emerson Collective; Kate Nack, director of The Allstate Foundation; former Rep. Carlos Curbelo (Florida); and two past Renewal Award winners, Juedy Mom, director of The Compton Initiative, and Pamela Urquieta, CEO and Executive director of Let’s Innovate Through Education. Allstate selected the Youth Empowerment Award winner.

Started in 2015, The Renewal Awards spotlight grassroots solutions to challenges faced by communities around the country and the people making a positive difference. The awards are the flagship initiative of The Renewal Project, The Atlantic and Allstate’s broader partnership that covers innovation and celebrates change-makers in local communities. With this year’s award, 31 organizations have received more than $800,000 in funding from The Atlantic and Allstate to further their work. To learn more about the awards, and read about past winners, please visit TheRenewalProject.com.

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