Posts tagged with "professor"

Christopher Ferguson

Chris Ferguson’s Research

Youth are growing up in a digital world with screen time and social media being a part of their daily routine. Some experts are divided on whether an increase in teen suicides in the United States can be attributed to an increased use of social screen media.

New research findings published in Wiley Online Library’s Developmental Science journal suggest that current survey data does not support the contention that there are links between screen use and mental health issues. The “Links Between Screen Use and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents Over 16 Years: Is There Evidence for Increased Harm?” journal article is based on research by Chris Ferguson, Ph.D., professor of psychology at Stetson University.

Dr. Ferguson is a media effects, screen, video game, and virtual reality expert. The research study used the Florida Youth Risk Behavior Survey data from 2001-2017 to track effect sizes for screen/depression correlations.

A second dataset from the United Kingdom Understanding Society was used to study the association between the time spent on social media and emotional problems. Dr. Ferguson’s research indicates that screen use and social media are not associated with teen mental health issues and there is no evidence that shows screen time has contributed to the rise in teen suicides.

360 Magazine

Ruha Benjamin x Deepening Social Inequality

From everyday apps to complex algorithms, Ruha Benjamin cuts through tech-industry hype to understand how emerging technologies can reinforce white supremacy and deepen social inequity.

Far from a sinister story of racist programmers scheming on the dark web, Benjamin argues that automation has the potential to hide, speed, and even deepen discrimination, while appearing neutral and even benevolent when compared to racism of a previous era. Presenting the concept of the “New Jim Code,” she shows how a range of discriminatory designs encodes inequity: by explicitly amplifying racial hierarchies, by ignoring but thereby replicating social divisions, or by aiming to fix racial bias but ultimately doing quite the opposite. Moreover, she makes a compelling case for race itself as a kind of tool – a technology designed to stratify and sanctify social injustice that is part of the architecture of everyday life.

This illuminating guide into the world of biased bots, altruistic algorithms, and their many entanglements provides conceptual tools to decode tech promises with sociologically informed skepticism. In doing so, it challenges us to question not only the technologies we are sold, but also the ones we manufacture ourselves.

The Author:

Ruha Benjamin is an Associate Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University.

Four Seasons, FS NY Downtown, Tribeca, Four Seasons Downtown, Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE, 360, 5 star, five-star, amenities, WTC, One World Trade Center, world trade center

LA DESIGN COMMUNITY

LA Architect and UCLA Professor Abeer Sweis designs (and remodels) homes to better withstand fires. She also uses sustainable materials.

Changing seasons have increased fire hazards, so she uses the latest fire grade materials to better prepare homeowners. A home designed by Sweis in Ojai’s fire zone survived. When the Thomas Fire blazed through, it reached the property, but it didn’t burn it down. http://www.sweiskloss.com/fire Feel free to ask questions. Sweis is available on the phone and on location here in LA. About SweisKloss

Abeer Sweis | design partner

At heart, Abeer is both an architect and interior designer. While she also has intimate knowledge of construction and structural engineering, it is her innate ability to look at a potential project and see the myriad of design possibilities that has helped make her company a success.

Abeer knew at a young age that she wanted to be an architect. When she was 10, her family moved from her native Amman, Jordan to Los Angeles, where she went on to receive her Bachelor of Architecture degree from Woodbury University. While working as a designer at a small architecture firm, she acquired the technical knowledge and business skills to build her own company. In 1998, she started her own design firm, and in 2006 she partnered with her husband Jeff Kloss to create the construction side of the company, fulfilling their design + construct vision.

Since 1995, Abeer has taught at UCLA Extension, Cal Poly Pomona, Pierce College, Woodbury University and other Los Angeles area design schools. A leader in her community, she is a distinguished past president of the Kiwanis Club of Santa Monica and an involved parent of two rapidly growing children.

Jeff Kloss | construction partner

A licensed general contractor and go-to guy for all things construction, Jeff has a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Woodbury University where he and Abeer met. While he was pursuing his degree, he worked for a local construction company and discovered his appreciation for building.

Jeff went on to manage the construction of exclusive restaurants, high-end retail projects and custom homes for the Marshall Group before leading institutional projects at CW Driver such as The Cerritos Public Library, Jewish Home for the Aging and the Torrance YMCA. He also oversaw multiple modernization projects for the La Crescenta Valley and El Segundo School Districts.

After learning all aspects of construction on a variety of large-scale jobs, Jeff started to miss collaborating with a team and working on projects that were more intimate and personal for the end user. Thus, the perfect opportunity presented itself to join forces with Abeer to create their full-service design + construct  firm. Jeff is an active parent, coach and mentor in Boy Scout Troop T2 and AYSO Soccer. From leading a hike or canoe trip, to refereeing soccer games, he enjoys spending time with his son and daughter.

Journalism: Why It Matters

Despite the criticisms that have been leveled at news organizations in recent years and the many difficulties they face, journalism matters. It matters, argues Schudson, because it orients people daily in the complex and changing worlds in which they live. It matters because it offers a fact-centered, documented approach to pertinent public issues. It matters because it keeps watch on the powerful, especially those in government, and can press upon them unpleasant truths to which they must respond. Corruption is stemmed, unwise initiatives stopped, public danger averted because of what journalists do.

Professional journalism dedicated to fact-centered stories about the events, people, moments and moods of life today matters. When this journalism is competent, compelling, and assertive, it makes a world of difference.

This book challenges journalists to think hard about what they really do. It challenges skeptical or distrustful news audiences who take pride in detecting media bias but fail to see that their own bias may distort their perception. And it holds out hope that journalism will be for years to come a path for ambitious, curious, young people who love words or pictures or numbers and want to use them to improve the public conversation in familiar ways or in ways yet to be imagined.


The Author: 

Michael Schudson is Professor of Journalism at Columbia University.

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Cocktail proves toxic to leukemia cells

Rice University, MD Anderson research points toward better personalized therapy

A combination of drugs that affect mitochondria — the power plants inside cells — may become the best weapons yet to fight acute myeloid leukemia, according to Rice University researchers.

A study led by Rice bioscientist Natasha Kirienko and postdoctoral researcher Svetlana Panina found that mitocans, anti-cancer drugs that target mitochondria, are particularly adept at killing leukemia cells, especially when combined with a glycolytic inhibitor, while leaving healthy blood cells in the same sample largely unaffected.

Their open access paper, a collaboration with the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, appears in the Nature journal Cell Death & Disease. The research could lead to new ways to personalize treatment for patients with leukemia.
“We started with the idea of finding an underlying connection between types of cancer and their sensitivity to specific kinds of chemotherapeutics, mitochondria-targeting drugs,” Kirienko said. “Our bioinformatic analysis, which included 60 cell lines from nine different cancer types, showed that leukemia cells are particularly sensitive to mitochondrial damage.”

The researchers exposed the cell lines to multiple known mitocan molecules. They found low doses of a mitocan/glycolytic inhibitor cocktail killed all of the leukemia cell lines they tested at concentrations lower than what was necessary to kill healthy cells. Conversely, they reported that solid tumor cells, like ovarian cancers, proved highly resistant to mitocans. Glioblastoma cells were sensitive to mitocans, but unfortunately more resistant than healthy blood cells.

In their best experimental results, 86% of targeted leukemia cells were killed, compared to only 30% of healthy blood cells. “A number of drugs currently used in the clinic have some cancer preference, but here we’re talking about a five-fold difference in survival,” Kirienko said.
The researchers also showed a significant correlation between how efficiently mitochondria can turn energy from incoming oxygen into useful adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and how resistant they are to treatment.

“The more efficient they are, the more resistant they will be to mitochondria-targeting drugs,” Kirienko said. “If this holds true, doctors can perform a relatively simple test of this specific parameter of mitochondrial health from a patient’s sample and predict whether the treatment would be effective.”
Panina said computational models led them to think the glycolysis pathway could be enlisted to help mitocans. “Glycolysis also provides ATP, so targeting that will decrease energy as well as block the precursor for energy production in mitochondria, which mitocans will exacerbate further,” she said. “It led us to believe this combination would have a synergistic effect.

“Cancer cells are usually more metabolically active than normal cells, so we predicted that they be might be more sensitive to this combined strike, and they are,” Panina said.

Kirienko said a presentation of the research she and Panina gave at MD Anderson’s recent Metabolism in Cancer Symposium drew a large response. “People were very interested, and they immediately started asking, ‘Did you test my favorite drug or combination?’ and ‘Are you going to test it in a wider panel of cancers?’”

That work is well underway, Panina said. “We’re currently doing high-throughput screening of these potential synergistic drug combinations against leukemia cells,” she said. “We’ve gone through 36 combinations so far, building landscapes for each one.”
“And we found some that are more effective than what’s reported in this paper,” Kirienko added. “But we’ve also found some that are antagonistic — two drugs that negate each other’s effects — so it’s also important to know what therapeutic cocktails should not go together.”

Co-authors of the paper are postdoctoral fellow Natalia Baran; Marina Konopleva, a physician-scientist and professor in the Department of Leukemia at MD Anderson; and Rice graduate student Fabio Brasil da Costa. Kirienko is an assistant professor of biosciences.
The Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas, the Welch Foundation and the National Institutes of Health supported the research.

Read the paper at http://www.nature.com/articles/s41419-019-1851-3.pdf.

This news release can be found online at http://news.rice.edu/2019/10/31/cocktail-proves-toxic-to-leukemia-cells/

Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.

Related materials:


Kirienko Lab: http://kirienkolab.rice.edu/index.html
Marina Konopleva: http://faculty.mdanderson.org/profiles/marina_konopleva.html
Rice Department of BioSciences: http://biosciences.rice.edu
Wiess School of Natural Sciences: http://naturalsciences.rice.edu

Tips From Dermatologists: The How-To Guide to Applying Topical Acne Medication

Acne is the most common skin condition in the United States, affecting up to 50 million Americans annually. However, despite its prevalence, accurate information about acne can be scarce.

Many teenagers and young adults believe that they have to let acne run its course instead of treating it, while others turn to do-it-yourself treatments–like applying diaper cream or toothpaste to pimples– without much success. Yet left untreated, say dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology, acne often results in significant physical and psychological problems, such as scarring, poor self-esteem, depression, and anxiety.

“As a dermatologist who treats patients with acne every day, I’ve seen firsthand the effects that acne can have on a person’s life, both physically and emotionally..If you find yourself in a bad mood or skipping outings with friends or family members because of acne, see a board-certified dermatologist for treatment,” says board-certified dermatologist Dee Anna Glaser, MD, FAAD, a professor and interim chair of dermatology at Saint Louis University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Today, says Dr. Glaser, there are many effective treatments for acne, including medications that are applied to the skin, antibiotics and in-office procedures. Some treatments that are applied to the skin, such as products containing benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid or adapalene, are available over-the-counter.

However, whether a person is using an over-the-counter treatment or prescription medication, Dr. Glaser says it’s important to be patient regarding results. For example, it usually takes four to eight weeks to see improvement after using a topical medication– a treatment that is applied to the skin–and once acne clears, she says, it’s important to continue the treatment to prevent new breakouts.

It’s also important, says Dr. Glaser, to follow your dermatologist’s directions while using acne medication. Particularly for topical medications, the wrong application and skin care routine can lead to dry, irritated skin.

To get the greatest benefit from topical acne medications, Dr. Glaser recommends the following tips:

  1. Use a gentle face wash. A common misconception is that people need to use a strong face wash while also using topical acne medication. However, using a face wash that is too harsh while also using acne medication can dry out and irritate your skin. Instead, look for a mild, gentle face wash that says “oil-free” or “noncomedogenic” on the label, as these won’t clog your pores. Gently as the affected areas twice a day and after sweating.
  2. Use a pea-sized amount of medication. Using too much medication can irritate your skin, and using too little can hinder results. To make sure you’re using the right amount, put a pea-sized amount on your index finger and dot the medication on your forehead, cheeks and chin. Once dotted, rub it around to cover your whole face.
  3. Ease into the medication. Since it can take time for your skin to adjust to new medication, start by applying the product every other day instead of daily. If you don’t experience any negative side effects after a few weeks, like increased burning or redness, you can start applying the medicine every day.
  4. If irritation occurs, apply moisturizer before applying acne medication. Studies have shown that applying moisturizer before applying topical medication helps prevent the medication’s negative side effects–like peeling and redness–without changing its effectiveness. Make sure your moisturizer says “oil free” or “ocomedogenic”
  5. Protect your skin from the sun. Many acne medications cause increased sensitivity to sunlight, which can increase your chance of sunburn. Before going outdoors, apply a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30 to all exposed skin, including your scalp, ears, neck, and lips. Remember to reapply every two hours or immediately after sweating. You can also protect your skin by seeking shade and wearing protective clothing, including a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses with UV protection.

“Acne is a complex skin condition that can have many causes, including skin care products, fluctuating hormones, family history and stress,” says Dr. Glaser. “Further, not everyone’s acne can be treated the same way. If you have acne and over-the-counter medications aren’t bringing relief, make an appointment to see a board-certified dermatologist.”

In recognition of National Healthy Skin Month, the AAD is reminding the public about how to find trustworthy sources of information on skin disease, including acne, skin cancer, eczema, and psoriasis. A board-certified dermatologist has the education, training, and experience to provide the best possible medical, surgical, and cosmetic treatment to patients. After earning a bachelor’s degree and medical degree, board-certified dermatologists must complete four additional years of education, including a one year internship and three yeas of dermatology residency. Before seeking dermatologic care, the AAD recommends that everyone make sure their dermatologist is board-certified by the American Board of Dermatology, the American Osteopathic Association, or the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

To find a board-certified dermatologist in your area click here.

The tips above are demonstrated in a video here that is posted to the AAD website and YouTube channel. This video is part of the AAD’s “Video of the Month” series, which offers tips people can use to properly care for their skin, hair, and nails. A new video in the series posts to the AAD website and YouTube channel each month.

About the AAD

Headquartered in Rosement, Ill, the American Academy of Dermatology, founded in 1938, is the largest, most influential, and most representative of all dermatologic associations. With a membership of more than 19,000 physicians worldwide, the AAD is committed to: advancing the diagnosis and medical, surgical and cosmetic treatment of the skin, hair, and nails; advocating high standards in clinical standards in clinical practice, education, and research in dermatology; and supporting and enhancing patient care for a lifetime of healthier skin, hair, and nails . For more information, contact the AAD at 888-462-DERM (3376) or aad.org. Follow the ADD on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or YouTube